Description: Press conference at the Boston Schools Information Center on day two of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Footage is silent until 00:01:37. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) takes questions about the arrests of 74 members of the Committee Against Racism, and how the police and judiciary process mass arrests in South Boston. DiGrazia also answers questions about police restraint and police response to violence in the streets. Ed Baumeister (WGBH reporter) notes that there are many arrests for minor infractions and few arrests for major incidents. Greg Pilkington (WGBH reporter) questions the police policy of restraint. DiGrazia says that there is a difference between low visibility and restraint; that police are making arrests. J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant US Attorney General) discusses the presence of federal marshals in Boston and the ongoing federal investigations into violations of the federal court order. Pottinger says that antibusing activity at night can be considered a violation of the court order. DiGrazia says that police are making great efforts to crack down on violence and vandalism during the evening hours. Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) reports on public safety teams in Charlestown. Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) reports on school attendance and atmosphere. She gives information on registration for students without school assignments. Reporters ask Pottinger questions about the federal investigations of antibusing activity. Reporters ask Fahey questions about school attendance and low attendance among white students. Fahey says that attendance will improve as parents and students realize that the schools are running smoothly. This tape has visible time code burned in at the bottom of the screen.
0:01:27: Visual: Press conference at the Boston Schools Information Center. Panelists assemble at a table with microphones. Reporters include Ed Baumeister (WGBH), John Henning, Greg Pilkington (WGBH), and Walt Sanders. Ron Brinn (Information Coordinator for Mayor Kevin White) begins to speak. Audio cuts in and out. 0:03:04: V: A reporter asks about the arrests of 74 members of the Committee Against Racism in South Boston, and a related confrontation with a hostile crowd at the South Boston courthouse. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) says he has spoken to the parties involved and that the problems at the South Boston courthouse were due to a lack of communication; that Chief Justice Flaschner will work with police and local courts to expedite the booking of arrestees; that he had previously met with Flaschner and others to discuss the expeditious booking of mass arrests; that there was confusion in South Boston on the day in question. A reporter asks if there was a firm agreement with all involved in the meeting to hold court in a venue other than the courthouse if necessary. DiGrazia says there was discussion and plans to implement action if necessary. 0:06:34: V: Baumeister points out that many arrests are made for minor infractions and few arrests are made for more serious acts of violence. DiGrazia responds that there have been quite a few arrests for acts of violence; that members of the Committee Against Racism needed to be moved in order to avoid a major confrontation along a bus route; that the police are trying to neutralize a dangerous situation; that police are showing great restraint. Pilkington points out that restraint by police was not effective during the previous year. DiGrazia interrupts him by saying that there is a difference between low visibility and restraint; that police are actively making arrests this year, but are showing restraint. Reporter asks if there is discussion of calling in the National Guard to aid police at night. DiGrazia says that police are working long hours but performing well; that there are no plans at present to call in the National Guard. 0:09:38: V: A reporter asks about the possibility of federal charges being brought against some arrestees. J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant U.S. Attorney General) responds that charges are being investigated; that federal and state charges may be lodged; that he is personally involved with five investigations. A reporter asks how federal marshals can aid police in the evening if their mandate is to enforce the federal court order. Pottinger says that certain actions outside of school hours could be handled by the federal marshals as violations of the federal court order; that federal marshals are there to assist police; that federal marshals are working long hours. Pottinger confirms that the Justice Department is investigating an incident at the JFK Home and a Molotov cocktail incident; that they are investigating reports of direct intimidation of individuals trying to comply with the court order; that they are investigating some arrests for the assault of police officers. 0:12:38: V: Pilkington asks if the violence committed by youth gangs in Charlestown constitutes a violation of federal law. Pottinger says that the violence may be a violation, especially if the violence involves an assault on a police officer or a fire official. Reporter asks what will be done about nighttime violence and vandalism. DiGrazia says that he will increase police numbers in Charlestown and South Boston; that police will be assisted by federal marshals; that federal marshals will investigate assaults on police officers. A reporter asks Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) to clarify a statement indicating that he has complaints against the media. Meade says that it was a humorous statement directed at a reporter whom he knows well; that he would like to clarify a his answer to a question from yesterday about police presence in Charlestown. 0:15:31: V: A reporter asks Meade what public safety teams are doing to prevent violence and vandalism in Charlestown. Meade says that several people are on the streets trying to calm the situation; that Roberta Delaney (Manager, Charlestown Little City Hall) will hold a meeting that afternoon with a public safety team; that antibusing leaders in Charlestown have made it clear that they do not support violence. A reporter asks DiGrazia to compare today's violence in Charlestown to that of the previous day. DiGrazia says that police did a good job in defusing a difficult situation today. A reporter asks if federal marshals will be on duty for the evening. Pottinger says that the federal marshals will not be on patrol; that they will be available upon request from police. 0:18:09: V: Brinn introduces Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools). Fahey thanks the public safety officials. Fahey says that attendance is up for both African Americans and whites; that there has been one suspension and no arrests; that the climate in the schools is good; that extracurricular activities are proceeding. Commissioner DiGrazia excuses himself and leaves. A reporter asks Fahey about low white attendance in West Roxbury. Fahey responds that they are watching the situation and will contact students who are absent. Reporter comments that attendance in elementary schools is primarily African American. Fahey says that some white parents may be waiting to assess the climate at the schools before sending their children; that she is confident that white attendance will go up. 0:21:37: V: A reporter asks Pottinger if there are some individuals under investigation who have not been arrested. Pottinger says yes, but that he will not give details. A reporter asks Fahey about students who have not yet been assigned to school. Fahey gives information on two sites where student registration will be held on the following day. Fahey asks the media to disseminate the information. Fahey says that 800 students were processed in last week's preregistration; that 400 students were processed today; that she has no way of knowing how many students still need school assignments. Fahey tells a reporter that she has no information on the suspension of an African American male student today. A reporter asks Fahey about plans to assess student achievement in the desegregated schools. Fahey says that she is working with consultants on assessing math and reading; that attendance is another indication of school performance. 0:25:21: V: Brinn interrupts to clarify Pottinger's title as he prepares to make a statement. Pottinger explains that he will be absent for a few days for personal reasons; that Robert Murphy (Civil Rights Division, US Justice Department) will be in charge in his absence. Brinn checks with Meade to see if he has a statement, then invites more questions. A reporter asks Pottinger for more detail on investigations of people who have not been arrested. Pottinger says that the investigations are centered on intimidations and threats to those trying to comply with the court order; that the FBI is investigating allegations; that it is possible to move quickly toward indictment if the evidence is sufficient; that he cannot predict when or if an indictment will occur. A reporter asks Pottinger about the five investigations he is involved with personally, and whether they concern people who have not been arrested. Pottinger says that he is familiar with five investigations concerning threats and intimidation as well as arrests made by the state; that there may be other investigations; that there are sitting grand juries available to hear these cases; that he does not think it will be necessary to empanel a grand jury. 0:28:49: V: A reporter asks Fahey where the 25,000 absentee students are. Fahey responds that she does not know. A reporter asks for a summary of the attendance figures. Robert Donahue (Boston School Department) says that the attendance has increased; that some parents have kept children out of school; that attendance will increase as it becomes clear to parents that schools are functioning normally. Fahey gives a rundown of attendance figures for the first and second days of school: that attendance was 60.3% and 64.1% at the high schools; that attendance was 60.1% and 65.8% at the middle schools; that attendance was 58.1% and 64.9% at the elementary schools. 0:30:44: V: Brinn thanks the panelists and closes the press conference. Baumeister gives a summary of the conference. Reporters mill around the room.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/09/1975
Description: No audio at the very beginning. Paul deGive interviews Jim Cooney (Charlestown resident) about the Bunker Hill Housing Project near Bunker Hill Street in Charlestown. Cooney says that young people in the project are often blamed for problems caused by outsiders. DeGive interviews Father William Joy (St. Mary's Parish) about urban renewal in Charlestown, the construction of the Mystic-Tobin Bridge and conditions in the Bunker Hill Housing Project. Joy says that Charlestown has been torn apart by urban renewal; that many residents of the housing project are unemployed. DeGive interviews a teenage project resident who says that the bad reputation of the youth in the project is exaggerated and unfair. He says that anti-busing parents are fueling the emotions of the youth. Joy says that a great number of students from the projects are being bused out of Charlestown; that students from the wealthier parts of the neighborhood are enrolled in parochial schools. Joy faults the Catholic Church for being out of touch with the needs and problems of project residents, and proposes an increased presence of priests in the Boston city projects. Racist graffiti on some of the project buildings.
0:00:11: Visual: Shots of a street near Bunker Hill Housing Project in Charlestown. (Project is near Monument Street and Bunker Hill Street.) Paul deGive sets up interview with Father William Joy (St. Mary's Parish) about urban renewal in Charlestown. Shot of the Mystic-Tobin Bridge. DeGive talks to Joy and Jim Cooney (Charlestown resident) informally. Cooney is considering leaving Charlestown 0:02:13: V: DeGive asks Cooney about troubled youth in the housing project. Cooney says that there are difficult kids everywhere; that housing projects in Boston are poorly maintained and patrolled; that outsiders often cause problems in the project; that kids from the project are often blamed for crimes they did not commit. Cooney says that he had no problem living in the housing project; that outside agitators are creating trouble in the housing project. 0:06:05: V: Shots of Mystic-Tobin Bridge. DeGive interviews Joy. Joy says that the building of the Tobin Bridge had a negative effect on Charlestown; that homes were torn down for its construction; that Charlestown has been torn apart by urban renewal projects; that the Bunker Hill Housing Project was always controversial because homes were torn down to build it. Joy reports that there are 1140 units in the project; that it is one of the largest housing projects in New England. Joy walks away. Shot of overpass running across street. Shots of housing project. 0:09:37: V: DeGive interviews Joy near the expressway overpass. Children wander by occasionally. Joy says that there is a lot of unemployment in the projects; that some residents lost their jobs when the Charlestown Navy Yard closed; that other project residents work at other factories in Charlestown. Shot of expressway from underneath; of "no busing" graffiti on the walls of the project. 0:12:53: V: DeGive interviews a teenager, Danny Sullivan (project resident), in front of a wall with "no busing" and "IRA" graffiti. Danny says that there are only a few kids causing violence in the project; that the media isn't covering the housing project fairly; that a few kids start trouble and others are drawn in; that anti-busing parents make the situation worse by fueling the emotions of the kids; that kids in Charlestown don't deserve their bad reputation. Shots of young kids who have stopped to listen to the interview. 0:15:34: V: DeGive interviews Joy in a courtyard of the housing project. Joy says that there is a high percentage of students from the project being bused out of Charlestown; that there is a high percentage of students from the project enrolled in public school; that students from the wealthier parts of Charlestown are enrolled in parochial schools. Shot of broken glass on the pavement. Joy has an off-camera exchange with a young kid. Shots of the housing project from the outside; of "ROAR" graffiti. 0:17:48: V: DeGive interviews Joy near St. Catherine of Siena Church. Shots of church. "White power" graffiti is visible on a wall near the church. Joy says that the church and other institutions have failed the project by not being visible and accessible to the people; that the church is out of touch with the residents of Charlestown; that the church needs to make a stronger commitment to reach project residents; that the nuns are visible in the projects; that no priests live in any of the housing projects in Boston. Joy says that local priests have made an effort to reach out to the people during the busing crisis; that priests can provide support and direction.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/09/1975
Description: Buses pull up in front of English High School. Robert Peterkin (Headmaster, English High School) stands out front as buses arrive. Students exit buses and congregate by race in front of school. Judy Stoia interviews African American and white students outside of the school about how they like school. Students talk about the school and report no racial tensions so far. Stoia interviews a white female student who says that she would prefer to attend Brighton High School. Stoia interviews two African American female students who says that the school is disorganized this year. The two girls complain about problems with their class schedules and relations with teachers. Stoia interviews a group of African American female students who say that they like the school. One of the students says that African American and white students can get along fine if their parents leave them alone. Stoia interviews two white male students from Brighton who like the facilities at the school. They say the school was originally supposed to be just for boys, but it's better now that it's coed. Stoia starts interview another group of students, when a teacher comes over and tells them they're going to be late for class. Stoia interviews Chris Lane (Flexible Campus Coordinator, English High School) about the opening of the school and school programs offered in conjunction with area colleges including Brandeis University, Massachusetts College of Art and UMass Amherst. Lane says that attendance has increased since yesterday. Dropout during middle of video.
0:00:46: Visual: Buses pull up outside of English High School on Avenue Louis Pasteur. White students exit buses. Robert Peterkin (Headmaster, English High School) watches from sidewalk. Students gather on steps. 0:01:41: V: Judy Stoia sets up an interview with a white female student. Student says that she is from Allston-Brighton; that she does not like English High School; that she is bused here but would rather go to Brighton High School; that the school is nice but she lives very close to Brighton High School; that she doesn't plan to take advantage of any of the special programs at English High School. Stoia closes the interview. 0:02:55: V: A bus pulls up to the school. Peterkin, a few school officials, and a small group of police officers are on the sidewalk. White students exit the bus. A second bus pulls up and more white students are unloaded. Students congregate by race on the steps of the school. 0:05:31: V: Stoia sets up an interview with two African American female students. The first student is from Dorchester and the second is from Roxbury. Both say that they do not like school so far this year. The first student says that the system is not organized. The second student says that the school is crowded; that her class schedule is mixed up. The first student says that teachers will not give her a second chance after having difficulties the previous year. The second student says that she is not involved in the school's special programs, but has heard of a program in which the students will visit Brandeis University. The second student says that the administrators waited until the last minute to prepare for the school year; that she would like school if her schedule were straightened out. V: Video cuts out for 15 seconds. The second student says that there have been no problems with integration so far; that she has always gone to school with white students. Both students say that they requested to attend English High School. Stoia closes the interview. 0:07:49: V; Stoia interviews a group of African American female students. Two students are attending English High School for the fourth year and both like it. One student takes the MBTA bus to school. A third student says she likes the school; that the students seem to get along. The first student says that the African American and white students will get along if their parents leave them alone. The third student says that African American students at English High School are there for an education; that they are not looking for trouble with the white students. The first student agrees. The third student says that she requested to attend English High School. The first student says that she likes the teachers at English High School; that they are strict about attendance; that they care about the students. The third student says that she would like to be involved in the program which allows English High students to teach younger children. The first two students say that they will be cheerleaders. Stoia closes the interview. 0:10:54: V: Two more buses pull up to the school. African American students exit the bus. Shots of students congregated in front of school. Another bus pulls up. More African American students exit the bus. Stoia sets up an interview with two white male students. Both students are from Brighton and like English High School so far. The first student says that the school has good facilities. The second student says he likes some of his classes and the gymnasium. Both students say that they requested to attend English High School. The second student says that he is happy that it is now co-ed; that he requested English High School because he heard it was good. The first student says that he wanted to leave Brighton High School. Both students say that they ride the bus to school; that African American and white students are getting along so far. Stoia closes the interview. 0:14:09: V: Long shot of the entrance to English High School. Students are entering the school. 0:14:46: V: Stoia sets up an interview with a three African American female students. She promises not to make them late. They are joined by several other African American students. The first student says that there are not enough people at school. The students disperse and head toward the school. Chris Lane (Flexible Campus Coordinator) jokes around with an African American male student as he heads into school. 0:15:36: V: Stoia sets up an interview with Lane. He says that English High School opened peacefully the previous day; that attendance is up today; that he expects that it will be a good school year; that buses arriving from all sections of the city looked full; that buses seemed to be on time; that transportation problems will decline. Lane says that buses scheduled to transport students to the ORC (Occupational Resource Center) did not show up the previous day; that they are scheduled to arrive today. Lane says that the special programs planned for English High School are not yet in place; that they are waiting on approval and funding. Lane explains what a magnet school is; that the staff is ready to implement a theater arts programs in conjunction with Brandeis University; that programs in conjunction with Massachusetts College of Art and University of Massachusetts will follow.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/09/1975
Description: Evening Compass late edition newscast on the second day of school during Phase II desegregation of Boston Schools. Ed Baumeister and Paul deGive introduce the show and give attendance statistics. Introduction includes footage of Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) giving an upbeat statement on the opening of schools. Greg Pilkington reports on African American students who are bused into Charlestown. Pilkington's report includes interviews with Caroline Bell (local resident), Harietta Moore (local resident), Robert Kelley (student), Galina Davis(student), Georgia Carter (local resident), John Filadoro (bus driver) and Leona Pleas (bus monitor). Pilkington notes that the bus rides from the South End to Charlestown have been uneventful so far. Pilkington reports on a group of Roxbury parents who are urging other African American parents to send their children to Charlestown High School. Richard Gittens (transitional aid, Charlestown High School) reports that there are no problems at Charlestown High School. Pilkington interviews Nathaniel Jones (general counsel, NAACP) about school desegregation issues and busing in Boston. Jones says that segregated schools are harmful to both white students and African American students. Judy Stoia interviews Renee Burke (student, Hyde Park High School) and Donald McCarthy (student, Hyde Park High School) on their participation in a leadership program to lessen racial tension at Hyde Park High School. Stoia interviews Judy Rattash (First National Bank of Boston), Suzanne Kelly (Stonehill College) and Gail O'Reilly (teacher, Hyde Park High School) about Hyde Park High School programs in conjuction with Stonehill College and the First National Bank of Boston. Rattash, O'Reilly and Kelly talk about the programs available to Hyde Park High School students. DeGive reports that the Massachusetts Supreme Court failed to lift an injuction blocking the City of Boston from paying legal fees for the Boston Home and School Association's appeals of court-ordered busing. DeGive notes that the Home and School Association will seek private funding to continue the fight against the court order. Pam Bullard interviews John Coakley about magnet schools and the opening of schools across the city. Coakley says that public-safety issues are being handled better this year than last year. This tape has audible time code on track 2 and visible time code in the upper right corner.
23:00:02: Ed Baumeister introduces a special Evening Compass broadcast featuring information on the school situation. Baumeister reports that the city is calm; that federal marshals are ready to act if there are any signs of a disturbance. Opening credits roll. Paul deGive reports that school attendance was 64.9%. Baumeister reports that there is still confusion over school assignments for some students. [ V: Footage of Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) saying that the general climate of the schools is "excellent"; that there have been no arrests in the schools. Baumeister reports that there were 14 arrests in Boston today; that 94 have been arrested since the opening of school; that 9 police officers have been injured. 23:02:25: Greg Pilkington reports on African American students assigned to Charlestown High School. V: Footage of African American students boarding buses at corner of Lenox and Tremont Streets, near the Cathedral Housing Project in the South End; of African American students riding buses. Pilkington reports that Charlestown has been the center of resistance to Phase II busing; that many African American students assigned to Charlestown schools did not attend the opening day of school for fear of violence; that there was no violence in the schools or along the bus routes on opening day. V: Footage of Pilkington interviewing parents at the bus stop. Caroline Bell (local resident) says that her two sons were assigned to the Holden School in Charlestown; that her sons were apprehensive about going to school in Charlestown; that they were pleased with the school when they returned home after the first day. Harietta Moore (local resident) says that four of her children were assigned to schools in Charlestown; that they did not attend the opening day of school; that they will attend school today because the schools in Charlestown appear to be peaceful. Robert Kelley (student) says that a crowd threw rocks at his bus as he was leaving school in Charlestown; that the climate inside the school was fine. Galina Davis (student) says that a crowd outside of her school in Charlestown was insulting the African American students. Footage of buses lined up to pick up students at a bus stop. Pilkington says that the busing of students from the South End to Charlestown was uneventful yesterday; that the absence of a bus monitor caused some confusion. V: Footage of Georgia Carter (local resident) saying that parents were concerned about their children riding buses without bus monitors. John Filadoro (bus driver) says that a bus monitor would have calmed the fears of the kids on the bus; that the police did a good job of breaking up crowds and easing tension on the streets; that he thinks his bus might have a bus monitor today. Leona Pleas (bus monitor) says that she came out today because she heard that bus monitors were needed; that she has a child assigned to school in Charlestown; that white parents should send their kids to school because a child's education is more important than politics; that more African American students are on the bus today to go to Charlestown. 23:06:45: Pilkington reports that 85 African American students attended Charlestown High School today; that the attendance figure for African American students at the high school is 38%; that a group of parents in Roxbury is urging African American parents to send their children to school in Charlestown. Pilkington interviews Richard Gittens (bus monitor and transitional aide, Charlestown High School) in the studio. Gittens says that the climate is good at Charlestown High School; that the principal at Charlestown High School is doing a good job; that there have been no problems between white and African American students; that the school situation is normal, despite the violence on the streets in Charlestown. Gittens says that he is among a group of parents urging others to send their children to school in Charlestown; that they hope for 100% attendance among African American students by Friday. Gittens says that African American parents and students are pleased with the middle school in Charlestown; that African American parents and students have found that there is a difference between schools in Charlestown and schools in African American neighborhoods. Gittens says white and African American parents need to send their kids to school, no matter how they feel about busing. Gittens says that the violence on the streets in Charlestown has not affected the educational climate in the high school. Gittens leaves the set. 23:11:14: Pilkington interviews Nathaniel Jones (general counsel, NAACP) in the studio about desegregation issues and the court case which brought desegregation to Boston (Morgan v. Hennigan). Jones says that the resolve of the government to enforce the court order has resulted in a peaceful opening of schools in Boston. Jones says that the plaintiffs in the lawsuit brought the case to court because the Constitutional rights of their children were being violated; that the court's decision in Morgan v. Hennigan is in line with the Supreme Court's landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education; that it is unconstitutional for a school board to make policy which results in a segregated school system. Jones says that segregation is harmful to both white children and African American children; that segregated schools are inherently unequal; that Judge Garrity's ruling eliminates segregation and tries to remedy the harm caused by segregation to white and African American children in Boston. Jones says that popular opinion about busing is irrelevant; that the Constitutional rights of the minority must be protected; that busing does not compromise a child's education; that busing has been used in the past to enforce segregation; that 3% of children in the US are bused for the purposes of desegregation. Jones says that he can understand why African Americans might have reservations about busing; that in the past, the burden of busing fell on the African American community; that the court order calls for students of both races to be bused in Boston; that the rights of African American students must be protected. 23:17:40: Baumeister reports that attendance at Hyde Park High School was 70% today; that African American attendance was 65%; that white attendance was 74%; that the school has opened peacefully this year. Baumeister reports that the pairing of Hyde Park High School with Stonehill College and the First National Bank of Boston led to the creation of Student Leadership Teams to deal with racial tension. 23:18:33: Judy Stoia interviews Renee Burke (student, Hyde Park High School), Donald McCarthy (student, Hyde Park High School) in the studio. Burke and McCarthy are members of the Hyde Park Biracial Leadership Team. Burke says that the training she received as a member of the team helped her; that the training brought the team closer together. McCarthy says that the training took place at Stonehill College; that members of the group have learned to trust one another. Burke says that members of the team are working as student aides in the school. McCarthy says that the team can set a good example for the other students; that the 52 members of the team can show that African American and white students can get along. Burke says that there has been a lessening of tension in the school; that team members can help to mediate problems among students. McCarthy says that there is much less tension this year than last year. Burke says that she hopes that the example of the biracial team will encourage more interaction between African American and white students. McCarthy says that interaction between the two groups will happen gradually; that there are probably a few resentments carried over from the previous year. 23:22:55: Stoia interviews Judy Rattash (First National Bank of Boston), Suzanne Kelly (Stonehill College) and Gail O'Reilly (teacher, Hyde Park High School) in the studio. Rattash says that the First National Bank will continue some of its pilot programs from the previous year at Hyde Park High School; that the bank developed a successful computer course taught at their facility in Columbia Park during the previous year; that the bank is developing a program called World of Work, in which students learn interview and resume techniques. Rattash says that students get hands-on experience with computers in the computer course. Kelly says that Stonehill College would like to expand the leadership program at Hyde Park High School; that they would like to get more students involved in one-day leadership workshops at the college. Kelly says that she is presently writing proposals to get funding for programs through the state legislature; that some programs may begin before the funds become available at the end of September. Kelly says that there are plans for academic enrichment programs, an ethnic studies program, an ethnic crafts course, and a radio production; that the programs take place at Stonehill College and at Hyde Park High School. O'Reilly says that she likes the programs available through Stonehill College and the First National Bank; that the bank's reading tutorial program will continue this year; that both the bank and the college will participate in the school newspaper. Rattash says that other outside organizations are interested in the schools; that the Greater Boston Real Estate Board may try to work with teachers to develop a curriculum for students at Hyde Park High School; that the bank will encourage the Junior Achievement program at Hyde Park High School. Burke says that students will be especially interested in the newspaper program. 23:29:57: Paul deGive reports that Massachusetts Superior Court Justice Francis Quirico has refused to lift an injuction blocking the city of Boston from paying legal fees for the Boston Home and School Association; that the city of Boston had paid over $50,000 until African American parents brought the city to court. DeGive reports that the Boston Home and School Association will seek private funds in order to continue to fight the court order; that the Home and School Association is slated to argue the desegregation plan in front of the First Circuit Court of Appeals next week. 23:30:56: Baumeister reports that John Coakley was praised for his performance last year as Boston's chief school desegregation planner; that he was appointed head of the city-wide magnet schools by William Leary (former Superintendent of Schools); that he was not reappointed to that post by the new superintendent Marion Fahey. Baumeister reports that Judge Garrity has requested that Coakley stay in the post until the end of September. 23:31:09: Pam Bullard interviews John Coakley in the studio. Bullard asks why there are more problems with transportation and student assignments this year. Coakley says that the school department had more time to implement the Phase I plan after it was handed down from the court; that the Phase II plan was more complex, and the schools had less time to implement it. Coakley says that organizing bus transit is very complex; that the school department did the best it could in the time allowed. Bullard reports that elementary school attendance city-wide was 70%; that elementary school attendance in Dorchester was 74%; that elementary school attendance in East Boston was 76%; that attendance in elementary-level magnet schools was 80%. Coakley says that parents choose magnet schools; that the magnet schools are well established and carry over a sizable population from year to year. Bullard asks Coakley if the magnet schools can continue to pull in students and reverse the trend of declining enrollments. Coakley says that the Boston area provides great resources to the magnet schools; that universities, hospitals, and other institutions are participating in magnet school programs. Bullard reports that attendance at high schools is down 7% from last year; that attendance at middle schools is up 11% from last year; that attendance at elementary schools is down 18% from last year. Coakley says that many elementary schools were unaffected by Phase I desegregation; that elementary schools are losing students because more schools are affected by Phase II desegregation this year. Coakley says that he thinks some elementary school students may have left public schools for reasons other than desegregation. Bullard asks Coakley to compare the opening of schools this year to the opening of schools last year. Coakley says that he is more optimistic about the schools this year; that public safety issues are being handled more effectively this year; that many residents, parents, and students do not wish to see a repeat of last year's violence; that many are trying to recover their pride in the city, which may have been lost last year. Coakley says that Phase II desegregation did try to incorporate educational improvements with desegregation; that the magnet schools are an example of this; that the involvement of universities and other institutions in the schools can provide some momentum for a more dynamic school system. 23:40:25: Bumeister reports on Evening Compass broadcasts for the following day. DeGive reminds viewers that Edwin Diamond (media critic) will analyze media coverage of busing on the tomorrow's late edition of Evening Compass. DeGive closes the show. Credits roll.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/09/1975
Description: Evening Compass newscast on the second day of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Ed Baumeister reports on the increased presence of federal law enforcement officials in the Boston. Report includes footage of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) saying that violations of the law committed in the evening will be prosecuted as federal offenses. Baumeister also reports on school attendance. Footage of Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) expressing optimism about the climate in the schools. Greg Pilkington reports on police commitment to stricter law enforcement relating to school desegregation. Report includes footage of a press conference with Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) and J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant U.S. Attorney General). Pilkington notes that police have made few arrests relating to violence Charlestown. Footage of Pilkington interviewing Scott Harshbarger (Assistant State Attorney General), about enforcement of the school desegregation order. Paul deGive reports on a confrontation between anti-busing mothers and police in Charlestown Paul deGive reports on confrontations between Charlestown residents, and police throughout the day. The report includes still photos and coverage of a standoff between police and Charlestown mothers during a prayer march. DeGive reports that Charlestown mothers charged police officers who were blocking the path of their march. DeGive reports on a confrontation between police, members of the media and Charlestown residents outside of the Bunker Hill Housing Project in Charlestown. DeGive notes that the police left the area because their presence seemed to provoke the residents. DeGive's reports includes footage of Charlestown resident chasing the media from the neighborhood. Pam Bullard reports on the atmosphere at Roxbury High School. Her report includes footage of interviews with Charles Ray (Headmaster, Roxbury High School) and a student who says that there is "no trouble" at Roxbury High School. Gary Griffith reports on police reaction to the increase in anti-busing violence and vandalism in the evenings. The report includes a photo of vandalism at the John F. Kennedy birthplace in Brookline. Graffiti in front of the house reads, "Bus Teddy." Judy Stoia reports on the atmosphere and programs at English High School. The report includes footage of interviews with English High School students, Chris Lane (Flexible Campus Coordinator, English High School) and Robert Peterkin (headmaster, English High School). Lane says that attendance has increased since yesterday. Peterkin talks about the tough academic standards at the school.
0:59:33: Audio of WGBH promotions and station identification. Baumeister introduces the Evening Compass newscast. Opening credits roll. Baumeister reports that the atmosphere in Boston schools was orderly; that nearly 2,000 law enforcement officials oversaw activities at the schools today. Bullard reports that there will be an increased federal presence in the city during the evenings. Visual: Footage of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) saying that federal rules and regulations will now apply to evenings; that violators of the law during the evening hours will be subject to prosecution under federal law. Baumeister reports that US Marshals will not patrol the streets in the evenings; that they will be on call to assist local police. Baumeister speculates as to whether the authority of the US Marshals will be able to quell disruptions on the street, which have been more frequent than disruptions in schools. Baumeister reports that attendance in schools rose today; that 49,400 students of 76,127 were present in schools. Baumeister says that police and federal officials had grim reports about confrontations with local residents in Charlestown; that Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) was optimistic. V: Footage of Fahey saying that there have been no arrests in the schools; that the climate in the schools is "excellent." Fahey goes on to give a lighthearted report of the conditions in the schools. Baumeister reports that many members of the pro-busing Committee Against Racism (CAR) were arrested in South Boston yesterday. 1:02:54: Greg Pilkington reports that police officials had promised stricter law enforcement concerning the school situation this year; that police officials had threatened to make more arrests and to prosecute arrestees more quickly this year. Pilkington notes that the safety of schoolchildren has been assured this year, even when there has been unrest on the streets. Pilkington reports that there was only one arrest in Charlestown yesterday, where a gang of youth overturned cars and beat up an African American student at Bunker Hill Community College. Pilkington adds that Charlestown residents skirmished with police throughout the day today; that there were a handful of arrests made. Pilkington reports that Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) was asked about police action in Charlestown. V: Footage of press conference at Boston Schools Information Center. Baumeister asks why there have been many arrests for minor offenses and fewer arrests for violent offenses. DiGrazia says that there have been quite a few arrests for acts of violence; that the arrests of the members of the Committee Against Racism were unfortunate; that the CAR members needed to be moved in order to avoid confrontation along a bus route; that the CAR incident was the only one in which demonstrators tried to approach a bus route or school. DiGrazia says that there were several arrests for violent incidents today; that police are more concerned with neutralizing the situation than making arrests. Baumeister asks if police restraint is the reason for the low number of arrests. DiGrazia responds that police did show restraint in attempting to control a volatile situation today. Pilkington notes that police had promised less restraint and more arrests this year. DiGrazia says that there is a difference between "low visibility" and "restraint"; that police were using low visibility tactics last year; that police continue to use restraint this year, but are making more arrests. V: Pilkington says that the police presence is definitely more visible this year. Pilkington quotes Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) as saying two weeks before that police intended to stop violence and make more arrests this year. Pilkington notes that police have not made many arrests in Charlestown, nor have they stopped the violence. Pilkington reports that federal officials have also said that they intend to enforce the law more vigorously this year. Pilkington reports that J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant US Attorney General) said at the press conference today that he expects the presence of FBI agents and 100 US Marshals to lead to more prosecutions under federal law. Pilkington notes that no federal charges have been filed in any of the cases being investigated by the Justice Department. V: Footage of Pilkington asking Pottinger if the youth violence in Charlestown constitutes a violation of federal law. Pottinger says that the violent activity of youth in Charlestown may constitute a violation of federal law; that attacks on police officers and fire officials are most definitely violations of federal law. Pilkington says that it is too early to predict the number of federal investigations which will result in federal charges. He notes that only 4 federal convictions resulted from 400 to 500 federal investigations last year. Pilkington reports that Scott Harshbarger (Assistant State Attorney General) will supervise the enforcement of the school desegregation order. V: Footage of Pilkington interviewing Harshbarger. Harshbarger says that the primary concern for law enforcement has been the safety of students in schools; that law enforcement has been concentrating on keeping violent demonstrators away from the schools. Pilkington notes that no arrests were made in Charlestown yesterday. He asks Harshbarger if the youth in Charlestown will feel as if they are immune from prosecution. Harshbarge says that youth in Charlestown are not immune from prosecution; that violence will not be tolerated; that the main priority right now is safety in and around the schools. Harshbarger adds that he is concerned about the youth violence. 1:09:38: DeGive reports that the morning was peaceful in Charlestown; that buses arrived at Charlestown High School without incident; that the media covering the story were fewer in number than yesterday; that there were no helicopters circling overhead. V: Shot of photographs of a female African American student looking out of the window of a bus; of Dennis Kearney (State Representative). DeGive reports that Kearney was optimistic about the atmosphere outside of the high school today; that Kearney had complained yesterday about the helicopters, the heavy police presence, and the large numbers of media. DeGive reports that DiGrazia held a brief press conference outside of Charlestown High School after the opening of the school; that DiGrazia said that police presence in Charlestown would be just as heavy today as yesterday. DeGive reports that 300 local police officers and Metropolitan District Commission police officers were stationed in Charlestown; that the Tactical Patrol Force and mounted police were on standby. V: Shot of photographs of DiGrazia speaking to reporters in front of the high school. Shot of photographs of police officers on a sidewalk in Charlestown; of officers stationed in Monument Square as a school bus passes by; of DiGrazia. DeGive reports that DiGrazia said that large groups would not be allowed to gather today in Charlestown. DeGive says that 200 antibusing mothers gathered to march on the street; that the women were stopped by a line of police; that the situation soon turned tense and ugly. DeGive reports that reporters and police were heckled by residents; that rocks and bottles were thrown occasionally at police officers and the media. V: Shot of photographs of a large group of white women sitting down in the street; of the women and police officers facing off on the street; of the media covering the confrontation. Shot of photographs of women sitting down in the street. DeGive reports that the trouble began when the group of mothers marched from Bunker Hill Street up to High Street, along the west side of the Bunker Hill Monument; that the group had grown to over 200 people when police cordoned off High Street and stopped the women from going further. DeGive reports that police ordered the marchers to walk along the sidewalk; that fathers and children complied with police while mothers sat down in High Street as a gesture of protest. DeGive reports that more police were added to the cordon in order to separate protesters from the media; that the mothers rose and demanded to be let through; that the mothers sang "God Bless America" and chanted the Lord's prayer and the "Here we go, Charlestown" refrain. V: Shot of photographs of the women gathered in the street; of street signs for Cordis Street and High Street; of the police cordon blocking the marchers' progress along High Street; of the women sitting down in the street. Shots of photographs of marchers in front of the cordon of police; of the women standing up in the street to face police; of marchers waving American flags. DeGive reports that the mothers charged the police line; that the police were ordered not to let them through, but not to hurt them. DeGive reports that the situation became rough; that males in the crowd were subject to the use of force; that two young men with the group of mothers were arrested quickly and roughly. DeGive reports that one man was dragged from the crowd with his neck locked between the body of a police officer and his nightstick; that another man was slammed against a car and subdued by five members of the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF). DeGive reports that the crowd finally chose to use the sidewalk; that the crowd moved down to the Revolutionary War-era training ground on Winthrop Street; that mothers dispersed while a group of youths challenged mounted police on the training ground. V: Shots of photographs of mothers facing off with police; of mothers pushing against the police cordon. Shots of photographs of police and officials on the street; of police officers walking in formation away from Monument Square. DeGive reports that the youths fired skyrockets at the mounted police; that one of the horses reared back and fell on a curb; that the police officer mounted on the horse was unhurt. DeGive reports that there was a lull in the action at lunchtime; that crowds gathered again near the Bunker Hill Housing Project on Bunker Hill Street around 1:30pm. DeGive reports that bus routes were changed to avoid the crowds; that the buses left Charlestown High School without incident. DeGive reports that there was a confrontation between police officers, the media, and bottle-throwing residents of the Bunker Hill Housing Project around 3:00pm; that a police lieutenant said that it was impossible to arrest those throwing bottles because they hide in the housing project. DeGive reports that the police lieutenant ordered his men away from the housing project because he felt that the police presence only provoked the residents. V: Footage of helmeted police officers crossing Bunker Hill Street and walking toward a police bus parked on Concord Street. White housing project residents yell and jeer at the departing police officers. White kids and teenagers move across the street toward the police officers and media. A station wagon passes by with "NEVER" written on the side window. DeGive reports that kids from the project crossed the street because they were attracted by members of the media; that the police departed the scene, warning the media that they would be unprotected. V: Footage of members of the press photographing the children from the projects; of the police bus departing down Bunker Hill Street. DeGive reports that the crowd grew in size after the departure of the police; that the crowd became hostile toward the media; that the media departed soon after. V: Footage of the crowd jeering at the media. Members of the media retreat up Concord Street. Audio of a man from the media saying, "C'mon, we're getting out of here." The crowd surges toward some members of the media, throwing objects. Members of the media get into their cars and pull away. The crowd throws objects at the departing members of the media. 1:15:13: Baumeister reports that white attendance at Roxbury High School has been extremely low; that 231 of 322 African American students attended school today; that 20 out of 241 whites attended school today; that 62 out of 116 other minorities attended school today. Baumeister introduces a report by Pam Bullard. Bullard reports that she spoke to white and Asian students at a bus stop in the South End; that they were not concerned about attending Roxbury High School. V: Shots of photographs of white and Asian students at a South End bus stop; of two white female freshmen. Bullard reports that two white female freshmen reported having no problems yesterday at Roxbury High School; that they were not pleased when they first heard that they had been assigned to Roxbury High School; that they had no problems yesterday and do not mind their assignment. Bullard reports that 44 Chinese American students attended Roxbury High School today; that a female Asian student said that she was happy at Roxbury High School. V: Shots of photographs of Asian students boarding the bus; of a female Asian student. Shots of photographs of Roxbury High School on Greenville Street; of a sign inside the building reading, "Welcome to Roxbury High. Have a Happy Day..."; of a freshly painted hallway inside the school; of the lunchroom; of a painted murals inside the school. Bullard reports that the busloads of students were met at the school entrance by faculty and staff; that the interior of the school has been recently painted; that the lunchroom and hallways are bright and immaculate; that some walls are decorated with artwork by the students. Bullard reports that Roxbury High School has set up innovative reading, math, and career programs in conjunction with Harvard University; that the school is collaborating with State Street Bank. V: Shots of photographs of Asian students exiting a bus in front of the school; of African American students approaching the school on Greenville Street. Bullard reports that Charles Ray (Headmaster, Roxbury High School) has said that this year's opening was very smooth; that Ray is optimistic about the school year. V: Footage of Bullard interviewing Ray outside of Roxbury High School. Ray says that the students this year are highly motivated; that many want to attend college; that the high school's programs can help the students develop their future plans. Ray says that most of the students are conscientious and sincere. Bullard asks Ray about how to improve the reputation of Roxbury High School. Ray says that he has invited parents to visit the school and experience how it is run; that he hopes the students from from the North End and Charlestown will take advantage of the excellent faculty and programs at Roxbury High School. Footage of Bullard interviewing Caroline Correia (student, Roxbury High School). Correia says that the school year has been good so far; that there is "no trouble" at Roxbury High School; that white students should not stay away because the school is located in an African American community. Correia says that she would like to see more white students at Roxbury High School; that more white students would probably be better for the school. 1:20:00: Baumeister reports that nighttime disturbances related to the busing crisis began the evening before schools opened this year. Baumeister introduces Gary Griffith's report from police headquarters. Griffith reports from the Police Department Information Center on Berkeley Street. Griffith sits at a desk, in front of a flag and a map of Boston. Griffith reports that US Marshals will now be available in the evenings to enforce the court order. Griffith reports that four US Marshals were present at South Boston High School two evenings ago, after a disturbance by South Boston youth. Griffith reports that there were no disturbances in South Boston during the day yesterday. He notes that there were motorcades in Charlestown and South Boston yesterday evening; that two Molotov cocktails were thrown at a school in Charlestown; that two youths were arrested for the possession of 17 Molotov cocktails in Roslindale; that an incendiary device was thrown through the back window of the John F. Kennedy birthplace in Brookline; that graffiti reading "Bus Teddy" was written on the sidewalk in front of the house. V: Shots of photographs of the JFK birthplace in Brookline; of graffiti reading "Bus Teddy," written on the sidewalk in front of the house. Griffith reports that a number of police officers were injured yesterday evening in South Boston; that the officers were punched, kicked, or hit by rocks. Griffith reports that a police officer was struck by a dart; that darts were hurled from a slingshot at police officers in South Boston yesterday evening; that windows at the South Boston District Courthouse were broken yesterday evening. Griffith reports that South Boston was very calm this morning; that only a small crowd was gathered near the high school in the morning; that there was no crowd gathered after school. V: Shots of photographs of Norman Halladay (Boston Police Department) holding a dart; of a broken window at the South Boston District Court. Shots of photographs of police and media in front of South Boston High School as buses pull up; of African American students boarding buses after school. Griffith reports that William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School) reported a minor incident involving two white females and one African American female at the high school today; that Reid says that the atmosphere in the school is less tense than last year. V: Shots of photographs of Reid speaking to reporters; of African American students on the steps of South Boston High School at the end of the school day. Griffith reports Reid's remarks that adult opposition to busing is expressed in the evenings. Griffith reports that the atmosphere in the city changes during the evening hours; that city officials announced this evening that US Marshals would be standing by; that the police have prohibited motorcades. Griffith notes that the Tactical Patrol Force and the Mobile Operations Patrol are on duty tonight; that police presence will now be as heavy in the evening as it is during the day. 1:23:17: Baumeister reports that desegregation has benefitted English High School; that English High School is a city-wide magnet school with the largest fine arts department of any school; that the school is developing a drama department; that the school has a flexible campus program and is developing its partnership with the John Hancock Mutual Insurance Company. Baumeister introduces Judy Stoia's report on the school. V: Footage of buses pulling up outside of English High School; of white students exiting buses; of African American students gathered in the courtyard of the school. Audio of Robert Peterkin (Headmaster, English High School) talking about the racial tension at the school last year. Peterkin says that a white female student was looking for the gymnasium; that she began screaming when an African American male student stopped her in the hall to try to give her directions. Footage of police officers talking to Peterkin outside the school; of African American students walking toward the school. Stoia reports that English High School once had a reputation as one of the toughest schools in the city; that magnet programs are being put into place at the school; that police officers at the school spend their time directing traffic. V: Footage of white students exiting a bus and gathering in the courtyard of the school; of more buses pulling up to the school. Stoia reports that there were 651 African American students, 445 white students and ten students of other minorities in attendance today; that some students are not here voluntarily; that most students want the school year to be peaceful. V: Footage of Stoia interviewing a white female student outside of English High School. The student says that she was assigned to English High School; that she wanted to attend Brighton High School; that the school seems nice, but Brighton High School is closer to her home. Stoia interviews three African American female students. One student says that the atmosphere in the school is peaceful. A second student says that everyone gets along well; that the students will get along fine if their parents stay out of the situation. Stoia interviews Chris Lane (Flexible Campus Coordinator, English High School). Lane says that attendance at English High School has risen since yesterday; that the rise in attendance figures is probably due to the peaceful opening of school yesterday. Lane says that he is optimistic about the school year; that school buses arriving with white students from the outlying neighborhoods were full this morning. Stoia interviews two white male students from Brighton. Both students like English High School. One student likes the multi-story building and the pool. The other student likes his English and math classes. The first student says that there has been no racial tension inside the school. Footage of Peterkin saying that many students were frustrated by the interruptions in schools city-wide last year; that many students at English High School are very serious about their education; that academic requirements at English High School have been strengthened; that students do not have a lot of time to misbehave. Shot of students entering the school. 1:27:14: Baumeister closes the show. End credits roll.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/09/1975
Description: Day 3, year 2 of desegregation. Reporters on set give accounts of day's events in school system. Ed Baumeister opens with press conference in which Metropolitan Distric Commission Police (MDC) Superintendent Lawrence Carpenter and mayoral spokesperson Peter Meade comment on student safety and “minority white” school system. Clip of Robert Donahue of School Department on student suspensions. Reporter Pam Bullard presents statistical figures for racial makeup of schools. Clip of Cardinal Medeiros on white influx to parochial schools. WGBH reporters discuss political significance of majority African American schools. At police command center, officers monitor communications to spot trouble and coordinate efforts of State, MDC, and Boston police forces: George Landry of Boston Police Department comments on the professional rivalry between groups. Reporter Gary Griffith reports on South Boston residents who are less vocal in protest than in year 1. Stills of bandaged Michael Coakley, allegedly beaten by the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF). Claims against brutality of TPF. Reporter Paul deGive discusses Charlestown residents' resentment of media and threatened retaliation against media presence. Stills of peaceful Charlestown marchers filling street. Gloria Conway, editor of Charlestown Patriot comments on the peaceful demonstration. Pam Bullard reports on location about Joseph Lee elementary school in Dorchester (first busing site) exterior and open classrooms. Lee School Principal Frances Kelley talks about school's program. Children line up to board bus; wave goodbye from inside bus as it pulls away.
2:12:09: Ed Baumeister introduces the show. Opening credits. Baumeister gives summary of the day's events: no arrests related to the schools; an orderly demonstration in Charlestown. Visual: Footage of the day's press conference by city officials. Baumeister asks if there are plans to reduce police presence. Lawrence Carpenter (MDC Police Superintendent) replies that he does not know; Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) doubts that there will be a reduction. Baumeister notes the absence of top officials from daily press conference; that present attendance levels in Boston schools indicate that white students are in the minority. V: Footage of Robert Donahue (Boston School Department) reporting on discipline in the schools. Donahue gives information on new student registration for the following day. Baumeister reports that attendance was 52,109 (68,4%). 2:16:01: Pam Bullard reports on the percentages of white and minority children in Boston schools. Bullard reports that under the court-ordered desegregation plan, 60 of 162 Boston schools are projected to be predominantly African American; that 46 of 115 elementary schools are projected to be predominantly African American; that current attendance levels put 61 of 115 elementary schools predominantly African American. Bullard reports that school officials fear that white children will become a minority in Boston schools. V: Footage of Meade talking about desegregation leading to a white minority in other urban school systems. Meade says that one could project a non-white majority in the future based on elementary school enrollments; that racial imbalance in Boston schools is unfortunate. Bullard reports that elementary enrollment is down 18% from previous year; that 73 whites of 306 have attended the Lee School so far; that 85 of 145 whites have attended the Morris School so far; that 86 of 136 whites have attended the Ripley School so far; that 75 of 148 whites have attended the Kilmer School so far. Bullard reports that many white parents enrolled children in private schools to avoid eventual busing; that Catholic schools are serving as a haven for anti-busers despite a pledge to the contrary by Humberto Cardinal Medeiros (Archdiocese of Boston). V: Footage of Medeiros saying that he would examine enrollment numbers at Catholic schools before determining any punishment for those who enrolled to avoid busing. Bullard reports that school officials are uncertain if white students will return. 2:21:49: Baumeister asks Bullard about the significance of a majority non-white school system. Bullard replies that a majority non-white school system may not receive sufficient funds from a white city government; that the city risks losing its white population. Baumeister reports on a rivalry among state, MDC and Boston police forces during the 1974 school year. 2:22:33: Donovan Moore reports on coordination among state, MDC and Boston police forces. Moore reports that school desegregation requires 100 federal marshals, 250 MDC police officers, 350 state troopers and 1,000 Boston police officers. V: Footage of officers sitting in front of radios at communications center in Boston Police Headquarters. George Landry (Boston Police Department) explains how the communications center operates. Officers are shown looking at a map of the city and working the radios. Moore reports that the center can communicate instantly with officers on the streets. Moore lists the different police forces. V: Shots of an MDC officer on horseback; of state police in front of South Boston High School; of Boston police officers walking on the street. Footage of Landry admitting to a spirit of competiveness among the police forces. Landry denies any hostility. 2:25:49: Gary Griffith reports that South Boston remains a stronghold of the anti-busing movement; that South Boston has been relatively quiet since the opening of school three days ago. V: Shots of photographs of Nancy Yotts (South Boston Information Center); of students in front of a high school; of African American students boarding buses. Griffith reports that the SBIC has accused the police department's Tactical Patrol Force (TPF) of police brutality; that the SBIC has produced witnesses including Michael Coakley, who says he was beaten by police. Griffith reports that the SBIC has demanded the withdrawal of the TPF from South Boston; that Warren Zanaboni (South Boston Marshals) says he tries to get South Boston youth off the streets at night. V: Shots of photographs of an SBIC poster in a store window; of Michael Coakley, with bandaged head and arm in a sling. Shot of a photograph of Zanaboni. Griffith reports on small skirmishes between police and South Boston youth during the previous three nights; that the MDC police and the police in South Boston have a good working relationship with the South Boston Marshals; that the TPF does not have a good relationship with the marshals; that four arrests were made by the TPF the previous evening; that South Boston residents say the trouble would subside if the TPF withdrew. 2:28:55: Paul deGive reports that relations between between Charlestown residents, the police and the news media show slight improvement; that rumors circulated in the morning that residents would target the media; that the media tried not to antagonize the residents during the mother's march. V: Shots of photographs of mother's march in Charlestown; of prayer meeting at the St. Francis de Sales church; of camerapeople covering the march; of peaceful street scenes in Charlestown; of police patrolling streets. DeGive reports that the police did not crowd the marchers; that Superintendent Joseph Jordan (Boston Police Department) was calmly watching events develop; that police were quietly patrolling the streets. V: Footage of Gloria Conway (Editor, Charlestown Patriot) interviewed by deGive. Conway says that the police were wise to allow a peaceful demonstration because it allowed residents to vent their frustrations; that the police presence today seemed less aggressive and threatening; that many officers were covering their regular beats. DeGive reports that Conway, Dennis Kearney (State Representative) and community leaders requested that the TPF not be deployed in Charlestown. [ V: Shot of a photograph of Kearney in street. DeGive reports that Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) accused the TPF of creating a military-like atmosphere; that community leaders agree that some police presence is needed; that Kearney is seeking a way to keep Charlestown youth in check. 2:34:16: Baumeister adds that the atmosphere was calm and attendance was low at Charlestown High School. Bullard reports from the Joseph Lee School in Dorchester. Bullard notes that the Boston School Committee's decision to ignore the racial imbalance at the Lee School's opening provoked the lawsuit leading to court-ordered desegregation in Boston; that four years later, the Lee School is still racially imbalanced. V: Shots of photographs of the Lee School; of groups African American kids outside of Franklin Field Housing Project; of school classrooms. Bullard notes that the Lee School is located in an inner city neighborhood; that white students from West Roxbury were to be bused into the Lee School; that 73 whites out of 306 have attended the Lee School so far; that the school is an excellent but underutilized facility. V: Footage of Bullard interviewing Frances Kelley (Principal, Joseph Lee School). Kelley talks about enrichment programs at the Lee School. She says that the school opened with no problems; that white parents may be staying away due to safety concerns; that in the past, parents have been very satisfied with the Lee School. Footage of children exiting school and boarding buses. Bullard notes that children assigned to the Lee this year will stay for subsequent grades; that desegregation has failed so far at the Lee. V: Footage of African American children outside of Lee School; of white children leaving the school on a bus. 2:40:07: Baumeister talks about the evening's late newscast and closes show. Credits roll.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/10/1975
Description: Evening Compass late edition newscast covering day 3 of Phase II desegregation in Boston Schools. Ed Baumeister summarizes events and report on school attendance figures. Pam Bullard reports that attendance figures show white students to be in the minority: Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) comments on racial makeup of the school system; Cardinal Medeiros (Archdiocese of Boston) comments on influx of Boston students to parochial schools to avoid busing. School officials comment on the opening of schools: Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent of Schools) reports a missing bus and problems with buses arriving late; Robert Donahue (Boston School Department) reports on registration for unassigned students; Frances Condon (Boston School Department) reports on kindergarten registration. Bullard interviews Thayer Fremont-Smith (Lawyer, Boston Home and School Association) about the court action to overturn forced busing. Fremont-Smith says that the court-ordered busing plan is too broad and will result in racially imbalanced schools as a result of declining white enrollment. Edwin Diamond (media critic) analyzes Boston Globe coverage of busing crisis with guests Mike McNamee (MIT student) and Robert Healy (Executive Editor, Boston Globe). Healy says that a local newspaper has to deal with the crisis differently than a national newspaper.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/10/1975
Description: Judy Stoia interviews Dennis Kearney (State Representative), Gloria Conway (Editor, Charlestown Patriot) and Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) on the steps of the Bunker Hill Monument. They talk about the anti-busing movement in Charlestown. O'Shea says that the media have portrayed Charlestown as a violent community; that the Charlestown anti-busing movement is working for public safety and rumor control. Conway discusses the damage the media can cause by reporting unverified rumors. Paul deGive interviews Conway on police presence in Charlestown and about violent youth in Charlestown. Conway says that police officers in Charlestown allowed a peaceful demonstration to proceed today; that residents need to vent their frustrations. Conway discusses the ways local and national media interact with the people involved in the busing situation, while they shoot cutaways. Tape 3 of 3
1:00:01: Visual: Judy Stoia interviews Dennis Kearney (State Representative), Gloria Conway (Editor, Charlestown Patriot) and Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) on the steps of the Bunker Hill Monument. 1:00:34: V: Stoia asks about the image of Charlestown as a violent community. O'Shea says that Charlestown's image is created by the media; that he does not condone violence; that anti-busing leaders in Charlestown have worked for public safety and the establishment of a rumor control center. Conway talks about the importance of the rumor control center. 1:03:16: V: Stoia winds up the interview. Two police officers descend steps beside them. The group talks informally. Stoia explains the editing process. Stoia compares anti-busing resistance in South Boston to resistance in Charlestown. The crew takes extra cutaway shots of the group. Conway talks about her work at The Patriot. Shots of area around Bunker Hill Monument. 1:07:39: V: The crew sets up Paul deGive's interview with Conway. DeGive asks about possible removal of TPF from Charlestown. Conway says that some police presence is necessary; that she will not speculate on numbers; that tension in the community has diminished; that the police were effective today because they allowed a peaceful demonstration to proceed; that peaceful demonstrations allow residents to vent their frustration; that many police deployed on Bunker Hill Street today were local officers known to the community; that the MDC Police officers have tried to work with the community. DeGive asks about violent youth gangs. Conway says that it is not unusual for youth to be out in the streets in Charlestown; that she cannot identify the element that needs to be controlled by the police. DeGive rephrases his question about potential violence of Charlestown youth. Conway says that there are a few leaders making trouble, but many kids are caught up in the events. 1:14:33: V: The crew sets up cutaway shots of Conway and deGive. DeGive and Conway talk informally. Conway comments on local and national media coverage of busing. Conway comments on TPF action against female residents of Charlestown. The crew wraps up the shoot.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/10/1975
Description: Judy Stoia interviews Gloria Conway (Editor, Charlestown Patriot), Dennis Kearney (State Representative) and Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) on the steps of the Bunker Hill Monument. They talk about youth violence, racism and the anti-busing movement in Charlestown. Conway says that racist graffiti in the neighborhood represents the actions of only a few people. Kearney recounts seeing a crowd of people, of which a few taunted a bus of African American students, while they others in the crowd were abhorred. Conway says that the Charlestown anti-busing movement is committed to non-violence. Sound cuts out at the very end. Tape 2 of 3.
0:00:55: Visual: Shot of police officers and residents lined up beside an ice cream truck. Judy Stoia sets up an interview with Dennis Kearney (State Representative), Gloria Conway (Editor, Charlestown Patriot) and Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) on the steps of the Bunker Hill Monument. 0:01:10: V: O'Shea and Conway speak about youth violence and gangs in Charlestown. O'Shea talks about younger kids being caught up in the aggression. Stoia asks about racism in Charlestown. Conway says that racist graffiti is the work of a few people and does not represent the community. Kearney says that many residents are disgusted by racial slurs directed at schoolchildren. Conway says that local anti-busing protestors have condemned violence and that marches in Charlestown have been peaceful. 0:04:19: V: Stoia talks about the perception of Charlestown as a violent community. O'Shea responds that violence is a problem in many cities. Audio cuts out.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/10/1975
Description: Evening Compass newscast during the first week of Phase II integration of Boston schools. Ed Baumeister reads school attendance statistics and reports on the stoning of a bus in Jamaica Plain. Pam Bullard reports on resistance to busing among Hyde Park parents. She interviews Hyde Park residents Paul Murphy, Ginny McCarthy, William Wager, Sylvia Connaughton, Pauline Haley, and Eddie Remondi. Remondi invokes the civil disobedience of Martin Luther King as a model for the antibusing movement. Gary Griffith reports on complaints of police brutality by Tactical Patrol Force officers in South Boston, Charlestown and Roxbury. Bill MacDonald, Joseph Rowan, William Johnston, Val Williams, and Kathy Fitzpatrick (all of the Boston Police Department) talk about the TPF and respond to the charges of brutality. Baumeister reports on how busing has affected East Boston. He interviews East Boston residents Rose DiScisio, Mina DeFilippo, Mrs. Jay DiGiangregorio and Evelyn Babin about busing. Judy Stoia interviews Dennis Kearney (State Representative), Gloria Conway (Editor, Charlestown Patriot) and Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) about youth violence in Charlestown. Conway, Kearney and O'Shea complain that the media has exaggerated the violence in Charlestown; that youth violence is a problem across the city. Greg Pilkington reports on his conversation with James Nabrit (attorney for the plaintiffs, Brown v. Board of Education) about busing as a means to achieve school desegregation. Pilkington reports that Nabrit says that busing is a necessary remedy for school desegregation.
19:30:00: Ed Baumeister introduces the Evening Compass broadcast. Opening credits roll. Baumeister reports that today's school attendance was 52,631 out of 76,127; that school attendance has risen each day since school opened; that a bus carrying white students was stoned in Jamaica Plain. Baumeister comments that coverage of the busing crisis has moved from daily statistics to larger issues of resistance and a white minority school population. Baumeister reports that Bob Schwartz (Educational Advisor to the Mayor) fears that a minority white school system in Boston will lead to a decline in the quality of education; that Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) favors a metropolitan desegregation plan. Baumeister reports that Thomas Atkins (President, NAACP) is not worried about a white minority population in the schools. 19:32:22: Pam Bullard reports on resistance to busing in Hyde Park. Bullard reports that over 600 African American students attend Hyde Park High School with 900 white students; that the school has been calm this year; that police are stationed outside of the school; that there was a heavy police presence in the school last year due to trouble between African American and white students; that residents of Hyde Park are still heavily opposed to busing. Visual: Footage of buses pulling up to Hyde Park High School; of white students walking toward the school; of African American and white students entering the school. Footage of Paul Murphy (Hyde Park parent) saying that he will never support busing; that the school appears calm but there is great tension within. Ginny McCarthy (Hyde Park parent) says that there is very strong antibusing sentiment in Hyde Park; that residents are not able to vent their feelings because of the strong police presence. William Wager (Hyde Park parent) says that he resents seeing police officers lining the streets. Sylvia Connaughton (Hyde Park parent) says that the antibusing movement has been silenced; that all forms of antibusing protest have been outlawed; that she will continue to fight the court order nonviolently. Pauline Haley (Hyde Park parent) says that the strong police presence does not allow for any form of protest. McCarthy says that antibusing residents will fight the court order through political means; that the antibusing movement must stay united and visible; that people should fight the court order, not leave the city. Connaughton agrees that the antibusing movement must stay active and visible; that the antibusing movement will not give up and accept busing. Eddie Remondi (Hyde Park parent) says that the antibusing movement must fight the court order through civil disobedience, citing the example of Martin Luther King; that the movement must fight in the courts and in the political arena. Wager says that the antibusing movement must create turmoil throughout the city through marches and lawful demonstrations; that the movement must avoid violence. 19:37:26: Baumeister introduces Gary Griffith's report on complaints lodged against the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF) by residents of Charlestown, South Boston and Roxbury. V: Footage Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) saying that the TPF is a well-disciplined and effective unit with expertise in crowd control. Griffith reports that the TPF are the elite corps of the Boston Police Department; that residents of South Boston and Charlestown have charged the TPF with police brutality. V: Footage of TPF officers gathered at the side of a street in Charlestown. A traveling shot follows one officer to his car. Footage of Joseph Rowan (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department) saying that the TPF reacts to violence directed at them by residents; that there may be isolated cases of brutality; that residents are encouraged to file complaints; that all complaints are investigated. Griffith reports that many TPF officers were previously regular duty police officers; that the TPF includes an emergency services unit, a canine unit, and an anti-crime unit; that TPF officers do not get paid more than regular police officers; that TPF officers may make additional money working overtime. V: Footage of Rowan saying that the TPF officers are carefully selected; that they are trained to work as a group; that TPF officers are stable, hardworking and are not afraid to perform their duties. Griffith reports that TPF officers have been called "drug-crazed animals." V: Footage of William Johnston (Boston Police Department) saying that that TPF officers are not "mean." Val Williams (Boston Police Department) says that the TPF has to deal with difficult situations; that rumors of TPF behavior have been exaggerated. Griffith asks Kathy Fitzpatrick (Boston Police Department) if she is involved in crowd control. She responds that she performs the same job as the men; that residents of South Boston and Charlestown are venting their frustration on the TPF. Griffith reports that TPF officers do not work in the neighborhoods; that they are called into difficult situations in which they must act quickly and forcefully. Baumeister asks Griffith if the TPF cultivates their fierce reputation in the city. Griffith says that the TPF officers like to play up their roles as "the hard guys"; that the TPF officers do not appreciate the rumors that circulate about TPF brutality; that he did not ask the officers about the allegations against TPF in the Rabbit Inn case or other cases. 19:43:16: Baumeister reports that East Boston has been the neighborhood least affected by court-ordered busing; that under Phase II desegregation, the East Boston district remains 95% white, 3% African American and 2% other minority; that the geographical isolation of the neighborhood makes the busing of students difficult; that the district high school will be open to students city-wide next year; that other East Boston schools will be unaffected next year. V: Footage of the entrance of the Callahan Tunnel. Traveling shot from a car driving through the tunnel. Baumeister reports that African American students have been bused into East Boston under Phase II desegregation; that buses are quietly escorted to the schools; that most students bused out of East Boston have chosen to attend city-wide magnet schools. V: Footage of a bus passing through toll booth. Footage of a white male student saying that he chose to attend Boston English High School because of its academic reputation; that he does not mind being bused; that his friends in East Boston tell him not to attend school. A white female student at a bus stop says that people tell her not to go to school. Shots of students boarding a bus in East Boston. Baumeister reports that many residents of East Boston strongly oppose busing. V: Footage of Rose DiScisio (East Boston resident) saying that many in East Boston will not allow their children to be bused; that there will be trouble in East Boston next year if students are bused out. Baumeister reports that DiScisio helps run the East Boston Information Center; that the East Boston Information Center is connected to ROAR (Restore Our Alienated Rights), the city-wide antibusing organization. Baumeister reports on the formation of two organizations formed to counter the antibusing movement in East Boston: EBQE (East Bostonians for Quality Education) and East Boston People Against Racism. V: Footage of Mina DeFilippo (East Boston resident) saying that she sends her children to Martin Luther King School in Dorchester; that her children are happy there; that she is a member of East Boston People Against Racism. Mrs. Jay DiGiangregorio (East Boston resident) says that her child has been sent to the Samuel Adams School in East Boston; that the school is overcrowded and lacks adequate facilities; that a nearby school is not overcrowded; that she will take her child out of the school system before the situation gets worse next year. DeFilippo says that her neighbors have insulted her in the streets for allowing her children to be bused; that she will continue to put her children on the bus. Evelyn Babin (East Boston resident) says that the antibusing movement is not causing trouble; that the other side tries to make the antibusing movement look bad. Baumeister reports that the organizations on both sides of the busing issue have support among East Boston residents; that many residents will wait until next year before getting involved in the busing debate. 19:50:16: Judy Stoia reports that the past two days have been relatively peaceful in Charlestown; that community leaders think reports of violence may have been exaggerated by the media. V: Footage of police officers lined up at an ice cream truck outside of Charlestown High School. Footage of Stoia interviewing Dennis Kearney (State Representative), Gloria Conway (Editor, Charlestown Patriot) and Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) on the steps of the Bunker Hill Monument. O'Shea says that it is normal for adolescents to act up; that the youth violence in Charlestown may not be related to race issues. Conway says that it is easy for kids to get caught up in the action of the moment. O'Shea says that very young children were caught up in an angry crowd on Monday evening; that it is dangerous for children to get caught up in violence. Conway says that racism is present in Charlestown, but not overwhelming; that one racist person can paint most of the graffiti in a neighborhood; that most people are concerned with the safety of their children. Kearney says that the majority of residents are shocked when they hear someone yell racial epithets at a bus of African American schoolchildren. Conway says that she has been active in the antibusing movement; that the antibusing movement has repudiated violence and has conducted peaceful demonstrations. Stoia comments that most people outside of Charlestown see it as a violent community. O'Shea says that violence is a problem in most urban environments; that there is violence in Charlestown, but it is still a good community. 19:55:07: Baumeister reports that the court case which brought desegregation to Boston schools is related to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case; that 17 lawyers worked to bring the Brown case to the US Supreme Court. Greg Pilkington reports that five of the lawyers from the Brown case have died; that four of those lawyers are now judges (Thurgood Marshall, Spotswood Robinson, Constance Baker Motley and Robert Carter). Pilkington reports on a conversation about busing with another one of the lawyers, James Nabrit, who is retired and living in Washington D.C. Pilkington reports that Nabrit said that quality education is not possible in a segregated school system; that Nabrit believes the antibusing movement is not sincere when they claim that the quality of education suffers under busing; that in a segregated system, African American schools will be of lesser quality than white schools; that both whites and African Americans suffer from the adverse effects of segregation; that busing is necessary remedy if it is the only way to desegregate schools. 19:57:36: Baumeister closes the show. He makes a joke about getting reading lessons before the next show to improve his delivery of the news. Credits roll.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/11/1975
Description: Sounds cuts out in beginning. B-roll of police. Gary Griffith interviews Joseph Rowan (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department) about the mission of the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF). Rowan responds to charges of police brutality by TPF in South Boston. Rowan says that the TPF responds to violence directed at them by residents; that complaints of brutality are fully investigated by the department. Griffith interviews three TPF officers: Kathy Fitzpatrick, William Johnston, and Val Williams. They answer questions about the TPF and deny charges of police brutality. Johnston says that the TPF is trying to keep the peace. Williams says that the TPF is called in to deal with difficult situations and that rumors of TPF behavior have been exaggerated. Fitzpatrick says that she performs the same duties as the male officers. Fitzpatrick says that city residents are venting their frustration on the TPF. The image cuts out for a section of the interview, and later cutaway footage shot, with reporter directing camera operator.
1:17:46: Visual: Joseph Rowan (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department) confers with Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) and another man on Austin Street. Main Street in Charlestown is visible behind them. Police radio is audible. They are joined by a third man. 1:19:08: V: Police officers are gathered across the street from Rowan. They confer in small groups. Traveling shot follows one officer as he heads toward his cruiser. 1:19:57: V: Griffith sets up interview with Rowan. Griffith asks Rowan about the TPF (Tactical Patrol Force). Rowan says that the TPF deals with crowd control and riots; that the TPF includes an anti-crime unit, an emergency services unit, a mounted police unit and a canine unit. Griffith asks Rowan to respond to charges of police brutality by the TPF in South Boston. Rowan says that the TPF reacts to violence directed at them by residents; that there may be isolated cases of brutality; that residents are encouraged to file complaints. Griffith asks if a pattern of police brutality is beginning to emerge. Rowan says that the TPF has been successful in stopping unlawful behavior; that lawbreakers make accusations but charges have never been filed; that certain situations are under investigation. V: The shot becomes dark, then is adjusted. Griffith comments that all of the busing-related arrests have been made by the TPF. Rowan says that some district officers have made arrests; that a specific recent arrest did not involve TPF officers shooting at suspects from rooftops. Griffith asks why district police officers cannot perform TPF duties. Rowan says that the TPF are carefully selected; that they are trained to work as a group; that TPF are stable, hard-working officers. 1:25:44: V: Rowan calls some TPF officers over to be interviewed. Rowan comments that the TPF are good officers. Griffith asks the TPF officers why they joined the TPF. William Johnston (Boston Police Patrolman) says that the TPF is involved with the community; that he appreciates the variety of work done by the TPF; that the TPF does not relish dealing with the busing crisis; that his colleagues in the TPF are great to work with. Griffith asks him to respond to complaints from residents of Charlestown and South Boston. Johnston says that the TPF is only trying to keep the peace; that some are using the busing crisis as an excuse to pursue criminal behavior. Griffith asks about pay and work hours for the TPF. Val Williams (Boston Police Patrolman) says that he enjoys working long hours for the TPF; that the pay is somewhat better in the TPF. Griffith asks Kathy Fitzpatrick (Boston Police Patrolman) why a woman would want to join the TPF. She says that she began as a female decoy for the TPF; that she has as much responsibility as the male officers. Griffith tells them that the TPF has been described as "drug-crazed animals". Johnston responds that he is only performing his job; that he has not seen one incident of brutality. Williams says that the reporter should look carefully at the source of the complaints; that TPF officers do not do drugs; that the TPF has done an exemplary job. Griffith asks about special training for the TPF. Johnston responds that they are trained in riot control techniques; that TPF supervisors are excellent; that TPF officers are not "mean." Williams says that the TPF has to deal with difficult situations; that rumors of TPF behavior have been exaggerated. Griffith asks Fitzpatrick if she is involved in crowd control. She responds that she performs the same job as the men; that residents of South Boston and Charlestown are venting their frustration on the TPF. Griffith closes the interview. 1:32:08: V: Johnston says that TPF officers must protect themselves; that anti-busers target the TPF; that the TPF only enforces the law. Griffith asks if the TPF were involved in the "sick-in." Johnston declines to comment. Williams says he was on vacation during the "sick-in." Johnston comments on the ability of the TPF to work as a team. Fitzpatrick says that there are two women on the TPF and about 180 men. 1:33:51: V: Shots of police officers standing on sidewalk beside a cruiser. Civilians pass by. Camera pans to police cruiser. Rowan stands beside cruiser. Shots of officers standing across the street. Shots of neighborhood and Bunker Hill Monument in distance.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/11/1975
Description: Interview with two members of Boston Police Tactical Patrol Force (TPF), explaining their tactics in making arrests, use of force, countering resistance.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/11/1975
Description: Young children entering school. Buses pulls up and children exit buses and walk up stairs into school yard. Exteriors of the William Monroe Trotter School. Young, racially mixed students in Trotter School classroom. Teachers working with an individual student on a math word problem. Close ups on the decorations on the classroom walls.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/11/1975
Description: Press conference at Boston Schools Information Center to sum up week one of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Ed Baumeister introduces the Boston School Report with a summary of the day's events. Ron Brinn (Information Coordinator, Mayor's Office) introduces the participants. Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) comments on a successful opening of schools. Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) gives a report on school suspensions and comments that the atmosphere in the schools is good. William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School) comments on the opening week at South Boston High School. Pat Brady (Detective, Boston Police Department) reads a police report detailing arrests and injuries. Brady reports that there were no major incidents today and that extra police will continue to be deployed. Dr. Louis Perullo (Boston School Department) analyzes school attendance statistics. Perullo compares attendance statistics from the 1975-76 school year to attendance statistics from the 1974-1975 school year. Reporters ask Reid about an altercation at South Boston High School and the effect of community demonstrations on the atmosphere in the schools. Reid says that outside disturbances have a negative effect on the atmosphere inside the schools. Fahey says that she has no control over demonstrations outside of the school. Fahey reports on increased attendance at the city's magnet schools. Reporters ask Fahey and Perullo about school attendance and the possibility of a non-white majority in the Boston school population. Fahey says that she is not yet ready to predict a non-white majority. Robert Murphy (Civil Rights Division, US Justice Department) reports on the activity of federal marshals in Boston and the ongoing federal investigations into violations of the federal court order. Ann Foley (administrative assistant to Fahey) announces a change in operating hours for the Boston Schools Information Center. This tape has audible time code on track 2 and visible time code burned in at the top of the picture.
17:00:00: Visual: Opening credits read Boston School Report. Press conference at Boston Schools Information Center sums up events during week one of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Ed Baumeister gives a summary of the day's events: school attendance dropped to 68.4% from 69.1% on the previous day; six African American students were sent home after a scuffle with white students at South Boston High School; no suspensions at South Boston High School; three peaceful protest marches were held. Reporters at the press conference include Baumeister and Walt Sanders. 17:00:51: V: Ron Brinn (Information Coordinator, Mayor's Office) opens the press conference, reminding all that it is day five of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. He introduces the panel: Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School), Ann Foley (administrative assistant to Fahey), Robert Murphy (Civil Rights Division, US Justice Department), Peter Meade (Mayor's Office). 17:01:52: V: Meade says that the school personnel deserve a lot of credit for their efforts; that students and parents deserve credit for behaving responsibly during the first week of Phase II desegregation. Meade says that the opening of schools was a success; that many doubted it would go as well as it did; that the city's problems are not over. 17:03:08: V: Fahey says that she is pleased with the progress made in the schools; that she would like to thank the staff of the school system; that ten African American males, 16 white males, five African American females and three white females were suspended over the past week. She introduces Dr. Louis Perullo (Boston School Department), who analyzes attendance statistics for the school system. She says that there were no arrests in the schools all week; that the atmosphere in the schools is good. 17:05:13: V: Brinn introduces Reid. Reid says that he prefers not to compare Phase I desegregation to Phase II; that they are more prepared this year; that he would like to see higher attendance figures; that the past week at South Boston High School was adequate. 17:06:38: V: Brinn stalls as he waits for Pat Brady (Detective, Boston Police Department). Brady reads a statement from Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston). The statement reads that there were no major incidents today; that no students were injured in incidents related to school desegregation during the week; that the peaceful opening of schools was due to increased police presence and effective leadership by community leaders; that 112 arrests were made during the week; that 16 police officers were injured; that DiGrazia is pleased with the events of the past week; that extra police will continue to be deployed. 17:09:00: V: Perullo talks about statistics he has compiled. He compares attendance statistics from a Thursday and Friday during the first week of Phase I busing with statistics from a Thursday and Friday during the first week of Phase II. Attendance was down significantly on Friday at all levels during Phase I. Attendance was down slightly on Friday at the high schools and middle schools during Phase II; the elementary schools experienced a slight increase. Perullo says that school attendance usually drops on Fridays. Perullo introduces a table with total attendance by area and level of schooling. He finds that attendance did not change significantly from yesterday to today in any of the areas except high schools; that attendance at Jamaica Plain High School decreased 5.5%; that attendance at Hyde Park High School decreased 6.9%; that attendance at Dorchester High School decreased 5.0%; that attendance at South Boston High School and East Boston High School decreased 4.4% and 5.3% respectively; that attendance at the magnet high schools declined only slightly; that elementary schools in Roslindale saw an increase in attendance of 3.5%. Perullo says that high school attendance increased from 60.3% on Monday to 68% on Thursday; that high school attendance today was down 2.6% from Thursday; that middle schools increased from 60% on Monday to 70.3% on Wednesday; that middle school attendance was down ).7% from Wednesday; that elementary school attendance increased from 58.1% on Monday to 69.8% today. Perullo says that white attendance increased from 56.9% on Monday to 64% on Wednesday; that white attendance was down 1.8% from Wednesday; that African American attendance increased from 62.5% to a high of 75% on Thursday; that today's African American attendance was down 0.6%; that the attendance of other minorities increased from 55% on Monday to 75.9% on Friday. 17:14:52: V: Brinn invites questions from the media. Reporter asks Perullo if he can verify that white students comprise 46% of the school system while African Americans and other minorities comprise 54%. Perullo says he has not yet analyzed those numbers and cannot verify the statistic. Baumeister asks Fahey if she has investigated claims by Frank Power (Headmaster, Charlestown High School), that the projected enrollment numbers are high. Fahey says that she has no answer. Reid says that it is normal to plan for the attendance of every student who might attend, even those whose attendance is doubtful; that students drop out or move away over the summer; that it is difficult to compare actual enrollment to projected enrollment during the first week of school; that actual enrollment is usually less than projected enrollment. 17:17:41: V: A reporter asks Reid about the atmosphere at South Boston High School, as compared to the previous year. Reid says that he does not remember the climate last year; that he has had a good first week of school; that the students were restless today due to a prayer march and rumors of a walkout. A reporter asks Reid about a disturbance resulting in a request for state troopers at South Boston High School today. Reid says that he works closely with Major Gilligan (Massachusetts State Police Department); that Gilligan places troopers where he thinks they will be effective; that decisions concerning the number of troopers are made by him, Gilligan, and the officer in charge of the building; that an altercation at South Boston High School began with an African American student who said he was punched; that three African American students were brought to the office to file reports; that another altercation involving one of these three students occurred after lunch; that he is investigating the situation. 17:20:39: V: A reporter asks Reid if he finds prayer marches and demonstrations outside of the building disruptive. Reid says that any actions taken by the outside community create tension in the school. A reporter reminds Fahey that she had told him that demonstrations outside Charlestown High School had no negative effects on the African American students inside the building. Fahey says that she does not dispute Reid's analysis of the atmosphere in his school; that normal school activity is taking place despite marches in South Boston, Charlestown and Hyde Park; that it is not up to her to restrict parade permits for these marches. A reporter says that Headmaster Power had complained that the number of non-school personnel present at Charlestown High School made it difficult to operate the school. Reid says that he shares Power's concern; that the court order allows 12 community persons to be in the school; that two persons are sufficient to monitor activity and report on the atmosphere. 17:22:54: V: A reporter asks Fahey for observations on the performance of the magnet schools so far. Fahey says that attendance has increased at the magnet schools; that programs in conjunction with area universities will be implemented; that programs are currently under review include a program between English High School and University of Massachusetts as well as an open education program involving the Martin Luther King School and Antioch University. Baumeister asks Murphy if any charges have been filed in cases involving Molotov cocktails. Murphy says that no charges have been filed; that charges may be filed at the end of next week. Baumeister reminds Murphy that the local US attorney has already filed civil charges in one case. Murphy says his office is working together with the local US attorney. Baumeister asks if federal marshals have made any arrests on their own in the past week. Murphy says that they have made no arrests. Baumeister asks if they have been instructed to use restraint. Murphy says that they have been instructed to be professional. 17:24:38: V: A reporter asks Meade if he can share any Police Department intelligence. Meade replies that he does not attend the police intelligence briefings and if he did, he would not share the information. A reporter asks Meade if the mayor will continue to request that two battalions of the National Guard be on call for the city at the expense of $37,000 per day. Meade responds that the decision will be made jointly by the mayor and the governor; that the expense had not been discussed; that a reduction of troops in the public safety plan must be submitted to the court. A reporter asks Fahey if she knows the racial breakdown of the kindergarten population. Fahey says that the school department is making efforts to gather that data. A reporter asks Fahey about the possibility of white students becoming the minority in Boston schools. Fahey says that she is not yet ready to predict a non-white majority; that the school system is engaged in a recruitment program for students of all races; that white attendance has gone up in Roslindale elementary schools; that recruitment is going on in West Roxbury, Jamaica Plain and Brighton; that it is too soon to make predictions. 17:29:26: V: A reporter comments on the fact that white students are staying away from schools in African American communities. Fahey says that this is true; that white parents may be keeping children out until they are sure the schools are safe; that the safety of the schools has been demonstrated over the past week. A reporter asks Fahey how long she thinks parents will wait before sending their children. Fahey says that the decision is up to individual parents. Baumeister asks if Fahey has seen results from the campaign to attract students back to the schools. Fahey says she has not had feedback from teachers; that over the past week teachers have been calling the parents of absentee students; that over the next two weeks teachers will write letters to the parents; that teachers will make personal visits to parents if they get no response from the letters or phone calls. A reporter comments that many classes will be racially imbalanced if white students do not return to schools in the next few weeks. Fahey says that she will refer the matter to the court. A reporter asks if it will be easier for parents to transfer students to a new school if classes are deemed to be racially imbalanced. Fahey reviews the transfer procedure and says that a transfer might be accepted if it does not upset the racial balance in either school. 17:35:01: V: Brinn invites other questions. Brady says that two arrests have been reported since his last report. An African American juvenile male was arrested at the Barton Rogers School for disorderly conduct and an African American juvenile female was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon relating to an incident on September 9th at the temporary Madison Park High School. Brady confirms 112 arrests for the week. Reporter asks if the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF) will be pulled out of South Boston. Brady responds that the TPF is stationed where it is needed. 17:36:46: V: Brinn invites Murphy to make a statement about the past week's events. Murphy says that he is happy that the federal marshals have made no arrests; that few arrests indicate that the situation is not so bad; that the marshals will continue to be stationed at the schools; that his office is investigating a dozen cases; that he does not expect a dozen indictments; that he is working on these cases with the state district attorney's office, the US attorney's office, the FBI, and the Bureau of Tobacco and Firearms. 17:38:28: V: Foley announces a change in operating hours for the Boston Schools Information Center. Foley says that the phone lines will be open until 5:30pm; that the center has received very few calls during the evenings. Fahey thanks the media and mentions that she will no longer attend press conferences on a regular basis; that she will be working hard to improve programs in the schools; that Boston is dealing with the same problems that many urban schools are facing. Fahey excuses herself. Brinn thanks the participants and the media, then closes the press conference. Baumeister gives a summary of the press conference.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/12/1975
Description: Front facade with pilasters of Jeremiah E. Burke High School in Dorchester. Students, mostly African Americans, walk towards school entrance in small groups. Teacher ushers students into school right after the bell rings. Classroom of almost all black students with white teacher.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/15/1975
Description: Mayor Kevin White attends groundbreaking ceremony for 119 units of elderly housing in Roslindale. A priest blesses the grounds. Mayor White addresses the lack of elderly housing in the city of Boston. After ceremony, Mayor White communes with children.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 10/16/1975
Description: Boston Mayor Kevin White speaks at dedication of the Greater Roslindale Health Center.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 10/16/1975
Description: Mayor Kevin White meets with Roslindale precinct workers to inspire them for door-to-door campaigning. White attends dedication of Greater Roslindale Health Center.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 10/16/1975
Description: Many camera moves on Hancock tower. Pan from top of older Hancock building to newer one. Close-up on sheer plane of windows. Glass monolith isolated against sky. At street level, Trinity Church and Copley Square concrete park.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 10/23/1975
Description: 1975 Boston mayoral race debate between current mayor Kevin White and Senator Joseph Timilty, filmed in WEEI studio. Reporter Mike Ludlum introduces White, Timilty, and City Hall reporter Les Woodruff. Ludlum sets ground rules and itinerary for debate. During debate, discussion of Timilty's accusations against White about "arrogance of power;" cronyism; corruption; CETA hiring abuse; Frog Pond; fundraising pressure; tax allocation. Film artifact obscures image intermittently starting at 00:12:16. Reel 1 of 3.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 10/23/1975