Description: Interview with headmaster Jerome Wynegar about changes at South Boston High School in last two years in four areas: administration, discipline, curriculum review, community relations. He sees improvement in students' ability to learn with fewer disruptions than in first years of busing. He discusses the school's attempt to prepare students for their futures. He says more research is needed into educational methods for a changing world; experiential learning should be emphasized over traditional lectures. He endorses alternative programs because attendance is encouraged. reel 1 of 2
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/01/1978
Description: Christy George reports that the city of Lowell has chosen a central enrollment plan to accomplish school desegregation in its public schools. George notes that central enrollment plans are implemented through magnet schools; she adds that students choose schools according to the programs they offer instead of by location. George interviews Robert Kennedy (Mayor of Lowell). Kennedy says that the Lowell School Committee opted for a central enrollment plan in order to avoid court-ordered desegregation of the schools. George reports that the city of Cambridge uses a central enrollment plan and has become a national model for school desegregation. George interviews Peter Colleary (Director of Student Assignments, Cambridge Public Schools) about central enrollment in Cambridge Public Schools. George's report includes footage of a meeting between Colleary and school officials from Rochester, NY. The officials from Rochester ask questions about central enrollment in Cambridge. George notes that opponents to school desegregation in Lowell believe that central enrollment is a form of mandatory desegregation. George interviews George Kouloheras (Lowell School Committee) about his opposition to the central enrollment plan. George notes that Cambridge had a successful school system even before the adoption of the central enrollment plan. She adds that the Cambridge model may not work in every city. George's report includes footage of buses in front of schools in Lowell, footage of a girls' soccer game in Cambridge, footage of school children in classrooms, and footage of buses arriving at South Boston High School in 1976. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Marcus Jones reports on tension over school desegregation in Lynn
1:00:05: Visual: Shots from a moving vehicle of students in front of South Boston High School in 1976; of buses with police escort travelling up G Street to South Boston High School; of African American students exiting buses in front of South Boston High School. Christy George reports that the city of Lowell wants to avoid court-ordered school desegregation and forced busing. George reports that Lowell is opting for a voluntary school enrollment plan; that students choose three schools which they would like to attend; that students will be bused to one of those schools. V: Shots of elementary school students in a school cafeteria; of a bus pulling up to an elementary school. Footage of Robert Kennedy (Mayor of Lowell) saying that the Lowell School Committee acted responsibly; that the School Committee wanted to avoid court intervention in Lowell schools. Shots of a white teacher teaching in a racially integrated elementary school classroom in Lowell. Shots of students in the classroom. George reports that the central enrollment plan is implemented through magnet schools; that the magnet schools offer diverse programs; that students can choose the school which offers programs which appeal to them. George notes that racial balance can result from the magnet school system; that the system has worked well in the city of Cambridge. V: Footage of Peter Colleary (Director of Student Assignments, Cambridge Public Schools) saying that school choice has been successful for Cambridge Public Schools. George notes that Colleary matches Cambridge students with their schools; that some schools have increased minority enrollment from 9% in 1981 to 43% in 1987; that students are willing to choose schools outside of their neighborhoods. V: Shots of the Cambridge High School girls' soccer team playing a soccer game. Footage of Colleary saying that 65% of Cambridge Public School students do not attend schools in their districts. Shots of the exterior of Cambridge Rindge and Latin School. George notes that the city of Cambridge owns many of its own buses; that half of the bus drivers work for the city. dShots of a school bus; of the exterior of Cambridge Rindge and Latin School. George notes that the Cambridge Public School System has become a national model for desegregation. V: Shots of Colleary talking to a delegation from the public school system of Rochester, NY. Members of the delegation ask Colleary questions about the Cambridge Public School System. George notes that critics in Lowell see the Cambridge model as another form of mandatory desegregation. V: Shot of a school bus pulling away from an elementary school in Lowell. Footage of George Kouloheras (Lowell School Committee) saying that central enrollment plans "are a euphemism for forced busing." Kouloheras says that central enrollment does not improve the education in the schools. Footage of Colleary saying that 35% of Cambridge students are bused; that the students have chosen to attend schools outside of their districts. Colleary calls it "busing by choice." George stands in front of a school at dusk. George reports that Cambridge was providing good education in its schools before the implementation of the voluntary desegregation plan. George notes that the Cambridge model may not work in every city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/26/1987
Description: No audio at very beginning. Police officers and US Marshals are stationed outside of Charlestown High School. African American and white students exit the school. White students walk away from the school. African American students board buses and depart. Members of the media record the event from across the street, under Bunker Hill Monument. Gary Griffith does several takes of reporter standup from the South End. He gives an update on the senatorial race in the second Suffolk district. Elevated train tracks are visible on Washington Street. South End environs Shot of the Prudential Center. Washington St. street sign.
0:00:00: Visual: School buses pull up to the front of Charlestown High School. Graffiti on the front of the school has been painted over. A Boston Police Department cruiser pulls up behind the buses. A police officer on a motorcycle waits behind the buses. A US Marshal surveys the school from across the street. A group of officials and another US Marshal stand at the entrance of the school. Members of the media observe the scene from behind the fence at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. 0:01:49: V: An African American police officer is stationed at the corner of Monument Square and Concord Street. Shot of Concord Street. A group of white youth observe events at the school from across Monument Square. A girl sits on the fence watching the school. Three young men stand on the steps of a brownstone house on Monument Square. A group of police officers are stationed on Monument Square where the youth have gathered. Some members of the media stand at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. Shot of the Bunker Hill Monument. School buses and police motorcycle escorts remain parked in front of the school. Police radios are audible. Shots of Charlestown High School through the fence at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. 0:06:37: V: A police officer talks to school officials at the entrance of the school. Two white US Marshals and one African American US Marshal are gathered in front of the school. Police officials and a US Marshal confer at the corner of Monument Square and Bartlett Street. Police officers are stationed along Concord Street. Shot of the Bunker Hill Monument and the gathered media. 0:08:25: V: African American and white students exit the school together. Some white students walk away from the school. African American students and some white students head toward the buses. Shot of the exterior of Charlestown High School. A student makes a gesture of peace to the media. The video is overly bright during this scene. 0:12:02: V: Buses pull away from the school, followed by a police motorcycle and a police cruiser. White students are gathered at the corner of Concord and Bartlett Streets. Police officials leave the scene. Another group of white students is gathered on the corner of Bartlett Street and Monument Square. One girl makes a peace sign for the camera. Two police officers with riot helmets walk up the street. 0:14:24: V: Gary Griffith reports on the senatorial race in the second Suffolk district. He stands on a street corner. The Prudential Tower is visible in the distance. Griffith says that the election will be determined in the Democratic primary because there are no Republican or independent candidates; that the Democratic primary will take place in four days. Griffith makes a mistake in his delivery and does two more takes. The camera pans to Washington Street. Elevated train tracks run down the center of the street. Shot of the fire escape of a building on the corner of Washington Street. The windows of the building are boarded up. Shots of rowhouses and buildings along the street perpendicular to Washington Street. Shots of a garden behind a chain link fence. A colorful sign on the fence reads "Community Garden". Shot of the street and the Prudential Tower. Clothes are hanging out to dry on the fire escape of a building on the street. Shots of Washington Street and elevated train tracks. Shot of street sign for Washington Street. Shots of overgrown lot on the corner of Washington Street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/09/1976
Description: Mayor Kevin White releases report on racial violence in Boston. He does not comment on the findings because he has not yet reviewed them. The report was written by a committee consisting of 13 diverse members, chaired by Speaker Thomas McGee and Judge David Nelson. They met ten times over two months to interview 17 community leaders, both supporters and opponents of busing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/24/1976
Description: Review of the first few years of court ordered desgregation, including explosion of racism and violence, and the heavy police patrol required to keep things under control. Garrity is still in charge of the Boston schools. Although things are more quiet, and certain programs are working , like magnet schools, a high percentage of Boston students are still significantly under the national average. The Boston school system is also still overwhelmingly made up of minority students. Black parents propose ‘freedom of choice’ plan. Interviews with Robert Peterkin, Robert Spillane, and other officials. Classroom scenes of the current school system,highlighting Mildred Reed and her daughter Kim. They are Jamaica Plain residents, and Kim is bused to Brighton High School. Interview with Kim, where she talks about the benefits of being bused. Scenes of Kim getting on the bus, the bus ride, and in school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/11/1984
Description: David Boeri reports that the US Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that the Boston Public School System is desegregated. Boeri reports that the Marshall Elementary School is less racially integrated now than it was before court-ordered desegregation began in 1974. He notes that the school population was 50% white when the school opened in the 1970s; he adds that the school population is now 8% white. Boeri interviews Jack Wyatt (Teacher, Marshall Elementary School), Elaine Rundle (teacher, Marshall Elementary School) and Lou Tobaski (Principal, Marshall Elementary School) about school desegregation at the Marshall Elementary School. Boeri notes that there are no educational problems at the school. He adds that the school faculty has been successfully integrated. Boeri interviews Jane Bowden (parent). Bowden says that the school is excellent. Boeri notes that the school is not racially balanced but that it is in compliance with the court order. Boeri's report is accompanied by footage of students and teachers in classrooms at the Marshall Elementary School. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Marcus Jones reports on integration at the Lee Elementary School Lee School is a successful integrated school
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of a white teacher singing a song with elementary school students in a classroom at the John Marshall Elementary School. Most of the students in the class are African American. Shot of a white male student in the classroom. David Boeri reports that the Marshall Elementary School opened 17 years ago as a neighborhood school; that 50% of the students were African American and 50% of the students were white when the school opened. Boeri notes that 8% of the school population is white in 1987. Boeri adds that the US Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that the Marshall School is desegregated. V: Footage of Jack Wyatt (teacher, Marshall Elementary School) saying that the school is not racially balanced; that the school was racially balanced when it opened. Shot of a white male student standing at the front of the classroom. Footage of Elaine Rundle (teacher, Marshall Elementary School) saying that many of the bright African American students are bused to the suburbs through METCO (Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity). Shots of an African American teacher teaching to a classroom of African American students. Boeri reports that two buses transport children to and from the school; that one of the buses brings African American students to the school; that African Americans comprise 61% of the school's enrollment. V: Footage of Rundle saying that she does not know why African American students are bused to the school. Shot of African American students walking away from the school. Boeri says that there do not seem to be educational problems at the school. V: Footage of Boeri interviewing Jane Bowden (Marshall School parent). Bowden says that she did opposed busing at first; that she refused the opportunity to put her children in a different school. Bowden notes that the Marshall School is "excellent." Shot of Bowden's children getting into her car. Footage of Boeri interviewing Lou Tobaski (Principal, Marshall Elementary School). Tobaski says that the school has been able to convince the white parents to keep their children in the school; that the children are receiving a good education. Tobaski says that the school is mostly African American because the surrounding neighborhood has mostly African American residents. Boeri notes that African American and Hispanic residents have moved into the neighborhood surrounding the school. V: Footage of an African American teacher in a classroom with mostly African American students. Shots of individual students. Boeri notes that the school has received more money from the School Department because of desegregation; that the staff at the Marshall School is integrated. Boeri adds that the school is not racially balanced; that the school is in compliance with the court order. V: Footage of Tobaski saying that the Boston School Committee has done its best to integrate the public schools; that not much more can be done.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/29/1987
Description: Marcus Jones reports that Ione Malloy (author and teacher) has written a book about the busing crisis in Boston called Southie Won't Go. Jones notes that Malloy was a teacher at South Boston High School during the busing crisis. He adds that Malloy's book is based on her notes and journal entries from that time. Jones interviews Malloy on the front steps of South Boston High School. Malloy says that she lived in constant fear for her safety during the busing crisis at South Boston High School. She recalls a tense staff meeting in the wake of the stabbing of a white student at the school in 1974. Malloy reads a journal entry written at the time of the stabbing. Malloy says that she wrote about the situation as she experienced it. Malloy adds that students were sacrificed in the name of social ideas during the busing crisis. Jones notes that Malloy does not state her opinions outright in her book. He adds that her point of view comes across through her journal entries. Jones' report is accompanied by footage of school desegregation at South Boston High School in the 1970s.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of Ione Malloy (author and teacher) being interviewed by Marcus Jones outside of South Boston High School. Malloy says that the children were sacrificed in the name of social ideas. Jones reports that Ione Malloy spoke to him today about her new book, Southie Won't Go. Jones reports that armed troops patrolled South Boston High School during the busing crisis; that students and faculty were in constant fear for their safety. V: Footage of African American students exiting buses outside of South Boston High School. A police officere stands on the school grounds. Footage of Malloy being interviewed by Jones. Malloy says that she was in constant fear during the busing crisis. Malloy that her editors told her that she used the word "afraid" too often in her book. Jones reports that Malloy now teaches at the Boston Latin School. V: Shot of Massachusetts State Troopers standing at the entrance of South Boston High School as students enter. Footage of Malloy being interviewed. Malloy says that students were sometimes too afraid to move from their seats. Jones reports that Malloy says that she has not returned to South Boston High School in nine years. Jones notes that Malloy says that her recollections of the tensions inside the school are still vivid. V: Shots of the exterior of South Boston High School; of Malloy and Jones sitting on the steps of the school. Jones reports that Malloy recalls a heated staff meeting called in response to the stabbing of a white student in December of 1974. Jones notes that the victim's name was Michael Faith. V: Shot of a newspaper article with a headline reading, "Eight South Boston district schools shut down after stabbing, crowd-police clash." Footage of Malloy being interviewed by Jones. Malloy says that an African American teacher stood up at the meeting to say that Faith got what he deserved. Malloy says that a white aide from South Boston stood up to say that the African American teacher should get what he deserves. Malloy says that another African American teacher stood up to say that no one deserves to be stabbed. Malloy says that she was shaking during the meeting. Jones reports that Malloy's work is in the form of a diary; that her book is a condensed version of her original notes. Jones notes that Malloy left out her own personal opinions of the events. V: Shot of Malloy and Jones looking through a scrapbook of newspaper clippings of the busing crisis. Jones reports that Malloy does not state her opinions outright; that her journal entries speak for themselves. V: Footage of Malloy and Jones on the steps of South Boston High School. Malloy reads a journal entry about the stabbing of Faith. Malloy says that writing in her journal was a catharsis at the time. Malloy says that she would like to see justice done by telling the truth of the events as she experienced them. Malloy says that people can compare her account of the events with the rulings and opinions of the court. Shot of Jones and Malloy sitting on the steps of the school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/21/1986
Description: Interview with James Kelly, director of South Boston Information Center, about a demonstration at Carson Beach. He describes it as a visit by armed black militants from Columbia Point. Then he expounds on his strident views on busing and affirmative action. SBIC storefront and sign “Welcome to Boston. The city is occupied. A boycott exists. A tyrant reigns. Law is by decree. People are oppressed. The spirit of freedom still lives.” Kelly on the street, talking to a pedestrian. Kelly sitting at desk in back room answering phone.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/02/1977
Description: Children play in front of a house with a sign on the door reading "Remember Black Tuesday." The sign is emblematic of resistance to court-ordered busing in Boston. Older sister reads to younger children on steps.
1:00:00: Visual: Three young white children play on the steps of a house. A sign reading "Remember Black Tuesday" is posted on one of the doors. 1:00:34: V: An older white girl reads to two of the children on the steps of the house. Pam Bullard talks to one of the younger children, telling her to stay still for the camera. Close up shots of the younger children.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/09/1976
Description: South Boston High School headmaster Jerome Wynegar interviewed on end of federal receivership of his school. Calmly says he seldom encounters overt hostility. He expects no substantial change in programs and attitudes now that jurisdictional control has reverted to the city. Exteriors of South Boston Highs School, and shots of Wynegar outside the school. Several takes of the reporter standup. A very bitter and angry Robert Lunnin, member of the South Boston Marshals and the South Boston Information Center, interrupts reporter standup. Lunnin says Wynegar lies, exaggerates attendance; that resistance to forced busing comes from both students and parents; that desegregation will never work “especially with the housing situation” (referring to effort to integrate blacks into public housing). He vehemently pronounces “forced busing.”
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/30/1978