Description: Press conference at City Hall. Boston Mayor Kevin White and Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia read prepared statements about the following day's school opening in the third year of court-ordered busing. White expresses confidence in a peaceful opening of schools. DiGrazia says that police have been instructed to use minimum force, but to act decisively against any disruptions of public order. Both men hope that police can be removed from schools as soon as possible. White notes that the atmosphere seems calmer this year than during the previous two years. White says that he would like to remove police from the schools as soon as possible because their presence hinders the development of a healthy learning environment. Reporters question them on the school opening. Shots of Pam Bullard listening to the press conference.
2:09:33: Visual: Members of the press are assembled for a press conference at City Hall with Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) and Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston). White begins reading a statement, then stops because there is a problem with sound. 2:11:53: V: White reads a prepared statement. He says that school opens tomorrow; that fewer students face assignments to new schools this year; that more students are attending the schools of their choice; that many schools are benefitting from programs linked with universities and businesses; that three new schools are opening; that he is confident that the school year will be productive. White says that the city is prepared to guarantee the safety of all schoolchildren; that he hopes to reduce the police presence at the schools this year; that police will restore order if disruptions occur. White urges citizens to share in the responsibility for a peaceful school opening; that the city will focus on improving schools this year. 2:14:32: V: DiGrazia reads a prepared statement. He expresses confidence in a peaceful school opening. He reports that police have received instructions to allow peaceful demonstrations, but to maintain public order; that police officers have been instructed to use minimum force and to treat those arrested with respect and courtesy. DiGrazia says that police will not tolerate any acts of violence or disruption; that these acts are often committed by only a few citizens. 2:15:56: V: White invites questions from the reporters. A reporter asks DiGrazia what kind of preparations have been made for additional police support. DiGrazia says that Massachusetts State Police will be assigned to South Boston; that MDC Police will be assigned to Charlestown; that US Marshals will be present for the opening of schools. DiGrazia says that the atmosphere on the streets seems calm; that a few citizens are engaging in disruptive behavior; that the atmosphere seems calmer than in the previous two years; that police presence will be less visible than last year; that additional police will stand by for support. DiGrazia says that the police have not received any indication that there will be outside agitators at the schools. DiGrazia says that he hopes there will be little overtime for police officers this year. DiGrazia says that uniformed State Police officers will be assigned to South Boston High School; that community service officers and juvenile officers will be assigned to monitor the other schools. 2:18:52: V: A reporter asks about cooperative efforts between the School Department, the city of Boston, and the Police Department. White says that the three entities have been working together on school desegregaton for three years; that differences about the school budget have not affected efforts to achieve a successful school opening. DiGrazia says that police will continue to enforce ordinances forbidding the assembly of more than three people along a bus route, or assemblies within 100 yards of schools. Shot of Pam Bullard. White says that he would like to remove police from schools as soon as possible; that police presence hinders a healthy learning atmospheres; that police can be removed if citizens refrain from disrupting the schools. A reporter asks DiGrazia to clarify the term "minimum force" in police conduct. DiGrazia says that he hopes police can dissuade citizens from engaging in disruptive behavior; that he would like to see the police removed from the schools as soon as possible. DiGrazia refuses to elaborate on minimum tolerance policy guidelines, but says that warnings will be given to disruptors before action is taken. DiGrazia says that the school department instituted the use of metal detectors at the schools; that they will be used again this year. DiGrazia refuses to give out information on the number of police officers assigned to the schools
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1976
Description: Charles Ray, the Headmaster of Roxbury High School, talking to students, parents and faculty members in the offices of Roxbury High School. Pam Bullard interviews Ray in the administrative offices of the school. Ray talks about how the school has changed since the beginning of school desegregation in 1974. He notes that white attendance is still low, but that it is improving. Ray describes the school's bilingual program, and the academic programs set up at the school in conjunction with Harvard University. He says that many students from Roxbury High School received college scholarships last year, and discusses their college opportunities. Ray talks about the atmosphere at the school, and the close relationships between the students and the faculty. He notes that very few students transfer out of the school. He adds that most students feel comfortable at Roxbury High School. Ray says that he tries to learn the names of every student in the school. Ray talks about the challenges of urban education. He says that he encourages pregnant students to remain in school as long as possible. Ray says that he would like to see a program set up to allow students to bring their children to school with them. Ray describes the school's building and facilities. Ray tells Bullard that it is important to treat each student with respect.
1:00:05: Visual: Charles Ray (Headmaster, Roxbury High School) speaks to an African American female student in the office of Roxbury High School. He tells the student what she needs to do in order to change school assignments. 1:01:37: V: Pam Bullard sets up an interview with Ray. Ray talks about some of the photographs in the school office. He notes that the photos were taken by students from the school. Ray talks to a student who has entered the office. The student asks Ray about the television crew in the school office. Bullard notes that the Boston Public Schools are beginning their fifth year of desegregation. Bullard asks Ray how things have changed in five years. Ray notes that Roxbury High School was paired with South Boston High School during the first year of desegregation. Ray notes that only a small percentage of students from South Boston attended Roxbury High School during the first year of school desegregation. Ray says that Roxbury High School was placed in the same district as Charlestown High School during the second year of school desegregation; that Roxbury High School has remained in that district. Bullard asks Ray about white attendance at Roxbury High School. Ray says that the school has more white students now than it had during the first year of school desegregation. He notes that sixty-three white students have been assigned to the school this year; that twenty-five white students are in attendance. Ray says that he would like the Boston School Department to assign more white students to the school. Ray says that Roxbury High School has a bilingual program for Asian and Spanish-speaking students. Bullard asks Ray about Roxbury High School's programs in conjuction with Harvard University. Ray explains that Roxbury High School has been paired with Harvard University by the federal court order governing school desegregation in Boston. Ray talks about a tutoring program in which Harvard students tutor Roxbury High School students. Ray talks about the Harvard Upward Bound Program. He adds that Harvard and Roxbury High School have set up programs for students in advanced math and sciences, reading, and art. Ray explains that teachers and advanced students can take courses at Harvard University. 1:06:46: V: Bullard notes that students who attend Roxbury High School tend to stay at the school and do not transfer out. Ray agrees that not many students transfer out of the school. He adds that most students like the school and the faculty. Bullard asks Ray if many students from Roxbury High School attend college. Ray says that 74 students graduated from Roxbury High School in 1978; that 37 of those students went on to college. He adds that many of the students received scholarships last year. Ray adds that the Girls High Alumni Association has contributed to a scholarship fund for the students. Ray notes that many Roxbury High School students have done well in their college careers. Bullard asks why Roxbury High School has been a successful school. Ray says that the teachers get to know the students and their families very well. Ray notes that the faculty know most of the students by name; that the students feel comfortable at the school. Ray adds that these close relationships are the key to the school's success. Bullard asks Ray if he knows the name of every student at the school. Ray says that he is learning the names of all of the incoming freshmen; that he makes an effort to talk to the students in the hallways. Ray adds that he knows the names of all of the returning students. Bullard notes that all of the students like Ray and speak highly of him. Ray talks about the importance of knowing the name of each student. He adds that the students know that the teachers and other faculty members care about them. 1:11:43: V: Bullard asks how urban education has changed in the past decade. Ray says that programs for special needs students have changed; that pregnant students now stay in school. Ray says that he encourages pregnant students to stay in school for as long as they can. He says that he encourages them to return to school as soon as possible. Ray adds that he would like to start a program that would allow students to bring their children to school with them. He says that it might be difficult for Roxbury High School to meet the safety requirements for such a program. Bullard asks Ray if he would have chosen to be assigned to Roxbury High School. Ray says that he likes Roxbury High School. He adds that the school is structurally sound and has good facilities; that he likes the layout of the building. Ray says that the faculty at the school have a good relationship with the community and with the parents. Ray adds that he likes the atmosphere at small high schools. He says that each student gets personal attention at Roxbury High School. Bullard asks Ray what he has learned over the course of his career. Ray says that he has learned the importance of treating each student with respect. He says that the students treat him respectfully in return. Bullard closes the interview. 1:16:38: V: Ray stands behind the counter of the office at Roxbury High School. He answers questions from a student about her school schedule. Ray confers with a teacher about two problem students. Ray tells the teacher that he will speak to the students. Ray talks to two more students about their school schedules. Ray confers with another teacher in the office.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/13/1978
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on controversy over a new student assignment plan for the Boston Public Schools, which minority members of the Boston School Committee spoke out against at a breakfast commemorating the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.. School Committee members John O'Bryant, Juanita Wade, Jean McGuire, and Gerald Anderson speak to the media. They do not believe that the plan will provide equitable education for all. The plan was proposed by mayor Ray Flynn. It will allow parents to choose which schools their children will attend. Interview with Flynn, who defends the proposal, saying that it's supported by parents. He adds that School Committee members have been asked for input on the plan. Vaillancourt also reports that Flynn has proposed the decentralization of the Boston School Department and selling off the headquarters of the Boston School Department. Vaillancourt reports that minority members of the School Committee may rescind their support for superintendent Laval Wilson if he supports Flynn's school choice proposal. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Elma Lewis in Marsh Chapel at Boston University on Martin Luther King Day and Carmen Fields interviews Robert Nemiroff about the playwright Lorraine Hansberry
1:00:26: Visual: Footage of city and state leaders including Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), Bernard Cardinal Law (Archidiocese of Boston), and Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) singing together at celebration in honor of the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader). Meg Vaillancourt reports that local leaders gathered over breakfast today to celebrate Martin Luther King's birthday. Vaillancourt notes that there was controversy at the breakfast over a new assignment plan for students in Boston Public Schools. V: Footage of Juanita Wade (Boston School Committee) speaking to the media. School Committee members John O'Bryant and Jean McGuire sit beside Wade. Wade calls the new plan "segregation redux." Wade says that the Boston Public Schools need to provide choice, equity, and a quality education right now. Footage of Flynn speaking to the media. Flynn says that the plan has the support of the citizens of Boston; that parents are looking for this kind of reform. Vaillancourt reports that the new plan would allow parents to choose which schools their children will attend; that parents have not been able to choose schools since school desegregation began in 1974. V: Shots of buses pulling up to the front of South Boston High School in 1974; of South Boston residents jeering at the buses. Shots of buses parked in front of South Boston High School; of African American students walking among the buses. Vaillancourt notes that the population of white students in Boston Public Schools has declined since 1974; that non-white students make up 70% of the student population in Boston Public Schools. Vaillancourt adds that the School System has been criticized for not providing students with a quality education. V: Shots of non-white students in a classroom; of an African American male student sitting in a classroom. Shot of Flynn. Vaillancourt reports that Flynn and two consultants have proposed a plan to improve the schools and to increase parental choice. V: Footage of School Committee members O'Bryant, Wade, McGuire, and Gerald Anderson sitting on a couch. African American community leaders, including Charles Yancey (Boston City Council), Eugene Rivers (African Peoples Pentecostal Church) and Louis Elisa (Boston chapter of the NAACP), stand behind them. Anderson addresses the media. Anderson says that the Boston School System needs to provide a quality education to all before it can claim to be equitable. Anderson says that the mayor needs to provide more funding to the schools. Shots of O'Bryant and other community leaders. Footage of Flynn being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks Flynn if he is surprised by the attitude of the African American community leaders. Flynn says that he has been working on the proposal for several months; that community leaders have had many opportunities to review and give input on the proposal. Footage of Anderson saying that he is offended by Flynn's attitude. Anderson notes that Flynn has said that the statements of the African American leaders are "bogus." Anderson says that the community leaders are standing up for their constituents; that Flynn's statements are "bogus." Footage of Flynn saying that the members of the School Committee have had input on the proposal; that the members of the School Committee voted twelve-to-one in favor of the plan. Flynn says that the School Committee members were told that they would have further opportunities to give input on the proposal. Footage of McGuire saying that Flynn's proposal will cost more money. McGuire says that the School Committee has not been given additional money to fund Flynn's proposal. Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Public School System spends more money per student than any other public school system in the nation. V: Shot of an African American teacher and student at the front of a classroom; of a white male student seated in a classroom; of an African American female student seated in a classroom. Vaillancourt notes that Flynn has come up with another controversial proposal to fund neighborhood schools; that Flynn has suggested the decentralization of the Boston School Department. Vaillancourt adds that the proposal would sell off the downtown headquarters of the Boston School Department on Court Street. V: Shots of the exterior of the Boston School Department headquarters. Footage of Flynn saying that the downtown headquarters of the School Department should be sold; that the money should be put into neighborhood schools. Footage of O'Bryant saying that the School System is going to end up back in court if it does not receive support from the city. Vaillancourt reports that Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) has supported Flynn's school choice plan; that Wilson's contract ends in June. V: Shots of a meeting in the chambers of the Boston School Committee; of Wilson speaking at a School Committee meeting. Vaillancourt reports that the African American members have voted to extend Wilson's contract in the past. Vaillancourt notes that Wilson's future support among the Committee's African American members may depend on his position on Flynn's school choice plan.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/16/1989
Description: Outside South Boston High School. Buses arrive. Mostly black students exit school and board buses. Police cruisers and motorcycles stationed in front of school. Interview with headmaster Jerome Wynegar who says despite some trouble and a severe lack of students, classes will go on, and faculty will try to keep up morale. He says “…kids come here to learn, believe it or not.” Several takes of reporter standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/18/1979
Description: Exterior South Boston High, first day of school on staggered opening schedule. Police on steps. Tilt up facade. White students walk up to school. Jerome Wynegar out front. Boston Police bus pulls up. Wynegar comments on insufficient buses to bring black students from distant neighborhoods because of contract dispute and the disruption of the staggered opening schedule. Press photographers. Person on the street interview with white mother, Evelyn Gorhan, who waited with daughter for bus that never came. Black mother, Edna Calhoun from Roxbury says she will not send her son to school until buses are available. Calhoun and another black woman, Frankie MacDonald, report rocks and expletives hurled at them. Shots of the children. “Nigers suck” graffiti on brick housing project.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1977
Description: Buses pull up to Roxbury High School. The buses are not full. Asian students exit the buses and enter the school. African American and Asian students approach the high school on foot. Shots of housing in the surrounding area. Exteriors of Joseph Lee Elementary school, which school children walking towards school. Buses pull up to the Lee Elementary School. White and African American students exit buses and enter the school. African American students and parents approach the school on foot. Racially integrated classes line up in the recess yard and enter the Lee School. The students wave at the camera as they enter the school.
1:00:16: Visual: A nearly empty bus pulls up to Roxbury High School. Asian students exit the bus and enter the school. African American students approach the school on foot. Shots of Greenville Street, in front of Roxbury High School. A second bus pulls up to the school. More Asian students exit the bus and enter the school. Shot of plaque above entrance, reading "Roxbury High School." Two police officers are stationed in front of the school. Asian and African American students approach the school on foot. 1:07:20: V: A small school bus is parked in front of the Joseph Lee Elementary School. Young students of various races exit the bus. African American students and parents approach the school entrance. African American and white students exit another small school bus and approach the school entrance. Two of the white boys are identical twins. An African American boy asks the camera crew questions. He walks in front of the camera in order to be on television. More African American students and parents approach the school. Closeup shots of young African American students who have approached the camera crew. 1:12:57: V: A school bus pulls up in front of the school. Mostly white and a few African American students exit the bus and are greeted by an African American teacher. The students enter the school. Another school bus pulls up. The same African American teacher greets more African American and white students as they exit the bus. The students enter the school. 1:17:10: V: African American and white students line up for class in the recess yard. A young white female student stands alone, looking lost. The racially integrated classes enter the school building. Many students address the crew or wave at the camera as they pass by.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/09/1976
Description: Police officers and US Marshals are present outside of Charlestown High School on the first day of school during the third year of court-ordered busing in Boston. The media is gathered across the street from the school, at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. Robert DiGrazia (Boston Police Commissioner) confers with police and surveys the scene outside of the school. A group of buses with a police motorcycle escort pulls up to the school. African American students exit the buses and enter the school. A crowd of white youth gathers near the school. Dennis Kearney (State Representative) and Robert Murphy (Headmaster, Charlestown High School) talk to the crowd of youths. DiGrazia and Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) confer near the crowd
0:00:05: Visual: Members of the media pass two police officers as they enter the enclosure surrounding the Bunker Hill Monument in Monument Square. Shot of three US Marshals walking toward Charlestown High School. An MDC Police officer exits a police vehicle parked near the high school. Shot of the exterior of Charlestown High School. A few police officers stand in front of the high school. Two US Marshals confer near the high school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: Commissioner Robert DiGrazia, Boston police and US marshals stationed outside South Boston High. Black students exit school, get on bus. Buses slowly come and go. Many officials mill about on sidewalk. Headmaster Jerome Wynegar talks to Joseph Jordan. Later, white students flow out of school en masse. Comments, some racist, from the crowd waiting outside the school can be overheard.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/14/1976
Description: African American and white students exit from separate buses and join other students entering West Roxbury High School. US Marshals stand in front of the school. Robert Donahue (District Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) greets students as they enter the school. More buses drop off students at the school. Robert DiGrazia confers with officials and enters the school. A white teacher affectionately greets some African American students as they arrive at school. Administrators use two-way radio to communicate with approaching buses. Donald Burgess (headmaster, West Roxbury High School) talks to students about bus schedules as they approach the school from the parking lot.
0:10:07: Visual: Robert Donahue (District Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) greets African American students as they exit a yellow school bus. A police officer stands near the bus as the students exit. White students exit a second bus pulled up behind the first bus. White and African American students from the separate buses walk toward the entrance of West Roxbury High School. Groups of white students gather in the courtyard. Three more buses pull up to the school. White students exit the first bus. African American students exit the second and third buses. Students walk toward the entrance of the school. A group of white male students is gathered to the side of the walkway. Donahue breaks up the group and they walk easily toward the school. Three US Marshals stand on the sidewalk in front of the school. Donahue greets the US Marshals. White students continue to stream into the school, walking past the US Marshals. Donahue talks and gestures good-naturedly with a white male student on crutches. Another school bus pulls up. African American students exit the bus and walk toward the school. Groups of African American and white students enter the school. 0:08:03: V: Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) speaks with officials gathered to the side of the walkway leading to the school. DiGrazia enters the school. White students are gathered outside of the school on the walkway. Donald Burgess (headmaster, West Roxbury High School) moves among the students with a walkie-talkie. Burgess encourages the students to enter the school. Students finish their cigarettes and make their way into the school. Members of the media film the inside of the school through a classroom window. 0:09:40: V: Another bus pulls up to the school. African American students exit the bus and walk toward the school. A teacher and a police officer supervise the students as they exit the bus. School officials and the police officer confer outside of the school. Donahue speaks into a walkie-talkie. A white teacher greets African American students affectionately as they exit the bus. He pats them on the shoulders and shakes their hands. A group of white female students walk up the steps from the school parking lot. They are followed by a group of white male students. Burgess speaks to the students as they walk up the steps. Donahue and Burgess confer about logistics. A large group of white and African American students make their way across the parking lot toward the school. Burgess speaks to some of the students about bus schedules as they approach the school. 0:16:50: V: US Marshals continue to stand in front of the school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/13/1976
Description: No audio at the beginning. Horse-mounted police officers, police cars, police bus. Police officers are gathered along G Street outside of South Boston High School. Exteriors of the school building. School buses, accompanied by a police motorcycle escort, pull up outside of the school. African American and white students exit the school. White students walk away from the school. African American students board the buses. The buses depart. Pam Bullard interviews four South Boston High School teachers: Jerry Power, Bob Healey, Bob Donovan, and Paul Grueter. The four teachers says that conditions in the school are improving, despite negative reports in the media. Donovan says that Judge Arthury Garrity (federal judge) is among those receiving inaccurate reports about the school. They discuss some of the good things that they think are happening in South Boston High despite the racial tensions.
1:00:04: Boston Police Department vehicles are lined up along the side of the road in South Boston. A mounted police officer exercises his horse. A horse stands in a yard with grass. 1:02:21: Visual: Boston Police Department vehicles are parked in the schoolyard of South Boston High School. Police are gathered along G Street in front of the high school. Shot of the exterior of South Boston High School. A Massachusetts State Police vehicle is parked in the schoolyard. A Boston Police station wagon is parked on G Street. 1:04:55: V: Buses pull up in front of South Boston High School. The buses are accompanied by a police motorcycle escort. White students exit the high school, walking out of the schoolyard. African American students exit the high school and walk toward the buses. A young African American male student raises a clenched fist and looks at the camera. Some white students continue to exit the school, along with African American students. Two African American female students pose for the camera and say, "Hi, mom." A few of the African American students wave at the camera as they walk to the buses. Police officers stand casually on the sidewalk in front of the buses. A white student walks by the camera crew and says, "We don't watch Channel 2 news." 1:10:13: V: A group of four police officers are gathered on G Street. They laugh casually at a joke. A female African American student rushes toward her bus. Police officers mount their motorcycles. The buses pull away from the school and travel down G Street with the police escort. 1:11:57: V: Shot of the exterior of South Boston High School. Pam Bullard exits the high school, followed by four white teachers. She sets up an interview in front of the school with Jerry Power (teacher, South Boston High School), Bob Healey (teacher, South Boston High School), Bob Donovan (teacher, South Boston High School), and Paul Grueter (teacher, South Boston High School). Donovan makes it clear to Bullard that each teacher is speaking as an individual; that they are not speaking for the faculty of the school. Bullard asks each of them to say and speak their names for the camera. Bullard tells them that negative reports have been circulating about the situation inside South Boston High School. Donovan asks where the negative reports are from. Bullard says that they are from the media. Donovan says that the situation is slowly getting better after a hectic beginning of the school year. Grueter agrees that the situation is improving. Healey says that sweep teams have been established in the corridors in order to get students to class; that the school corridors had been a problem until now. Donovan says that the school faculty took some drastic measures to control the situation inside the school. Power says that the atmosphere in the school has swung between periods of tension and periods of calm; that there has been a decrease in the number of suspensions and separations of students from the school. Bullard says that many school officials and teachers outside of South Boston High School are calling the school "a lost cause." Donovan says that the faculty and staff at South Boston High School are committed to educating the students and keeping the school open. Healey says that many people are not aware of the good programs at South Boston High School. He mentions the automotive shop, business courses, and computer courses. Power says that he was quoted in a Boston Herald article that was critical of the school. He says that his quote was taken out of context. He had meant to say that not all of the students are taking full advantage of the programs offered to them; that there are both white and African American students at the school who are not interested in getting an education. Donovan says that the faculty is not ashamed of their school; that Judge Arthur Garrity (federal judge) is among those receiving inaccurate information about the situation at South Boston High School; that Garrity received a letter from the CCC which contained inaccurate information about the school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/01/1976