Description: Press conference with Ella Fitzgerald after receiving the Hasty Pudding Woman of the Year Award. She answers questions from reporters. Sharon Stevens does several takes of reporter standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/22/1982
Description: Interview with Judith Jamison previously of the Alvin Ailey Dance Company. She talks about her current career on Broadway, and what it feels like not to be part of a company anymore. She gives advice for aspiring dancers. They shoot cutaways. Closeup on award presented to Jamison by the Harvard Foundation. Interview with Dr. Allen Counter of Harvard Foundation on the founding of the Harvard Foundation, which tries to improve on problems of racial discord. He also explains why Jamison was chosen for its first cultural award. They shoot cutaways.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/26/1982
Description: Researchers in a lab at MIT. People in lab coat and goggles at lab tables. Closeups on lab and safety equipment.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/09/1984
Description: Stevie Wonder appears at a Harvard Law School forum at Sanders Theater. Man introduces Wonder. Wonder sings "Let's Join Together As One And Have Some Fun." Wonder talks about the elements required to achieve success and the need for artists, the media, and lawyers to work together to benefit all people. Wonder encourages the law students to do pro bono work for those in need. He says, "Without people, there are no laws, and no laws, no lawyers." Tape 1 of 2.
1:00:00: Visual: Audience members file into Sanders Theatre at Harvard University before a Harvard Law School Forum featuring Stevie Wonder. 1:00:39: V: The audience applauds as Stevie Wonder (pop singer) walks on to the stage. Wonder is guided onto the stage by an African American man and an African American woman. They help Wonder get seated behind a podium, facing the audience. Shot of the audience members applauding. A white male Harvard representative thanks the audience and welcomes Wonder. 1:02:34: V: The African American man who guided Wonder onto the stage stands at the podium to introduce Wonder. He welcomes Wonder on behalf of the university. The man reviews Wonder's career and talks about Wonder's accomplishments. The man talks about Wonder's efforts for political and social change. The man mentions Wonder's efforts to create a holiday in honor of Martin Luther King's birthday. The audience applauds. 1:05:20: V: The man finishes speaking and guides Wonder to his keyboard. The keyboard is set up near the podium, facing the audience. The audience cheers. Wonder makes adjustments to his keyboard. Wonder programs his keyboard to play a drumbeat. Wonder begins to accompany the drumbeat on his keyboard. A crew member adjusts the microphone for Wonder. Wonder begins to sing "Let Us Join Together As One And Have Some Fun." The audience claps in time to the music. Wonder finishes the song and the audience cheers. 1:12:35: V: Wonder talks about the need to bring attention to oneself in order to succeed. Wonder says that students are trying to win the attention of their professors; that job applicants are trying to win the attention of job recruiters; that musicians compete for the attention of their audiences. Wonder says that many individuals are competing for attention in a democratic society; that competition is good. Wonder talks about the need to follow through on initial success. Wonder says that one needs to continue to excel after winning the attention of others. Wonder says that he will not "name names"; that everyone can think of public figures who have not lived up to their initial successes. Wonder says that artists and the media are in the "same family"; that lawyers are part of that family as well; that communication is essential to all three professions. Wonder says that successful individuals in these professions must work for the benefit of all people. Wonder talks about the importance of giving freely to help others. Wonder talks about giving tickets to his concerts to needy children and families. Wonder says that he wants to give those children the opportunity to dream. Wonder tells the Harvard Law School students that they must share their knowledge with the less fortunate; that lawyers must give their services to those in need. Wonder says, "Without people, there'd be no laws, and without laws, there'd be no lawyers." Wonder has a good rapport with the audience.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/19/1984
Description: Stevie Wonder speaks at a Harvard Law School Forum at Sanders Theatre. He answers questions from the audience. Wonder discusses his record label and the ups and downs of his career. Wonder talks about his need to be creative and to make music. Asked about apartheid, Wonder says that he will not perform in South Africa; he says that American citizens should make an effort to not support apartheid. Wonder takes his glasses off and pretends to read a letter given to him from an audience member. The audience cheers.
1:00:06: Visual: Stevie Wonder speaks at a Harvard Law School Forum at Sanders Theatre. Wonder talks about his record label. Wonder says that he is always looking for new talent. Wonder elicits laughs from the audience when he tries to imitate the mannerisms of a slick record producer. 1:01:43: V: Tape cuts out during an audience member's question about the ups and downs of Wonder's career. Wonder answers that his faith has helped him a lot. 1:01:58: V: Wonder talks about his desire to be creative and to make music. He talks about the time period when his song "Uptight" became a hit. Two members of a campus singing group present Wonder with a button from their group. One member of the group asks Wonder about his position on boycotts of apartheid South Africa. Wonder says that he will not perform in South Africa; that he understands the feelings of some musicians who do perform there. Wonder says that American citizens have a responsibility to do what they can to not support apartheid; that American citizens understand the ill effects of racism. An audience member talks about how she gave Wonder a necklace in 1973 when she attended one of his private recording sessions. Another audience member asks permission to go up on stage to present Wonder with a letter she wrote for him. The woman gives Wonder a hug on stage and presents him with the letter. 1:08:05: V: Wonder pretends to take off his glasses and read the letter. The audience cheers. Wonder leaves the stage. The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/19/1984