Description: Wreckage footage of World Airways crash in icy Boston Harbor off Logan runway. Speculative cause is said to be poor braking. Part of impromptu press conference with forensic anthropologist Dr. Clyde Snow. Additional footage of planes overhead.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/25/1982
Description: End of an interview with South African playwrights and actors Percy Mtwa and Mbongi Ngema at the Spingold Theater at Brandeis University about their play Woza Albert. The two men describe reactions to the play in the South African townships. Each man talks about his future plans. They shoot cutaways. Several takes of reporter standup by the box office of the theater.
0:58:59: Visual: Tug Yourgrau interviews South African actors Percy Mtwa and Mbongeni Ngema at the Spingold Theater at Brandeis University about their play Woza Albert. The first actor says that the play has been well-received in South Africa; that the response has been enthusiastic in the township. The first actor says that people in the township have stood up to sing the national anthem after seeing the play. Yourgrau asks about the actors' future plans. The first actor says that he will write another play. The second actor says that he is writing a screenplay; that he also is involved in music. The second actor says that he has another play which he might bring to the US. Both men say that they have enjoyed touring in the US. The first actor says that he has always dreamed of visiting the US. The first actor says that the play has been well received in the US. The crew takes cutaway shots of Yourgrau and the two actors. 1:02:05: V: Theatergoers purchase tickets at the box office of the Spingold Theater. Yourgrau stands in front of the entrance of the theater. Yourgrau reports that Woza Albert is now playing at the Spingold Theater; that negotiations to bring the play to the Spingold Theater lasted two years. Yourgrau notes that Woza Albert is a satire about life under apartheid; that the play is an international hit. Yourgrau does several takes of his report for the news story. Theatergoers enter the theater.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/08/1984
Description: Profile of cellist Yo-Yo Ma. Interview with Ma on his childhood playing. Ma plays a piece in his Cambridge living room. Ma talks about being a cello soloist and the small amount of music written for the cello. Interview with Benjamin Zander on working with Ma. Ma rehearses Brahms Trio and jokes around with violinist Lynn Chang and pianist Richard Kogan. Ma talks about his technique. Ma, Chang and Kogan play at a benefit for Cambodian refugees at Sanders Theater. Christopher Lydon introduces and ends report. He notes that Yo-Yo Ma is having surgery on his spine.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/21/1980
Description: Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) endorses Mel King (candidate for Mayor of Boston) at a press conference at Northeastern University. Jim King (Senior Vice President, Northeastern University) introduces Young. Young talks about King's candidacy for mayor of Boston. King says that he and Young have discussed ideas for local job creation and for trade between local businesses and third world markets. In response to audience questions, Young talks about his recommendation that King set up a trade mission to export local manufactured goods. King discusses the value of his endorsement of King and the differences among the political situations in Boston, Chicago, and Philadelphia. Young says that he does not consider Boston to be a racist city. Young talks about the potential impact of the African American community on the election outcome. Young refuses to comment on the the presidential campaign of Jesse Jackson.
1:00:06: Visual: Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) walks sits down at a table next to Mel King (candidate for Mayor of Boston). Mel King's campaign signs are visible on the walls of the room. Behind King and Young is a Northeastern University flag. A young African American woman announces that Young and "future mayor" Mel King will speak; that they will take questions after. Jim King (Senior Vice President, Northeastern University) introduces Young. He reviews Young's accomplishments. Shots of the audience. Young says that King's leadership will benefit Boston. Young talks about the importance of housing and neighborhood revitalization. Young says that King will work to reduce unemployment; that King will work with existing businesses and help to build new businesses. Young says that King is familiar with urban problems. Young commends King for his strong marriage, his family, and his values. 1:03:33: V: King calls Young "Mayor Class." King says that Young is one of the classiest politicians in the world; that Young has a world view which allows him make connections between his city and events in the greater world. King says that he and Young discussed how to create jobs in Boston; that Young has given him advice on how to unlock third world markets; that the city can help neighborhoods and businesses take advantages of these markets to create jobs. King thanks Young for coming to Boston. The audience applauds. 1:05:53: V: The audience asks questions. An audience member asks Young about his experiences as the Mayor of Atlanta. Young says that it is "fun" to solve local problems. Young says that he has recommended that King set up an export trading company to help export the city's manufactured goods. Young talks about trade missions that he has undertaken as Mayor of Atlanta. Young says that he has gone on trade missions to Trinidad and Jamaica, and is planning a trade mission to Nigeria. Young talks about how trade missions can benefit local businesses and industry. Young says that he and Henry Cisneros (Mayor of San Antonio) share the leadership of a task force for the National League of Cities; that mayors can create jobs by promoting international opportunities for local industry. Young says that Boston could export many products; that King is concerned about creating jobs through exports. Young says that he appointed a woman as Deputy Chief of Police in Atlanta; that her appointment heightened awareness of crimes against women in the city. Young says that it is important for a mayor to be responsive to problems of those who have been ignored; that King will be responsive. 1:09:59: V: An audience member asks Young about the value of his endorsement of King. Young says that Boston needs a good mayor; that he does not judge Boston to be a racist city on the basis of the actions of a few "hoodlums"; that there are voters who will elect King on the basis of his values and his positions on unemployment and crime; that skin color is not important. Young says that he is here as an urban mayor to remind people about important urban issues; that he is able to get television exposure for King. The audience applauds. An audience member asks Young about similarities in the political situations in Boston, Chicago and Philadelphia. Young says that there are few similarities; that there was a "revolution" against the mayor in Chicago; that there is more racial antagonism in Chicago than there is in Boston. Young says that Wilson Goode (candidate for Mayor of Philadelphia) will be elected because of his experience and broad support. Young says that he hopes King will emerge with broad support in Boston. Young refers to Boston's revolutionary history, saying that he hopes the city will rally around King. 1:14:11: V: An audience member points out that Boston has a small African American community with a record of low voter turnout. Young uses the example of Los Angeles as a city with a small minority population and a popularly elected African American mayor. An audience member asks Young to speculate on the chances of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) being elected to the presidency. Young says that it is too soon to speculate on anyone's campaign for the presidency. 1:16:23: V: Young answers more questions from the audience. Shots of Young from behind the audience and media; of members of the audience. Audio cuts in and out during this segment. Young talks about the need for "open and honest" government and a good relationship with the press. King answers a question about his campaign. The moderator announces an end to the press conference. 1:18:45: V: Young and King greet members of the audience and the media.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/22/1983
Description: Tug Yourgrau interviews Zwelakhe Sisulu (South African journalist) about reactions in the South African townships to the play Woza Albert. Sisulu discusses censorship and the facilities in the townships where the play has been staged. Yourgrau and Sisulu talk about why the South African government has failed to ban Woza Albert; they talk about the government's attitude toward Bishop Desmond Tutu (South African anti-apartheid leader). Yourgrau and Sisulu discuss the effect of the Soweto uprising on black political consciousness in South Africa and the related politicization of black theater in South Africa. Yourgrau and Sisulu analyze the relationship of black theater to political rallies in South Africa and to black political culture. Sisulu talks about the multi-lingual, multi-ethnic nature of black South African society. Sisulu discusses the banning of theater groups or theatrical works by the South African government. Sisulu says that black theater portrays the situation in South Africa more accurately than the US media.
0:00:59: Visual: Tug Yourgrau interviews Zwelakhe Sisulu (South African journalist). The two are sitting among shelves of books. Yourgrau asks about the reaction to Woza Albert in the South African townships. Sisulu says that the play has had a good run in the townships; that the actors have enjoyed a good rapport with the audiences in the townships; that the audience becomes part of the play when it is run in the townships. Yourgrau asks where plays are staged in the townships. Sisulu says that the play is run in community halls or church halls in the townships; that there are no theaters in the townships. Sisulu notes that the play must have the approval of the township superintendent in order to be staged in the community hall. Sisulu says that the facilities in the township are inadequate. Sisulu says that the township supervisors are appointees of the South African government; that they are members of the white ruling party. Yourgrau notes that Woza Albert has never been banned. Sisulu notes that Woza Albert has never been staged in a community hall; that community halls were burnt down in 1976. Sisulu says that Woza Albert was staged in church halls or independently owned halls in the black community. Sisulu says that community halls were rebuilt as administrative offices for the government. Yourgrau asks if the government has shown tolerance by not banning the play. Sisulu says that the black community is beginning to exhibit some power in South Africa; that the black community is more militant. Sisulu notes that the government is aware that a ban of the play could provoke a crisis. Yourgrau asks about the government's attitude toward Bishop Desmond Tutu (South African anti-apartheid leader). Sisulu says that the government would like to jail Tutu; that the government cannot act against Tutu because of his standing in the international community. Sisulu says that the government cannot ban Woza Albert because of its international reputation. 1:05:22: V: Yourgrau asks again about the reaction to Woza Albert in the black townships. Sisulu talks about the good rapport between the actors and the audience in the townships. Sisulu says that the audience is seeing their own lives played out on stage. Yourgrau asks about the effect of the Soweto uprising on black consciousness in South Africa. Sisulu asks Yourgrau to define "black consciousness." Yourgrau asks about black political consciousness. Sisulu says that South African blacks began to assert their power in 1976. Sisulu talks about the origins of protest theater and protest poetry in 1969. Sisulu says that contemporary black theater in South African focuses on social issues and apartheid; that earlier black theater focused on entertaining people. Sisulu says that 1976 brought changes in black political consciousness and in black theater. Yourgrau asks how black theater has changed. Sisulu talks about the change in black theater since 1976. Sisulu says that theater has turned away from singing and dancing; that one-man and two-man plays are common since 1976. Sisulu says that contemporary black theater in South Africa is concerned with creating a dialogue about apartheid and South African society. 1:09:59: V: Yourgrau asks if black theater is present at political rallies in South Africa. Sisulu says that a typical political rally in Soweto includes speeches, poetry, and theater. Sisulu notes that speeches are often in English; that the plays are performed in native languages; that theater is used to get the message across to all people. Sisulu says that theater has become a part of black political culture. Yourgrau asks about the multiple languages used in Woza Albert. Sisulu says that black South African culture is multi-lingual. Sisulu says that black South Africans are not divided by language or ethnicity; that residents of Soweto can communicate in several different languages. Yourgrau asks if theater groups have been banned in South Africa. Sisulu says that a theater group was banned along with other organizations in October of 1977. Sisulu says that the government would ban a particular script instead of all works by a particular playwright. Sisulu adds that township managers would refuse to give permission for some plays to be staged. Yourgrau asks if the recent strike by black workers in the Transvaal area is an isolated event. Sisulu says that the US media does not present an accurate depiction of events in South Africa; that the US media portrays the situation in terms of riots and disturbances. Sisulu says that there is a "low-scale civil war" in South Africa. Sisulu says that South African black theater accurately reflects the situation.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/08/1984