Description: Carmen Fields reports on differing opinions of the African American studies program at Harvard University. Interviews with Harvard professors Harvey Mansfield and Orlando Patterson. Mansfield says that conservative scholars are excluded from the African American studies program at Harvard. He adds that the program is too political and not concerned enough with the study of the African American experience. Mansfield calls African American studies an "advocacy major" which promotes a certain point of view. Patterson notes that many academic departments are too political. He adds that history and English departments also often teach history from only one perspective. Patterson says that African American studies offers an inter-disciplinary approach to the study of one area of life. Patterson discusses his concerns over the lack of African American scholars entering academia. Fields's report is accompanied by footage of the Harvard campus and footage of students in a class taught by Derrick Bell at the Harvard Law School.
1:00:05: Carmen Fields reports that Harvey Mansfield (professor, Harvard University) has been a professor of government at Harvard University since 1965; that Orlando Patterson (professor, Harvard University) has been a professor of sociology at Harvard since 1970. Fields says that both men believe that students should learn about the African American experience; that Mansfield is critical of how it has been taught. V: Shots of Mansfield; of Patterson; of Harvard students in a lecture hall. Footage of Mansfield being interviewed by Fields. Mansfield says that teaching on the African American experience has been politicized; that teaching on the African American experience has been forced to be "politically correct." Mansfield says that the Afro-American Department at Harvard is too concerned with questions of power and the status of African Americans at Harvard; that the Afro-American Department is not concerned enough with the black experience in America. Shots of Harvard students in a lecture hall. Fields reports that Mansfield believes that African American Studies departments have lost sight of the richness and diversity of the African American experience. Fields reports that Mansfield believes that "leftists" and "liberals" are encouraged in the departments; that Mansfield believes that African American conservatives are ignored. V: Footage of Mansfield being interviewed by Jones. Mansfield says that African American conservatives are not welcomed by the Afro-American Department at Harvard. Mansfield says that the limited scope of the department has a bad effect on the university. Shot of Harvard Yard through one of the gates. Fields reports that Mansfield believes that African American studies departments turn academics into activism. Fields reports that Mansfield says that African American Studies departments and Women's Studies departments design their majors to promote particular points of view. V: Shot through an iron gate of the window to a classroom. Footage of Mansfield being interviewed. Mansfield says that "advocacy majors" promote certain points of view. Mansfield says that the classes for these majors presuppose a certain viewpoint; that questions are not raised; that professors address a "rally" of like-minded people. Footage of Patterson being interviewed. Patterson says that many history and English departments contain like-minded professors and like-minded students; that many of these departments take a narrow view of their subject. Patterson says that American history was taught in a narrow way until the 1960s and 1970s; that history and English are still taught in a narrow way in some places. Fields reports that Patterson agrees that overly politicized departments are a problem; that Patterson is more worried about a lack of African American scholars. Fields reports that there has been a decline in African American scholars since the late 1960s. V: Shot of Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School) teaching a class at Harvard Law School in December of 1990. Shots of the students in Bell's class. Footage of Patterson being interviewed. Patterson says that he is concerned about the low numbers of African American students entering graduate schools in all areas. Patterson says that the African American culture does not have an "intellectual tradition." Patterson says that African American culture has made major contributions to American life. Fields reports that African American Studies departments may encourage more African American students to pursue higher education in a variety of fields. V: Shots of students on the Harvard campus; of Bell teaching a class; of an African American female student in Bell's class. Footage of Patterson saying that African American Studies offers an inter-disciplinary approach to the study of a particular area of life.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/27/1991
Description: Marcus Jones reports that Alex Haley discussed African American history and his work at a Black History Month event at Harvard University. Haley is in great demand as a speaker during Black History Month. Haley speaks to students and faculty. Interview with Haley, who talks about how he came to write the novel Roots. Haley also discusses the importance of African American history and the importance of Black History Month. Haley believes that Black History Month is important because it draws attention to African American history; he is concerned about a lack of historical awareness among African Americans. Jones's report is accompanied by footage from the television series based on Roots.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Alex Haley (author) walking into a building with two other men. Marcus Jones reports that February is the busiest month of the year for Haley; that February is known as Black History Month. V: Shot of Haley standing up as an a small audience applauds for him. Footage of Haley being interviewed by Jones. Haley says that he will speak at thirty-two different venues during the month of February, 1991. Jones reports that Haley discussed history and his work with students and faculty at Harvard University today; that Haley will speak at Salem State College this evening. V: Shots of Haley speaking to students in a room at Harvard University. Shots of the students. Shot of the cover of Haley's novel, Roots. Jones reports that Haley told the story of his own family in Roots; that Haley is in great demand as a speaker during Black History Month. V: Footage Haley being interviewed by Jones. Haley says that people tend to talk about black history as if it is separate from American history. Haley says that black history is a part of American history; that people who claim to know American history must be familiar with black history. Haley says that American history has many components; that historians of American history must also know Native American history. Jones reports that Haley says that he does not court controversy. Jones reports that Haley is known for documenting the life of Malcolm X (African-American leader); that Malcolm X is a controversial figure. V: Shot of the cover of The Autobiography of Malcolm X. Footage from the TV series, Roots. Jones reports that history is always controversial; that Haley learned the power of history when he traced his family tree back to Africa. Footage of Haley being interviewed by Jones. Jones asks Haley about his motivation for writing Roots. Haley says that he had heard family stories from his grandmother and her sisters; that his initial motivation was curiousity. Haley says that the civil rights movement made him begin to think about Africa and his roots there; that his grandmother had told him stories handed down about Africa. Footage from Roots. Jones reports that all newcomers to the US are aware of their roots; that Haley is concerned about the lack of historical awareness among African Americans. V: Footage of Haley being interviewed by Jones. Haley says that most images of cowboys in the old west are of white cowboys; that more than half of the cowboys in the old west were African American. Haley says that it is important for young African Americans to know that African Americans were also cowboys. Haley says that young African Americans need to know the part played by their people in American history. Haley says that young African Americans cannot grow up thinking that they are the same as white people. Haley says that young African Americans need to be able to identify with other African Americans. Shots of Haley speaking to students at Harvard; of the students. Jones reports that Haley is not a critic of the limited attention given to black history during one month per year. Jones reports that Haley does not see Black History Month as "tokenism." Jones says that Haley sees Black History Month as an opportunity to encourage people to explore their roots. V: Footage of Haley being interviewed by Jones. Haley says that Black History Month is necessary because it sets aside a block of time to concentrate of black history. Haley says that he hopes that successive Black History Months in the coming years will leave a strong imprint on the popular perception of black history. Footage from Roots.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/25/1991
Description: Hope Kelly reports that more than a dozen students at Harvard Law School have filed a lawsuit which charges the school with discriminatory hiring practices. Kelly notes that Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School) supports the lawsuit, but thinks it will be difficult to win. Kelly reports that Bell has taken an unpaid leave of absence from the school to protest the lack of diversity among the faculty. Kelly interviews Bell. Bell talks about the culture at Harvard Law School and about the need for a diverse faculty. Bell says that he has taken a leave of absence because it is important to make sacrifices in order to advance one's beliefs. Kelly reports that Bell is teaching a seminar called "Civil Rights at the Crossroads." She notes that Bell is not paid for the course and that the students receive no credit. Kelly's report includes footage of Bell and his students in class. The students discuss the importance of diversity at the school. Kelly notes that there are three African Americans and five females among the sixty-six tenured professors at Harvard Law School. Kelly reports that the school has failed to provide a set of role models reflecting the diversity of the student body.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School) teaching a class. Hope Kelly reports that Derrick Bell is one of sixty-six tenured professors at Harvard Law School; that only two of Bell's colleagues are also African American. Kelly notes that there are no Asian, Latino or Native American professors at the school; that there are no African American female professors at the school. V: Footage of Bell's class. A white female student says that the school needs a woman of color on the faculty in order to provide a wider perspective on issues of women in international development and on issues of human rights. Shots of students in the class. Kelly reports that more than a dozen Harvard Law School students have signed on to a lawsuit which charges the school with discriminatory hiring practices. Kelly reports that many experts think the lawsuit will be difficult to win. V: Footage of Bell being interviewed by Kelly. Bell says that US courts only understand race discrimination if it is obvious. Bell says that Harvard Law School has not prohibited African American women and other minorities from being hired onto the faculty. Bell says that Harvard Law School will not hire a professor who does not share the Harvard culture. Kelly reports that the culture at Harvard Law School is overwhelmingly white and male.. Kelly notes that only five of the sixty-six tenured professors are women. V: Shots of students in Bell's class; of Bell's hands as he makes gestures while speaking. Footage of Bell being interviewed by Kelly. Bell says that all professors teach a perspective; that all professors have a worldview. Kelly reports that students in Bell's class think that their perspectives are being "whitewashed." V: Shots of students in the class. Footage of an African American male student saying that diversity and quality do not have to be mutually exclusive. Shots of Bell at the front of the class. Kelly reports that Bell's seminar is called "Civil Rights at the Crossroads." Kelly reports that students have flocked to the class. Kelly notes that the students receive no credit for the course; that Bell receives no salary for teaching the course. Kelly reports that Bell is on unpaid leave. Kelly reports that Bell says that he will stay on leave until a woman of color is hired onto the faculty. V: Shots of Bell and the students in class. Footage of Bell being interviewed by Kelly. Bell says that he is a teacher; that teachers teach best by example. Bell says that he has always tried to teach law students about the importance of taking risks and making sacrifices. Bell says that real success stems from standing up for one's beliefs. Bell says that he must practice what he teaches. Kelly reports that Bell is passing up a salary of more than $100,000 per year. Kelly notes that Harvard Law School has continued to provide him with his office, a secretary and a classroom in which to teach. Kelly reports that Harvard Law School has failed to provide a set of role models which reflect the diversity of the student body. V: Shots of students walking on the campus of Harvard Law School. Shots of Bell in the classroom; of an African American female student in Bell's class.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/03/1990
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School) has announced that he will take a voluntary leave of absence from Harvard Law School until an African American female is granted tenure. Vaillancourt notes that Harvard Law School has only five tenured female professors and three tenured African American male professors on staff. She adds that the student body is 25% minority and 40% female. Vaillancourt's report includes footage of Bell speaking at a student demonstration. Bell makes his announcement. Bell adds that it is necessary to make sacrifices to advance one's beliefs. Students applaud Bell. Many students hold protest signs. Three students address the demonstrators. They talk about the lack of minority faculty. Vaillancourt's report also includes footage of Louis Kaplow (Associate Dean, Harvard Law School) speaking at a press conference. Kaplow defends the school's record of minority hiring. Vaillancourt notes that Bell does not know if his act of conscience will have any effect on the school administration. Vaillancourt's report includes footage from May 1988, of Harvard Law School students occupying the dean's office to protest the lack of minority faculty. Following the edited story is additional footage of the demonstration, including law student Barack Obama introducing Derrick Bell.
1:00:09: Visual: Footage of Harvard Law School students at a demonstration outside of Harvard Law School. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Harvard Law School counts fifteen Supreme Court Justices among its alumni; that tenure is granted only to the academic elite. Vaillancourt reports that Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School) is a tenured professor who has announced his departure. V: Shot of a student at the demonstration. Footage of Bell at the demonstration. Bell says that he will remove himself from the Harvard payroll as a "sacrificial financial fast." Bell says that he is not trying to coerce his colleagues; that he is trying to honor a commitment to those responsible for his presence at Harvard. The students applaud. Shots of the media and students at the demonstration. Vaillancourt reports that Bell was the first African American to be granted tenure at Harvard; that he was granted tenure in 1969. Vaillancourt reports that Bell has decided to take a leave of absence until an African American female is granted tenure. V: Footage of Bell saying that students have already enrolled in his classes; that he can ill afford to live for a year without his salary. Bell says that he he has urged students to take risks to further their beliefs; that he must do the same. Shots of students holding a sign reading, "Where are our tenured black women professors?" Shots of students applauding for Bell; of female students holding signs reading, "Come out of the ivory tower" and "No education without representation." Vaillancourt reports that approximately 500 students are supporting Bell's decision; that student are urging alumni to boycott Harvard's current fundraising drive. V: Footage of an African American female student addressing the crowd of demonstrators. She says that Robert Clark (Dean of Harvard Law School) has plans to improve the school by building a new library; that he should instead improve the school by making the faculty more diverse. The students applaud. A white male student holds a sign reading, "reflect reality." Footage of a Latina female student saying that Bell has set an example for all of the students. The student says that she has not role model at the school; that there are no Latino or Latina professors on the faculty. Footage of an African American female student addressing the demonstrators. The student says that people must make sacrifices to advance their cause. Shot of Bell outside of a Harvard Law School building, with chanting demonstrators. Vaillancourt reports that Bell is giving up a salary of more than $100,000 per year. Vaillancourt notes that students have staged sit-ins to protest the lack of minority faculty; that the issue has been contested for nearly twenty years. V: Footage from May, 1988 of a student sit-in at the dean's office in the administration building of Harvard Law School. Students study textbooks as they occupy the office. Vaillancourt stands on the campus of Harvard Law School. Vaillancourt reports that there are 1600 students at Harvard Law School; that nearly 25% are minority students; that nearly 40% are women. Vaillancourt notes that the Harvard Law School faculty has 5 tenured female professors and three tenured African American male professors. V: Footage of Louis Kaplow (Associate Dean, Harvard Law School) speaking at a press conference. Kaplow says that Harvard Law School only hires a few people each year; that some years they do not hire anyone. Kaplow says that positions at Harvard Law School are often permanent; that hiring decisions are made carefully and cautiously. Vaillancourt reports that Kaplow spoke at a press conference after Bell's announcement. Vaillancourt notes that Kaplow does not believe that Harvard Law School will make any significant changes to its hiring practices. V: Shots of student demonstrators in the audience of the press conference. The demonstrators stand together, raising linked arms. Some demonstrators hold protest signs. Footage of Kaplow saying that Harvard's hiring has been fully 50% minority and women over the past eight to ten years; that Harvard's job offers have been fully 50% minority and women over the past eight to ten years. Kaplow says that Harvard is making an effort; that Harvard has kept some positions empty in an effort to locate minority and women candidates. Shots of the students at the press conference. Shots of student demonstrators marching outside a Harvard Law School building. Vaillancourt reports that Bell does not know if his act of conscience will have any effect on the school's hiring record; that Harvard will have only two tenured African American professors if Bell leaves. V: Shots of student demonstrators with linked arms upraised. Footage of Bell addressing the demonstrators. Bell says that he hopes that student persistence will prevail for those minority candidates who deserve to be on the faculty. Bell says that hopes to be able to remain on staff if the students succeed.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/24/1990
Description: David Boeri reports that Jesse Jackson will travel to Iraq to interview Saddam Hussein for the Jesse Jackson Show. Previously, Jackson has met with both the Iraqi ambassador and Prince Turki bin Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia, the brother of King Faad. Prince Aziz considers Jackson's trip to be a diplomatic mission to cool hostilities between Iraq and the United States. Boeri's report includes footage of Prince Aziz and his entourage. Interview with Mustafa Aziz, an advisor to Prince Aziz, who says that Jackson is well regarded in the Middle East. Boeri notes that George Bush does not support Jackson's trip. Jackson traveled to Syria in 1984 to secure the release of US Navy pilot Robert Goodman, Jr.. Footage from a press conference with Goodman and Jackson and footage of Ronald Reagan, who didn't like Jackson's 1984 trip. Many suspect Jackson of using guise of a journalist carry out a diplomatic mission to Iraq. Boeri's report features footage from the Jesse Jackson Show.
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) from the Jesse Jackson Show on October 5, 1989. Jackson talks about his goal of discussing a broad range of ideas and viewpoints on his show. David Boeri reports that Jackson has found controversial ideas to discuss on his show. Boeri reports that Saddam Hussein (leader of Iraq) will be a guest star on Jackson's show; that Jackson's producers hope to be in Baghdad by the weekend. Boeri notes that Jackson's show will be syndicated. V: Shot of Hussein speaking on a telephone; of Hussein exiting a vehicle and being greeted by a few soldiers. Shot of an Iraqi military soldier in a bunker; of Iraqi military soldiers standing at attention. Footage of Jackson in Syria in January of 1984. Jackson sits beside Lieutenant Robert Goodman, Jr. (US Navy pilot) at a press conference. Jackson expresses gratitude for religious leaders and people who prayed and fasted for Goodman's release. Boeri reports that Jackson visited Syria in 1984; that Jackson went on a mission to free a US Navy pilot shot down by the Syrians. V: Footage of Jackson greeting an official in January of 1984. Footage of Goodman at the press conference with Jackson. Goodman says that he is happy to be going home; that Jackson is respected in the Middle East. Boeri reports that George Bush (US President) has not commented publicly on Jackson's trip to Iraq. Boeri reports that Ronald Reagan (former US President) did not appreciate Jackson's efforts in Syria in 1984; that Reagan did not return Jackson's pre-trip phone calls. V: Shot of Reagan speaking at a press conference during his presidency. Boeri reports that permission for Jackson's upcoming trip to Iraq was granted after a meeting with the Iraqi ambassador. Boeri reports that Jackson has been involved in a round of meetings; that Jackson recently traveled to Boston to meet Prince Turki bin Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia (brother of King Faad of Saudi Arabia). V: Shot of Jackson speaking. Footage of Prince Aziz and his entourage entering a luncheon room. Aziz greets US officials and members of the press, including Boeri. Boeri reports that Prince Aziz is fifth in the line of succession to the Saudi throne; that Aziz is a former deputy defense minister; that Aziz has been staying at the Charles Hotel in Cambridge. Boeri notes that Dr. Mustafa Aziz (advisor to Prince Aziz) believes that Jackson's upcoming trip to Iraq may be the last chance for a peaceful solution. V: Footage of Dr. Mustafa Aziz being interviewed by Boeri. Mustafa Aziz says that Jackson is seen in the Middle East as an honest politician and a civil rights champion. Boeri reports that Prince Aziz considers Jackson's trip to be a diplomatic mission instead of a journalistic mission. Boeri notes that Prince Aziz considers violent hostilities to be imminent. V: Footage of Mustafa Aziz being interviewed by Boeri. Mustafa Aziz says that the situation is tense and explosive. Boeri stands in front of the Charles Street Hotel. Boeri reports that the Bush administration told Jackson that they do not want him to go to Iraq; that the Bush administration said that they would not stop Jackson; that the Bush administration wished Jackson good luck. Boeri reports that Jackson's producers see the trip as an opportunity for Jackson to prove himself as a world-class journalist with international connections. Boeri notes that many suspect Jackson of taking cover as a journalist while on diplomatic mission to Baghdad. Boeri reports that Prince Aziz has installed a satellite on the roof of the Charles Hotel; that Prince Aziz will be watching Jackson's broadcast from Baghdad.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/23/1990
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jesse Jackson visited Harvard Law School to join student protests over the school's minority hiring practices. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson supports Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School), who has announced that he will leave his post to protest the school's poor affirmative action record. Derrick Bell is Harvard's first African-American tenured professor. Vaillancourt reports that there are only five tenured female professors and three tenured African American male professors out of sixty-one tenured professors at the school. Vaillancourt's report includes footage of Jackson addressing students at the school. Barack Obama is seen among students in the background. Jackson shakes hands with Bell and condemns the school's affirmative action record. Vaillancourt notes that the school administration has refused Jackson's offer to act as a mediator on the issue. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson accused Harvard Law School of institutional racism and sexism. She adds that Robert Clark (Dean, Harvard Law School) issued a statement defending the school's hiring practices. Vaillancourt's report features footage of Bell at a student demonstration at Harvard Law School in April 1990 and footage of Jackson at a student demonstration. This tape includes additional footage of Jackson addressing demonstrators at Harvard Law School.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) speaking at Harvard Law School. Jackson says that affirmative action is a response to years of denial by law. Shots of the audience listening to Jackson in a lecture hall at the school. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jackson's visit to Harvard Law School attracted national attention to the controversy over the school's minority hiring practices. V: Footage of Jackson addressing the audience. Jackson says that it is an error and an insult to say that there is no African American woman qualified to be a tenured professor at Harvard Law School. Shots of the audience. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson visited the school to support Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School). Vaillancourt notes that Bell was the first African American to be granted tenure at Harvard Law School. Vaillancourt reports that Bell has announced that he will leave his post to protest the school's poor affirmative action record. V: Shot of Jackson and Bell shaking hands in the conference hall. Footage from April 24, 1990 of Bell at a demonstration on the campus of Harvard Law School. Bell addresses student demonstrators. Bell says that he he has urged students to take risks to further their beliefs; that he must now do the same. Shot of demonstrators holding a sign reading, "Where are our tenured black women professors?" Vaillancourt reports that Bell will take a leave of absence until the school adds a woman of color to the faculty. Vaillancourt notes that there are 61 tenured professors at the school; that three of those professors are African American; that the African American professors are all male. Vaillancourt reports that half of the students at Harvard Law School are women; that there are only five tenured female professors; that there are no Latino or Asian law professors at the school. V: Shots of Bell and Jackson entering the lecture hall; of students standing and applauding for Bell and Jackson. Shots of white and African American female students in the audience. Shot of Jackson, Bell and a white woman raising linked arms at the front of the lecture hall. The students applaud. Vaillancourt reports that the school seems ready to accept Bell's departure; that Robert Clark (Dean of Harvard Law School) declined to speak on camera about the school's hiring practices. Vaillancourt reports that Clark issued a statement in which he defended the slow pace of change at Harvard Law School. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson has accused Harvard of institutional racism and sexism. V: Shot of students demonstrators on the Harvard Law School campus on April 24, 1990. Footage of Jackson addressing student demonstrators outside on the campus of Harvard Law School. Student supporters stand behind him. Jackson says that Harvard should negotiate with Bell and the student demonstrators. The demonstrators applaud Jackson. Vaillancourt stands outside of a building on the Harvard Law School campus. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson met briefly with Clark today; that the school has refused Jackson's offer to act as a mediator on the issue of faculty diversity. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson called for a reexamination of race relations in the US during his speech at Harvard Law School. V: Footage of Jackson addressing an audience in a lecture hall at Harvard Law School. Jackson says that most people in the world are not white nor are they males. Jackson says that these people cannot wait for some archaic standard to allow them to be appraised as worthy by white males. Shots of students in the audience. Shot of Jackson entering a room. Jackson shakes hands and embraces Bell. Jackson shakes hands with other Harvard Law School professors and officials. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson has called for a new Kerner Commission; that the Kerner Commission issued a study twenty years ago which concluded that white America and black America were separate and unequal. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson praised Bell for his courage; that Jackson called on Harvard Law School faculty to support Bell. V: Footage of Jackson addressing an audience in the lecture hall. Jackson talks about the sacrifices made by Rosa Parks (civil rights activist) and Martin Luther King (civil rights leader). Jackson says that Bell is taking a principled stand; that Bell is drawing attention to the problem of racism and sexism at Harvard. Shots of Bell at a demonstration on the Harvard Law School campus on April 24, 1990. Shots of Bell addressing a demonstration outside of a building on the Harvard Law School campus today. Jackson stands beside Bell. Student demonstrators stand behind them. The demonstrators raise their linked arms. A demonstrator holds a sign reading, "diversity now." Vaillancourt reports that faculty were scheduled to vote today on a resolution encouraging diversity. Vaillancourt notes that Harvard officials say that a personal matter forced the dean to end the meeting before the resolution came to a vote. Vaillancourt notes that the vote was not rescheduled.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/09/1990
Description: Marcus Jones reports that anti-war activists protested across the nation to rally public opinion against the use of force in the Persian Gulf, including in downtown Boston. Jesse Jackson visited MIT to speak out against going to war in the Middle East on the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. Jones notes that the MIT Initiative for Peace in the Middle East brought Jackson to the campus. Jackson says that the US must not rush to war on January 15. Interviews with MIT graduate students Corrie Lathan and Steve Penn, who oppose the war. Interview with Jesse Jackson, who says that the US and Iraq should negotiate because war is inevitable if talking is impossible. Jones' report includes footage from Inside Edition of Jackson in Iraq. Following the edited story is additional b-roll of anti-war demonstrations and of Jackson at MIT talking about Martin Luther King, Jr.
1:00:36: Visual: Footage of anti-war protesters on Winter Street in downtown Boston. The protesters carry signs protesting the Gulf War. They chant together, "We remember Vietnam. We won't go." Shot of two police officers standing in front of a building. Marcus Jones reports that a group of anti-war protesters demonstrated outside of the Army recruiting headquarters in Boston. V: Shot of a protesters carrying a sign reading, "U.S. Troops out of the Gulf." The protesters chant, "We won't fight for Texaco." Shot of a protester handing out leaflets. Jones reports that anti-war activists took to the streets across the country today; that the protesters are trying to rally public opinion against the use of force in the Persian Gulf. V: Shot of an older white woman wearing a sign around her neck. The sign reads, "Bring our troops home." Shot of two white children standing among the protesters. Jones reports that Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) visited MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) tonight; that the members of the MIT Initiative for Peace in the Middle East brought Jackson to the campus. Jones reports that Jackson spoke out against going to war in the Middle East on the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. (civil rights activist). V: Shots of Jackson greeting an MIT student; of Jackson greeting students as he walks to the podium. Shots of students in the audience. Footage of Jackson addressing the students. Jackson says that the US must not rush to war on January 15. Jackson says that efforts toward peace must be made on King's birthday. Footage of Corrie Lathan (MIT graduate student) being interviewed. Lathan says that she is opposed to the war; that the situation should be resolved in a non-violent manner. Footage of Steve Penn (MIT graduate student) being interviewed by Jones. Penn says that decision-makers in the US understand pressure; that the voice of the people must speak out against the war. Jones reports that Jackson's call for restraint may reflect a change in his thinking. Jones notes that Jackson met with Saddam Hussein (Iraqi leader) last year. Jones reports that Jackson said last year that war would be inevitable if talking proved impossible. V: Footage from Inside Edition of Jackson entering a building in Iraq; of Jackson speaking to Hussein. Jones questions whether Jackson has changed his position. V: Footage of Jackson speaking at MIT. Jones asks Jackson if he has changed his position. Jackson says that he has kept the same position. Jackson says that war is inevitable if talking is impossible. Jackson says that the US and Iraq should "talk"; that the two countries must choose negotiation over confrontation. The audience applauds for Jackson as he walks away from the podium.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/14/1991
Description: Marcus Jones profiles Julian Bond. Jones notes that Bond was a lecturer at Harvard University last fall. Jones interviews Bond about his role in the Eyes on the Prize series and his involvement in the civil rights movement. Bond talks about his beginnings in the civil rights movement and about the 1968 Democratic Convention. Jones notes that Bond was nominated for vice president during that convention. Jones' report includes footage from the 1968 Democratic Convention and footage from Eyes on the Prize. Jones interviews Harvard students Carlos Watson and Natosha Reid about the class they took with Bond at Harvard. Jones' report also features footage of Bond in class with his students. This tape includes additional b-roll footage of Bond in class with his students. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Banks agree to improve access to banking services in low-income neighborhoods Banks improve services to low-income neighborhoods Christopher Lydon interviews Sarah Small Sarah Small
1:00:06: Visual: Footage from the opening credits of Eyes on the Prize II. Footage of Julian Bond (narrator, Eyes on the Prize) talking about the success of the Eyes on the Prize series. Bond says that the first series had a tremendous impact on the viewing public. Bond says that the second series will also have an impact; that he is proud to be associated with the series. Black and white footage from Eyes on the Prize, with narration by Bond. Marcus Jones reports that Bond is the narrator for the six episodes in the first series; that Bond will be the narrator for the eight episodes in the second series. Jones notes that Bond is proud of his social activism. V: Footage of Bond being interviewed by Jones. Bond talks about the accomplishments of the civil rights movement. Footage from Eyes on the Prize with narration by Bond. Jones reports that Bond was a senior at Morehouse College in Atlanta in 1959; that Bond joined the student sit-in movement. V: Footage of Bond being interviewed by Jones. Bond talks about how he became involved in the sit-in movement. Bond says that he has been involved in the civil rights struggle ever since. Black and white footage from Eyes on the Prize of the 1964 Democratic Convention. Jones reports that an African American delegation from Mississippi demanded to be seated in the place of an all-white delegation at the 1964 Democratic Convention. Jones notes that the effort failed; that Bond and other activists challenged the rules of representation at the 1968 Democratic Convention; that Bond was named as a nominee for vice president. V: Color footage from the 1968 Democratic Convention. Footage of Bond being interviewed by Jones. Bond talks about being nominated for vice president at the 1968 Democratic Convention. Bond says that he was nominated in an attempt to seize control of the microphones; that he was only twenty-eight years old. Bond says that the attempt failed; that the reformers were not allowed enough input on the convention floor. Jones reports that Bond lectured on southern politics at Harvard University last fall. V: Shots of Bond with his students at Harvard. Footage of Natosha Reid (freshman, Harvard University) saying that Bond's class has given her perspective on African Americans in politics. Footage of Carlos Watson (junior, Harvard University) saying that Bond's class was one of the best classes of the semester. Shot of Bond in class with his students. Jones reports that Bond intends to do more teaching and television work in the future. V: Footage of Bond being interviewed by Jones. Bond says that great leaders and fiery orators are important. Bond says that ordinary people need to be the leaders of the civil rights movement; that ordinary people can accomplish extraordinary things without depending on a leader.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1990
Description: Profile on the Kennedy family's humor. Examples of Kennedy family dry wit and sense of humor illustrated by quips from Rose, Robert, Edward and John. John Kenneth Galbraith remembers JFK's wit in a speech at a conference as part of the "Profile in Courage" awards at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. Award recipient Charles Weltner shares his favorite JFK story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/29/1991
Description: Carmen Fields reports that Dr. James Williams, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will fast each Wednesday in April outside of the office of the president of MIT. Williams is protesting the lack of diversity among the faculty at MIT. There are fourteen African Americans in a faculty of 900 professors. Interview with Williams, who talks about the role of professors as role models and the need for a diverse faculty. He says that he is trying to encourage minority students to fight for change. Interview with MIT spokesperson Ken Campbell, who talks about the university administration's efforts to hire more minority faculty. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Meg Vaillancourt reports on the annual Black/Jewish Seder supper
0:59:01: Visual: Footage of Dr. James Williams (professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology) being interviewed. Williams says that his mother inspired his current protest actions. Williams talks about his mother as a sensitive and caring person. Carmen Fields reports that Williams will fast and work outside of the office of the president of MIT. V: Shots of the door of the president's office; of Williams working at a table near the door. Footage of Williams being interviewed. Williams says that minority students must act; that minority students must not be discouraged by institutional intransigence. Williams says that minority students must act decisively to effect change. Shot of Williams working at the table outside of the president's office. Fields reports that Williams is an MIT graduate; that Williams is dissatisfied with the lack of African American faculty at the school. Fields notes that there are fourteen African American faculty members in a faculty of 900 professors. V: Shot of a building on the MIT campus. Shot of Williams speaking to a group of students of color. Fields reports that Williams believes that African American students and all students need African American role models. V: Footage of Williams being interviewed. Williams says that he is trying to be a role model for minority students through his protest. Williams says that professors are role models even if they do not want to be. Williams says that professor can choose what kinds of role models to be. Fields reports that MIT believes that Williams has reason to protest. V: Footage of Ken Campbell (MIT spokesperson) being interviewed. Campbell says that the university agrees with Williams; that there are too few minority faculty members. Campbell says that two more African American faculty members have been hired since Dr. Charles Vest (president, MIT) became president of the university. Campbell says that the school needs to make more progress. Fields reports that Williams believes that protest is still necessary. V: Footage of Williams being interviewed. Williams says that people must still act in the face of slow-moving institutions. Williams says that people must not give up in defeat.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/03/1991