Description: Commissioner Robert DiGrazia, Boston police and US marshals stationed outside South Boston High. Black students exit school, get on bus. Buses slowly come and go. Many officials mill about on sidewalk. Headmaster Jerome Wynegar talks to Joseph Jordan. Later, white students flow out of school en masse. Comments, some racist, from the crowd waiting outside the school can be overheard.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/14/1976
Description: No audio in the beginning. Pro golfers at Ferncroft course in Danvers. Teeing off. Walking on fairway. Putting on green.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/12/1977
Description: Judy Stoia interviews James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) about resistance to busing and his decision not to attend the Procession Against Violence. Kelly says that he has appealed to African American parents to put pressure on the NAACP to stop busing. Kelly says that many African American parents agree that "forced busing is the problem." Following interview is silent footage of helicopter and security detail among rooftops of City Hall Plaza. A WGBH camera crew overlooks City Hall Plaza and records the Procession Against Violence. Thomas O'Neill, Jr. (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Kitty Dukakis, Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Kathryn White, Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), Charles Barry (State Secretary of Public Safety), Dr. Charles Glenn (Massachusetts State Department of Education), Ann Landers (advice columnist), Joseph Kennedy, Edward Kennedy (US Senator), and Edward Brooke (US Senator) are among those at the front of the procession. Footage includes overhead shots of the crowd and audio of hecklers jeering at White and Kennedy. Reverend Robert Golledge and John Colburn address the crowd. Tape 1 of 3.
1:00:15: Visual: Judy Stoia sets up an interview with James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) near City Hall Plaza. Stoia asks Kelly about a message he delivered to African American parents. Kelly says that he urged African American parents to use their influence with the NAACP to stop forced busing; that both white and African Americans know that "forced busing is the problem"; that African American parents have encouraged the South Boston Information Center to continue the fight against busing. Kelly says that he made the plea to African American parents in order to help restore sanity to the city. Kelly says that he will not participate in today's Procession Against Violence because it will do nothing to remedy forced busing; that the mayor, state officials and "the liberals" need to take a stand against forced busing. Stoia probes Kelly's motives in boycotting the march. Kelly says that his statement to African American parents will be more effective than a march around the city by "the liberal establishment." Kelly says that white parents want a good education for their children in neighborhood schools; that the "liberal establishment" and the media need to realize that "good education for all kids" is more important than "quality integrated education." Kelly says that he hopes white parents and African American parents can work together to solve some of the problems in the city. Stoia thanks Kelly. The crew takes some cutaway shots of Stoia asking questions. 1:05:09: V: A small crowd begins to gather for the procession against violence at City Hall Plaza. A few people look down on the plaza from rooftops. Helicopters circle above City Hall Plaza. A crowd mills about on the plaza. A small crowd is gathered around some seating. A marching band plays. 1:07:44: V: Groups of people walk toward City Hall Plaza. Police officers are visible. One officer directs traffic. The music of a marching band is audible, then it stops. Marchers begin to fill the street, moving toward the plaza. Four men in uniform lead the march, carrying an American flag and a Massachusetts state flag. A crowd of people stream into the plaza. A woman yells, "Kevin, stop forced busing." A man yells, "Hey, you hypocrite." Thomas O'Neill (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Kitty Dukakis, Kathryn White, Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), Charles Barry (State Secretary of Public Safety), Dr. Charles Glenn (Massachusetts State Department of Education) and Ann Landers (advice columnist) are among those visible at the front of the marchers. Some of the crowd jeers. A man yells, "Kennedy, you faker." The officials at the front of the march greet Elma Lewis and others informally as they proceed to the front of the plaza. A woman yells, "Stop forced busing. A large crowd continues to stream into the plaza. Shots of the assembled crowd. The WGBH crew tries to locate and identify public figures. A helicopter circles overhead. 1:15:25: V: A marching band begins to play. The stream of marchers continues into the plaza. Shots of assembled crowd. A woman yells, "Stop forced busing. A voice is heard addressing the crowd, calling for "a peaceful community in Boston." Shot of the crowd. O'Neill, Joseph Kennedy, Edward Kennedy (US Senator) and Edward Brooke (US Senator) are visible. Audio is difficult to hear. Reverend Robert Golledge (Vicar, Old North Church) addresses the crowd from the podium. Golledge introduces the band from the St. William's School in Dorchester. Assembled in front of the podium, the band strikes up the national anthem. Shots of the media photographing the event; of the crowd filling the plaza; of officials at the front of the crowd. John Colburn (Episcopal Archdiocese) leads the crowd in prayer.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/23/1976
Description: Participants in the Procession Against Violence are assembled on City Hall Plaza. WGBH camera crew records the gathering from a rooftop above City Hall Plaza. Thomas O'Neill, Jr. (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Edward Kennedy (US Senator), Joseph Kennedy, Edward Brooke (US Senator) Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Kitty Dukakis, Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), Kathryn White and Ann Landers (advice columnist) are visible in the front of the crowd. Robert Golledge (Vicar, Old North Church) introduces the speakers. Humberto Cardinal Medeiros (Archdiocese of Boston) and Michael Haynes (Twelfth Street Baptist Church) lead the crowd in prayer. John Colburn (Episcopal Archdiocese), Roland Gittelsohn (Temple Israel), Michael Germinal Rivas (Chaplain, Boston University), and John Zanetos (Greek Orthodox Cathedral) are heard addressing the crowd. Paula Lyons (aide to Mayor Kevin White) leads the crowd in singing "God Bless America." Crowd breaks up and departs among marching band accompaniment. Tape 2 of 3
0:58:14: Visual: A crowd is assembled at City Hall Plaza for the Procession Against Violence. John Colburn (Episcopal Archdiocese) leads a prayer. Shot of the crowd. Thomas O'Neill (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Edward Kennedy (US Senator), Edward Brooke (US Senator), Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) and Kitty Dukakis are visible. Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), Kathryn White, and Ann Landers (advice columnist) are visible. Reverend Robert Golledge (Vicar, Old North Church) introduces Rabbi Roland Gittelsohn (Temple Israel). Gittelsohn addresses the crowd and condemns violence. Shots of crowds at City Hall Plaza. Marchers continue to stream into the plaza. 1:00:54: V: Michael Haynes (Twelfth Street Baptist Church) leads the crowd in prayer for peace. Overhead shot of massive crowd filling the plaza; of O'Neill, Joseph Kennedy, Edward Kennedy, Brooke, Michael Dukakis and Kitty Dukakis. 1:03:06: V: Golledge leads the crowd in the "Our Father." Shots of crowd; of Kennedy and Brooke. Golledge introduces Humberto Cardinal Medeiros (Archdiocese of Boston), who leads the crowd in prayer. The crowd applauds for Medeiros. Golledge introduces Reverend Michael Germinal Rivas (chaplain, Boston University). Rivas leads a prayer. Shots of the crowd. 1:06:32: V: Reverend John Zanetos (Greek Orthodox Cathedral) addresses the crowd. Shots of crowd; of Kevin White and Kathryn White. Golledge introduces Paula Lyons (aide to Mayor Kevin White). Lyons leads the crowd in singing"God Bless America". Shots of O'Neill, Joseph Kennedy, Edward Kennedy, and Brooke; of crowd in the plaza. Crowd slowly breaks up. Edward Kennedy and Joseph Kennedy make their way out with the crowd. Michael Dukakis and Edward Kennedy shake hands with White. Edward Brooke makes his way out of the plaza. The crowd breaks up and leaves the plaza. The marching band plays.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/23/1976
Description: Participants in the Procession Against Violence are assembled at City Hall Plaza. A WGBH camera crew records the event from the back of the crowd. Edward Brooke (US Senator), Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), and Kathryn White are visible at the front of a large crowd gathered on City Hall Plaza. Robert Golledge (Vicar, Old North Church) introduces the speakers and is heard leading the crowd in the Lord's Prayer. Michael Haynes (Twelfth Street Baptist Church) and Humberto Cardinal Medeiros (Archdiocese of Boston) lead the crowd in prayers. Michael Germinal Rivas (Chaplain, Boston University) and John Zanetos (Greek Orthodox Cathedral) are heard addressing the crowd. Paula Lyons (aide to Mayor Kevin White) leads the crowd in singing "God Bless America." The crowd breaks up and departs. Judy Stoia and Pam Bullard ask white, Asian American and African American attendees why they attended the Procession Against Violence. Interviewees speak out against violence and talk about the importance of the march. Tape 3 of 3.
0:58:46: Visual: Paricipants in the Procession Against Violence are gathered at City Hall Plaza. A WGBH crew is on the ground with the crowd. Audio of the police leading a man away from the crowd. The media and the members of the St. William's School band mix with the crowd. Shots of crowd members. 0:59:49: V: Michael Haynes (Twelfth Street Baptist Church) addresses the crowd from the podium. Shots of Haynes at podium; of assembled speakers behind him. Haynes leads the crowd in a prayer for peace. Shot of Edward Brooke (US Senator) from behind. The Reverend Robert Golledge (Vicar, Old North Church) leads the crowd in the Lord's Prayer. Shots of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) and Kathryn White reciting the Lord's Prayer; of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) from behind; of Brooke. Golledge introduces Humberto Cardinal Medieros (Archdiocese of Boston), who leads the crowd in prayer. Shots of Medeiros at podium; of speakers assembled behind Medeiros; of marching band in front of podium; of crowd. Sirens wail during Medeiros' prayer. A fire truck is visible, passing by the plaza. Golledge announces Reverend Germinal Rivas (Chaplain, Boston University). Rivas leads the crowd in prayer. Shots of crowd; of police strolling through crowd; of media documenting the procession; of Kevin White and Kathryn White listening to Rivas. 1:08:21: V: John Zanetos (Greek Orthodox Cathedral) addresses the crowd. Traveling shot through assembled crowd. Shots of crowd at far edge of plaza, listening to the prayer. Golledge announces that Paula Lyons (aide to Mayor Kevin White) will lead the crowd in singing "God Bless America." Shots of crowd singing "God Bless America." The crowd applauds. The crowd breaks up and begins to leave the plaza. Shots of people leaving the plaza. Stoia is heard interviewing a man about why he marched. The man says he is concerned about the violence and he thinks it is important to support non-violent action. 1:13:41: V: The crowd breaks up. Pam Bullard interviews members of the crowd. An Asian American woman says that she is a student at the University of Massachusetts; that she is concerned about violence and felt it was important to support the march. A white male student says he is glad that a lot of people came out for the march; that he thinks it is important for the people of Boston to show that they do not support violence. A female student says that she came because she opposes violence; that the march was important. An older white male from Cambridge says that he came out to support peace. Bullard asks a young boy why he came to the march. He says that he came because his mother said so. A young African American man says that the march is "a black and white thing." A young white man says that he feels badly about the violence; that he hopes to help find a solution. Another young white man says that the march promotes unity; that he is glad that there was a good turnout. An African American woman says that she hopes the march helps to stop the violence; that she wants her nieces to be able to go to school safely; that she does not think the march will help the situation. Bullard interviews an African American family about the march. The mother says that she does not support violence. The father says that a lot of people attended the march; that it should help the situation; that he marched in order to express his objection to violence. One of their sons says that he marched because his parents did. 1:18:25: V: Bullard asks an older white man why he participated in the march. The man says that the city must be saved; that it is important for residents to show solidarity with one another; that the march will not solve the problem, but it can help. An older woman says that the violence in the city is getting worse; that the march was important because it brought citizens, city officials, and the clergy together; that the judicial system must be improved; that the courts must punish perpetrators of violence.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/23/1976
Description: B-roll of the site of a proposed multilevel garage for Quincy Market, which is currently a parking lot between Haymarket and the Expressway. Close-ups on cars in the parking lot. Several takes of reporter standup on the Boston Redevelopment Authority's plans. Exteriors of Faneuil Hall before North Market was developed. Several takes of another portion of reporter standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/24/1977
Description: Quincy Market environs, domed roof of long market building. Extremely high shot looking beyond expressway. Exterior of market, children eating ice cream. Entrance to Crate & Barrel, Crabtree & Evelyn, The Berkeley Shop, other shops. Grasshopper weather vane on gold cupola of Faneuil Hall.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/22/1978
Description: Railroad terminal yard in Allston adjacent to Mass. Turnpike. Freight containers and container beds parked on train tracks. Sole engine moving slowly into yard. Traffic on elevated section of pike in background. Hancock Towers and Prudential in hazy distance.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/19/1976
Description: Testing clams for effects of red tide. Samples in plastic bag collected from Gloucester. Shells pried open with knife, innards scraped out, rinsed in sieve, pureed in blender, poured into beaker, weighed on balance scale, diluted with acid, placed on burner, transferred to vial, placed in centrifuge. Chart and map of shellfish sampling areas on North Shore for red tide measurement.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/13/1977
Description: Mayor Kevin White releases report on racial violence in Boston. He does not comment on the findings because he has not yet reviewed them. The report was written by a committee consisting of 13 diverse members, chaired by Speaker Thomas McGee and Judge David Nelson. They met ten times over two months to interview 17 community leaders, both supporters and opponents of busing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/24/1976
Description: Republican gubernatorial candidates Frank Hatch, Ed King, and John Buckley make campaign presentations to voters in Newton. Each candidate talks his record and about reaching out to minority communities in Massachusetts. Several takes of reporter standup on the race for the Republican gubernatorial nomination.
0:00:16: Visual: Frank Hatch (Republican gubernatorial candidate), Ed King (Republican gubernatorial candidate) and John Buckley (Republican gubernatorial candidate) make a campaign presentations before voters in Newton. Hatch says that he has worked on redistricting proposals in the House of Representatives; that he has worked with African American groups to improve African American political representation in Boston. He adds that he filed the first bill to initiate bilingual education in the state of Massachusetts. Hatch says that he has worked with groups in urban areas to recruit political candidates and to further political legislation for the benefit of constituents in those areas. Hatch says that he can count on support from those urban areas in the gubernatorial election. 0:01:34: V: King is called on to speak. King says that he will not aim any programs at specific racial or ethnic groups; that the people of the state of Massachusetts have common interests; that he will strive to improve education and the economy for all people. King says that he has the support of prominent African American leaders because they agree with his position on the issues; that Dr. Mildred Jefferson (President, Massachusetts Citizens for Life) and Warren Brown (former republican candidate for the Boston School Committee) are among the African American leaders who support his candidacy for governor. King says that he wants to pull the citizens together; that he does not want to divide them along racial lines. 0:03:35: V: John Buckley cites the example of Hubert Humphrey as a politician who was respected by all people. Buckley says that his first political fundraiser for the governor's race took place in Roxbury. Buckley notes that he employs many African Americans in the Middlesex County Sheriff's Department; that the department has tried to reach out to minorities. Buckley says that he is concerned about all of the citizens in Massachusetts; that he received over 90% of the African American vote in Middlesex County during the last election. 0:05:40: V: The moderator announces that the candidates will be available for conversation over refreshments. He adjourns the meeting. Shots of the members of the audience. The audience members are white. 0:06:00: V: Marjorie Arons stands in the front of the room. Behind her, people are gathered for refreshments and conversation. She does two takes of the closing to her story on the Republican gubernatorial race. Arons reports that Republican voters make up 16% of the voting population in Massachusetts; that the race for the Republican gubernatorial nomination is lively and interesting. Arons notes that the race will be very tight; that multiple ballots may be cast at the Republican convention; that a fourth candidate may emerge to unify the party.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/18/1978
Description: Interview with Mr. Delaney of Revere about storm flood damage to his waterfront home in the Beachmont section during major blizzard. Snow inside home with furniture askew. Exteriors of the house, car, and the neighborhood. Drive down street past detour sign, hazard sawhorses, dirty, crusty snow piles, BostonGas repair trucks. Tide breaking against rocky barrier.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/13/1978
Description: Robert Dole addresses Massachusetts building trades representatives. Speaks about construction industry, real estate, and inflation. Defends President Ford. Makes several jokes and makes the audience laugh. Makes sarcastic comments about Jimmy Carter.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/16/1976
Description: Video starts with people speaking over color bars. B-roll of Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority advisory board meeting. Interview with Robert Foster, chair of MBTA. He is requesting a larger operating budget. He discusses the work done by the MBTA and their attempts develop a better relationship with the advisory board. He speaks of plans for transportation demands during Pope John Paul II's visit. They shoot cutaways. Interview with Ed Novakoff, advisory board representative from Brookline, who complains about green line LRVs, and does not support giving the MBTA a larger operating budget. Several takes of reporter standup in the MBTA lot, with buses in the background.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/21/1979
Description: Exterior of Boston English High School. Interview with Boston police commissioner Joseph Jordan about how successful he thinks the third year of court-ordered desegregation will be. Interview with Headmaster of English High School Robert Peterkin on the opening of school, and English High School as a magnet school. Interview with two students, Maura and Sharon, about what they like about English High School. Interiors of the school, lockers, students in hallways, on the escalator, in the cafeteria, in the classroom.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: Route 1 near junction of Revere, Malden and Saugus. Shot from moving vehicle. Additional shots of traffic from the side of the road, both oncoming and receding automobiles. Close-up on dilapidated surface of road and crumbling concrete bridge parts.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/11/1979
Description: Rowers on Charles River near Harvard, practicing for regatta. One-, five-, and nine-person shells. All male and all female crews. Exteriors of boat house. Florida Institute of Technology team bus.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/19/1979
Description: Footage of the exterior of Roxbury High School on Greenville Street and footage of students in an English class at Roxbury High School. Pam Bullard interviews Roxbury High School students Domingo Rivera, Ramon Alicea, Crystal Roach, Mark Benjamin, and Chiman Lee about their experiences at Roxbury High School. The students talk about academic programs at the school, their college plans, the atmosphere at the school, and extracurricular activities and sports programs at the school. All of the students speak highly of Charles Ray (Headmaster, Roxbury High School). Footage of Ray greeting students in the hall as they change classes.
1:00:07: Visual: Shots of the exterior of Roxbury High School on Greenville Street. Shots of the plaster statues at the entrance of the school. One of the statues has a cigarette stuck in its mouth. A male student enters the school. Shots of the houses on Greenville Street. 1:02:24: V: African American and white students sit in a classroom at Roxbury High School. A white female teacher talks to them about a book. She asks one of the students to read a paragraph. An African American male student reads from the book. The teacher asks the students questions about the passsage from the book. Shots of the students in the classroom. The students look at their books. The teacher and the students continue to discuss the book. Shots of the students seated at their desks. 1:06:50: V: Pam Bullard interviews a group of Roxbury High School students in a classroom. The students tell Bullard their names: Domingo Rivera, Ramon Alicea, Crystal Roach and Mark Benjamin. Bullard asks the students questions about Roxbury High School. Roach says that she is an the college program and has an internship at State Street Bank. Roach talks about her internship at the bank. Roach says that she would like to go to college and hopes for a scholarship. Alicea says that he is in the college program and is involved in the Upward Bound Program. Alicea talks about the Upward Bound Program; he says that the Upward Bound Program is helping him prepare his college applications. Alicea says that he plays for the football team. Rivera says that he is also in the college program and is involved in the Upward Bound Program. Rivera says that he has taken an English class through the Upward Bound Program. Rivera says that he does not know where he wants to go to college. Benjamin says that he is also in the college program. He says that he wants to major in sciences when he goes to college. Bullard asks Benjamin if he likes the school. Benjamin says that he likes the school. He adds that the majority of the students get along well at the school. 1:11:41: V: Bullard interviews Chiman Lee (Roxbury High School student); Lee has joined the group in the classroom. Lee says that he has recently moved to Boston and has been at Roxbury High School for six months. Lee says that he likes the teachers and students at the school. Lee adds that he is enrolled in the bilingual program. Bullard asks Roach what she likes about the school. Roach says that the teachers are helpful; that everyone gets along well. Roach says that she attended Charlestown High School for one week; that she transferred to Roxbury High School because she did not like Charlestown High School. Roach says that she likes Charles Ray (Headmaster, Roxbury High School) and the teachers at Roxbury High School. Roach says that Ray is helpful and friendly. Benjamin agrees that Ray is concerned about the students at the school. Benjamin talks about how much he likes going to school at Roxbury High School. He adds that the teachers are eager to help the students with their problems. Bullard asks about extracurricular activities at the school. Roach talks about the sports program and the annual Fall Festival at the school. Benjamin says that the sports teams would be better if all of the students participated. He talks about the football and basketball teams. Benjamin says that basketball is the most popular sport. Bullard asks Rivera about the baseball team. Rivera says that the baseball field is not very close to the school. He adds that it is inconvenient for some students to get to the field after school. Alicea says that the football team will be good this year. Bullard closes the interview. 1:17:38: V: The WGBH camera crew films Charles Ray as he greets students in the hallway of Roxbury High School. Ray greets most of the students by name. Some of the students wave and strike poses for the camera. Many students pass Ray in the hallway as they change classrooms. Some students stop to retrieve books from lockers in the hallway. Ray speaks to a teacher about the bilingual program at the school. Ray jokes with the students and urges them to go to their classrooms.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/13/1978
Description: Charles Ray, the Headmaster of Roxbury High School, talking to students, parents and faculty members in the offices of Roxbury High School. Pam Bullard interviews Ray in the administrative offices of the school. Ray talks about how the school has changed since the beginning of school desegregation in 1974. He notes that white attendance is still low, but that it is improving. Ray describes the school's bilingual program, and the academic programs set up at the school in conjunction with Harvard University. He says that many students from Roxbury High School received college scholarships last year, and discusses their college opportunities. Ray talks about the atmosphere at the school, and the close relationships between the students and the faculty. He notes that very few students transfer out of the school. He adds that most students feel comfortable at Roxbury High School. Ray says that he tries to learn the names of every student in the school. Ray talks about the challenges of urban education. He says that he encourages pregnant students to remain in school as long as possible. Ray says that he would like to see a program set up to allow students to bring their children to school with them. Ray describes the school's building and facilities. Ray tells Bullard that it is important to treat each student with respect.
1:00:05: Visual: Charles Ray (Headmaster, Roxbury High School) speaks to an African American female student in the office of Roxbury High School. He tells the student what she needs to do in order to change school assignments. 1:01:37: V: Pam Bullard sets up an interview with Ray. Ray talks about some of the photographs in the school office. He notes that the photos were taken by students from the school. Ray talks to a student who has entered the office. The student asks Ray about the television crew in the school office. Bullard notes that the Boston Public Schools are beginning their fifth year of desegregation. Bullard asks Ray how things have changed in five years. Ray notes that Roxbury High School was paired with South Boston High School during the first year of desegregation. Ray notes that only a small percentage of students from South Boston attended Roxbury High School during the first year of school desegregation. Ray says that Roxbury High School was placed in the same district as Charlestown High School during the second year of school desegregation; that Roxbury High School has remained in that district. Bullard asks Ray about white attendance at Roxbury High School. Ray says that the school has more white students now than it had during the first year of school desegregation. He notes that sixty-three white students have been assigned to the school this year; that twenty-five white students are in attendance. Ray says that he would like the Boston School Department to assign more white students to the school. Ray says that Roxbury High School has a bilingual program for Asian and Spanish-speaking students. Bullard asks Ray about Roxbury High School's programs in conjuction with Harvard University. Ray explains that Roxbury High School has been paired with Harvard University by the federal court order governing school desegregation in Boston. Ray talks about a tutoring program in which Harvard students tutor Roxbury High School students. Ray talks about the Harvard Upward Bound Program. He adds that Harvard and Roxbury High School have set up programs for students in advanced math and sciences, reading, and art. Ray explains that teachers and advanced students can take courses at Harvard University. 1:06:46: V: Bullard notes that students who attend Roxbury High School tend to stay at the school and do not transfer out. Ray agrees that not many students transfer out of the school. He adds that most students like the school and the faculty. Bullard asks Ray if many students from Roxbury High School attend college. Ray says that 74 students graduated from Roxbury High School in 1978; that 37 of those students went on to college. He adds that many of the students received scholarships last year. Ray adds that the Girls High Alumni Association has contributed to a scholarship fund for the students. Ray notes that many Roxbury High School students have done well in their college careers. Bullard asks why Roxbury High School has been a successful school. Ray says that the teachers get to know the students and their families very well. Ray notes that the faculty know most of the students by name; that the students feel comfortable at the school. Ray adds that these close relationships are the key to the school's success. Bullard asks Ray if he knows the name of every student at the school. Ray says that he is learning the names of all of the incoming freshmen; that he makes an effort to talk to the students in the hallways. Ray adds that he knows the names of all of the returning students. Bullard notes that all of the students like Ray and speak highly of him. Ray talks about the importance of knowing the name of each student. He adds that the students know that the teachers and other faculty members care about them. 1:11:43: V: Bullard asks how urban education has changed in the past decade. Ray says that programs for special needs students have changed; that pregnant students now stay in school. Ray says that he encourages pregnant students to stay in school for as long as they can. He says that he encourages them to return to school as soon as possible. Ray adds that he would like to start a program that would allow students to bring their children to school with them. He says that it might be difficult for Roxbury High School to meet the safety requirements for such a program. Bullard asks Ray if he would have chosen to be assigned to Roxbury High School. Ray says that he likes Roxbury High School. He adds that the school is structurally sound and has good facilities; that he likes the layout of the building. Ray says that the faculty at the school have a good relationship with the community and with the parents. Ray adds that he likes the atmosphere at small high schools. He says that each student gets personal attention at Roxbury High School. Bullard asks Ray what he has learned over the course of his career. Ray says that he has learned the importance of treating each student with respect. He says that the students treat him respectfully in return. Bullard closes the interview. 1:16:38: V: Ray stands behind the counter of the office at Roxbury High School. He answers questions from a student about her school schedule. Ray confers with a teacher about two problem students. Ray tells the teacher that he will speak to the students. Ray talks to two more students about their school schedules. Ray confers with another teacher in the office.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/13/1978
Description: Racially integrated, open classrooms at the Joseph Lee School in Dorchester. The teachers are primarily white. The classes are racially integrated; the majority of students are African American. Pam Bullard interviews Frances Kelley (Principal, Joseph Lee School) about school attendance, the faculty and the atmosphere at the school. Kelley is optimistic about the coming year. Bullard interviews two Roxbury High School students about their experiences at the school. Both are enthusiastic about the school, report little racial tension among students, and comment on how helpful headmaster Charles Ray is to the students.
0:59:58: Visual: Racially integrated classes enter the Joseph Lee School in Dorchester. The doors close. A few latecomers knock on the door to be let in. 1:02:01: V: Frances Kelley (Principal, Joseph Lee School) talks to a teacher about attendance. A white teacher helps students in an open classroom. The class is integrated, although a majority of the students are African American. The teacher helps the students learn how to print their names. The students color in pictures on their worksheets. Shot of a white student and an African American student sitting together at a table. 1:08:19: V: Shot of open classrooms at Lee School. Several classes are conducted at once. A teacher tells her students to stand up behind their chairs. The students stand and push their chairs in. Another white teacher teaches her class to read the names of colors. The class is racially integrated. 1:12:20: V: Pam Bullard sets up an interview with Frances Kelley (Principal, Joseph Lee School) in the open classrooms. Kelley admits that a certain percentage of students have not returned to the Lee School this year; that her staff will begin contacting their parents. Kelley says that parents are supportive of the programs at the Lee School; that some are upset because bus routes were consolidated this year; that there is some confusion over bus stops. Bullard comments that the Lee School lost some faculty this year. Kelley says that her faculty likes the school; that some are worried about losing their jobs due to the shrinking student population. Kelley says that morale tends to be low in June; that morale is higher in September when teachers return to school. Kelley says that the faculty at the Lee School is young, enthusiastic, and innovative; that the children like the school and its programs. 1:15:28: V: Bullard sets up an interview with a non-white female student (Betty) and a white male student (Paul) about their experiences at Roxbury High School. Both students opted to return to Roxbury High School after attending the previous year. Betty says that she likes the school because it is close to where she lives and it has good programs; that there are no problems. Paul says that he returned to Roxbury High School to play football; that he gets along well with the teachers and had no problems during the previous year; that he does not mind taking a bus to school. Betty says that there is no tension among the students at the school. Paul agrees that there are no racial problems. Betty says that it is a small school; that the teachers will give individual attention to the students. Paul says that everyone at the school seems to get along; that the teachers are willing to help the students with problems they might have; that Charles Ray (Headmaster, Roxbury High School) is a good principal. Bullard talks to the students informally while the crew takes cutaway shots. Betty says that she likes the programs at the high school; that there is a new chemistry lab; that students have access to photography equipment. Paul says that he moved to Boston from California last year; that people had told him not to attend Roxbury High School; that he liked the school after visiting it for the first time. Bullard comments that Roxbury High School does not deserve its bad reputation.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/09/1976