Description: Marcus Jones reports on tension over school desegregation in Lowell. Jones reports that Robert Kennedy (Mayor of Lowell) called on supporters of school desegregation to show support by riding buses with students in Lowell today. Jones' report includes footage of Kennedy addressing supporters, including Evelyn Murphy (Lieutenant governor of Massachusetts), Luis Tiant (former Red Sox pitcher) and Grace Corrigan (mother of astronaut Christa McAuliffe). Jones reports that George Kouloheras (Lowell School Committee) is a leader of the anti-busing movement in Lowell. Jones reports that Kuoloheras is campaigning to elect anti-busing candidates to the Lowell School Committee in order to overturn the present school desegregation plan. Jones interviews Kouloheras. Kouloheras says that he hopes that new school committee will reject busing and find another way to integrate schools. Jones also interviews Michael Kennedy (Regional Manager, National School Bus Service, Inc.) and Donna Senior (Lowell parent) about the bus routes in Lowell. Jones notes that the coming elections will decide how school desegregation is implemented in Lowell. Jones' report is accompanied by footage of students and school buses in Lowell. This tape includes additional footage of school buses on the streets in Lowell. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Christy George reports on student enrollment plans in the cities of Cambridge and Lowell
0:59:06: Visual: Footage of Robert Kennedy (Mayor of Lowell) addressing an audience. Supporters of the mayor stand behind him, including Evelyn Murphy (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Luis Tiant (former Red Sox pitcher), and Grace Corrigan (mother of astronaut Christa McAuliffe). Kennedy says that he is glad to be with so many of "Lowell's friends." Marcus Jones reports that many supporters of school desegregation voluntarily rode school buses in Lowell today. V: Shots of Murphy, Tiant and Corrigan. Footage of Corrigan saying that she is happy to spend time with the schoolchildren of Lowell. Footage of Kennedy urges citizens to put aside their political differences and to ride the buses with Lowell schoolchildren. Jones reports that Kennedy called in supporters to build faith in the Lowell busing program. V: Shots of busing supporters walking on a sidewalk; of school buses on the street. Footage of Michael Kennedy (Regional Manager, National School Bus Service. Inc.) saying that he will need a few more weeks to finalize the bus routes in Lowell; that he will need to recruit bus drivers for the bus routes. Shot of a school bus pulling up to a school; of schoolchildren exiting the bus. Footage of Donna Senior (Lowell parent) saying that the bus routes are chaotic in Lowell; that there is a risk of someone getting hurt in the winter; that parents are waiting at bus stops until 4:00 or 5:00pm for their children to arrive home from school. Footage of George Kouloheras (Lowell School Committee) saying that the issue is political; that he is disappointed in the situation. Jones reports that Kouloheras opposes the city's busing plan; that Kouloheras is campaigning to elect anti-busing candidates to the Lowell City Council and to the Lowell School Committee; that these candidates may alter the state-mandated central enrollment plan. V: Shot of Kouloheras speaking to two white women on the street. Footage of Kouloheras saying that he hopes that four new members of the School Committee will be elected. Kouloheras says that he hopes that the new School Committee will reject busing and find another way to integrate schools. Jones notes that Robert Kennedy cast the swing vote which approved the city busing plan last spring. V: Footage of Robert Kennedy saying that the city can choose between taking control of desegregation or having the court make desegregation decisions. Jones stands in front of a school bus. Children board the bus. Jones reports that next Tuesday's elections are viewed as a referendum on the busing plan; that the election results will decide how the desegregation plan is implemented.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/26/1987
Description: Interview with Boston School Committee Chairman John Kerrigan. Kerrigan expresses his views against busing. He discusses the states racial imbalance law. He comments on the public conflict between Commissioner Sullivan and Secretary Finch, over their views on busing.
Collection: WHDH
Date Created: 03/12/1969
Description: Air piece on a program, called Operation Discovery, which will bus African American students from Roxbury to a school in Sharon for summer school classes. Reporter standup in Post Office Square in Sharon. Interview with Reverend Donald Al Wasserman of the Unitarian Church, who originated the program.
Collection: WHDH
Date Created: 05/21/1965
Description: Police lined up outside Charlestown High. Teachers gathered at the front of the school. Black students get off bus. Person on the street interviews with students boycotting school in busing protest. They discuss the purpose of their boycott. Some fiercely defend sovereignty of sports teams, make racist comments.
1:00:04: Visual: Police are lined up in the street in front of Charlestown High School on the first day of school. Graffiti on the front of the school is painted over. The media is gathered behind a fence across the street from the school. 1:01:30: V: A police car approaches slowly, escorting a school bus. The school bus pulls up to the front of the school. African American students exit the bus and enter the school. White students watch the action on the street from an upper window of the school. Police officers on motorcycles wait alongside the bus. The bus pulls away, followed by motorcycles. Shot of the bus circling Monument Square; of two police motorcycles circling Monument Square; of police stationed in Monument Square. 1:05:48: V: Crowds of people, including school-aged kids, are assembled outside of the Bunker Hill Housing Project on Bunker Hill Street. Cars pass by slowly. Shots of the top of the Bunker Hill Monument, visible over a building. 1:08:14: V: A group of white youth are gathered near a fence on Bunker Hill Street. A voice yells, "No busing." The group waves at the camera. Judy Stoia approaches the group and brings some members over to the camera for an interview. Two males convince a girl named Patty to join the interview. She is reluctant. They are joined by an older man. The older man says that he has six grandchildren who are being bused out of Charlestown. One of the males (Mike) says he plans to boycott school all year; that Charlestown has been quiet "because we are not racists." The older man says that he has spoken to some African American residents of the Dudley Street Housing Project; that they were "good people." Members of the group say that crowds of anti-busers will stay in the street until the end of the schoolday. Mike says that a total boycott of the school could stop busing; that anti-busing demonstrations in Charlestown may turn violent. Another male says that demonstrators in Charlestown will be peaceful. The group is reluctant to talk further and begins to move away from the camera. Stoia asks them how they feel about dropping out of sports programs because of the boycott. Members of the group say that they can play sports among themselves; that they do not mind African American students being bused into Charlestown; that they resent Charlestown students being bused out; that "townies" must stick together. 1:13:20: V: A group of young white male students are gathered in the street. A reporter asks them about sports in Charlestown. One student says that you can't go to sports practice if you have missed school. A second student says that Charlestown sports teams should not have to admit players from outside of Charlestown; that players from outside of Charlestown will be given a hard time in practice until they quit. Members of the group say that Charlestown students who are assigned to schools outside of Charlestown are boycotting school; that buses leaving Charlestown are empty. Another student says that there are no cops on the field for sports practices; that Charlestown players will be rough on outsiders during sports practices. Members of the group say that Charlestown sports teams do not need players from outside of Charlestown. The group says that Charlestown students were turned away from Charlestown High School this morning because they were late. Several members of the group use racist language. One student says that tardy students were turned away unless they had a note from their parents; that African American students on buses were let in to school. Several of the group say that they had been planning to take over the school this morning. One student shows his Charlestown High School identity card to the reporter.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/08/1975
Description: Mike Levitt interviews a couple of parents on whether they would send their kids to school if they were assigned to be bussed. Mother says she would send them to help integrate the schools. Reporter standup on children attended schools they weren't assigned to because their parents refuse to bus the.
Collection: WHDH
Date Created: 09/13/1971
Description: Judy Stoia interviews Gloria Conway (Editor, Charlestown Patriot), Dennis Kearney (State Representative) and Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) on the steps of the Bunker Hill Monument. They talk about youth violence, racism and the anti-busing movement in Charlestown. Conway says that racist graffiti in the neighborhood represents the actions of only a few people. Kearney recounts seeing a crowd of people, of which a few taunted a bus of African American students, while they others in the crowd were abhorred. Conway says that the Charlestown anti-busing movement is committed to non-violence. Sound cuts out at the very end. Tape 2 of 3.
0:00:55: Visual: Shot of police officers and residents lined up beside an ice cream truck. Judy Stoia sets up an interview with Dennis Kearney (State Representative), Gloria Conway (Editor, Charlestown Patriot) and Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) on the steps of the Bunker Hill Monument. 0:01:10: V: O'Shea and Conway speak about youth violence and gangs in Charlestown. O'Shea talks about younger kids being caught up in the aggression. Stoia asks about racism in Charlestown. Conway says that racist graffiti is the work of a few people and does not represent the community. Kearney says that many residents are disgusted by racial slurs directed at schoolchildren. Conway says that local anti-busing protestors have condemned violence and that marches in Charlestown have been peaceful. 0:04:19: V: Stoia talks about the perception of Charlestown as a violent community. O'Shea responds that violence is a problem in many cities. Audio cuts out.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/10/1975
Description: Judy Stoia interviews Dennis Kearney (State Representative), Gloria Conway (Editor, Charlestown Patriot) and Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) on the steps of the Bunker Hill Monument. They talk about the anti-busing movement in Charlestown. O'Shea says that the media have portrayed Charlestown as a violent community; that the Charlestown anti-busing movement is working for public safety and rumor control. Conway discusses the damage the media can cause by reporting unverified rumors. Paul deGive interviews Conway on police presence in Charlestown and about violent youth in Charlestown. Conway says that police officers in Charlestown allowed a peaceful demonstration to proceed today; that residents need to vent their frustrations. Conway discusses the ways local and national media interact with the people involved in the busing situation, while they shoot cutaways. Tape 3 of 3
1:00:01: Visual: Judy Stoia interviews Dennis Kearney (State Representative), Gloria Conway (Editor, Charlestown Patriot) and Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) on the steps of the Bunker Hill Monument. 1:00:34: V: Stoia asks about the image of Charlestown as a violent community. O'Shea says that Charlestown's image is created by the media; that he does not condone violence; that anti-busing leaders in Charlestown have worked for public safety and the establishment of a rumor control center. Conway talks about the importance of the rumor control center. 1:03:16: V: Stoia winds up the interview. Two police officers descend steps beside them. The group talks informally. Stoia explains the editing process. Stoia compares anti-busing resistance in South Boston to resistance in Charlestown. The crew takes extra cutaway shots of the group. Conway talks about her work at The Patriot. Shots of area around Bunker Hill Monument. 1:07:39: V: The crew sets up Paul deGive's interview with Conway. DeGive asks about possible removal of TPF from Charlestown. Conway says that some police presence is necessary; that she will not speculate on numbers; that tension in the community has diminished; that the police were effective today because they allowed a peaceful demonstration to proceed; that peaceful demonstrations allow residents to vent their frustration; that many police deployed on Bunker Hill Street today were local officers known to the community; that the MDC Police officers have tried to work with the community. DeGive asks about violent youth gangs. Conway says that it is not unusual for youth to be out in the streets in Charlestown; that she cannot identify the element that needs to be controlled by the police. DeGive rephrases his question about potential violence of Charlestown youth. Conway says that there are a few leaders making trouble, but many kids are caught up in the events. 1:14:33: V: The crew sets up cutaway shots of Conway and deGive. DeGive and Conway talk informally. Conway comments on local and national media coverage of busing. Conway comments on TPF action against female residents of Charlestown. The crew wraps up the shoot.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/10/1975
Description: Police, including Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) disperse a crowd in Monument Square in Charlestown after an anti-busing demonstration. A crowd is gathered in front of Bunker Hill Housing Project. Police and US Marshals are stationed across the street from the crowd. The police maneuver in the street. The crowd jeers at police and at least one bottle is thrown. The crowd retreats into the housing project. Police move up Bunker Hill Street. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) is present.
0:58:19: Visual: A large crowd of mostly students is gathered along a street in Monument Square. Police are stationed in the street, monitoring the crowd. Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) addresses the crowd through a bullhorn, telling them to go home. Crowd begins to disperse, chanting periodically. An MDC Police vehicle is visible. 1:01:02: V: A Boston Police truck with officers seated in back drives past Charlestown High School and stops. MacDonald issues instructions to them through a bullhorn. Police officers exit from the back of the truck and gather in front of the high school. MacDonald issues more instructions through a bullhorn. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) confers with an officer across from the school. 1:02:37: V: The crowd disperses, moving along Bunker Hill Street. Shot of Concord Street and the intersection of Concord and Bunker Hill Streets. DiGrazia walks down Concord Street. Residents watch the action on the street from their windows. Graffiti on Concord Street marks a boundary of 100 yards from the high school: "100 yds. - Freedom Ends Here." Shot up Concord Street to High School. 1:03:45: V: Police are assembled at the intersection of Concord and Bunker Hill Streets. A crowd is gathered outside of the Bunker Hill Housing Project on Bunker Hill Street. Shots of crowd outside housing project; of police assembled in street. 1:05:25: V: The crowd cheers as police march back up Concord Street toward the high school. Members of the press, including Gary Griffith (reporter), follow the police up Concord Street. The crowd in front of the housing project moves into the street. A voice yells into a bullhorn, "Ok kids, it's your neighborhood." The crowd mills about in front of housing project. 1:07:08: V: A few police officers walk down Concord Street toward the housing project. A large crowd is still gathered in front of the housing project. A group of US Marshals walk down Concord Street. DiGrazia surveys the scene from the top of Concord Street. Voices can be heard taunting the police. DiGrazia walks down Concord Street toward the housing project. A woman walks her father back to his house, so that he won't get hurt "when the bottles start." 1:09:06: V: The large crowd in front of the housing project cheers loudly. Shot of a US Marshal walking away from the crowd. Noise of a bottle breaking against the pavement. Police on Concord Street watch the crowd in front of the housing project. The noise of a helicopter is audible. MacDonald shouts instructions through a bullhorn to police. Two US Marshals in riot helmets walk down Concord Street. A group of police march in formation from Monument Square down Concord Street. DiGrazia stands with a group of officers at the end of Concord Street, across from the housing project. A helicopter circles overhead. The crowd thins as people move into the housing project. MacDonald advances toward a crowd of youth, turning the corner onto Bunker Hill Street. DiGrazia and a group of officers and US Marshals follow MacDonald. MacDonald shouts into the bullhorn. A group of police officers exit the housing project and take a right as they continue to walk up Bunker Hill Street. Cars pass slowly on Bunker Hill Street. Small groups of people are gathered on the sidewalks. Police officers and the media walk in the street. 1:13:49: V: Three US Marshals in riot helmets confer on Bunker Hill Street. Police officers walk up the street. The media are gathered on a street corner. Two officers stand at the side of the street. One officer adjusts his riot helmet.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: 11 B+W wire service photos of South Boston residents opposing busing. Helmet bearing legend "Southie is my home town." Man with loudspeaker in car. Van with sign flipped upside down "Boston Under Siege." "Forced busing? Never!" under three-leaf clover. South Boston Information Center and Home School Association storefront.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1979
Description: Bunker Hill Monument, exteriors of Charlestown High School, and Charlestown environs. A few police officers are stationed along Monument Square outside of Charlestown High School. Robert Murphy (Headmaster, Charlestown High School) stands in front of the school. School buses, accompanied by a police motorcycle escort, pull up in front of the school. African American students exit the buses and enter the school. Police officer tells camera operator that there is a standing order that the press has to remain across the street. A small number of photographers record the arrival of the buses from across the street. White students walks towards school and enter. Gary Griffith does several takes of reporter standup saying that the arrival of school buses at Charlestown High School was routine.
0:00:18: Visual: Shots of the Bunker Hill Monument; of the exterior of Charlestown High School. Two police officers stand outside of Charlestown High School. A white woman walks into the school. A muffled voice yells out, "No busing." Robert Murphy (Headmaster, Charlestown High School) stands out in front of the high school. Shot of Concord Street. Police motorcycles approach the school. Five police officers on motorcycles receive instructions from a police official. The motorcycles pull away. 0:03:41: V: School buses circle Monument Square and approach the high school. Police motorcycles escort the buses. A police officer stands near a Boston Police Department station wagon parked across the street from the high school. The officer watches the buses pull up in front of the school. African American students exit the buses and enter the school. Shot of the Hudson Bus Lines logo on one of the buses. The school buses pull away from the high school, accompanied by the police motorcycles. Murphy, a police officer, and a few school officials remain in front of the school. 0:07:06: V: White students walk toward the entrance of the school. Murphy and another school official greet a few of the students. A police officer is heard telling members of the media to move across the street. Two police officers stand casually on the corner of Bartlett Street and Monument Square. White students walk toward the school. Fewer than ten members of the media record the scene from the sidewalk across the street. A Hudson Bus Lines airport van pulls up in front of the school. An African American student is inside of the van. The van pulls away. The sidewalk in front of the school is empty. Some members of the media depart as two police officers walk up the opposite side of the street. Murphy speaks to two police officers on the corner of Bartlett Street and Monument Square. A man in a business suit speaks to a two-person camera crew. The street is quiet. Murphy and a police officer walk toward the school. 0:12:11: V: Gary Griffith stands outside of Charlestown High School. Griffith reports on the routine arrival of five buses at the high school this morning. He reports that there is no sign of unrest. The crew does two more takes of Griffith reporting on the story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1977