Description: Marcus Jones reports on the ordination of Reverend Barbara Harris as Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts, which has been the focus of international attention and controversy. Press conference held by Harris and David Johnson. Harris says that she will seek understanding with opponents of her ordination. Interviews with James Solheim of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts and Greer Gordon of the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston. Solheim talks about about opposition to Harris's nomination and his support of her nomination. Gordon talks about the reasons for the Roman Catholic Church's opposition to the ordination of women.
1:00:01: Visual: Footage of Reverend Barbara Harris (Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts) at a press conference. Bishop David Johnson (Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts) sits next to her. Harris says that she is pleased that the consent process is nearing completion. Shots of the media at the press conference. Marcus Jones reports that it has taken four months for Harris to convince Episcopal Church leaders of her qualifications to be Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts. V: Footage of Johnson saying that some Episcopal leaders are afraid of women taking over the Episcopal Church. Johnson says that he disagrees with those leaders; that it is important to share the ministry. Footage of Harris saying that her ordination as bishop presents theological and emotional problems for some. Harris talks about the need to seek understanding and reconciliation with opponents of her ordination. Jones reports that the ordination of women into the priesthood has long been controversial among Christian religions. Jones reports that Harris's ordination has been the focus of international attention. V: Footage of the Reverend James Solheim (Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts) saying that Harris' election has polarized the Episcopal Church. Solheim says that Harris' election to bishop is a first in the history of the Church. Solheim says that some religions leaders do not believe that a woman should stand in apostolic succession. Footage of Greer Gordon (Catholic Archdiocese of Boston) saying that there is no evidence of women having been admitted into the realm of the apostles. Gordon talks about the principle of apostolic succession. Gordon says that the apostles are seen as a direct line from Jesus. Shot of Pope John Paul II. Jones reports that the Episcopal Church was born out of a separation from Roman Catholicism; that the Roman Catholic Church still bans the ordination of women. V: Footage of Gordon being interviewed by Jones. Gordon talks about and quotes from the Scriptures. Gordon talks about the beginnings of the Roman Catholic Church as represented in the Scriptures. Footage of Solheim saying that the Scriptures should not be read "legalistically." Solheim says that there are many laws in the Scriptures which are not followed today. Jones reports that Harris will be installed as bishop on February 11, 1989. Jones notes that it will be a time of celebration for some; that it will be a time of soul-searching for others.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/25/1989
Description: Marcus Jones reports on the Ninth Annual Black-Jewish Seder held in Roxbury. Jones reports that the audience at the Seder honored civil rights workers Andrew Goodman, James Chaney, and Michael Schwerner. Jones notes that the three civil rights workers were murdered in Mississippi during the civil rights movement. Jones notes that family members were present at the Seder to talk about the men on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the murders. Jones' report includes footage from the Seder supper. Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) talks about the sacrifices made by the three men. Family members Ben Chaney, Carolyn Goodman and Cassie Schwerner talk about the three men. Ben Chaney announces a freedom ride from Mississippi to New York planned for the summer. Chaney, Carolyn Goodman and Cassie Schwerner talk about the need to continue the struggle for civil rights. Jones reviews the events leading up to the murder of the three men. Jones' report also features clips from Eyes on the Prize and Mississippi Burning. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Christy George reports that the Boston School Committee held an executive session to make a decision on the renewal of the contract of Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools)
1:00:17: Visual: Footage from a trailer for the 1988 film, Mississippi Burning. Shots of official FBI posters with head shots of three missing men. Marcus Jones reports that the film Mississippi Burning is based on the murders of civil rights workers Andrew Goodman, James Chaney, and Michael Schwerner in Mississippi during the civil rights movement. V: Shot of a newspaper article with a headline reading, "Three men reported missing in Mississippi rights campaign." Jones reports that African Americans and Jews gathered in Roxbury last night to honor the three men and their family members. V: Shot of a flyer for the Ninth Annual Black-Jewish Seder. Footage of Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) speaking at the Ninth Annual Black-Jewish Seder. Stith talks about the sacrifice made by Goodman, Chaney, and Schwerner. Shots of audience members, including Leonard Zakim (Director, Anti-Defamation League of B'Nai B'rith) Jones reports that the twenty-fifth anniversary of the murders will be marked in June. Jones notes that relatives of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner are traveling across the country to enlist people in a major demonstration planned for the summer. V: Shots of black and white photos of the three men which are displayed at the Seder gathering. Footage of Ben Chaney (brother of James Chaney) saying that racism and anti-semitism are not a regional problem. Chaney says that a group of demonstrators will depart from Mississippi on June 21; that the demonstrators will travel to New York. Chaney says that the demonstrators want to send a message about the national importance of civil rights. The audience stands to applaud Ben Chaney. Jones reports that Ben Chaney was eleven years old in 1964; that Ben Chaney began to work with James Chaney and Michael Schwerner to register African Americans in Mississippi to vote in 1964. V: Shots of black and white photos of James Chaney and Michael Schwermer. Black and white footage of a white man approaching the home of an African American man; of a body being put onto a stretcher. Footage of Ben Chaney saying that he used to attend demonstrations with James Chaney and Schwermer; that Chaney and Schwermer would bail him out of jail when he got arrested. Ben Chaney says that he did not believe that any of the demonstrators would die as a result of their actions until his brother was found dead. Footage from Eyes on the Prize of the Chaney family at the burial of James Chaney. Black and white footage of Mr. and Mrs. Goodman (parents of Andrew Goodman) speaking to the media in 1964. Mr. Goodman says that he is proud of his son's commitment and the commitment of Chaney and Schwarmer. Shots of an audience listening to Goodman. Jones reports that the anniversary of the murders brings back disturbing memories for Dr. Carolyn Goodman (mother of Andrew Goodman). V: Footage of Goodman at the Seder gathering. Goodman says that there are civil rights issues which still need to be addressed. Footage of Goodman being interviewed by Jones. Goodman says that the families of the victims wish to perpetuate the work performed by the three men. Goodman says that young people need to be made aware of the events of the civil rights era. Footage of Cassie Schwermer (niece of Michael Schwermer) at the Seder gathering. Schwermer says that the murders of the three men were meant to discourage northern volunteers from participating in the Mississippi Freedom Summer. Jones reports that Cassie Schwermer never knew her uncle; that she has come to understand his beliefs. Jones reports that Cassie Schwermer is a social activist. V: Shot of a black and white photo of Michael Schwerner. Shot of a newspaper article with a headline reading, "Three in rights drive reported missing." Footage of Schwermer being interviewed by Jones. Schwermer says that she would like to see a renewed commitment to activism by young people today. Black and white footage of Fannie Chaney (mother of James Chaney) speaking in 1964. Fannie Chaney says that the three men died to help African Americans achieve equal rights. Footage of the Chaney family at the funeral of James Chaney. Footage of Carolyn Goodman saying that the work of civil rights activists is never finished. Goodman says that there will always be threats to our freedoms. Black and white shot from 1964 of James Chaney's coffin.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/11/1989
Description: Christy George reports from Atlanta on African American residents' views of the Democratic presidential ticket and the Democratic National Convention. George notes that Michael Dukakis needs to show African American voters that he wants their support. Interviews with employees and customers at the Auburn Rib Shack. The interviewees support Jesse Jackson and hope that Jackson will be named as Dukakis's running mate. George notes that both Dukakis and Lloyd Bentsen have good records on civil rights and that Jackson's supporters may be waiting for Jackson to throw his support behind Dukakis. Interviews with African Americans in Atlanta about Jackson and Dukakis. Many interviewees are skeptical about Dukakis. George's report also features footage of Jackson speaking to an audience and footage of Dukakis addressing the Democratic National Convention.
1:00:21: Visual: Footage of James Wyatt (Atlanta resident) driving his cab in Atlanta. Wyatt talks about how life has changed in Atlanta since the civil rights movement. Christy George reports that Wyatt is 84 years old; that he has been driving a cab for 52 years. V: Footage of Wyatt talking about how is mother used to work in the cafeteria of a white school. Wyatt says that she would bring the leftovers home to him. Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American leader) addressing an audience. Jackson talks about how his mother could not prepare a Thanksgiving meal for his family. Jackson say that his mother was busy serving another family's meal. Footage of Wyatt saying that he would have liked to have seen Jackson as the Democratic nominee or as the running mate of Michael Dukakis (Democratic nominee for US President). Christy George stands in front of the Auburn Rib Shack in Atlanta. George reports that Dukakis needs to ask African American voters what they want. V: Footage of an African American female working behind a counter in a restaurant. The woman says that some voters may vote for the Republican ticket if they are disappointed in the Democratic ticket. Footage of an African American male saying that many voters will be upset if Jackson is left off of the Democratic ticket. Shot of an African American man working in the kitchen of the Auburn Rib Shack. George reports that workers and customers at the Auburn Rib Shack are hoping that Jackson will named to the Democratic ticket. V: Footage of an African American man saying that many African Americans registered to vote in order to vote for Jackson. Footage of Dukakis speaking from a podium at the Democratic National Convention. Jackson and Lloyd Bentsen (US Senator) stand on each side of Dukakis. Dukakis says that he wants Jackson and his supporters to play a major role in the presidential campaign. George reports that Dukakis and Bentsen both have good civil rights records. George notes that African American voters may be waiting for Jackson to throw his support behind Dukakis. V: Footage of an African American woman in the driver's seat of a car. The woman says that Jackson deserves a chance. Footage of an African American woman saying that it is time for a change; that the US is ready for an African American candidate. Footage of two women wearing T-shirts which read, "Jesse Walk Out." The women say that Dukakis should go back to Massachusetts. Footage of Wyatt talking about Dukakis. Wyatt says that he has not heard much about Dukakis; that the Democratic Party needs a good leader. Shot of Wyatt's cab turning a corner.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/18/1988
Description: Christy George reports from the Democratic National Convention in Atlanta. George reports that Atlanta is the heart of the new South; she adds that the region is becoming more diverse, and has been energized by an influx of industry and culture. George reports that the Mississippi Delegation to the Democratic National Convention is said to lead the region on issues of race relations. George notes that the Mississippi delegates are representative of the new South. Interviews with Mississippi delegates Jesse Banks, Ed Cole, Isaiah Frederides, Sherry Fisher, Deborah Dunn and Joe Gaitlin. Each delegate expresses pride in the political process and talks about the changes in the state of Mississippi. George reviews the struggle by African Americans for inclusion in the Democratic Party. George discusses the history of African Americans at the Democratic National Convention from 1948 to 1968. George's report includes footage of civil rights protesters in the 1960s and footage of the Democratic National Convention in the 1960s. George's report is also accompanied by footage of Jesse Jackson at the 1988 Democratic National Convention. George notes that Jackson has led a new group of people into the Democratic Party.
1:00:16: Visual: Black and white footage from Eyes on the Prize of Fannie Lou Hamer (Mississippi Freedom Delegation) at the Democratic National Convention in 1964. Black and white footage from "Eyes on the Prize" of African Americans exiting a bus; of white political officials. Shots of a uniformed man taking American flags from the hands of African American demonstrators; of African American demonstrators marching with American flags. Shots of a Democratic National Convention from the 1960s. Christy George reports that African Americans have been fighting for inclusion in the Democratic Party since 1948; that white delegates from Mississippi and Alabama walked out of the convention in 1948 to protest a civil rights plank in the party platform. George notes that the Mississippi Freedom Delegation was seated at the Democratic National Convention in 1968. V: Footage of Jessie Banks (resident of Tchula, Mississippi) talking about the seating of the Mississippi Freedom Delegation at the 1968 convention. George reports that Banks is now a Mississippi delegate to the Democratic National Convention; that the Mississippi delegation is said to lead the South on the issue of race relations. V: Shot of the Mississippi delegation on the floor of the 1988 Democratic National Convention. Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) addressing the convention on July 19, 1988. Jackson announces that Ed Cole (Mississippi delegate) is the leader of the Mississippi delegation; that Cole is African American. Shots of Jackson exiting a building. He waves to voters. A bus awaits Jackson. A banner on the bus reads, "Rainbow voter registration campaign." Jackson stands in the entrance to the bus, waving to supporters. George reports that Jackson has a led a new group of people into the Democratic Party. V: Footage of State Representative Isaiah Frederides (resident of Gulfport, Mississippi) says that his mother was a domestic servant; that his mother was fired from her job when he tried to register to vote; that his father-in-law's job was threatened. Frederides says that he and his wife were the first two African Americans to register to vote in his county. Footage of Sherry Fisher (resident of Vicksburg, Mississippi) saying that she is attending a convention for the first time; that she wants to be a part of the US democracy. She says that it feels good to be a part of the changes in Mississippi and the US. Shot of delegates on the floor of the 1988 convention. George says that the "new South" is focused on sharing power between those of common backgrounds. V: Footage of Deborah Dunn (resident of Bruce, Mississippi) being interviewed by George. Dunn says that she is a white woman who has picked cotton and worked hard for what she has. Dun says that all southerners are proud of what they have achieved. Footage of Jackson addressing the 1988 Democratic National Convention. Jackson calls Atlanta the "crucible of the new South." V: Shots of the Atlanta skyline; of construction workers working on a new building in Atlanta. George reports that Atlanta is becoming a major urban center. V: Footage from WNEV-TV of an Atlanta Hawks basketball game. Footage of Joe Gatlin (resident of Laurel, Mississippi) saying that industry has come to Atlanta from the north; that industry has brought culture and diversity. Gatlin says that the South is diversifying while keeping some of its old values. Shots of the Atlanta skyline. George reports that diversity and new people may energize the Democratic Party as it is energizing the South. V: Footage of Banks saying that she has great hope for the nation; that the Democratic Party has great African American and white leaders. Christy George stands in downtown Atlanta. George reports that African Americans and whites live in harmony and prosperity in Atlanta; that the Democratic Party will begin to understand the "new South" after holding its convention in Atlanta.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/20/1988
Description: Coverage of the annual performance of Black Nativity by Langston Hughes. The performance takes place in the Opera House in Boston. Interview with Music Director John Ross, who talks about the play. He says that the story of the nativity is told in a "black context," using traditional music. Excerpts from the performance.
1:00:08: Visual: Shots of schoolchildren entering an auditorium. V: Footage from the Black Nativity performed at the Opera House in Boston. V: Footage of John A. Ross (Music Director) saying that Langston Hughes used the Bible as a source for Black Nativity; that the story is told in a "black context." Ross says that the play relies on traditional gospel music. V: Footage from the performance of Black Nativity. V: Footage of a female African American student saying that some of her friends and former teachers were in the performance. Footage of a female African American student saying that the play shows us "how God began his life." Footage of a female white students saying that the acting is good; that the play is "pretty." Footage of a group of African American students in the lobby. One student says that he likes the music. Another student says that she likes everything. V: Footage from the performance of Black Nativity.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/08/1989
Description: Marcus Jones reports that the Black Political Task Force has announced its candidate endorsements for the upcoming elections. Footage from a press conference at which the Task Force announces its slate of candidates. Salvatore DiMasi (candidate for State Representative) addresses the audience. The Task Force has generated controversy by endorsing some white candidates over African American candidates. Footage of Georgette Watson and Robert Rufo talking about Black Political Task Force endorsement. Jones interviews Peter Hardie (President, Black Political Task Force) about the endorsements. Clips of Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP), Baroness Williams-Martin (political activist), and Regina Placid (candidate for State Representative) commenting on the endorsements. Clips of Mel King (political activist) and Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) campaigning.
1:00:21: Visual: Footage of Peter Hardie (President, Black Political Task Force) addressing a crowd at a press conference in front of the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial on Boston Common. Hardie talks about the mission of the Black Political Task Force. Marcus Jones reports that the Black Political Task Force was started in 1979; that the Task Force is comprised of 60 minority activists who collect dues, hold forums, and endorse candidates. V: Shots of a male Task Force member wearing a Bob Rufo campaign pin; of a female Task Force member; of Mel King (political acitivist) campaigning in Roxbury; of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts). Jones reports that the Task Force endorsed Mel King in the 1983 mayoral race; that they endorsed Michael Dukakis in the 1982 governor's race. V: Shots of African American campaign workers holding campaign signs for Georgette Watson (candidate for Suffolk County Sheriff); of Bob Rufo (candidate for Suffolk County Sheriff) shaking hands with Hardie. Jones reports that the Task Force has endorsed Bob Rufo over Georgette Watson in the race for Suffolk County Sheriff. V: Footage of Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP) saying that the Task Force does not always have to endorse African American candidates; that Watson deserves the endorsement of the Task Force because she is a good leader. Footage of Baroness Williams-Martin (political activist) saying that the Task Force's endorsement of Rufo was unfair; that the endorsement was "a political slap in the face to Watson." Jones says that Watson was shaken by the Task Force's endorsement of Rufo. V: Footage of Watson with supporters at a press conference. Watson has tears in her eyes. Watson says that the Task Force's decision has been an "emotional experience"; that she is going to wage a winning campaign. Footage of Hardie at the Task Force press conference. Hardie says that Rufo is a better candidate for the position than Watson. Footage of Rufo saying that the race is important to him; that the voters need to decide which candidate is most qualified for the position. Rufo says that he hopes that the endorsement does not become an issue between him and Watson. Jones says that the Task Force announced its full slate of candidates at the press conference today. Jones reports that the Task Force has endorsed Rufo for Suffolk County Sheriff, Gerry D'Amico for lieutenant governor, Jo Ann Shotwell for attorney general, Byron Rushing for state representative for the ninth Suffolk District. Jones notes that the Task Force endorsed Salvatore DiMasi over Regina Placid for state representative of the third Suffolk District. V: Shots of Rufo at the Task Force press conference; of Gerry D'Amico (candidate for lieutenant governor) at the press conference; of Jo Ann Shotwell (candidate for state attorney general) at the press conference; of Byron Rushing (candidate for state representative) at the press conference. Footage of Salvatore DiMasi (candidate for state representative) at the Task Force press conference. DiMasi says that this endorsement shows that people from different communities and ethnic backgrounds are working together. DiMasi says that he is proud to receive the Task Force's endorsement. Footage of Regina Placid (candidate for State Representative) saying that the Task Force's endorsement does not represent the true voice of the African American community. Footage of Hardie at the press conference. Hardie says that the Task Force is accustomed to the controversy which often accompanies their endorsements. Jones stands on the Boston Common. Jones reports that no one can predict if the Task Force's endorsements will make a difference in the upcoming elections. Jones notes that critics of the Task Force say that their endorsements may backfire. Jones says that some critics predict that the African American community may back the African American candidates not backed by the Task Force.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/25/1986
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that many African American legislators are opposed to the adoption of the latest version of the state budget proposed by the Ways and Means Committee of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Vaillancourt reviews the proposed budget, which includes cuts in rental assistance and welfare assistance. The budget also includes cuts to the Department of Social Services and the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination. Interview with State Rep. Shirley Owens Hicks, State Rep. Byron Rushing, and Louis Elisa of the Boston chapter of the NAACP at a breakfast meeting of the Massachusetts Legislative Black Caucus. Owens Hicks and Elisa talk about the need for funding of human services. Rushing says that many voters are not opposed to new taxes to fund human services. Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee Richard Volk talks about the proposed budget in the chambers of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Maureen Hart Hennessey of the Norman Rockwell Museum and African Americans in the paintings of Norman Rockwell
1:00:11: Visual: Shots of a breakfast meeting of the Black Caucus. Shots of attendees at the breakfast including Byron Rushing (State Representative). Meg Vaillancourt reports that African American legislators are concerned about the adoption of the budget proposed by the Ways and Means Committee of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Vaillancourt notes that African American legislators are concerned about cuts to specific areas of the budget. V: Footage of Shirley Owens Hicks (State Representative) saying that cuts to the budget will affect the poor; that many people depend on the services provided by state agencies. Vaillancourt reports that Richard Volk (Chairman, House Ways and Means Committee) unveiled a budget which cuts $582 million from the budget proposed by Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts); that the budget includes no new taxes. V: Shot of Volk in the House chambers. Volk stands at a podium to explain the proposed budget. On-screen text details some of the cuts included in the budget proposed by the House Ways and Means Committee. Vaillancourt reports that the House Ways and Means budget includes an $8.5 million decrease in rental assistance and a $12 million decrease in emergency welfare assistance. Vaillancourt notes that the budget cuts $6 million from the Department of Social Services; that the budget cuts $20,000 from the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD). Vaillancourt reports that the House Ways and Means budget increases spending on AIDS prevention, elder services, and drug treatment. V: Footage of Rushing saying that the House Ways and Means budget did not cut some areas; that the budget increased spending in other areas. Rushing says that the House Ways and Means Committee proposed spending more money on drug treatment than Dukakis did. Shot of the Massachusetts State House. Vaillancourt reports that legislators are aware of the popular revolt against new taxes; that the minority community may be more receptive to the governor's call for new taxes. V: Footage of Rushing being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Rushing says that his constituents favor new taxes; that many voters all over the state probably favor new taxes. Rushing says that many state representatives are not listening to their constituents. Footage of Owens-Hicks being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks Owens-Hicks if she will vote for new taxes. Owens-Hicks says that she is not opposed to some elements of the new tax package; that she supports a capital gains tax; that she is not opposed to cigarette or alcohol taxes. Owens-Hicks says that she will not endorse a gasoline tax. Footage of Louis Elisa (Boston chapter of the NAACP) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Elisa says that every citizen of the Commonwealth needs to reaffirm their commitment to human services and to their neighbors. Elisa says that the state legislators cannot play politics when there are lives at stake.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/24/1989
Description: Harold Washington (Mayor of Chicago) and W. Wilson Goode (Mayor of Philadelphia). The city of Hartford, Connecticut has elected Carrie Perry, an African American woman, as mayor of the city. Marcus Jones notes that Hartford is the only major city in New England with an African American mayor. Jones' report includes footage of Perry at a polling station and at a press conference. Jones reports that Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) is seen as having the best chance at becoming Boston's first African American mayor. Interview with Bolling, who says that he might run for mayor someday, but that he is concentrating on his agenda in the City Council. Jones notes that Bolling differed with Mel King (candidate for Mayor of Boston in 1983) and other African American community leaders over the issue of Roxbury's secession from Boston. Footage of Bolling, King, Andrew Young (Greater Roxbury Incorporation Project) and Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) on the Phil Donahue Show in 1986. Jones notes that the minority community in Boston is becoming impatient for an African American mayor. Interviews with Charles Weeks (Black Political Task Force) about the chances of Boston electing an African American mayor.
1:00:09: Visual: Shots of Harold Washington (Mayor of Chicago) celebrating his victory at the polls; of W. Wilson Goode (Mayor of Philadelphia); of an African American man official from the campaign of Carrie Perry in Hartford. Shot of Carrie Perry (Mayor of Hartford) entering a polling booth. Marcus Jones reports that Carrie Perry is the first African American to be mayor of Hartford; that Hartford is the only major city in New England with an African American mayor. V: Footage of Perry at a press conference. Footage of Bruce Bolling (President, Boston City Council) being interviewed by Jones. Bolling says that the city of Hartford deserves a lot of credit; that Hartford voters have looked beyond race in electing city officials. Jones reports that Bolling is seen as having the best chance of becoming Boston's first African American mayor. V: Footage of Bolling saying that he is not preoccupied with the thought of running for mayor. Bolling says that he is pursuing his agenda in the City Council. Jones notes that Bolling was once seen as a successor to Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston in 1983); that King and Bolling differed publicly on the issue of Roxbury's proposed secession from Boston. V: Shot of King campaigning in Roxbury in 1983. Footage of Bolling, King, Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) and Andrew Jones (Greater Roxbury Incorporation Project) on the Phil Donahue show on October 30, 1986. Bolling says that African Americans and voters from other races supported King's candidacy in 1983 because they wanted a change in the city. Footage of Charles Weeks (Black Political Task Force) saying that there will be an African American mayor in Boston; that the African American mayor will need to be the mayor for all residents, not just African Americans. Jones notes that the Black Political Task Force endorsed Bolling's last bid for re-election to the City Council. V: Footage of Weeks saying that whites are becoming more accustomed to seeing African Americans in positions of authority; that an African American will eventually become mayor of Boston. Footage of Bolling saying that it is possible that he might become mayor someday. Bolling adds that an African American will become mayor of Boston in the future. Footage of African American audience members debating on the Donahue show. Marcus Jones notes that the minority community in Boston is becoming impatient for an African American mayor.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/04/1987
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on issues of race in the presidential campaign. While the African American community has traditionally voted Democratic, Michael Dukakis is not receiving unanimous support from the African American community. Younger African Americans seem open to voting Republican. At a meeting of the Black Republican Leadership Council, Reverend Earl Jackson criticizes the Dukakis campaign and Ed Reed speaks out in favor of George Bush. Interviews with African American voters about which candidate they support. Many of the interviewees support Bush. Vaillancourt reports that some African American voters support Bush because they want to support the eventual winner. She notes that some African American voters are disillusioned with Dukakis for not choosing Jesse Jackson as his running mate. The African American community is still a Democratic stronghold, but that Dukakis may be alienating some African American voters in his effort to appeal to more conservative Democratic voters. Interview with Janice Thurmond of the Dukakis campaign about the campaign and his appeal to African American voters. Vaillancourt's report is accompanied by footage of Dukakis and Jackson at the 1988 Democratic National Convention. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Curtis Davis of the Greater Roxbury Incorporation Project (GRIP)
1:00:22: Visual: Footage from CBS of Lloyd Bentsen (Democratic US vice-presidential candidate) being interviewed on October 26, 1988. Bentsen says that there are elements of racism in the campaign. Meg Vaillancourt reports that race has become an issue in the presidential election; that Democrats claim that Republican campaign advertisements are racist. Vaillancourt notes that Republican accuse Democrats of racially divisive tactics. V: Footage of the Reverend Earl Jackson (Black Republican Council) addressing a meeting of the Black Republican Leadership Council in Roxbury. Shots of the audience. Jackson accuses Michael Dukakis (Democratic US presidential candidate) of hypocrisy. Jackson remarks that Dukakis has kept his distance from the African American community during the campaign; that Dukakis is now accusing George Bush of racism (Republican US presidential candidate). Shots of an African American neighborhood; of African American female shopper. Vaillancourt reports that the African American community has traditionally voted Democratic; that younger African Americans have doubts about Dukakis. V: Footage of an African American female saying that she will vote Republican this year because Dukakis is not a good candidate for president. Footage of another African American female saying that she would vote for Bush because he seems like an honest man. Footage from CNN of Dukakis, Kitty Dukakis (wife of Dukakis), Jesse Jackson (African American political leader), and Jaqueline Jackson (wife of Jackson) with other Democratic Party leaders at the 1988 Democratic National Convention; of delegates at the convention. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis is not running as strongly with African American voters as previous Democratic candidates. Vaillancourt reports that a poll has found younger African American voters to be more open to Republican overtures. V: Shots of the meeting of the Black Republican Leadership Council; of the attendees. Footage of Ed Reed (Black Republican Council) saying that Bush will make an effort to increase minority participation if elected. Vaillancourt reports that some African Americans are supporting Bush because they want to support the winner. V: Shots of African Americans residents on the streets of Roxbury. Footage of an African American man saying that Dukakis doesn't have what it takes to win. Vaillancourt reports that African American voters may not be convinced by the Republican Party's position on economic issues. V: Footage of an African American woman saying that she will vote for Dukakis because she is a poor, African American woman. Shots of a voter registration table in Dorchester. African American workers register African American residents to vote. Vaillancourt notes that many African American voters seem angry at Dukakis. V: Footage of an African American male saying that he is angry at Dukakis for not choosing Jackson as his vice-president. Footage of an elderly African American woman saying that she remembers when the candidates were nice to poor people. Footage from CNN of Michael Dukakis, Kitty Dukakis, and Euterpe Dukakis (mother of Michael Dukakis) at the Democratic Convention. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis may be alienating traditional Democratic voters by trying to appeal to a wider spectrum of voters. Vaillancourt notes that the African American community is still a Democratic stronghold. V: Shots of African American residents on the streets of Roxbury. Footage of Janice Thurmond (Dukakis campaign) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Thurmond says that young African Americans take civil rights for granted. Thurmond says that Dukakis represents justice and a sense of fair play.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/27/1988
Description: Hope Kelly reports on a celebration at the Museum of Afro-American History marking the arrival of the first African Americans in Massachusetts. Kelly notes that the first African Americans arrived as immigrants, not as slaves. Kelly's report features footage of Henry Hampton (Chairman, Museum of Afro-American History) addressing the gathering. Kelly reviews the history of African Americans in Massachusetts. Kelly's report is accompanied by historical photos and drawings related to African American history in Massachusetts.
1:00:09: Visual: Footage of a group of African American singers performing a song. Hope Kelly reports that a gathering at the Museum of Afro-American History celebrated the anniversary of the arrival of black immigrants in Massachusetts; that the first black immigrants arrived in Massachusetts on February 26, 1638. V: Shot of a black and white image of black immigrants and early white settlers; of a ship in a harbor; of a black man addressing a crowd. Footage of Henry Hampton (Chairman of the Board, Museum of Afro-American History) saying that the most important history is found in the lives of individual people; that people form the families and cultures which are important to history. Kelly reports that the first black immigrants arrived in a boat from the West Indies; that the first black immigrants were not slaves; that many worked as servants and laborers and in factories; that skilled professions were off limits to the first black immigrants. V: Shots of a black and white image of early black immigrants in the hold of a boat; of a poster for a slave auction. Shots of black and white images of the early black immigrants working as servants. Shot of a color image of black men working as dock laborers. Shots of a black and white image of black immigrant women working in a factory. Shot of a black and white image of black men and women waiting at a dock as sailing ships approach. Shot of a black and white image of a slave auction. Kelly reports that the experience of black immigrants in the north was different from that of black slaves in the South. V: Shot of a black and white image of two black children and a white school master. Shots of black and white photos of African Americans in Boston in the nineteenth century. Footage of Henry Hampton addressing an audience. Hampton says that the study of history must include the stories of all people. Footage of a group of African American singers singing "Amazing Grace."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/26/1988