Description: Bill Murray, Christopher Reeve, Stockard Channing and other celebrities assemble at Sanders Theater for a poetry reading. Interview with Reeve on performing in Boston. William Alfred (Harvard professor) on Anglo-Saxon poetry.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1989
Description: Regina Maris ship. Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg unveils JFK sculpture model. Michael Dukakis and William Bulger pose for picture with the statue. Soviet ambassador Yuri Dubynin give speech at Kennedy Library on nuclear weapons control; Jerome Wiesner, McGeorge Bundy, Ted Sorenson, Edward Kennedy. Christian Science Twitchells story. Steven Pierce on revenue in the State House chambers. Massachusetts National Guard building. Illegal immigrant raid at Suffolk Downs. Justice Department seal. Excerpts from Charles Stark Draper films, including lecture, "Theory of Inertial Guidance" from 1961, "The Airplane at Play" from 1931, with audio from a 1976 lecture, and 1976 dedication ceremony in Technology Square.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/01/1988
Description: Jan von Mehren reports that a small band of Harvard Alumni have announced the candidacy of Archbishop Desmond Tutu (black South African leader) for the Harvard University Board of Overseers. Von Mehren notes that the Board of Overseers is elected by university alumni to make policy recommendations. She adds that Tutu is on a slate of candidates nominated by the Harvard/Radcliffe Alumni Against Apartheid organization. Von Mehren's report includes footage of Alumni Against Apartheid members Robert Wolff, Robert Zevin, and Linda Davidoff addressing a small crowd on the Harvard Campus. Wolff says that the Board of Overseers will have a hard time explaining to Tutu why they have not divested completely from South Africa. Von Mehren notes that Harvard has divested some its holdings in South Africa. She adds that university officials have no comment on Tutu's candidacy or on their divestment policy. Von Mehren's report also features footage of apartheid protesters at Harvard and footage of Tutu in South Africa. This tape includes additional footage of the Alumni Against Apartheid gathering on the Harvard campus.This tape also includes footage of Archbishop Desmond Tutu speaking. Students walking through Harvard Yard.
1:00:16: Visual: Footage of Robert Wolff (Alumni Against Apartheid) standing in front of the office of Derek Bok (President, Harvard University) in Massachusetts Hall on Harvard campus. Robert Zevin (Alumni Against Apartheid) and Linda Davidoff (Alumni Against Apartheid) stand on either side of Wolff. Jan von Mehren reports that a small band of Harvard Alumni gathered outside of Bok's office in Harvard Yard today. Von Mehren reports that the Alumni announced the candidacy of Archbishop Desmond Tutu (black South African leader) for the Harvard University Board of Overseers. V: Footage of Wolff saying that he looks forward to the first meeting of the Board of Overseers with Tutu present. Wolff says that he would like to see Bok explain to the Overseers and Tutu why divestment is not in the best interests of black South Africans. Von Mehren reports that the thirty-member Board of Overseers is elected by the university alumni; that the Board of Overseers makes policy recomendations. V: Shots of Harvard students walking in Harvard Yard. Shot of Tutu at a religious service. Von Mehren reports that Tutu is one of five candidates on a slate nominated by the Harvard/Radcliffe Alumni Against Apartheid organization. Von Mehren reports that Zevin and Davidoff are also running for the Board. V: Footage of Zevin and Davidoff standing in front of Bok's office. Davidoff says that she expected Harvard to be a leader on issues like divestment; that Harvard needs to make its alumni proud again. Shots of apartheid protestors at Harvard University on September 5, 1986. Von Mehren reports that has decreased its investments in South Africa since the 1970s; that $250 million remains invested in companies doing business in South Africa. V: Footage of Davidoff saying that Harvard's divestment policy is "part-way there." Footage of Wolff saying that Archibishop Tutu will win a debate with Bok on divestment. Von Mehren stands in Harvard Yard. Von Mehren reports that university officials have no comment on Harvard's divestment policy or on Tutu's candidacy for the Board of Overseers. V: Footage of Wolff saying that Harvard officials never admit to caving in to outside pressure. Wolff says that Harvard has already divested part of its holdings in response to pressure from alumni, faculty, and students. Von Mehren reports that Tutu and the pro-divestment slate will be running against Elizabeth Dole (US Secretary of Labor), Paul Kirk (former Chairman of the Democratic Party), and others. V: Shots of Tutu; of Dole; of Kirk. Von Mehren reports that the winners will be announced at Harvard's graduation in June. Von Mehren notes that Tutu's election to the Board of Overseers will force Harvard to reevaluate its divestment policy. V: Shots of Harvard students walking in Harvard Yard.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/09/1989
Description: Marcus Jones reports that fifty students at Harvard Law School have occupied the dean's office to demand an increase in minority faculty at the school. The students have presented the school with a list of demands, including the promotion of professor Derrick Bell to the position of dean of the school. Interview with Robert Wilkins of the Harvard Black Law Students Association about the lack of diversity among faculty members and about the students' demands. Interview with Derrick Bell. Students at universities across the nation are protesting racism and a lack of diversity on college campuses. Jones' report includes footage of Harvard Law students in the Dean's office and footage from Frontline of a campus protest against racism.
1:00:17: Visual: Shots of Harvard Law students studying their textbooks as they occupy the Dean's office in the administration building of Harvard Law School. Most of the students are African American. Marcus Jones reports that 50 Harvard Law School students marched into the administration building in the afternoon; that most of the students are African American; that many of the students wore black as a show of solidarity. V: Footage of Robert Wilkins (Harvard Black Law Students Association) saying that the students want the administration to deal with the problem of minority faculty at the school; that the school has no specific goals, programs, or ideas to increase the numbers of minority faculty. Shots of the students studying as they sit in the dean's office. Jones reports that the students presented James Vorenberg (Dean, Harvard Law School) with twelve demands; that one of the demands is for the school to hire at least twenty tenured or tenure-track minority professors over the next four years. Jones notes that other demands include the hiring of an African American female faculty member by fall and the promotion of Derek Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School) to Dean next year. Jones notes that Vorenberg will leave the post of Dean next year. V: Shots of protest signs hanging in the administration building. Some of the signs read, "Why no tenured Asian American?" and "More black faculty now." Shots of signs reading, "Stop racism at HLS now" and "Black female faculty now." Footage of Bell saying that a cross-section of the population should be represented in the student body and the faculty; that diversity enhances quality instead of harming quality. Shots of students studying texts as they occupy the Dean's office. Jones reports that the protests of students twenty years ago forced Harvard to hire minority professors like Bell. Jones adds that today's students are hoping that their protest will force the university to take action. V: Footage of Wilkins saying that there have been demonstrations at universities across the country; that a lack of minority faculty is a common problem. Wilkins says that Harvard should take the lead in dealing with this problem. Footage from Frontline of a campus protest against racism. Jones reports that racism on college campuses is a growing problem; that students are protesting to draw attention to the issue. Jones stands in the administration building with the Harvard students. Jones reports that the tenured faculty of Harvard Law School will meet tomorrow; that no one is sure if the faculty will take a stand on the students' demands. Jones notes that the students say that the occupation will continue in shifts to accomodate those who are taking final exams.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/10/1988
Description: David Boeri reports that a group of Harvard Law students occupied the Dean's office overnight to protest the lack of minority faculty at the school. The students held a rally for their cause this morning. Charles Ogletree, a visiting Ppofessor at Harvard Law School, addresses a rally of students outside of the school. The sit-in is over for now and that student leaders met with James Vorenberg, the Dean of Harvard Law School) to discuss their demands for an increase in minority faculty members. Interview with Robert Wilkins, of the Harvard Black Law Students Association, about the meeting with the Dean. Boeri reads a quote from Vorenberg about the meeting. The students and the administration disagree about some of the students demands. The school faculty will need to vote on the students demands in the fall.
1:00:04: Visual: Shots of Harvard Law students studying their textbooks as they occupy the administration building of Harvard Law School. Most of the students are African American. David Boeri reports that a group of Harvard Law School students occupied the office of the Dean overnight; that the students are demanding that twenty minority professors be hired over the next four years; that an African American female professor be hired by fall. Boeri reports that the students held a rally today outside of Harvard Law School. Boeri notes that the faculty of the school has only two tenured African Americans and five tenured white women. V: Shots of the student rally outside of Harvard Law School; of a protest sign reading, "Black female on Harvard Law School faculty now." Footage of Charles Ogletree (Visiting Professor, Harvard Law School) addressing the students at the rally. Ogletree says that he is proud of the students; that the students have picked up where the civil rights movement left off twenty years ago. Ogletree leads the students in chanting, "Enough is enough." The students applaud for Ogletree. Boeri reports that student leaders met this morning with the Dean of Harvard Law School. V: Footage of Robert Wilkins (Harvard Black Law Students Association) saying that the sit-in is over for now. Wilkins says that the dean has agreed to seven of the student's twelve demands. Shot of a protest sign reading, "Stop H.L.S. Racism now." Shots of the students at the rally. Boeri reports that the students say that the Dean agreed to a fellowship program to train minority students to become law professors; that the students says that the Dean agreed to student participation in a minority search committee. Boeri quotes James Vorenberg (Dean, Harvard Law School) as saying this evening, "I just wouldn't put it that way. . . I don't know where you draw the line between agreeing to look into something and agreeing to do it." V: Vorenberg's quote appears written on-screen. Shot of a student at the rally holding a sign reading, "The fire this time." Shots of the students at the rally. Boeri reports that there is major disagreement between the Dean and the students on five of the students' demands. Boeri quotes a statement from the school administration as saying that the school will give priority to minority hiring but will not guarantee that specific numbers of minorities will be hired in a given time period. V: The quote from the administration's statement is written out in text on-screen. Boeri stands outside of Harvard Law School. Boeri reports that the students' demands will require faculty approval; that student leaders predict that a vote will take place in the fall. Boeri notes that the students are threatening to take action against faculty members who vote against them.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/11/1988
Description: David Boeri reports that five Harvard alumni and other protesters were arrested for an apartheid protest outside the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University in November of 1986. Boeri notes that the protesters are acting as their own lawyers in court this week. Boeri reports that the defendants claim to have committed the lesser crime of civil disobedience in order to prevent the greater crime of economic support to the apartheid regime. Boeri reports that the judge has ruled that the defendants cannot use this line of defense and has refused to hear testimony about apartheid. Boeri notes that the defendants are testing the limits of the judges' ruling by continuing to introduce testimony about apartheid. Footage of the proceedings in the courtroom. Don Carney (Cambridge Police Department) testifies against the defendants. Peter Bellotti (Assistant District Attorney, Middlesex County) objects to testimony by Sarah Browning (defendant) and Joel Reisman (defendant). Wendy Gershengorn (judge, Middlesex County) issues instructions from the bench. Interviews with defendants Peggy Schirmer and Robert Wolff. Boeri notes that the trial will be slow and tedious. Footage from an apartheid protest at the Fogg Art Museum.
1:00:00: Visual: Footage of court proceedings in the Middlesex County Courthouse. Shots of the judge, bailiff and co-defendants in the trial of Harvard alumni and alumnae. David Boeri reports that five Harvard alumni and other protesters were arrested outside of the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University last November; that the protesters were demonstrating against apartheid outside of a fundraising dinner at the museum. Boeri notes that the fundraising dinner had originally been scheduled for September; that apartheid protests forced the dinner to be postponed until November; that arrests were made at the demonstration in November. V: Footage of apartheid protesters sitting in the museum. The protesters are clapping and chanting. Footage of Don Carney (lieutenant, Cambridge Police Department) in court. He testifies that the protesters were told to leave the area; that the protesters were arrested when they failed to comply with the order. Footage of Peter Bellotti (Assistant District Attorney, Middlesex County) saying that no one was arrested for protesting. Shots of the audience in the courtroom; of a man standing before a blackboard in the courtroom. He indicates locations on a map drawn on the blackboard. Boeri reports that the defendants did not contest the testimony of police officers who arrested them; that the defendants want to use their trial to put Harvard on trial. V: Footage of Peggy Schirmer (defendant, Radcliffe Class of 1938) saying that Harvard has almost $300 million invested in companies doing business in South Africa; that Harvard has no plans to divest those stocks. Shots of the defendants conferring in the courtroom. Boeri reports that the defendants claim to have committed lesser crimes to prevent the greater crime of economic support of apartheid; that Judge Wendy Gershengorn (Middlesex County) has ruled that the defendants cannot use the necessity defense. Boeri adds that the defendants are acting as their own lawyers; that the defendants are testing the limits of the judge's ruling. V: Shots of Gershengorn conferring with the defendants who stand in front of her bench. Footage of Bellotti objecting to testimony by Sarah Browning (defendant, Harvard Class of 1984); of the Bellotti objecting to testimony by Schirmer. Gershengorn sustains the Bellotti's objections. Footage of the Bellotti objecting twice to testimony by Joel Reisman (defendant, Harvard Class of 1975). Shots of Gershengorn issuing instructions from the bench. Boeri reports that the defendants were frustrated by Gershengorn's refusal to hear testimony relevant to apartheid. V: Footage of Robert Wolff (defendant, Harvard Class of 1954) saying that they were at the museum to protest apartheid; that the reason for the protest is relevant evidence; that the jury should be allowed to hear that evidence. Boeri reports that the trial will be slow and tedious. Boeri notes that the defendants are trying to use the necessity defense; that the prosecution objects to much of their testimony.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/28/1987
Description: Christy George reports that Jesse Jackson spoke about leadership in a speech at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. George reports that Jackson is very active in this non-election year. George's report includes footage of Jackson walking a picket line with striking Eastern Airline employees and footage of Jackson visiting an Armenian earthquake zone. George talks about Jackson's activities since the 1988 election. George's report also features footage from Jackson's speech at Harvard. Jackson talks about voter cynicism in the 1988 election and the qualities of a good leader. Jackson says that the US must invest in itself in order to flourish. He explains a metaphorical term: "honeybee sense." George's report also includes footage from Jackson's 1988 presidential campaign. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Lee Atwater visits Massachusetts for a Republican Party fundraiser
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) as he enters an auditorium at the John F. Kennedy School of Goverment at Harvard University. The audience applauds for Jackson. Shot of a man in the crowd. Footage of Jackson addressing the audience. Jackson jokes about his speech being televised on C-Span. Jackson waves to his mother. Christy George reports that Jackson talked about the scarcity of good leaders in American politics during his speech at the Kennedy School of Government. V: Footage of Jackson delivering his speech. Jackson says that public cynicism won more voters than Bush did in the 1988 campaign. Jackson notes that 50% of the eligible voters did not vote; that 70% of voters expressed a desire for a different choice. Jackson says that Bush's campaign won while the country lost. Footage of Jackson at a campaign rally in New Hampshire on February 16, 1988. The crowd chants, "Win, Jesse, Win." George notes that Jackson travels the country regularly in non-election years. V: Shots of Jackson doing a television interview; of Jackson picketing with striking Eastern Airline employees. George reports that Jackson has walked with striking Eastern Airline employees across the nation; that Jackson turned a tour of an Armenian earthquake zone into a Soviet-American people's summit. V: Shot of a Soviet news anchor reading the news; of Jackson kissing a baby in Armenia. Footage of Jackson looking out of a window while riding on a bus in Armenia. Jackson speaks to the media, saying that human beings must care for one another. Footage of Jackson at a 1988 campaign rally. George calls Jackson a "perpetual candidate" and a "peripatetic preacher." V: Footage of Jackson speaking at the Kennedy School. Jackson says that he is a "liberal" who fights for change. Jackson says that pollsters and pundits are looking for a manufactured candidate. Jackson says that great leaders do not follow opinion polls; that great leaders mold public opinion. Jackson says that John F. Kennedy (former US President) was not following opinion polls when he reached out to Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader). Jackson says that Kennedy's actions were based on courage and principles. Jackson says that the US needs bold leadership to deal with the nation's "structural crisis." Jackson talks about "honeybee sense." Jackson says that honeybees know to drop pollen when they pick up nectar; that honeybees know the importance of keeping the flowers alive. Jackson says that the US needs to invest in itself in order to stay alive and flourish. The crowd rises to its feet and applauds for Jackson.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/25/1989
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jesse Jackson gave a speech at Sanders Theatre at Harvard University as part of his effort to support the presidential campaign of Michael Dukakis. Jackson attacked George Bush and the Republican Party on issues of race, and defended the term "liberal" from Republican attacks. Additional footage of Jackson and Dukakis at the 1988 Democratic Convention. Independent presidential candidate Lenora Fulani also visited Boston today. Fulani is the African American progressive candidate of the New Alliance Party. Interview with Fulani, who says that progressive voters need to vote against Dukakis. She adds that the Democratic Party needs to differentiate itself from the Republican Party in order to win the votes of progressives. Vaillancourt notes that Fulani is a Jackson supporter. Vaillancourt reports that Fulani will probably not be a threat to Dukakis in the 1988 election. She adds that a future Jackson candidacy could threaten the Democratic Party by attracting disenchanted progressive voters from the Democratic Party.
1:00:14: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) addressing an audience at Sanders Theatre at Harvard University. Jackson talks about the civil rights movement. Shots of the audience. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jackson attacked the Republican Party in his speech at Saunder Theatre today; that Jackson accused the Republicans of misusing the term "liberal" in the presidential campaign. V: Footage of Jackson at Sanders Theatre. Jackson accuses George Bush (Republican US presidential nominee) of attacking civil liberties as "subversive." Jackson riffs on the term "liberal." Shots of the audience applauding for Jackson. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson was campaigning for Michael Dukakis (Democratic US presidential nominee); that Jackson attacked Bush on issues of race. V: Footage of Jackson accusing Bush of buying a property labeled "caucasians only" in Houston. Footage from CNN of Dukakis, Kitty Dukakis (wife of Dukakis), Jackson, Jaqueline Jackson (wife of Jackson), and other Democratic Party leaders on stage at the 1988 Democratic Convention. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson appears frequently with Dukakis; that Jackson defended Dukakis's campaign style in his speech today. V: Footage of Jackson saying that "passion is a new extra-constitutional requirement" for the presidency. Vaillancourt stands outside of Memorial Hall at Harvard University. Vaillancourt reports that Lenora Fulani (Independent candidate for US President) was in Boston today; that Fulani is an African American progressive candidate for the presidency. V: Footage of Fulani being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Fulani says that voters should not vote for Dukakis; that the Democratic Party needs to learn not to take African American and white progressive voters for granted. Vaillancourt reports that Fulani is the candidate of the New Alliance Party. Vaillancourt adds that Fulani describes the New Alliance Party as a progressive party which is mindful of gay and minority voters. V: Footage of Jackson shaking hands with supporters after his speech. Jackson holds up a young white girl. He gives the thumbs-up sign to the crowd. Vaillancourt reports that Fulani is a Jackson supporter; that Fulani is running against Dukakis. V: Footage of Fulani being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Fulani says that progressive voters need to vote according to their own self-interests; she urges progressive voters to vote against Dukakis. Vaillancourt asks if progressive voters should vote for Fulani and risk having a Republican president. Fulani says that the Democratic Party is responsible for the Republican victories of Ronald Reagan (US President) and Richard Nixon (former US President). Fulani says that the Democratic Party needs to differentiate itself from the Republican Party. Fulani says that Dukakis is now paying attention to progressive voters because he is down in the polls. Vaillancourt reports that Fulani will probably not be a threat to Dukakis; that her criticism may signal a future problem for the party. V: Shot of Jackson on stage at the end of his speech. Vaillancourt reports that the Democratic Party would be threatened if a candidate like Jackson decided to run as an independent candidate; that his candidacy would attract disenchanted Democratic voters. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson is still campaigning strongly for Dukakis; that Jackson's campaign efforts make him a force within the Democratic Party.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/24/1988
Description: Harvard University Hasty Pudding Club names Lucille Ball the 1988 Woman of the Year. Harvard University marching band plays "I Love Lucy" theme song as they accompany Lucy along the street. Footage of the actress accepting the award on stage. Reporter Marcus Jones gives a brief retrospective on the 76-year-old actress's rise to fame before "I Love Lucy," and off-screen involvement in radio and Broadway performances. Clips from feature films that Ball had roles in alongside Catherine Hepburn, Ginger Rogers, and Fred Astaire. Still image of Ball with Marx Brothers. Clip of Lucy and husband Ricky (Desi Arnaz) announcing pregnancy. Ball tells Hasty Pudding Club a story about inspiration for a chocolate comedy routine. Closing sequence of slapstick clips from "I Love Lucy."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/19/1988
Description: Callie Crossley reports on three local recipients of the prestigious MacArthur Foundation Fellowships. Crossley notes that mathematician David Mumford, community organizer Muriel Snowden, and MIT professor Eric Lander are three of the thirty-two national winners of the Fellowships. Interview with Mumford about his work in mathematics. Crossley reviews Snowden's community activism. Interview with Snowden about her community work and her future plans. Crossley's interview includes photos of Snowden and footage of Snowden with colleagues. Interview with Lander about his work. mapping the generic patterns of certain hereditary diseases. Crossley's report includes footage of Lander and MIT graduate students in his laboratory.
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of David Mumford (mathematician) solving a problem on a blackboard in a classroom. Callie Crossley reports that Mumford uses mathematics and computers to explain vision. V: Footage of Mumford being interviewed by Crossley in his office. Mumford talks about the complex calculations which underly vision. Mumford says that computers can be used to advance scientific understanding of the role of these calculations. Shot of a print of an abstract design, held of Mumford's lap; of Mumford speaking to Crossley. Crossley reports that Mumford is one of 32 national and 3 local winners of a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship; that recipients s are chosen by an anonymous committee. V: Shot of another print of an abstract design held by Mumford. Footage of Mumford saying that he received the news of the Fellowship on his birthday. Footage of Mumford sitting in front of a computer. He talks about the abstract design which is taking shape on the screen. Shot of the design on screen. Crossley reports that MacArthur Fellows receive a monetary grant over a five-year period; that Mumford won $305,000. V: Footage of Mumford saying that the money from the Fellowship will allow him the flexibility to explore new areas in his work. Footage of Muriel Snowden (community organizer) talking about her work with young people. Snowden sits at a table with a small group. Crossley reports that Snowden has been a community organizer in Boston for 35 years. V: Footage of Snowden saying that she does not like to think of herself as retired; that the money from the MacArthur award will give her a "new beginning." Shots of black and white photos of Muriel and Otto Snowden; of Muriel Snowden with city officials; of Snowden with John F. Kennedy (former US President). Crossley reports that Muriel Snowden founded Freedom House in Roxbury with her husband Otto in 1949; that Snowden has advocated city programs to eradicate racial bias; that Snowden has pushed for greater educational opportunities for minority youth. V: Footage of Snowden saying that her husband and colleagues share much of the credit for her work; that she wants those people to share in the honor of being awarded the MacArthur Fellowship. Shots of Snowden sitting at a table with a small group of people. Crossley reports that Snowden will use her $375,000 award to travel and to write a book about desegregation in Boston. Crossley reports that there was an air of subdued excitement at the Whitehead Institute at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); that Eric Lander (MIT) is the fourth Whitehead Institute employee to win a MacArthur Fellowship. Crossley notes that Lander and his team of MIT graduate students have created a computer program to map the genetic patterns of certain hereditary diseases. V: Shot of the Whitehead Institute; of Eric Lander in his laboratory; of two MIT graduate students who work with Lander. Footage of Lander working in the laboratory. Lander takes fluid from a bottle with a pipette. Crossley notes that Lander is a mathematician and an assistant professor at the Harvard Business School. V: Footage of Lander being interviewed by Crossley. Lander talks about studying families with genetic diseases to track down the causes of these diseases. Lander says that he has strayed from the study of mathematics in recent years. Lander talks about trying to track down and analyze data about genetic diseases. Crossley notes that Lander will put his award of $205,000 in the bank for future use. V: Shot of Lander talking to a graduate student. Crossley notes that MacArthur Fellowships have been called "genius awards." V: Footage of Lander saying that the awards should not be called "genius awards."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/16/1987