Description: Martin Luther King, Jr. received his doctorate of theology from Boston University in 1955, and he donated more than 80,000 personal papers to the university before he died. Coretta Scott King has filed suit against the university to get the papers returned to her. Interviews with students on campus about whether BU should return the papers to Scott King. The law firm of Melvin Miller, a BU Trustee, is handling the case for the university. Miller has accused Scott King of trying to profit from her husbands' materials. Scott King does not believe that King's agreement with the university is binding. Interview with BU Vice President Greg Felker and Black Student Union President Kiphanie Radford about the case. Shots of the papers and footage of Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King. This tape includes additional footage of King's papers on display at BU.
1:00:10: Visual: Black and white footage of Martin Luther King (civil rights leader) delivering the "I Have a Dream" speech. Marcus Jones reports that King was one of Boston University's most distinguished graduates; that King received his doctorate of theology from the university in 1955; that a statue in honor of King was placed on the campus after his assassination in 1968. V: Shots of students on the BU campus near the statue honoring King; of the statue honoring King. Jones reports that King donated more than 80,000 personal papers to the university before he died; that Coretta Scott King (widow of King) wants the papers returned to her. V: Black and white shots of King. Shots of the King papers on display; of Coretta Scott King. Jones reports that Coretta Scott King has filed suit against BU. V: Shot of Coretta Scott King standing near the Martin Luther King's grave. Footage of a white male student saying that the university should give the papers back; of an Asian American female student saying that BU is within its rights to keep the papers. Footage of a white female student saying that BU should return the papers if they are not being cared for properly. Footage of a male student saying that Coretta Scott King should have the papers. Jones reports that the law firm of Melvin Miller (BU Trustee) is handling the case for the university; that Miller accuses Coretta Scott King of trying to make a profit from her husband's written material. V: Footage of Miller addressing an audience. Shot of a newspaper article in The Daily Free Press with a headline reading, "Miller: Mrs. King not telling the truth." Footage of King delivering the "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington in 1963. Shot of Coretta Scott King. Jones reports that Coretta Scott King claims that Martin Luther King had changed his mind about keeping his papers at BU before his death. Jones notes that Miller disputes the claim by Coretta Scott King. V: Footage of Greg Felker (Vice President, BU Student Union) saying that BU should return the papers. Felker adds that there is evidence to support Coretta Scott King's claim that Martin Luther King changed his mind about housing the papers at BU. Footage of Kiphanie Radford (President, BU Black Student Union) saying that there may be merit in BU's refusal to return the papers. Shot of King's papers on display. Text of a quote from King is displayed on screen. Jones quotes a letter written by King to BU: "In the event of my death, all such materials deposited with the University shall become from that date the absolute property of Boston University." Jones says that Coretta Scott King claims that King's letter is not binding. V: Shots of Coretta Scott King at the grave of Martin Luther King; of a sign for the Martin Luther King Jr. reading room at Boston University. Jones stands on the BU campus. Jones reports that the public outcry surrounding the issue has not convinced BU to return the papers. Jones adds that BU is scheduled to respond to Coretta Scott King's charges on Monday, which is the anniversary of King's death.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/01/1988
Description: Candid interview with Kitty Dukakis in her home after five years of sobriety. She talks about her addiction to prescription drugs, and the potential risk associated with habit forming and mood altering drugs. She talks about her husband, Michael Dukakis, confronting her when he found her pills. She compares her personality on pills to her personality when sober. They shoot cutaways. Christopher Lydon reasks questions for editing. Editor's note: Content given off the record was edited out of this footage.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/08/1987
Description: Digital Corporation sponsors a demonstration of the evolution of voice technology at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. A moderator and a group of speakers answer questions from the audience about voice technology and computing technology. The speakers and audience discuss the importance of access to this technology by the blind and disabled. The moderator introduces musician Stevie Wonder. A short clip of Saturday Night Live is played, featuring Stevie Wonder as a news reporter. Wonder speaks to the audience about the opportunities provided to him through technology. He explains the transition from acoustic technology to a more visual technology in terms of music. Wonder discusses his experiences with technology and explains how he works with a Kurzweil reading machine, a DECtalk computer and a synthesizer to compose music. He explains how technology helps further opportunity. Wonder thanks the creators of this technology. Tape 1 of 2
0:59:59: Visual: A man stands at a podium, talking about the evolution of voice technology at a demonstration of the Kurzweil voice recognition machine at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. The man talks about the applications of voice technology in computer-assisted instruction. He talks about speech synthesis and speech recognition as two components of computer-assisted instruction devices. The man says that computer-assisted instruction devices can help young children learn. 1:01:36: V: The audience applauds. The moderator invites the audience to ask questions of the speakers. The speakers are gathered beside the podium, in front of a large banner for the Digital Corporation. The moderator talks about Digital's commitment to promoting and furthering technology in the interests of the company and the greater community. An audience member asks about the sales of the voice recognition machine. The moderator says that the product is successful; that sales figures are not the focus of this conference. 1:03:26: V: The man who spoke answers a question at the podium. The man talks about silicon technology. He says that the price of silicon chips will continue to decline. He says that his company has an active research and development team; that they are working hard to incorporate the latest technology into their products. The man predicts that the future will bring more powerful devices at lower costs; that companies in the field would like to provide computing devices which are affordable for individuals. Another man says that blind people can benefit from voice recognition machines which are available at their workplaces or through community organizations. He notes that blind people can access the machines in these ways, even if they cannot afford to buy one. The first man quotes a statistic indicating that two-thirds of all blind college students have access to a Kurzweil reading machine through their college campuses. The man notes that the Xerox Corporation donated reading machines to many college campuses. A third man approaches the podium. He says that many corporations are interested in donating machines to appropriate organizations; that corporations want to provide access to the machines. 1:05:33: V: The moderator tells the audience that there will be a question and answer period after the presentation of Stevie Wonder (pop singer). A fourth man talks about Wonder's Kurzweil music synthesizer. The man talks about Wonder's involvement with technology. The man talks about Wonder's accomplishments and his efforts to establish a holiday in honor of Martin Luther King (African American civil rights leader). The man talks about recent awards given to Wonder. 1:07:00: V: The audience applauds as Wonder enters the room. A man guides Wonder to the podium. Wonder introduces a video presentation, which begins to play. The video presentation shows Wonder doing a parody of a music critic on Saturday Night Live (late night TV show). 1:09:09: V: Wonder talks about the opportunities provided to him through technology. Wonder talks about the contributions made to the technology which allows him to communicate more fully. Wonder says that technology is his "little sister, big brother, mother and father. I get inspired by it." He talks about learning and developing along with technology. Wonder says that he was first introduced to technology through learning the Braille language; that the Braille language provided him with a fundamental understanding of technology; that he applies that lesson to the machines he encounters today. Wonder says that technology has become more visual; that blind people need to be able to read or hear visual displays on machines. Wonder thanks the technological community for allowing him to access to technology through voice recognition. Wonder says that he used a Teleprompter for the blind during his appearance on Saturday Night Live. Wonder talks about his portable Braille machine, which allows him to access information on a cassette tape. Wonder talks about the pleasure of reading a book through the Kurzweil reading machine. Wonder talks about the DECtalk machine. Wonder says that the DECtalk machine can read Braille input in English. Wonder talks about the usefulness of the DECtalk machine. Wonder says that he will show the audience how the DECtalk machine can read the visual output of a Kurzweil machine, which allows him to use synthesizers without relying on visuals. Wonder says that he is frustrated that these machines are not more accessible to the blind. Wonder says that this technology must be made available to the handicapped and non-handicapped alike; that demand for the product will lead to greater access. Wonder urges the technology community to apply its skill to create greater access for all people. Wonder thanks the creators of the technology and the audience. The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/29/1985
Description: Stevie Wonder demonstrates a Kurweil Reading Machine with text-to-speech capability, which enables blind people to read printed text. He uses the machine to help him read instructions for his synthesizer, so he can compose a song. He jokes around with the audience. He sings part of "I Just Called to Say I Love You." A Boston politician presents Wonder with a commemorative award of his visit to Boston. Wonder addresses the crowd and talks about how the Reading Machine is making a more "harmonious world." Several takes of reporter stand up. A man demonstrates a computer with a touchscreen and Deck Talk features.
1:00:00: Visual: An audience from the technology industry is gathered in the ballroom of the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. Stevie Wonder (pop singer) is at the front of the room, preparing to demonstrate the Kurzweil reading machine and DECtalk machine, which allow him to fully operate a synthesizer. Wonder stands before the keyboard. Wonder explains that the computer keyboard interfaces with the synthesizer; that he cannot operate the machine because he cannot see the controls. Wonder pushes a knob and a computerized voice says what the button does. Wonder begins to program the keyboard. Wonder program the keyboard to play like a piano. Wonder programs the synthesizer to lay down a drumbeat. Wonder stops the drumbeat. Wonder plays and records the tune to the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." The audience applauds when he finishes. 1:05:57: V: Wonder says that the synthesizer allows him to create the sound of a band. He jokes that he cannot afford a band of his own. Wonder programs the synthesizer to sound like drums. Wonder plays the drum track over the recorded tune to the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." Shots of the audience. The audience applauds when he finishes. Wonder programs the synthesizer to play bass and strings. Wonder has to try a few times before successfully programming the machine. Wonder adds a track with strings to the other tracks of the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." 1:13:48: V: The audience applauds. Wonder sings along to the recorded tracks of the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." He adds a line to the song, singing "What it is, is something true, that technology like this makes it possible for me to do." The audience sings and claps along with Wonder. Wonder sings a line, thanking DEC (Digital Equipment Corporation) and Raymond Kurzweiler (inventor of the reading machine). The audience gives Wonder a standing ovation. Wonder is guided to the podium. 1:17:16: V: Shots of the audience. A speaker presents Wonder with a silver Revere Bowl from Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) commemorating his visit to Boston. The audience applauds. 1:18:15: V: Shot of Wonder from the back of the room. Wonder stands at the podium. He talks about how technology makes communication easier. Shots of audience applauding. Meg Vaillancourt stands at the back of the room. Vaillancourt reports on Wonder's demonstration of new technology. 1:20:08: V: Shots of a computer on display at a vendor's table. Vaillancourt interviews the computer vendor. The computer vendor demonstrates the touch-sensitive screen on his computer. A computerized voice identifies which icon has been pushed. The computer vendor explains that the screen can show either text icons or picture icons. The computer vendor talks about the different voice options on the computer. The computer vendor programs the computer voices to repeat stock phrases for the camera.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/29/1985
Description: Douglas Wilder, the Democratic candidate for Governor of Virginia, visits the African Meeting House in Boston. Wilder speaks to Director Ruth Batson. Reporter Marcus Jones notes that Wilder is expected to win the election; he adds that Wilder will become the first African American governor of any state in the nation. Jones reviews Wilder's career. Interview with Wilder at the African Meeting House. He talks about his campaign for governor. Wilder downplays speculation that he could be a presidential candidate in 1992. Jones notes that Wilder is visiting Boston to meet supporters and to raise funds for his campaign. Following the edited story is additional footage of Wilder visiting the Meeting House and footage of Jones's interview with Wilder.
1:00:03: Visual: Footage of L. Douglas Wilder (Democratic candidate for governor of Virginia) autographing his picture for an admirer outside of the African Meeting House on Joy Street in Boston. Shots of Wilder entering the Meeting House; of a group of people following Wilder into the Meeting House. Shot of the exterior of the Meeting House. Marcus Jones reports that Wilder is not a familiar face to Massachusetts voters. V: Footage of Ruth Batson (Director, African Meeting House) speaking informally to Wilder and a small group of people. Batson tells Wilder that he joins a long list of illustrious African Americans to pass through the Meeting House. Wilder says that he was named for Frederick Douglass (Nineteenth-century abolitionist). Shots of Wilder in the Meeting House; of the media in the Meeting House. Jones reports that Wilder is the current Lieutenant Governor of Virginia; that Wilder will become the Democratic nominee for governor of Virginia next month. Jones reports that Wilder is attracting national attention because he is expected to win the election. V: Shot of Wilder examing an exhibit in the Meeting House. Shot of a newspaper headline reading, "Black Virginia Politician rests at brink of history." The article is accompanied by a photo of Wilder. Jones reports that no African American has been elected governor of any state in the US. V: Footage of Wilder being interviewed by Jones at the Meeting House. Wilder says that he had high aspirations when he was young; that he never expected to be in this position when he entered politics in 1969. Wilder says that it is significant for an African American to be the Democratic nominee for governor of Virginia. Jones reports that Wilder is in Boston to meet supporters and to raise money for his campaign. Jones notes that Wilder has tried to remain neutral on racial issues; that 80% of Virginia's electorate is white. V: Shots of a black and white photo in an exhibit at the Meeting House; of Wilder talking to an African American woman as he stands near an exhibit at the Meeting House. Jones reports that Wilder entered politics as a state senator in 1969; that Wilder represented the city of Richmond. Jones notes that Wilder has become more conservative on some issues since 1969; that Wilder has run unopposed for the gubernatorial nomination in Virginia. Jones adds that Wilder is a highly respected member of the Democratic establishment in Virginia; that some predict that Wilder could move into national politics. V: Shot of the newspaper article about Wilder. Footage of Wilder being interviewed by Jones. Jones asks Wilder if he could see himself as president in 1992. Wilder says that he hopes to be enjoying his post as governor of Virginia in 1992. Wilder says that he is concentrating on the gubernatorial race in Virginia; that he thinks he is the most qualified candidate to become governor of Virginia. Shot of Wilder with supporters outside of the African Meeting House.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/18/1989
Description: Hope Kelly reports that Charles Laquidara (WBCN disc jockey) is leading a radio campaign against the Shell Oil Company. Laquidara is encouraging listeners to cut up their Shell credit cards to protest Shell's involvement with the repressive South African government. The campaign is part of a larger international boycott aimed at all Shell products. Interview with Laquidara about the campaign. Footage of Laquidara and employees in the WBCN studios and footage of Roger Clemens (Boston Red Sox) in the WBCN studios. Kelly quotes Norm Allsteader (Shell Oil Company) as denying any Shell involvement with the South African government. Kelly reports that Jerry Straccia (Shell Oil dealer in East Boston) is feeling the effects of the boycott. Interview with Straccia about the boycott. Straccia criticizes the boycott. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Teachers and parents are frustrated over new starting times for the Boston Public Schools for the coming school year and Meg Vaillancourt interviews Elma Lewis about the Roxbury neighborhood
1:00:13: Visual: Footage of Charles Laquidara (WBCN disc jockey) in the WBCN radio studio. Laquidara introduces a song. Shots of Laquidara putting up anti-apartheid signs in the studio. Shots of the signs. Footage of Laquidara saying on-air that the Shell Oil Company supports the South African "military machine." Hope Kelly reports that Laquidara is leading a radio campaign called "Shell shock"; that Laquidara is encouraging radio listeners to cut up their Shell credit cards in order to protest Shell's involvement with the South African government. V: Shots of a WBCN female employee opening the mail; of cut up credit cards pulled from the envelopes. Kelly reports that local celebrities are participating in the campaign. V: Footage of Roger Clemens (Boston Red Sox pitcher) in the WBCN studio. Clemens reads an anti-apartheid radio spot. Kelly reports that Clemens came in to do a radio spot; that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has turned in his credit card. V: Shots of WBCN employee pulling cut-up credit cards from envelopes received by WBCN. V: Footage of Laquidara in the studio, being interviewed by Kelly. Laquidara says that twenty or thirty credit cards are being turned in each day; that he would like to see 1,000 credit cards be turned in each day. Laquidara says that each credit card represents money to Shell. Shot of a sign above a Shell gas station. Kelly reports that the Shell Company says that the campaign has had no effect. V: Footage of Laquidara saying that he hopes these campaigns will convince Shell to get out of South Africa; that he hopes other companies will follow suit. Laquidara says getting out of South Africa is the right thing for Shell to do. Shot of a radio script with instructions for listeners on how to participate in the campaign. Kelly reports that Laquidara's campaign is part of a larger international boycott aimed at all Shell products. Kelly notes that Royal Dutch Shell has approximately 300 subsidiaries; that Shell Oil Company is a visible subsidiary in the US. V: Shot of Laquidara in the studio holding a bumper sticker reading, "Get the Shell out of South Africa." Laquidara speaks on the air. Shots of a car pulling up to a Shell gas station; of a large Shell sign above the gas station. A quote from Norm Allsteader (Shell Oil Company) appears written on-screen. Kelly quotes Norm Allsteader (Shell Oil Company) as saying that "Shell Oil Company has no employees, no investments, and certainly sells no oil to South Africa." V: Footage of Laquidara saying that members of the Board of Directors of Royal Dutch Shell sit in on board meetings at the Shell subsidiary in Houston, Texas. A second quote from Norm Allsteader (Shell Oil Company) appears written on-screen. Kelly quotes Allsteader as saying, "No Shell company outside of South Africa is sending any oil to South Africa." V: Shot of Jerry Straccia (Shell oil dealer in East Boston) wiping the gas pumps clean at his Shell gas station. Kelly stands in the parking lot of Straccia's Shell station in East Boston. Kelly reports that there are over 300 Shell stations in New England. Kelly notes that Straccia says that he is feeling the effects of the boycott. V: Footage of Straccia standing in front of gas pumps at his station. Straccia says that Laquidara's campaign is going to hurt a lot of people before it affects Shell. Shot of the Shell sign above Straccia's gas station. Shot of Straccia and a mechanic looking under the hood of a car. Audio of Straccia saying that he has noticed a 50% drop in business; that the decline is most noticeable during the morning hours when Laquidara is on the air. Kelly reports that Straccia has been a Shell dealer for over three years; that Straccia had been a fan of Laquidara until now. V: Shots of Straccia standing near the gas pumps; of the handle of a gas pump in the gas tank of a car. Kelly reports that Straccia has not spoken to any other Shell dealers about the campaign; that Straccia has spoken to Laquidara. V: Footage of Straccia saying that Laquidara told him that he understands Straccia's position. Straccia says that he does not think that Laquidara understands how much he is hurting Straccia. Footage of Laquidara saying that he does not know how long he will keep the campaign going.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/23/1988
Description: Larry Bird wins MVP award for the third year in a row. NBA commissioner David Stern announces the award. Bird gives comments upon receiving it. Interviews with Bill Russell, Hakeem Olajuwon and Tommy Heinsohn. Montage of Celtics game play featuring Bird.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/28/1986
Description: Marcus Jones reports on proposals by Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) to improve educational standards in the Boston Public School System. Jones' report includes footage of Wilson at a press conference. Wilson discusses his goals and agenda for improving the level of education in the school system. Jones reviews Wilson's proposals. Jones' report includes footage from an interview with John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee). Nucci comments on Wilson's proposals and talks about efforts by the Boston School Committee to find funding for the proposals.
0:59:59: Visual: Footage of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) at a press conference, talking about his goal to improve the level of education in the Boston Public School System. Marcus Jones reports that Wilson has proposed a comprehensive education improvement plan for the schools; that the plan is now under review by the Boston School Committee. V: Footage of Wilson saying that 20% of first graders did not pass first grade last year; that Boston students do not read well; that students do not perform well on standardized tests. Jones reports that the average senior graduating from Boston Public Schools read at a seventh grade level; that Wilson wants to raise that level. V: Shots of students in a classroom; of male high school students in the hallway of a high school. Footage of Wilson saying that graduating seniors should be able to read at the eighth grade level at least; that eighth graders should be able to read at a sixth grade level. Shot of a school hallway. On-screen text lists Wilson's proposals for stricter promotion standards, for more reading assignments, for programs to retain dropouts and for an increase in writing and math course work. Shots of a teacher teaching reading to elementary school students; of students in the classroom. Jones reports that budget cuts may force the layoff of forty teachers. V: Footage of Wilson saying that some positions and programs can be cut from the budget. Footage of John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) saying that the School Committee needs to find ways to fund Wilson's initiatives; that the School Committee is already cutting the school budget by $10 million. Nucci says that Wilson's proposals are valuable; that the School Committee will cut the budget to fund the proposals. Jones stands outside the offices of the Boston School Committee. Jones reports that Wilson's initiatives will address sixteen areas of concern in the school system; that Wilson submitted thirteen proposals to the School Committee today.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/12/1987
Description: Laval Wilson (candidate for Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) prepares for his interview with the Boston School Committee. He arranges several large posterboards around and in front of a table in the School Committee chambers. Eileen Jones interviews Wilson about his upcoming interview with the School Committee. Wilson says that he will try to show the School Committee that he is the best candidate for the job. He adds that posters and visual aids help him to communicate. Wilson says that he hopes to have the support of a broad spectrum of community groups and not just the African American community. Wilson declines to identify himself as "conservative." Wilson begins his interview with the School Committee. Wilson talks about his previous experience and his thorough understanding of school desegregation issues and school curricula. Wilson answers questions about remedial education. A member of the School Committee asks Wilson why two African American members of the School Committee do not support his candidacy. Wilson says that he is not familiar with the politics of individual committee members; he adds that he is an educator who happens to be black. Wilson says that he would like to be superintendent for all students and members of the community. Wilson notes that educational programs are more important than ethnicity. Jones reports on the interview and the School Committee's process in selecting a new superintendent.
1:00:00: Visual: Dr. Laval Wilson (candidate for Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) prepares for his interview with the Boston School Committee for the post of superintendent. He arranges several large posterboards around and in front of a table in the School Committee chambers. The boards display papers, advertisements and articles representing his achievements. Members of the press are gathered in front of the table. Several members of the press take photographs. Eileen Jones (WGBH reporter) comments that Wilson does not look nervous. Wilson says that he is a professional; that he has confidence in his abilities; that he hopes to convince the Boston School Committee to hire him. Crowd noise muffles the audio. Jones asks Wilson about his chances of being hired. Wilson says that he is one of three candidates; that he does not know how the School Committee will respond to his candidacy; that he plans to demonstrate his abilities and to answer the School Committee's questions. Wilson mentions that he will use visual aids in his presentation to the School Committee; that the visual aids document his career; that he plans to discuss ideas. Jones comments that the visual aids seem "showy." Wilson says that visual aids help him to learn and communicate better; that the visual aids document his abilities in several areas including planning, budget development, and partnerships. Jones asks how Wilson feels about African Americans in Boston coming out to support his candidacy. Wilson says that he does not know anything about it; that he is concentrating on his interview with the School Committee; that he hopes the entire community will support his candidacy. Wilson says that he is delighted to have support from the African American community; that he hopes to have support of the entire school system and a broad spectrum of community groups. Jones asks Wilson about his reputation as a tough administrator. Wilson says that descriptions are subjective; that he considers himself a "professional educator." Jones asks Wilson if he considers himself "conservative." Wilson says that he considers himself as a school superintendent, not as a liberal or a conservative. 1:06:10: V: Wilson sits down at the table, which faces the members of the Committee. John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) warns the audience to be silent during the interview and presentation, so as not to distract Wilson. Nucci asks Wilson why he would like to be Superintendent of Boston Public Schools. Wilson arranges the microphones on the table. Wilson describes his previous experiences including his positions as a superintendent in Rochester NY, Berkeley CA, and on Long Island. Wilson says that he has a thorough understanding of school desegregation policies and school curricula. He describes his experiences in working with government agencies and lobbying for school funding. Wilson describes his planning abilities and his commitment to working with parent groups. Shot of the members of the school committee. Kevin McCluskey (Boston School Committee) asks Wilson a question about remedial education. Shot of Wilson. Wilson talks about his experience in and views on remedial education programs. Shots of African American audience members. Wilson talks about the possibility of extending the school day. Committee members ask Wilson questions about a specific remedial education program. Wilson talks about the need to close the gap between low-achievement scores and high-achievement scores. Shots of the audience; of individual audience members. 1:13:03: V: Wilson says that he is not the type of person to brag about his achievements; that he must highlight his achievements in order to be considered for this post; that he considers himself to be one of the most qualified superintendents in the nation. Wilson notes that he was selected as one of the top 100 executive educators in the nation; that he has a strong reputation across the nation. A member of the Committee asks Wilson why African American School Committee members John O'Bryant and Jean McGuire do not support his candidacy. The member says, "What do they know about you that we don't know about you?" Wilson says that he does not know why O'Bryant and McGuire do not support him; that a superintendent needs to make decisions for students of all races; that he is a school educator who happens to be black. Wilson says that he has not read the newspapers; that he is not familiar with the politics of individual Committee members. The same committee member asks Wilson what it means to be an educator "who also happens to be black." The committee member asks Wilson if he will deal with minority students who are not getting an education, or if he will "keep playing a game." Wilson says that the superintendent needs to implement the best educational programs for the school population. Wilson says that he would not like his statements as superintendent to be seen as "the black statement"; that he would not be the superintendent for any particular group; that he would be the superintendent for the whole community. Wilson says that the superintendent cannot afford to be associated with one particular ethnic group; that the superintendent has to work together with all staff, students, parents, and community groups. Wilson says that it is important to consider issues, not skin color. Wilson says that ethnicity can be an issue; that every ethnic group has its own specific concerns; that educational programs are more important than ethnicity. 1:18:55: V: Jones reports that the interviews with candidates are not the end of the selection process; that School Committee members will make site visits to the school districts of each candidate. Jones notes that the School Committee will elect a new superintendent on July 31. Jones does two takes of her closing to the news story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/19/1985
Description: Marcus Jones reports that Dr. Laval Wilson, Superintendent of Boston Public Schools, has announced cuts to the school budget. Jones outlines the nature of the cost-saving measures and reports that additional cuts may be necessary. Wilson talks about the budget at a press conference. Interview with John Nucci, President of Boston School Committee, about Wilson's attempt to cut costs in the budget. Jones notes that the Boston School Committee has rejected Wilson's proposal to consolidate eight schools. School Committee meeting. This tape includes additional footage from the end of a news story on mental illness.
1:01:08: Marcus Jones reports that Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) has announced cuts to the school budget. Visual: Shots of Wilson at a press conference; of an audience member looking at a handout of the budget. Footage of Wilson saying that he was faced with difficult decisions when he made the budget cuts. Shots of a list of names of school administrators targeted for layoffs. Jones reports that the superintendent submitted a $292 million budget last month; that the mayor had allotted $288 million for the school budget. Jones notes that the total for the new budget is $289.3 million; that more budget cuts may be necessary. V: Footage of Wilson saying that he has tried not to cut programs; that he has made minimal cuts in the school support staff. Shot of the printed cover of Wilson's preliminary budget. Jones reports that Wilson has recommended layoffs for 90 teachers, administrators and office workers; that Wilson has cut chosen not to implement a $2 million program geared toward reducing the school dropout rate; that Wilson had eliminated a $6 million request for repairs to aging school facilities. V: Footage of John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) saying that Wilson has made a good effort to preserve educational programs while staying within the budget. Jones reports that the School Committee vetoed Wilson's proposal to cut costs by closing or consolidating eight schools. Jones notes that Wilson has made cuts elsewhere in the budget. V: Shots of audience members at a School Committee meeting. The audience members hold up signs protesting school closings. Shot of a sign reading, "JP is a pleasure because JP is a treasure." Shots of Wilson at the meeting. Footage of Nucci saying that the School Committee will not cut educational programs for at-risk youth; that the Boston Public Schools have an "astronomical dropout rate." Marcus Jones stands outside the offices of the Boston School Committee. Jones reports that the School Committee will discuss the new budget proposal next Tuesday; that members of the public will have an opportunity to weigh in on the proposed budget.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/14/1986
Description: Dr. Laval Wilson and members of the Boston School Committee assemble themselves at a press conference in Wilson's office. The media sets up a shot of Wilson and Nucci signing copies of Wilson's contract. Wilson and Nucci shake hands. Wilson shakes hands with each member of the School Committee. Wilson takes questions from reporters. Wilson talks about his enthusiasm for his new post. He says that his biggest challenge will be to familiarize himself with the issues and problems within the school system. A reporter asks Wilson about the politics of the school system. Wilson says that politics are always involved in public education. Wilson says that he and his family are making themselves at home in the city. Wilson answers reporters' questions about Arthur Garrity (federal judge) and his supervisory role over the Boston Public Schools. Wilson says that the city of Boston owes Garrity a debt of gratitude for his wisdom and leadership in the school desegregation case. Wilson talks about his meeting with Garrity in the courtroom. Wilson says that he is committed to integrated schools. Wilson adds that today's hearing in Garrity's courtroom was the last. He says that Garrity will soon turn over stewardship of the schools to Wilson and the School Committee. Meg Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Grady. Grady talks about the importance of Garrity's final hearings. He says that today is a "historic" day. Grady is optimistic about Wilson's selection as superintendent. Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Nucci. Nucci talks about the significance of Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. He says that the School Committee is ready to take on the responsibility of running the schools. Nucci adds that the School Committee is looking forward to working with Wilson as superintendent.
1:00:01: V: Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) walks over to a desk and lays out two copies of his contract. Microphones are set up on the desk. Shot of papers laid out on the desk. Wilson confers with Boston School Committee members John Nucci, Rita Walsh-Tomasini, John Grady, and Joe Casper. The School Committee members stand to the side of the desk. Wilson examines the papers with Nucci and Walsh-Tomasini. Boston School Committee members Abigail Browne and Jean McGuire walk behind the group with Wilson. Close-up shots of Wilson, Nucci and Walsh-Tomasini. Casper stands on the opposite side of the desk from the group with Wilson. The media sets up a shot of Wilson sitting at the desk with the members of the School Committee, including Kevin McCluskey, standing around him. Wilson takes his suitcoat off and settles into the desk. Wilson and Nucci each sign both copies of the contract. Wilson shakes hands with Nucci and each of the School Committee members. 1:03:12: V: Wilson sits down and takes questions from reporters. The School Committee members remain standing around his desk. A reporter asks Wilson if he has any second thoughts about coming to Boston. Wilson says that he is delighted to be in Boston; that he wishes he could have had more time to prepare for the coming school year. Wilson says that he will work with school staff to get to know the school system; that he will do his best to work with the School Committee and the mayor to benefit the schools. A reporter asks Wilson to name the biggest problem he faces. Wilson says that his biggest problem will be to get to know the system. Wilson says that he must understand the issues and the problems before he can address them. A reporter asks Wilson about the politics involved in the Boston Public School System. Wilson says that politics come with the territory of public education. Shot of the members of the media recording the event. A reporter asks Wilson about the insights given to him by the transition team. Wilson says that he has not yet received a briefing from the transition team. Shot of Grady. Wilson says that he is happy to be in Boston; that his three children will be attending Boston Public Schools; that he is in the process of looking for a home in the city. Wilson again shakes hands with Nucci and the members of the School Committee. 1:07:20: V: Wilson is interviewed by the media. Wilson talks about a conversation he had with Arthur Garrity (federal judge). Wilson says that Garrity told him that the problems in the school system may be exaggerated by the media. Wilson notes that the city of Boston owes Garrity a debt of gratitude for his wisdom and leadership in the school desegregation case. Wilson says that Garrity will soon turn over supervision of the school system to Wilson and the School Committee. A reporter asks Wilson about the challenges he will face in improving the schools. Wilson says that the community must commit itself to integrated schools; that all children must have equal access to the schools. A reporter asks Wilson how he felt while meeting with Garrity. Wilson says that the meeting was, in fact, "historic." Wilson adds that he appreciated the opportunity to talk to Garrity in the courtroom. A reporter asks how Garrity responded to Wilson's requests to meet with him privately. Wilson says that Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) told him that Garrity had decided not to meet privately with any of the superintendents of the Boston Public Schools; that Dentler told Wilson not to feel slighted if Garrity does not meet with him. Wilson adds that he had a productive conversation with Dentler. A reporter asks Wilson if today's hearing was the last in the Boston school desegregation case (Morgan v. Hennigan). Wilson says that Garrity indicated that today's hearing was the last. Wilson says that he will do his best to provide equal access to integrated schools; that another hearing can be avoided if the schools remain integrated. 1:10:45: V: Meg Vaillancourt sets up a meeting with Grady. Vaillancourt asks him if today's hearing was the final hearing. Grady says that Garrity indicated that today's hearing was the last one. Grady notes that it is a "historic" day for the Boston Public School System; that the Boston School Committee and the Boston School Department have worked hard to arrive at this day. Vaillancourt asks Grady about the challenges facing Wilson and the School Committee. Grady says that Wilson will need to move ahead in the same direction; that the schools have "turned the corner." Grady says that there is "an air of optimism" throughout the school system; that Wilson will be a capable superintendent. Vaillancourt thanks Grady. 1:11:57: V: Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Nucci. Vaillancourt asks Nucci about the withdrawal of Garrity. She notes that Garrity told the Boston School Committee to pay heed to the parents and teachers. Nucci says that the School Committee recognizes the contributions of parents and teachers over the past ten years. Nucci says that he is optimistic; that Garrity is confident in the School Committee's commitment to integrated schools; that Garrity is optimistic about the selection of Wilson as superintendent. Nucci says that it is time to close "a chapter in Boston's history." Vaillancourt notes that Dr. Robert Spillane (former Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) left because the School Committee switched to district representation. She asks if Wilson will face a challenge in dealing with the School Committee. Nucci says that Garrity has cited the district-elected School Commitee's commitment to desegregated schools. Nucci adds that the new School Committee has led to Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. Another reporter asks Nucci if any potential problems could prevent Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. Nucci says that there are only minor differences to be resolved. The reporter asks about the significance of Garrity's withdrawal. Nucci says that the judge will set the parameters for desegregation in his final court orders; that the Boston School Committee will be responsible for running the schools. Vaillancourt asks Nucci if a larger School Committee could hinder Wilson's ability to get his programs approved. Nucci quotes Spillane as saying that the size of the committee is less important than the quality of the people who serve on the committee. Nucci says that the School Committee will help Wilson in his new role as superintendent.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/21/1985
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that The Boston Herald newspaper has accused Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) of misusing the credit card of the Boston School Department. Vaillancourt notes that Wilson has denied the charges and has demanded a retraction from The Boston Herald. Vaillancourt's report includes footage of Wilson at a press conference with Philip Crowe (attorney for Wilson). Wilson talks about the accusations and denies any wrongdoing. Crowe adds that Wilson may sue The Boston Herald for libel. Vaillancourt notes that Alan Eisner (Editor, The Boston Herald) has refused to print a retraction. Vaillancourt reports that Wilson may have been dropped from consideration for a position with the New York City Public School System because of the Herald article. Vaillancourt adds that Wilson is an "embattled superintendent."
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) at a press conference. Wilson sits at a round table with his lawyer at his side. Wilson says, "That's a blatant lie." Meg Vaillancourt reports that Wilson has adamently denied accusations by The Boston Herald that he has misused a credit card belonging to the Boston School Department. V: Footage of Wilson demanding a front-page retraction of the accusations and an editorial retraction. Shot of a newspaper photo of Wilson. On-screen text details the Herald's accusations against Wilson. Vaillancourt reports that The Boston Herald has accused Wilson of double-billing the city for travel expenses; of taking improper cash advances on the School Department's credit card; of being late in filing expense reports. Vaillancourt notes that the Herald says that Wilson's tardiness in filing expense reports has cost the city $589 in interest charges on the credit card. V: Footage of Wilson saying that the Herald reporter is intentionally misrepresenting the facts. Vaillancourt notes that Wilson admitted to the accrual of interest charges on the credit card due to his tardiness in filing expense reports. Vaillancourt adds that Wilson has denied all of the other charges. V: Shots of Wilson at the press conference. Wilson holds up a notebook for the reporters. Vaillancourt reports that Wilson showed reporters credit card receipts; that Wilson said that he gave those receipts to The Boston Herald to review. Vaillancourt reports that Wilson has accused the Herald of sensationalizing the story. V: Footage of Wilson saying that the story and editorial in the Herald were malicious. Vaillancourt reports that the Herald is standing by its story. V: Shot of reporters in a newsroom. A quote by Alan Eisner (Editor, The Boston Herald) appears on screen in text. Vaillancourt quotes Eisner as saying, "We have no intention of giving Wilson a retraction." Vaillancourt also quotes Eisner as saying, "The city documents we examined show a clear pattern of credit card abuse." Vaillancourt reports that Wilson was in the process of applying for a position with the New York City Public School System when the Herald story was published. V: Shot of Wilson at the press conference. Shot of the Herald article with a headline reading, "State pays for Wilson credit 'abuse'." Vaillancourt quotes sources as saying that Wilson is no longer a finalist for the job in New York. V: Footage of Wilson saying that he intends to find out if the Herald story had a negative impact on his candidacy for the job. Footage of Philip Crowe (attorney for Laval Wilson) saying that Wilson may bring a libel suit against the Herald. Shots of Wilson sitting at a meeting with members of the Boston School Committee in May of 1986; of the audience at the School Committee meeting. Vaillancourt says that it is not clear whether Wilson is innocent or guilty; that the story has created problems for Wilson, who is "an embattled superintendent."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/22/1987
Description: Marcus Jones reports that superintendent Laval Wilson is frustrated because the Boston School Committee has twice rejected his proposal to consolidate Boston high schools. Interviews with School Committee members John Nucci, Joseph Casper and John O'Bryant. Nucci says that Wilson is frustrated by a lack of support from some members of the Committee. Casper accuses the minority members of the School Committee of causing trouble for Wilson. O'Bryant resents Casper's accusations that the minority members of the Committee vote in a bloc. Jones notes that some critics accuse the committee of focusing too much on the daily operations of the schools and not enough on educational policy. Interview with City Councilor Michael McCormack. O'Bryant and Casper differ on how much parental participation they think should be encouraged by Wilson and the School Committee. A spokesperson for Wilson says that Wilson has no intention of leaving his post. Footage of a Boston School Committee meeting.
1:00:08: Marcus Jones reports that school officials are are concerned that Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) may leave the Boston Public Schools. Jones notes that Wilson was frustrated after the Boston School Committee's second rejection of his plan to consolidate Boston high schools. Visual: Shots of Wilson and members of the School Committee at a meeting of the Boston School Committee. Footage of John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) saying that Wilson is committed to the Boston Public Schools; that Wilson is frustrated by a lack of support from certain members of the School Committee; that this lack of support needs to be addressed. Jones reports that Wilson's consolidation plan for Boston Latin Academy, Boston Technical High School and Madison Park High School initially won council approval by a margin of 5 to 4; that the four minority votes were abstentions. Jones notes that School Committee members Jean McGuire and John O'Bryant voted against the plan on a second vote. V: Shots of a plaque reading "Boston Latin Academy"; of the sign reading "Boston Technical High School," hanging above the door to the school; of the exterior of Madison Park High School. Shots of McGuire and O'Bryant at a School Committee meeting. Shots of Wilson. Jones notes that the proposal was defeated; that Wilson suggested that the School Committee should begin looking for another superintendent. V: Footage of Joe Casper (member, Boston School Committee) saying that the superintendent is getting "nailed" by the minority members of the School Committee; that the white members of the school committee are not causing trouble for Wilson. Footage of John O'Bryant (member, Boston School Committee) saying that the votes of the minority members of the School Committee are often split; that no one ever accuses white members of the School Committee of voting in a bloc. Jones reports that Wilson has won more battles with the School Committee than he has lost. V: Shots of Wilson and the School Committee members in a meeting. Shots of School Committee members John Grady, Kevin McCluskey, Casper and Thomas O'Reilly. Jones says that some critics see flaws in the ways that the School Committee is administering to the schools. V: Footage of Michael McCormack (Boston City Council) saying that the School Committee needs to focus on educational policy; that the operations of the schools should be left up to the superintendent. Footage of O'Bryant saying that Wilson does not consult parents on issues affecting the schools. O'Bryant says that parental participation in the school system should be encouraged. Footage of Casper saying that parents are being encouraged to attend the meetings to push for their special interests; that Wilson cannot be expected to cater to parents while running the schools effectively. Jones stands outside the offices of the Boston School Committee. Jones quotes a spokesman for Wilson as saying that Wilson has no intention of leaving his post. Jones notes that Wilson will have another encounter with the School Committee at next month's meeting. V: Shot of Nucci.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/21/1987
Description: Emerson College will be moving from downtown Boston to Lawrence in 1992. Interview with a representative of Emerson on the reasons for the move. Interview with Lawrence Mayor Kevin Sullivan on the urban renewal project that will help improve the city. Sullivan, Gov. Dukakis, and Sen. Patricia McGovern speak at a ceremony held at the site along the Merrimack River. Construction in progress on site. Interview with William Callaghee, publisher of the Lawrence News, who speaks against the project. Interviews with Lawrence residents on the benefits they predict will come from the relocation of Emerson into their city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/27/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Lee Atwater, the Chairman of the Republican National Committee, visited Massachusetts for a Republican Party fundraiser. Vaillancourt reports that Atwater is optimistic about the Massachusetts Republican Party and has been making efforts to recruit minorities to the Republican Party. Students at Howard University protest Atwater's trusteeship at Howard University. Critics accuse the Republican Party of racist politics. David Duke, former Ku Klux Klan wizard, at a press conference. Vaillancourt notes that Atwater denies exploiting racial issues in 1988 presidential campaign advertisements. Vaillancourt's report features footage of Atwater speaking at the fundraiser. Atwater predicts that the next governor of Massachusetts will be a Republican. Atwater defends the Willie Horton campaign advertisements and condemns David Duke. Atwater shakes hands with Herman Wheeler, the President of the MBTA Police Officers Association, who recently switched his allegiance from the Democratic Party to the Republican Party. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Jesse Jackson addresses students at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government
1:00:00: Visual: Footage of Lee Atwater (Chairman, Republican National Committee) speaking at a Republican fundraiser in Watertown, Massachusetts. Atwater says that Massachusetts will see no real progress until the state elects a Republican governor. Shots of audience members listening to Atwater. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Atwater visited Massachusetts for a fundraiser; that he was not afraid to attack former rival Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts). V: Footage of Atwater speaking at the press conference. Atwater says that he can "smell" a Republican victory in the Massachusetts air. Shot of Atwater shaking hands with attendees of the fundraiser. Vaillancourt reports that Atwater has had a few setbacks recently. Vaillancourt reports that one of Atwater's goals is to increase minority membership in the Republican Party; that Atwater was recently forced to resign from the Board of Trustees of Howard University when African American students staged a three-day protest. V: Footage of student protests at Howard University on February 8, 1989. Vaillancourt reports that students were angry over the Republican Party's exploitation of race in the presidential campaign. V: Shot of a black and white photo of Willie Horton (furloughed convict). Vaillancourt reports that Atwater denies that the Republican Party exploited race in the Willie Horton campaign advertisements. V: Footage of Atwater speaking at the fundraiser. Atwater says that the Republican Party was opposed to Dukakis's criminal furlough program. Vaillancourt reports that critics say that racist politics resulted in the election of David Duke (former wizard of the Ku Klux Klan) as the Republican candidate for governor of Lousiana. V: Footage of Duke at a press conference; of a Duke campaign sticker. Footage of Atwater at the fundraiser. Atwater says that Duke is a racist "charlatan"; that Duke has no place in the Republican Party. Atwater says that the Democrats should focus on Reverend Louis Farrakhan (Nation of Islam leader). Shots of attendees at the fundraiser. Vaillancourt reports that Atwater highlighted the efforts of the Massachusetts Republican Party to attract African American voters; that Atwater welcomed a president of an MBTA patrolmen's union. Vaillancourt notes that the president of the patrolmen's union has switched parties. V: Footage of Atwater shaking the hand of Herman Wheeler (President, MBTA Police Officers Association). Atwater tells Wheeler that it takes courage to switch parties; that the Republican Party needs courageous members. Shot of audience members, including Ron Kaufman (Republican National Committee). Vaillancourt reports from the Republican Party fundraiser. Vaillancourt says that Atwater's speech to the Massachusetts Republican Party was optimistic. Vaillancourt notes that the Republican Party has recently lost two special Congressional elections; that there is another special Congressional election in Wyoming tomorrow. Vaillancourt reports that some are wondering why Atwater is not in Wyoming today. V: Footage of Atwater saying that he would risk being called an "outsider" if he went to Wyoming to campaign. Atwater says that he hopes the Party will win the election in Wyoming; that "all is not lost" if the Party loses the election. Atwater says that special elections do not portend the results of the next election cycle. Shots of attendees at the fundraiser; of Atwater greeting attendees. Vaillancourt reports that Atwater has a lot of work ahead of him.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/25/1989
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jesse Jackson gave a speech at Sanders Theatre at Harvard University as part of his effort to support the presidential campaign of Michael Dukakis. Jackson attacked George Bush and the Republican Party on issues of race, and defended the term "liberal" from Republican attacks. Additional footage of Jackson and Dukakis at the 1988 Democratic Convention. Independent presidential candidate Lenora Fulani also visited Boston today. Fulani is the African American progressive candidate of the New Alliance Party. Interview with Fulani, who says that progressive voters need to vote against Dukakis. She adds that the Democratic Party needs to differentiate itself from the Republican Party in order to win the votes of progressives. Vaillancourt notes that Fulani is a Jackson supporter. Vaillancourt reports that Fulani will probably not be a threat to Dukakis in the 1988 election. She adds that a future Jackson candidacy could threaten the Democratic Party by attracting disenchanted progressive voters from the Democratic Party.
1:00:14: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) addressing an audience at Sanders Theatre at Harvard University. Jackson talks about the civil rights movement. Shots of the audience. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jackson attacked the Republican Party in his speech at Saunder Theatre today; that Jackson accused the Republicans of misusing the term "liberal" in the presidential campaign. V: Footage of Jackson at Sanders Theatre. Jackson accuses George Bush (Republican US presidential nominee) of attacking civil liberties as "subversive." Jackson riffs on the term "liberal." Shots of the audience applauding for Jackson. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson was campaigning for Michael Dukakis (Democratic US presidential nominee); that Jackson attacked Bush on issues of race. V: Footage of Jackson accusing Bush of buying a property labeled "caucasians only" in Houston. Footage from CNN of Dukakis, Kitty Dukakis (wife of Dukakis), Jackson, Jaqueline Jackson (wife of Jackson), and other Democratic Party leaders on stage at the 1988 Democratic Convention. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson appears frequently with Dukakis; that Jackson defended Dukakis's campaign style in his speech today. V: Footage of Jackson saying that "passion is a new extra-constitutional requirement" for the presidency. Vaillancourt stands outside of Memorial Hall at Harvard University. Vaillancourt reports that Lenora Fulani (Independent candidate for US President) was in Boston today; that Fulani is an African American progressive candidate for the presidency. V: Footage of Fulani being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Fulani says that voters should not vote for Dukakis; that the Democratic Party needs to learn not to take African American and white progressive voters for granted. Vaillancourt reports that Fulani is the candidate of the New Alliance Party. Vaillancourt adds that Fulani describes the New Alliance Party as a progressive party which is mindful of gay and minority voters. V: Footage of Jackson shaking hands with supporters after his speech. Jackson holds up a young white girl. He gives the thumbs-up sign to the crowd. Vaillancourt reports that Fulani is a Jackson supporter; that Fulani is running against Dukakis. V: Footage of Fulani being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Fulani says that progressive voters need to vote according to their own self-interests; she urges progressive voters to vote against Dukakis. Vaillancourt asks if progressive voters should vote for Fulani and risk having a Republican president. Fulani says that the Democratic Party is responsible for the Republican victories of Ronald Reagan (US President) and Richard Nixon (former US President). Fulani says that the Democratic Party needs to differentiate itself from the Republican Party. Fulani says that Dukakis is now paying attention to progressive voters because he is down in the polls. Vaillancourt reports that Fulani will probably not be a threat to Dukakis; that her criticism may signal a future problem for the party. V: Shot of Jackson on stage at the end of his speech. Vaillancourt reports that the Democratic Party would be threatened if a candidate like Jackson decided to run as an independent candidate; that his candidacy would attract disenchanted Democratic voters. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson is still campaigning strongly for Dukakis; that Jackson's campaign efforts make him a force within the Democratic Party.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/24/1988
Description: Carmen Fields reports that the play Les Blancs, by playwright Lorraine Hansberry will be produced by the Huntington Theater Company. The play is set in a fictitious African nation struggling for independence. Interview with Hansberry's ex-husband Robert Nemiroff, who is overseeing the production of the play. He talks about Hansberry and her work. Nemiroff says that Hansberry's play foreshadows the revolutionary changes that would take place in Africa in the 1960s. He says that much of her work revolved around the relationship between the oppressed and their oppressors. Fields reviews Hansberry's career. She notes that Nemiroff is gathering materials for a Hansberry Library Collection. Fields report includes footage from the WNET production of Les Blancs and footage from the 1961 film A Raisin in the Sun. Fields report includes footage and photographs of Hansberry and shots of advertisements for Hansberry's plays. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: African American school committee members criticize Flynn's school choice plan
1:00:13: Visual: Footage from the Huntington Theatre production of the play, Les Blancs. Carmen Fields reports that Les Blancs is set in a fictitious African country; that Les Blancs was written by Lorraine Hansberry (playwright). V: Black and white shot of Hansberry. Shot of a black and white photo of Hansberry. Footage of Robert Nemiroff (production advisor) saying that Hansberry foresaw the revolutionary changes which took place in Africa in the 1960s. Shot of a black and white photo of Hansberry. Shot of the cover of a book of plays by Hansberry. Fields reports that Hansberry wrote Les Blancs in 1960; that only a few African nations were independent in 1960. Fields notes that Hansberry plays often deal with the changing relationships between the oppressors and the oppressed. Fields adds that Al Freeman Jr. (actor) and Roy Scheider (actor) starred in the Broadway production of Les Blancs. V: Footage from WNET of Les Blancs. Footage of Nemiroff being interviewed by Fields. Nemiroff says that Hansberry did not believe that race issues were the ultimate source of world conflict. Nemiroff says that Hansberry believed that the ultimate struggle was between the oppressed and the oppressors. Footage from the 1961 film, A Raisin in the Sun. Shot of an advertisement for A Raisin in the Sun. The advertisement notes that A Raisin in the Sun won Best Play of the year from the Drama Critics' Circle in 1959. Fields reports that the Hansberry's work often revolves around the choices made by ordinary people; that Hansberry wrote A Raisin in the Sun and The Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window. V: Shot of a poster for The Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window. Fields reports that Hansberry died in 1965 at age 34. V: Shot of Hansberry. Shot of a black and white photo of Hansberry and Nemiroff. Fields reports that Nemiroff was married to Hansberry when she died; that Nemiroff is advising the production of Les Blancs at the Huntington Theatre. Fields notes that Nemiroff is gathering materials for a Hansberry Library Collection. V: Footage of the Huntington Theatre production of Les Blancs. Shot of a room with Hansberry's writing materials. Footage of Nemiroff saying that there are no villains in Hansberry's plays; that each character in a Hansberry play has his or her own motives. Nemiroff says that Hansberry had great respect for the potential of every human being. Fields reports that Hansberry described her work as "dramatic realism." V: Black and white footage of Hansberry. Hansberry talks about realism in her work.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/16/1989
Description: Carmen Fields interviews Lindiwe Mabuza of the African National Congress about apartheid in South Africa. Mabuza says that F.W. de Klerk, the President of South Africa, is not committed to fundamental changes in the regime. She adds that the ANC is struggling for a united, democratic, and non-racial South Africa. Fields reports that black South Africans are celebrating the recent release of eight political prisoners. Mabuza talks about the release of the prisoners and the role of the ANC. Mabuza discusses the possibility of negotiations with the South African government. She reviews the conditions under which black South Africans could negotiate with the South African government. Mabuza talks about her support for sanctions on the South African government. Fields' report is accompanied by footage of de Klerk, footage of black South Africans celebrating the release of prisoners and footage of a large demonstration by black South Africans.
1:00:09: Visual: Footage of Lindiwe Mabuza (African National Congress Representative to the US) being interviewed by Carmen Fields. Mabuza says that there will be little difference between the administrations of P.W. Botha (former president of South Africa) and F.W. de Klerk (president of South Africa). Mabuza says that de Klerk is not committed to fundamental changes in the apartheid policy of the South African government. Fields reports that de Klerk was elected by the small minority of white South Africans; that de Klerk does not support the one person, one vote concept. Fields reports that the African National Congress (ANC) does not agree with de Klerk's vision of a post-apartheid nation. V: Shots of de Klerk and white South African government officials in a governmental chamber. Footage of Mabuza saying that the ANC is struggling for a united, democratic ,and non-racial South Africa. Mabuza says that South Africa is currently divided by apartheid. Mabuza says that de Klerk believes that there are many groups and nations within South Africa; that de Klerk wants to divide the black South Africans into groups; that these divisions are a continuation of apartheid. Fields reports that black South Africans are celebrating the recent release of eight political prisoners; that seven of the eight released prisoners are high-ranking ANC officials. Fields reports that the released prisoners met in Soweto today to plan for an ANC rally. V: Shots of black South Africans singing together as they celebrate the release of the prisoners; of white South African military police. Shots of the released prisoners outside of the prison; of the released prisoners walking in a group; of a released prisoner greeting a friend. Footage of Mabuza being interviewed by Fields. Mabuza says that the released ANC officials should re-assume their leadership roles. Mabuza says that the leaders have been released without restrictions; that the leaders should address the problems of black South Africans. Mabuza says that de Klerk cannot afford to put the leaders in prison again; that de Klerk has publicized the release of the prisoners in order to make the South African government look good. Fields asks about negotiations with the South African government to end apartheid. Mabuza says that the South African government must lift the state of emergency; that the government must withdraw troops from civilian areas; that the government must release thousands of political prisoners including Nelson Mandela (jailed South African leader). Mabuza says that the government must lift its ban on the ANC; that the government must lift restrictions on other organizations and banned individuals. Mabuza says that the government must make these changes in order to negotiate in good faith with black South Africans. Fields reports that Mabuza does not believe that sanctions hurt black South Africans. V: Shot of a man putting up a poster with a newspaper headline reading, "Unity on SA blown apart by Thatcher." Footage of Mabuza saying that millions of blacks are out of work and suffering because of apartheid; that black South Africans are willing to make sacrifices to end apartheid. Mabuza says that black South Africans want change in South Africa. Shots of a large demonstration by black South Africans. Many are holding signs and banners.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/23/1989
Description: Harvard University Hasty Pudding Club names Lucille Ball the 1988 Woman of the Year. Harvard University marching band plays "I Love Lucy" theme song as they accompany Lucy along the street. Footage of the actress accepting the award on stage. Reporter Marcus Jones gives a brief retrospective on the 76-year-old actress's rise to fame before "I Love Lucy," and off-screen involvement in radio and Broadway performances. Clips from feature films that Ball had roles in alongside Catherine Hepburn, Ginger Rogers, and Fred Astaire. Still image of Ball with Marx Brothers. Clip of Lucy and husband Ricky (Desi Arnaz) announcing pregnancy. Ball tells Hasty Pudding Club a story about inspiration for a chocolate comedy routine. Closing sequence of slapstick clips from "I Love Lucy."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/19/1988
Description: Deborah Wang reports on a labor dispute concerning the Boston Harbor Cleanup project. Wang notes that labor have signed an agreement with the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA), in which the unions have promised not to strike if the MWRA agrees to hire only union workers for the project. Interview with John Cruz of J.B. Cruz Construction, who says that many minority businesses would like to bid on the project. Cruz can afford union wages but cannot afford union rules. He says that his business is more efficient because his workers are not unionized. Interview with Richard Fox of the MWRA), who says that the MWRA wants to avoid a work stoppage during the project. Interview with Joe Nigro of the Building Trades Council, who says that unions give workers good healthcare and pensions. Wang reports that Cruz and other non-union contractors may challenge the agreement in court. Following the edited story is additional b-roll footage of construction workers and construction sites.
1:00:08: Visual: Shots of two African American men moving a heavy object from the basement of a building; of a truck belonging to the J.B. Cruz Company; of rowhouses being renovated in Roxbury. Deborah Wang reports that the J.B. Cruz Company has been building and renovating homes in Roxbury since 1948. V: Shots of two African American men lifting a heavy object onto the back of a truck. Wang reports that the J.B. Cruz Company hopes to bid on the Boston Harbor Cleanup project; that the Boston Harbor Cleanup project is the largest public works project to date. V: Shot of an African American man working on the wiring of a home. Footage of John Cruz (J.B. Cruz Construction) being interviewed by Wang. Cruz says that he hopes the project will have a 30% minority set-aside; that minority businesses see the program as a great opportunity. Shots of an African American man operating a tractor; of rubble being transported out of a building on a conveyor belt. Wang reports that the J.B. Cruz Company may not be able to bid on work for the Harbor Cleanup project because the J.B. Cruz Company runs an "open shop" using non-union labor. Wang reports that the city's unions do not want non-union workers to participate in the project. V: Shots of two African American construction workers examining a document; of a construction worker measuring a pipe. Footage of Cruz saying that the union policy is discriminatory. Cruz says that he has been fighting discrimination all of his life. Shots of a construction worker operating a backhoe; of a construction worker using a welding torch. Wang reports that the unions are in control of the Boston Harbor Cleanup project; that the unions have signed a labor agreement with the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA). Wang notes that the unions have promised not to strike during the ten-year project. Wang adds that the unions consider the no-strike clause as a major concession. V: Shots of a construction site; of a worker descending stairs on a piece of scaffolding; of a construction worker using a mallot. Footage of Richard Fox (MWRA) saying that a work stoppage during the project could cost millions of dollars. Fox says that the MWRA wanted an agreement which guaranteed good relations with labor and construction workers. Shot of two construction workers walking on a job site; of a construction worker working in a subterranean structure; of a construction worker operating a backhoe. Wang reports that the unions fought for a clause stating that all workers on the project must be union members. Wang notes that Cruz must enroll all of his workers in a union if he wants to bid on the Harbor Cleanup Project. Wang reports that Cruz says that he can afford union wages but cannot afford union rules. V: Shots of construction workers working at a construction site; of Cruz being interviewed by Wang. Shots of a gravel truck at a construction site; of the driver of the gravel truck. Footage of Cruz saying that his business runs more efficiently because his business is not subject to union work restrictions. Shots of workers shoveling rocks down a chute into a building. Footage of Joe Nigro (Building Trades Council) saying that unions try to give workers good healthcare and a healthy pension. Nigro says that Cruz pays his workers low wages; that Cruz does not offer health and welfare benefits. Wang stands at a construction site. Wang reports that unions have a highly skilled work force; that unions get most of the jobs on big construction projects. Wang notes that unions can often dictate the labor terms on big construction projects. V: Footage of Cruz being interviewed by Wang. Cruz says that the unions are threatened by open-shop contractors because they are more efficient. Shots of a construction site near Boston Harbor. A worker climbs on a half-built structure. Another worker stands on a large piece of equipment. Wang reports that other non-union contractors are unhappy about the labor agreement for the Boston Harbor Cleanup project. Wang notes that a trade group may challenge the agreement in court; that the lawsuit could signal further delays for the Harbor Cleanup Project. V: Shots of construction workers at a site near Boston Harbor; of the Boston skyline; of large equipment operating in the harbor.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/26/1989