Description: African American beachgoers are escorted onto Carson Beach in South Boston by Metropolitan District Commission (MDC) police officers. Officers are posted on the beach, forming a ring around the African American beachgoers. Police officers station themselves at the edge of the water as children play. Police officers line up near the recreation building, observing the action on the beach. Three MDC police boats patrol the water. Three white males are escorted from the beach. White beachgoers stand around, observing the scene.
0:00:26: Visual: Four Metropolitan District Commission (MDC) police officers escort a small group of African American youth on to Carson Beach in South Boston. There are white swimmers and sunbathers on the beach. The Boston skyline is visible in the distance. A group of older white men sit under a shelter near the road. Cars pass by slowly on the road. Groups of white people sit under the shelters or sunbathe on the sand. 0:01:50: V: A larger group of African Americans walk on to the beach, accompanied by police officers. The group of African Americans ranges in age from young kids to adults. The group walks along the beach, heading toward the recreation building. Young African American children play in the water along the shore. Police officers stand casually on the beach as the African American beachgoers get settled . An older white man greets some of the African American youth. White beachgoers are seated near the African American beachgoers. Many whites stare at the African Americans. MDC police officers are lined up near the recreation building, observing the scene on the beach. 0:06:25: V: White residents and beachgoers are standing up, watching the African American beachgoers and the police on the beach. Police officers walk among the crowd. A police officer escorts a white man from the beach. A large line of MDC police officers circles approaches the recreation building to join the other group of officers. Approximately 50 police officers stand in front of the recreation building. Two helmeted police officers escort another white man from the beach. Another group of police officers walks toward the beach. A group of 20 more African Americans are escorted onto the beach by a police officer. 0:09:31: V: An older white man with a walkie talkie walks down the beach toward the crowd. Police officers stand at the edge of the water while African American children play. A few white beachgoers mill about near the police officers. Most white beachgoers sit separately from the African American beachgoers. Other white beachgoers observe the scene from further up the beach. A group of police officers stands in front of the recreation building. A group of five African American adults walk down the beach toward the African American beachgoers. They are followed by a police officer. 0:12:05: V: African American beachgoers are seated in small groups on the beach. A line of police officers forms a ring around them. A group of white beachgoers stands nearby. Shot of a young white boy sitting by himself on the beach. African American children play in the water. MDC police officers stand at the edge of the water. White beachgoers stand near the police officers, watching the African American children. The African American beachgoers enjoy themselves. Police stand by. The media record the scene. White beachgoers stand around in groups. Two MDC Police boats patrol the water. 0:15:33: V: A line of MDC police officers with riot helmets stands in front of the recreation building. MDC police officers observe the action on the beach from the MDC boats in the water. A line of police cordons off the African American beachgoers from the white beachgoers. Members of the media and white bystanders stand near the African American beachgoers. White beachgoers sit and stand apart from the African American beachgoers. Two police officers escort a young white man from the beach. A group of African American beachgoers heads toward the recreation building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/03/1977
Description: Boston Police Department press conference with Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, Captain Morris Allen, and Captain Fred Conley. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) is the moderator. The speakers are seated at a table featuring an array of street weapons used against police in a riot in South Boston on the previous day. Press conference includes police department videotapes of a riot in South Boston on the previous day and of an unruly crowd at a Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC) meeting at English High School. DiGrazia announces that violence and disruptions of public order will no longer be tolerated by police.
0:00:16: Visual: Shot of bottles, baseball bats, pipes, bricks and other weapons lying on table. Some have exhibit tags attached to them. Microphones are also set up on the table for a press conference. Shot of a police map of the city of Boston. 0:03:31: V: Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) and others sit down at the table displaying the weapons. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) introduces the police officials on the panel: Captain Morris Allen, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, DiGrazia, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, Captain Fred Conley. Dunleavy announces that a short videotape will be shown. 0:05:02: V: A videotape plays on a television screen. The videotape shows a large crowd on a city street. Police officers in riot gear are stationed on the street. Dunleavy points out the weapons used by the crowd, and that the crowd has thrown tear gas at the police. The videotape shows a cloud of tear gas in the police ranks. Rioting crowd charges police, throwing bricks and other objects. Dunleavy says that the street on the videotape is East 6th Street in South Boston. V: The videotape shows crowd throwing rocks and other objects. The crowd retreats, still throwing objects, as police advance. Dunleavy announces that the next videotape was shot at English High School last Thursday at a meeting of the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC). V: The videotape shows a noisy crowd seated in an auditorium. Members of the CCC are seated on stage. The crowd chants and claps its hands, disrupting the meeting. Arthur Gartland (CCC) threatens to call in the police to establish order. Shot of members of press watching videotape on the television. 0:14:03: V: Shot of DiGrazia. Dunleavy shows photos of the aftermath of violence yesterday in South Boston, including photo of a police cruiser with rear window missing. He says that the weapons on the table were used against police in South Boston yesterday. DiGrazia says that a demonstration in South Boston turned violent yesterday; that citizens of Boston have a legitimate right to stage demonstrations against busing; that the actions of some are denying the rights of others; that the governor's wife was denied her right to speak at Faneuil Hall; that a US Senator has been harassed and threatened; that a presidential candidate was denied the right to speak out last week; that parents are prevented from holding meetings. DiGrazia says that there is a conspiracy against public order in Boston; that the police will no longer be tolerant of those disrupting the rights of others. DiGrazia says that the police will protect the rights of anti-busers and pro-busers alike; that arrests will be made and violators of the law will be prosecuted. 0:18:44: V: Reporters ask questions to DiGrazia and other police officers. DiGrazia says that a small number of people in the city are using the busing issue as an excuse to pursue vandalism and mayhem. DiGrazia says that the police department took a low visibility approach to busing in 1974; that they acted more forcefully in 1975; that they have been attempting to let people demonstrate against the law; that they will be more forceful from now on. A reporter asks if there is evidence of a conspiracy against the police. DiGrazia replies that the weapons on the table are evidence of a conspiracy; that police were letting the demonstration proceed until they were attacked by the crowd.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/16/1976
Description: Boston Police Department press conference with Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, Captain Morris Allen, and Captain Fred Conley. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) is the moderator. The speakers are seated at a table featuring an array of street weapons used against police in a riot in South Boston on the previous day. DiGrazia says that violence and disruptions of public order will no longer be tolerated. He says that the police department is actively investigating participants in the violence at the previous day's demonstration in South Boston. DiGrazia says that the police are gathering evidence against the South Boston Marshals and others for engaging in violent actions. DiGrazia notes that the demonstrators in South Boston knowingly violated the restrictions of their parade permit. Some drop out in the middle of the video. Reel 2 of 2.
1:00:03: Visual: Press conference with Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston), Captain Morris Allen, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, and Captain Fred Conley. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) is the moderator. DiGrazia and the police officers sit at a table displaying bottles, rocks, pipes and bricks which were used against police in a demonstration in South Boston the day before. DiGrazia takes questions from reporters. A reporter comments that one anti-busing organization has decided to take to the streets. DiGrazia replied that statements like that will be considered conspiratorial and could be used against the organization in court. DiGrazia says that the police will use whatever force is necessary to keep order. DiGrazia says that the police department has been working with the state police and the MDC police since 1974; that the Boston police will continue to rely on those police forces for support. DiGrazia says that he is compiling facts and evidence to be presented before a grand jury; that the police will arrest those who participate in violence or who violate the civil rights of others. DiGrazia says that a parade permit was granted to demonstrators in South Boston yesterday; that the demonstrators knowingly violated the permit when they marched up to the high school to confront police. 1:02:52: V: A reporter asks DiGrazia if the police department has the support of the mayor. DiGrazia says that the mayor supports police efforts to enforce the law and protect the community. DiGrazia says that he is concerned with the lack of prosecutions of those violating the court order; that he was pleased when the US Justice Department began investigating cases in 1975; that he is particularly dismayed at the lack of prosecutions in the South Boston District Court. DiGrazia says that he does not know where the demonstrators in South Boston procured tear gas. DiGrazia says that the police is now taking a more forceful approach against disruptors of public order. A reporter asks if past policies of tolerance were a mistake. DiGrazia says that they began with a low visibility policy in September of 1974; that the policy worked in all areas of the city except South Boston; that in 1975, they changed tactics and were more forceful; that the police have been tolerant of demonstrations up until now; that they will no longer tolerate violence during demonstrations. DiGrazia says that expenses are not an issue when city residents are injured and property is damaged; that the money will be made available to the police to deal with these problems. 1:06:02: V: A reporter asks DiGrazia about how the police handled demonstrators at the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC) meeting. Shot of weapons on table. DiGrazia says that police tried to take their cues from Arthur Gartland (CCC), who ran the meeting; that from now on, police will act when they think it is necessary. DiGrazia says that he has not been in contact with Judge Garrity about the change in police deparment tactics. Dunleavy adds that a list will be made available of the 80 police officers injured in yesterday's demonstration in South Boston; that 13 arrests were made at the demonstration. DiGrazia says that the police department's new policy on demonstrations will not affect the way police handle their duties in and around the schools. DiGrazia says that he will not station more police in South Boston permanently; that he will send more officers there if it is necessary. A reporter comments that demonstrators were using radios to monitor police activity. A reporter asks if police department will change radio frequencies to avoid being monitored. DiGrazia says that police department may explore other means of communications in order to avoid radios altogether. 1:09:24: V: DiGrazia invites the reporters to question the other officers who were all present at the demonstration in South Boston on the previous day. A reporter asks if it is a small group of people who are actively participating in violence. DiGrazia replies that he has seen demonstrations with as few as 150 people; that 1,000 people were present at yesterday's demonstration; that there is a group of 300-400 "hoods" who are leading the violence; that the police department is gathering evidence on the participation of the South Boston Marshals in violent acts. DiGrazia says that the police department is actively investigating actions connected to yesterday's demonstration; that he will not put a time limit on the investigation. DiGrazia thanks the media and leaves. 1:10:41: V: DiGrazia exits. Members of the media talk among themselves. Jordan talks to members of the press informally. 1:12:07: V: Judy Stoia stands next to map of South Boston. Allen refers to the map as he charts out the course of the previous day's demonstration. Allen says that one group of marchers began at the Broadway MBTA station and proceeded up West Broadway to Perkins square; that the other group of marchers began at the Andrews MBTA station and marched up Dorchester Avenue to Perkins Square;that the marchers were supposed to proceed to the Dorchester Heights Monument. Allen says that the marchers chose to march up East Broadway to G Street, heading toward the front of the high school; that there were over 2,000 marchers gathered in Perkins Square. Stoia and crew prepare to leave.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/16/1976
Description: Interview with James Kelly, director of South Boston Information Center, about a demonstration at Carson Beach. He describes it as a visit by armed black militants from Columbia Point. Then he expounds on his strident views on busing and affirmative action. SBIC storefront and sign “Welcome to Boston. The city is occupied. A boycott exists. A tyrant reigns. Law is by decree. People are oppressed. The spirit of freedom still lives.” Kelly on the street, talking to a pedestrian. Kelly sitting at desk in back room answering phone.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/02/1977
Description: South Boston High School exterior. Background comments of pedestrians talking to camera operator and reporter. Pam Bullard interviews headmaster Jerome Wynegar on what programs his school will offer, including core curriculum and vocational education. Wynegar says racial problems have been aggravated by outside agitators. He adds that the school is enrolled to capacity, and cannot accommodate students who wish to return after dropping out. He says that the school should make sure to listen to the suggestions of the students, and those students who dropped out, to try to improve the school. He commends the faculty. Additional comments from Wynegar as they shoot cutaways. Shots of graffiti painted on pavement, which reads “Stop Forced Busing.” Several takes of reporter voice over and standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/17/1976
Description: Commissioner Robert DiGrazia, Boston police and US marshals stationed outside South Boston High. Black students exit school, get on bus. Buses slowly come and go. Many officials mill about on sidewalk. Headmaster Jerome Wynegar talks to Joseph Jordan. Later, white students flow out of school en masse. Comments, some racist, from the crowd waiting outside the school can be overheard.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/14/1976
Description: Exterior South Boston High, first day of school on staggered opening schedule. Police on steps. Tilt up facade. White students walk up to school. Jerome Wynegar out front. Boston Police bus pulls up. Wynegar comments on insufficient buses to bring black students from distant neighborhoods because of contract dispute and the disruption of the staggered opening schedule. Press photographers. Person on the street interview with white mother, Evelyn Gorhan, who waited with daughter for bus that never came. Black mother, Edna Calhoun from Roxbury says she will not send her son to school until buses are available. Calhoun and another black woman, Frankie MacDonald, report rocks and expletives hurled at them. Shots of the children. “Nigers suck” graffiti on brick housing project.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1977
Description: Exteriors of South Boston High School. South Boston environs. Large graffiti in crosswalk “Winegar [sic] we don't want you.” Black students stream off bus, walk toward front entrance. Jerome Wynegar stands by. Plainclothes US marshals with armbands and walkie-talkies. Police keep press photographers behind line.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: South Boston environs. Graffiti written in large white letters on G Street reads, "Go home, Jerome. You failed." (Graffiti refers to South Boston High School Headmaster Jerome Wynegar.) African American and white members of a girls' softball team stand on the steps outside of South Boston High School. A few school officials, police officers and others, including Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs, Morgan v. Hennigan), are gathered on the steps of the school. Police are stationed along G Street as school buses pull up in front of the school. African American students exit the school and board the buses. The softball team boards a bus parked in front of the steps to the school. The buses depart.
0:00:31: Visual: Shots of East 6th Street in South Boston. Boston harbor is visible in the distance. Boston Police Department trucks are parked on G Street in front of South Boston High School. Graffiti in large white letters on the pavement of G Street reads, "Go home Jerome. You failed." (Graffiti refers to South Boston High School Headmaster Jerome Wynegar.) Police are gathered in groups along G Street. 0:02:28: V: A police cruiser with flashing lights leads two yellow school buses up East 6th Street. The buses head toward the high school, directed by a police officer. African American and white members of a girls softball team are gathered on the steps of the high school. Police officers, other students and school officials are also on the steps. Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs, Morgan v. Hennigan) stands on the steps, talking to an African American woman and two African American men. 0:04:01: V: A bus is parked in front of the steps of the high school. The softball players board the bus. A group of African American students exit the school and walk toward the school buses parked in front of the school. Two police officers seated on their motorcycles observe the scene. African American students continue to board the buses. A few white students are gathered on the steps of the high school. Police officers direct the school buses in front of the school to depart. The buses travel down G Street, followed by a police motorcycle. Members of the media record the departure of the buses. The bus carrying the softball team departs. The girls wave goodbye. 0:07:01: V: Two police officers confer in the school yard of the high school. Massachusetts State Police officers board a Massachusetts State Police bus in the school yard.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/12/1977
Description: State and Boston police and US marshals outside South Boston High School. Black students get off buses. Headmaster Jerome Wynegar. Girls in parochial school uniforms walk by. More black students get off buses, walk up to school. Police on motorcycles escort empty buses away from school. Mass of white students wait at iron fence. TV cameramen and news photographers stand by. Girl wearing Southie sweatshirt. White students are allowed to enter school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/13/1976