Description: Copley Square environs on a rainy day. John Hancock tower, Old Hancock Building, Trinity Church, and other buildings. Pedestrians and cars go by. Puddles on the sidewalk. Pidgeons.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/18/1984
Description: Interview with jazz pianist and band leader Count Basie at the Berklee Performance Center. He talks about his long career and current musicians.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/25/1982
Description: Interview with the Crown Prince of Jordan at the Ritz-Carlton. He talks about his optimism for negotiations in the Middle East. He talks about relations between individual Middle Eastern countries, specifically Jordan, Israel, and Palestine. He adds his advice to the US administration in working with the Middle Eastern countries. They have an informal discussion while getting a wide shot. Lydon reasks questions for cutaways.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/18/1982
Description: Guests walk in front of the Museum of Fine Arts. Barbara Bush walks into the event tent. Dedication ceremony of the West Wing of the museum. Speeches given by Chairman Howard Johnson and Director Jan Fontaine cover the history of the museum and facilities of the new wing. Honored guest Barabra Bush is introduced and addresses the audience. Governor Ed King addresses the audience. I.M. Pei, and Mayor Kevin White also sit on stage during ceremony. Interiors of the new wing. Entrance to the People's Republic of China exhibit.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/17/1981
Description: Deer Island sewage treatment, boiler room, generators, control room, outside shots. Water gates, gas spheres, rushing water. Man explains the sewage treatment process and the way the machinery works. Boston skyline across the Harbor. Tape damage toward the end of the video.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/26/1982
Description: Brief interview and readings with South African writer Dennis Brutus. Discussion of civil rights and struggle for change. Brutus reads portions of poems "Sequence for South Africa," about the pain of his exile, and "Sharpeville," about the Sharpeville Massacre of March 21, 1960 in the Transvaal Province of South Africa.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/26/1982
Description: Derek Walcott, Saint Lucian poet, reads from his work. Walcott reads the poems "Sea Change" and "The Beachhead." Walcott begins to read the poem "Sea Cranes."
1:00:11: Visual: Derek Walcott (West Indian poet) reads from his work, a poem called "Sea Change." The poem is about the political unrest in the West Indies. 1:02:21: V: Walcott reads from his work, a poem called "The Beachhead." The poem is about an abandoned navy base in the West Indies. 1:04:34: V: Walcott begins to read from another poem called "Sea Cranes." Tape ends at the beginning of the reading.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/20/1982
Description: The Boston School Committee holds a meeting in the School Committee chambers. Members of the School Committee discuss school business. John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) reports on the need for school repairs; Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) reports on staffing issues. Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) interviews Kathleen Kelly (President, Boston Teachers Union) about a proposed school choice plan. Kelly says that many parents support a school choice plan because the current system allows little flexibility. Kelly says that the school choice plan must be considered carefully to prevent a return to segregated schools. Stevens interviews O'Bryant about the proposed school choice plan. O'Bryant says that the plan promotes greater access to schools across the city; that the current system is archaic and inflexible. Stevens interviews Barbara Gray (parent) about the proposed school choice plan. Gray says that parents should be allowed to choose a school with programs suited to the needs of their children. Gray says that the schools need to be improved; that the Boston Public Schools are not truly integrated because there are few white students. Stevens has extended conversations with interviewees while cutaways are shot. Takes of Stevens doing standup about supporters of the school choice plan working on an official proposal for the end of the month. The audio quality on this tape is uneven.
1:00:12: Visual: A Boston School Committee meeting is held in the chambers of the Boston School Committee. School committee members Jean McGuire, John O'Bryant, Jean Sullivan McKeigue, Kevin McCluskey, and Rita Walsh Tomasini are seated at the front of the room. Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) sits at the front with the members of the School Committee. Community members and the press are seated in the audience. O'Bryant talks about the need for $40 million to make school repairs. He says that the mayor, the Boston City Council, and the community must be made aware of the money needed for repairs. Shots of the various committee members. McKeigue agrees that school repairs are needed. A vote is taken on approving a draft of a letter to the mayor and the Boston City Council. O'Bryant thanks Spillane for his report. O'Bryant asks Spillane a question about staffing. Spillane says that more staff is needed before instituting a certain program. Audio is muffled. Shots of Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter); of members of the audience; of the stenographer; of the committee; of the audience. The committee members discuss school business. Audio remains muffled. Shot of the committee members from the perspective of the audience. 1:05:10: Visual: Spillane talks about setting objectives for the school Social Studies programs. Shots of the committee members; of the audience. Audio is muffled. The committee members take a vote. Committee members discuss school contract issues. Shot of Stevens; of Kathleen Kelly (President, Boston Teachers Union) speaking to another audience member; of audience members. 1:08:15: V: Stevens sets up an interview with Kelly. Stevens asks Kelly about a "freedom of choice" proposal supported by some African American parents. Kelly says that she has not yet seen the proposal; that many African American and white parents support a "freedom of choice" plan because the geocode system allows little flexibility; that parents are more interested in good education than racial statistics. Kelly says that a control mechanism must be put in place to prevent a return to segregated schools; that the plan must be given careful thought. Kelly says that the choice of educational programs is more important than the choice of school location. Stevens asks Kelly if busing is "almost dead." Kelly says that busing is no longer the only remedy for Boston schools; that busing can serve as a tool to further the goals of desegregation and educational quality. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and Kelly. Stevens and Kelly speak informally. 1:12:36: V: Stevens sets up an interview with O'Bryant. Stevens asks for O'Bryant's opinion of the "freedom of choice" proposal. O'Bryant says that parents are trying to reform the rigid geocode system; that students have been denied access to schools because of the geocode system. O'Bryant mentions students who have been denied access to the Trotter School. O'Bryant says that the parents are asking for more accessibility to the schools; that the "freedom of choice" proposal has been made into a bigger issue than it should be. O'Bryant says that the geocode system assigns students to schools based upon their residence; that the geocode system is archaic and inflexible; that the geocode system must be addressed in the consent decrees put forth by the court; that leaving the geocode system in place would have "disastrous" consequences. Stevens asks O'Bryant about NAACP intervention in the court case, and NAACP opposition to the "freedom of choice" plan. O'Bryant says that there is a lack of communication between the NAACP and supporters of the plan; that supporters of the plan want greater access to the schools. Stevens asks if the "freedom of choice" plan could result in a return to segregated schools. O'Bryant says that schools in Boston are already segregated because white parents refuse to send their children to most schools located in African American communities; that African American parents want greater access to quality schools all over the city. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and O'Bryant. O'Bryant says again that the "freedom of choice" plan does not represent a return to segregated schools. 1:16:13: V: Stevens sets up an interview with Barbara Gray (parent), who supports the "freedom of choice" plan. Gray says that the supporters of the plan want greater access to all of the schools; that supporters of the plan want an end to the rigid geocode system. Gray explains that the geocode system assigns children to schools according to address and race. Gray says that all of Boston schools need to have high standards; that the each of the schools should have different programs designed to suit specific needs; that students should be able to choose a school whose programs suit their needs. Gray says that education needs to be improved so that all of the schools are equally competitive and able to provide a good education. Stevens asks if the "freedom of choice" plan could result in a return to segregated schools. Gray says that she does not want to go back to segregated schools; that true integration does not exist in Boston because there are not enough white students in the school system; that white students might return to the system if the schools are reformed. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and Gray. Gray says that parents want more control over the education of their children. 1:19:59: V: Stevens records the closing segment of the story from outside of the headquarters of the Boston School Committee. She reports that the supporters of the "freedom of choice" plan are working on an official proposal for the end of the month; that the Massachusetts State Board of Education will propose an end to court intervention in the Boston School System. Stevens does two more takes of the closing segment.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/08/1982
Description: Interview with comedian Dick Gregory at Logan Airport. Discusses plans to hold prayer vigil at White House; discusses the beliefs in the Qu'ran and how Iranian culture is modeled after it. Gregory believes that government of President Jimmy Carter should study teachings of Qu'ran as part of its diplomacy with Iran; Gregory answers questions about his 15 minute meeting with Ayatollah Khomeini in Tehran in regards to the US Embassy Hostage Crisis in Iran.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/09/1980
Description: Story on the Drop-a-Dime Program started by Roxbury residents Georgette Watson and Rev. Bruce Wall. Pedestrians on the streets of Roxbury and Roxbury neighborhood in the evening. Watson points out a drug dealer and a building out of which the drug trade operates. Interview with Watson about the drug problem in the city and the effectiveness of the Drop-a-Dime Program. She talks about the role of neighborhood youth in the drug trade. Representatives from the Drop-a-Dime Program were not included in the mayor's newly formed council on drug abuse. Mayor Ray Flynn holds press conference announcing the formation of the council. Ben Thompson, Chairman of the council, says that the council intends to work with anti-crime and drug prevention groups across the city. William Weld, US Attorney for Massachusetts, and Derek Sanderson, former player for the Boston Bruins, stand with the other members of the council at the press conference. Interview with Bruce Wall about how community groups have not been included on the council. He adds that members of community groups understand how the drug trade functions in their neighborhoods. Flynn will go to the Boston City Council to obtain funding to combat drug abuse in the city.
1:00:05: Visual: Shots through the windshield of a traveling car of Boston streets; of Washington Street; of youth gathered in front of a building. Audio of Georgette Watson (Roxbury community leader) talking about drug trafficking in her neighborhood. Watson points out a well-known drug dealer as he walks across the street. Watson talks about the role of neighborhood youth in the drug trade. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Watson is familiar with the drug trade in her neighborhood; that Watson and Reverend Bruce Wall (Roxbury community leader) started the Drop-a-Dime program. Vaillancourt reports that the Drop-a-Dime program encourages residents to phone in tips and information about the drug trade to police; that South Boston and Roxbury police have found the tips to be mostly accurate. V: Shots of Watson and Wall; of a tape recorder. Footage of a hand pressing the play button on the tape recorder. Audiocassette is heard playing in the background of the report. Shots from a traveling car of Washington Street in the evening. Vaillancourt reports that Watson wants to expand Drop-a-Dime program into a city-wide service; that representatives from the program were not included in the mayor's council on drug abuse. V: Footage of Watson saying that Drop-a-Dime deserves more support from the mayor and the city. Vaillancourt reports that the Ray Flynn (Mayor of the City of Boston) held a press conference today to announce his new drug abuse council; that Flynn did not answer questions regarding the absence of Drop-a-Dime representatives from the council. V: Shots of Flynn and his council at a press conference. Footage of Ben Thompson (Chairman of the Council), saying that the council intends to be "inclusive"; that the council intends to work with other anti-crime and drug prevention groups across the city. Footage of Wall saying that community groups need to be included on the mayor's council; that community groups understand how the drug trade functions on the streets of the city. Shots of members of the drug abuse council, including William Weld (US Attorney for Massachusetts) and Derek Sanderson (former player for the Boston Bruins). Footage of Flynn explaining that Sanderson will be paid by the city of Boston; that the rest of the committee is made up of volunteers. Shots of the council preparing to leave the press conference. Vaillancourt notes that the council is made up of local and state officials. Vaillancourt notes that the council will prepare a report on how the city can combat drug abuse; that Flynn will take the report to the Boston City Council in order to obtain funding; that it will be difficult for Flynn to obtain extra funds because of the economic crisis faced by the city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/07/1984