Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on controversy over the affirmative action program in the Boston Fire Department. A 1976 court ruling required the Boston Fire Department to offer equal opportunities to minorities. Interview with Kathleen Allen, of the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination, about the affirmative action program in the Fire Department. Vaillancourt reports on the percentages of non-white firefighters in the department. Vaillancourt notes that some white firefighters consider the affirmative action program to be unfair, while many non-white firefighters support the program. Interview with David Coritella from the Mayor's Policy Office about the affirmative action program and the civil service exam. Cortiella says that the highest-scoring applicants in each racial group are hired. Vaillancourt reviews statistics concerning the rank and salaries of non-white firefighters. There are few minorities in positions of authority within the department. White firefighters Philip Malone and Paul Malone were recently fired for having claimed to be African American on their job applications. City and state officials fully support the affirmative action program. Vaillancourt's report is accompanied by footage of white and minority firefighters on the job and in a fire station. Vaillancourt's report also features clips from Nova. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Marcus Jones reports on the affirmative action program at the Bank of Boston
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of an African American firefighter and a white firefighter sitting in a fire station. Shots of the two firefighters sliding down a pole and putting on gear. Shot of a fire truck pulling out of a station with its siren blaring. Footage from Nova of flames and burning buildings. Shots of firefighters fighting fires. Meg Vaillancourt reports that a 1976 court ruling found discriminatory practices in the Boston Fire Department; that a consent order required the Boston Fire Department to offer equal opportunities to minorites. V: Shot of a siren; of a white firefighter putting on gear and climbing into a fire truck. Footage of Kathleen Allen (Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination) saying that firefighters used to be hired only if they knew someone on the force; that firefighters were not hired according to their qualifications before 1976. Shot of an African American firefighter and a white firefighter working with equipment in the fire station. On-screen visuals and text detail the racial breakdown of employees in the Boston Fire Department. Vaillancourt reports that there were nineteen non-white firefighters in 1976; that minority firefighters made up less than one percent of the department in 1976. Vaillancourt reports that there are 373 non-white firefighters in 1989; that minority firefighters make up 23% of the department in 1989. V: Vaillancourt stands in a fire station. Vaillancourt reports that Boston firefighters did not want to talk about affirmative action on camera because it is a touchy subject. Vaillancourt notes that some white firefighters said that the consent decree was unfair. Vaillancourt reports that some white firefighters say that the consent decree allows minorities to be hired before whites who scored higher on the civil service exam. Vaillancourt reports that some African American firefighters said that the consent decree allowed them an equal opportunity to be hired. Vaillancourt notes that David Cortiella (Mayor's Policy Office) is the former director of the city of Boston's affirmative action program. V: Footage of Cortiella being interviewed by Vaillancourt at a fire station. Cortiella says that the consent decree does not force the Fire Department to hire minorities. Vaillancourt asks if the consent decree would allow a white applicant to be passed over in favor of a minority applicant who scored lower on the civil service exam. Cortiella says that such a scenario is possible. Cortiella adds that the highest-scoring applicants in each racial group will be hired. Vaillancourt reports that white firefighters in Alabama have won the right to sue for reverse discrimination. Vaillancourt notes that the white Alabama firefighters have not yet proven their case. V: Shots of a white firefighter; of an African American firefighter; of a firefighting ladder extended toward a tall building. Shots of an African American firefighter in uniform; of a white firefighter standing on a firefighting ladder. Vaillancourt reports that it is hard to argue that affirmative action has decreased opportunities for white firefighters. Vaillancourt notes that few minorities are in positions of authority within the Boston Fire Department. V: On-screen text and visuals details statistics about the rank and salaries of minority firefighters. Vaillancourt reports that there was one African American lieutenant in the Fire Department in 1976; that there are seven African American lieutenants or captains in 1989. Vaillancourt notes that 158 firefighters earn salaries of $43,000 or more; that only one of those 158 firefighters is a minority. Vaillancourt reports that some white firefighters in Boston believe that affirmative action puts them at a disadvantage. Vaillancourt notes that two white firefighters were recently fired for having claimed to be African American on their job applications. Vaillancourt adds that the two firefighters are fighting their dismissal; that the two firefighters claim that their grandmother was African American. V: Shot of a white firefighter climbing into the driver's seat of a fire truck. Shots of black and white photos from WNEV of Philip Malone (former firefighter) and Paul Malone (former firefighter). Vaillancourt reports that two other firefighters are under review for having claimed to be Latino. V: Shots of firefighters fighting fires. Footage of Cortiello saying that he will not comment on the cases of the two firefighters who claimed to be Latino. Shots of firefighters sliding down a pole in a fire station. The firefighters climb onto a fire truck. Shot of a fire truck pulling out of a fire station. Vaillancourt reports that city and state officials say that they will not retreat from their affirmative action program.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/15/1989
Description: Runners at starting line and on course of Boston Marathon. Press conferences on John Hancock as new sponsor. Laurel wreath, Bill Rodgers.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/19/1985
Description: Hotel workers union Local 26 is not being permitted to protest against Boston Marathon sponsor and Back Bay Hilton owner, John Hancock, during the race. Start of the Boston Marathon. Interview with union leader Domenic Bozzotto. Hearing on the protesting. Several union protests. Footage from a John Hancock Boston Marathon commercial.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/16/1987
Description: Three-part series updating the state of the Boston Public Schools since court ordered desegregation. First part on changes in racial and socioeconomic composition of student body. White enrollment has declined and more children come from poor and single-parent households. Second part on the dilapidated conditions of school buildings and the difficult decision of which schools should be closed. Exteriors of closed schools, some boarded up. Third part on the evolution of curriculum planning to enhance flexibility and keep up with standards. Interviews with John Coakley, School Department; Robert Dentler, expert on court order; Ellen Guiney, Citywide Education Coalition; Leon Nelson, Freedom House. Superintendent Robert Spillane attends School Committee meeting.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/20/1985
Description: U.S. Commerce Secretary Malcolm Baldridge opens the new Boston World Trade Center. Discussion of Massachusetts as an export state, and local industry's competition with imported goods. Michael Dukakis and Baldridge speak at the opening ceremony, and mention new trade legislation on the floor in Congress. Interview with Dukakis on his differing opinions on the legislation. Exteriors of the Trade Center and scenes of the Boston Harbor and waterfront. Following the edited story is b-roll of the ceremony, a helicopter taking off, the world trade center building from multiple angles, and photographs and aerials of the surrounding area.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/28/1986
Description: Marcus Jones reports that the Dorchester Youth Collaborative (DYC) provides a safe haven from street violence for young people in the area. Jones reports that some young people at the DYC have formed their own music groups and write their own songs. Jones interviews Robert Bostic (15-year old Roxbury resident) and his friends. Bostic says that he is using rap music to send a positive message. Jones also interviews Al McClain (DYC counselor), who talks about the impact of the DYC on the lives of the neighborhood teenagers. Jones reports that the DYC-member group One Nation has released an album. Jones interviews DeMaul Golson (DYC member) and other members of the group One Nation. Jones also interviews Todd Maxell (16-year old Roxbury resident), who says that teenagers will listen to anti-violence messages from their peers. The report includes footage of Natalie Jacobson (WCVB-TV) and R.D. Sahl (WNEV-TV) reporting on crime in Roxbury. The report also features footage of teenagers at the DYC, footage of the members of One Nation performing on stage and footage from a video produced by teenagers at the Roxbury Boys and Girls Club. This tape includes additional footage of DYC members and a music video called "Stand Back From Crack" filmed inside Back Bay Station.
1:00:29: Visual: Footage of the members of the group One Nation dancing and performing on stage. Footage from WNEV of R.D. Sahl (WNEV reporter) reporting on gang violence in Roxbury. Footage from WCVB of Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) reporting on shootings in Roxbury. Shots of paramedics wheeling an injured African American woman out of a building; of police vehicles and an ambulance on a street in Roxbury; of paramedics tending to an injured African American patient inside of an ambulance. Marcus Jones reports that a group of Roxbury youngsters are not surrenduring to the violence in Roxbury. V: Footage of Robert Bostic (15-year old Roxbury resident) sitting with a group of his friends. Bostic says that he wants to set a good example for young people; that young people should avoid violence. Bostic says that he and his friends are using rap to send a positive message. Jones reports that Bostic and his friends are members of the Dorchester Youth Collaborative (DYC). V: Shots of Bostic and other members of the Youth Collaborative; of a sign for the Youth Collaborative. Shots of African American youth entering the Youth Collaborative building. Footage of Al McClain (Counselor, Dorchester Youth Collaborative) saying that the Youth Collaborative has had a great impact; that some of the members of the Youth Collaborative used to be in gangs. Shots of members of the youth collaborative dancing to rap music; of Jones sitting with the members of the youth collaborative. Jones reports that some of the members of the Dorchester Youth Collaborative have formed groups to make music. Jones notes that some of the youth write their own music; that the DYC member group One Nation has released an album about AIDS. V: Shot of the cover of an album by the group One Nation. Footage of One Nation members performing a rap song about street violence. Footage of Jones interviewing DeMaul Golson (DYC member) and two other African American male DYC members. Jones asks the boys if they are scared by the street violence. The boys say yes. Golson says that his cousin was shot in the back; that his cousin is dead. Footage of One Nation members performing on stage. Jones reports that the DYC members are determined to rise above the violence. Jones notes that members of the Roxbury Boys and Girls Club are also doing their best to fight the violence. V: Footage of a video produced by members of the Roxbury Boys and Girls Club. Footage of Bostic saying that most kids are not going to listen to their parents' advice; that kids are influenced by the people on the streets who are making money from drugs. Footage of Todd Maxwell (16-year old Roxbury resident) saying that kids might listen to their peers if their peers tell them not to do drugs. Shots of an African American man being led into a police station by police officers; of police standing near a cordoned-off crime scene.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/01/1989
Description: Story on the thriving Boston rock scene. Interviews with musicians who came from Boston. Footage of Boston Music Awards. Up and coming bands mentioned include Down Avenue, The Liars, and New Man. Aimee Mann thanks crowd. Marcus Jones focuses on one up and coming band, The Regulars. Interview with lead singer on why he's based in Boston. Interview with Debbie Gilberg, manager of The Regulars. Jones says that Boston is a good place to develop a local base following because it has venues and radio that feature local artists. Interview with radio DJ on finding good local bands to play on the air. Footage from Tracy Chapman's Fast Car music video. Interview with Jeff Marshall, founder of Monolith Records, on signing bands to smaller labels. following the edited story is b-roll of Newbury Comics interiors with closeups on album covers. Exterior of Newbury Comics.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/16/1988
Description: Hope Kelly reports that Superintendent Laval Wilson proposed a set of reforms to improve the Boston Public Schools in the beginning of his tenure as superintendent. Kelly reviews Wilson's proposals for school reforms and notes that the programs were backed by the Boston School Committee. Kelly's report includes footage of Wilson in 1985 and footage of Wilson announcing his school reform package. The Boston School Committee has recently cut Wilson's budget by $8.5 million. Kelly reviews the budget cuts. Interviews with John Nucci (Boston School Committee), Sam Tyler (Boston Municipal Research Bureau), and Ellen Guiney (Educational Advisor to Mayor Flynn) about the budget cuts. Kelly reviews the budget figures for municipal spending on education from 1984 to 1989 and budget figures for overall city spending from 1986 to 1988. Kelly notes that the city's spending on education has greatly increased from 1984. She notes that critics believe that the School Department is not spending its money wisely. Kelly reports that the city will need to curb its spending in the next few years due to the absence of budget surpluses. Kelly's report is accompanied by footage of students in the Boston Public Schools.
1:00:19: Visual: Footage of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) being interviewed by the Boston School Committee for the position of superintendent of schools on July 19, 1985. Wilson says that his goal is to convince the members of the Boston School Committee that he is the best candidate for the position. Hope Kelly reports that Wilson took over the Boston Public School System at a time when the average graduating senior reads at a seventh-grade level. Kelly notes that the average drop-out rate is 43%. V: Shots of high school students outside of a high school; of students descending a stairs in a school building. Kelly notes that Wilson approached the job with determination. V: Footage of Wilson saying that his goal is to lift the educational level of the students coming out of the Boston public school system. On-screen text and visuals detail the specifics of Wilson's proposed educational programs. Kelly reports that Wilson proposed a set of reforms called the Boston Education Plan. Kelly notes that Wilson proposed a $3.1 million dollar program for after-school remedial reading; that Wilson proposed a $1.3 million program to standardize remedial reading programs city-wide. Kelly notes that the School Committee backed Wilson's programs when he arrived. Kelly reports that the School Committee cut Wilson's budget by $8.5 million on Wednesday. V: On-screen text detail the specifics of the budget cuts. Kelly reports that Wilson proposed a budget of $364.6 million; that the School Committee cut his budget to $355.9 million; that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has refused to spend more than $350.0 million on the school budget. V: Shot of Flynn talking to reporters. Footage of John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) saying that the city administration does not understand the impact of its cuts to the school budget. Kelly reports that Sam Tyler (Boston Municipal Research Bureau) runs an agency which monitors city spending. V: Footage of Tyler being interviewed by Kelly. Tyler says that city officials were thinking about the future when they asked the School Department to keep its spending to within $350 million. Tyler says that the superintendent cannot introduce new programs and expect them all to be funded. Footage of Ellen Guiney (Flynn's Education Advisor) being interviewed by Kelly. Guiney says that $350 million is what the city can afford to spend on education. On-screen text and visuals detail the city of Boston's spending on education from 1984 to 1989. Kelly reports that the city has increased its spending on schools from $245 million in 1984 to $341.1 million in 1989. V: Footage of Guiney says that some city officials in other departments think that the School Department already receives too much money. Kelly reports that some critics wonder if the School Department is spending its money wisely. V: Shot of two elementary-school students in front of a computer terminal. Footage of Tyler saying that the school system has improved. Kelly reports that Nucci points to a 1% decrease in the drop-out rate. Kelly notes that Guiney points to improved teacher salaries and more teachers; that Guiney admits that there have been few actual performance gains by students. V: Shot of Nucci; of Guiney; of a white male teacher in a classroom. Footage of Guiney saying that she would have liked to have seen greater improvements in the last five years. Shot of an African American girl coloring a picture in a classroom. Kelly reports that spending by the city has risen overall in the past five years. V: On-screen text compares the rise in city spending to the rise in school spending from 1986 to 1988. Kelly reports that city spending has risen 34% since 1986; that school spending has risen 23% since 1986. Kelly stands in front of the offices of the Boston School Committee. Kelly reports that the city had surpluses from 1986 to 1988; that it is less certain that surpluses will exist in future city budgets. V: Footage of Tyler saying that the city needs to put a brake on its spending. Shot of elementary school students entering a classroom.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/06/1988
Description: Reviewing opinions on the dangers of boxing and risk of brain damage. Scenes of bowers training and sparring in the ring at Connolly's Gym. Interview with doctor Francis Rocket on the danger of brain damage. Interview with Boxing Commissioner James McCarin, using Muhammad Ali as an example of a boxer affected by brain damage from the sport. Footage of Ali, he slurs his speech. Boxing can also cause blindness. Interview with eye doctor Edward Ryan. Gym owner Jim Connolly defends boxing in comparison to other more dangerous sports like hockey and football.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/31/1986
Description: Christy George reports on the end of a two-week fast by chaplains at Brandeis University. George notes that the chaplains fasted to protest the university's investments in South Africa. George's report includes footage from a gathering of apartheid protesters on the Brandeis campus. Father Maurice Loiselle, Rabbi Albert Axelrad and Reverend Diane Moore discuss their fast and the university's policy regarding South Africa. The protesters sing and hold hands at the gathering. George reports that the chaplains' fast serves as the last phase of a community protest against apartheid. George notes that Brandeis trustees will review their investment policy at an upcoming meeting. George reviews the apartheid protest at Brandeis University since last year. George's report includes footage of Brandeis students at a shantytown on campus from the previous year.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/13/1987