Description: On the 15th anniversary of Ms., Gloria Steinem, Marlo Thomas, and Ruth Westheimer hold a press conference on the magazine, it's magazine's evolution, and changes in the feminist movement. Interviews with many women on if they read Ms., what they think about the way it has changed, or what they read instead.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/23/1987
Description: A day in the life of The Ten O'Clock News
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/21/1988
Description: David Boeri reports on a demonstration by members of ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now), outside of the offices of Mayor Ray Flynn. Demonstrators advocate for more affordable housing in Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan. Footage of Peggy Jackson (ACORN demonstrator) and Neil Sullivan (Director of housing policy for the Flynn administration) debating the administration's affordable housing policy. Boeri notes that the demonstrators demanded the deed to a vacant lot in order to develop affordable housing themselves.
1:00:03: Visual: Shot of a multi-colored, hand-drawn sign reading, "Welcome to the mayor's office." A group of demonstrators stand outside of the mayor's office chanting, "Mayor Flynn, come on out." One of the demonstrators holds a sign reading, "ACORN: Housing Now." The demonstrators are affiliated with ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now). V: Shot of an office telephone; of the demonstrators. Shot of a sign reading, "Shelter is our need. Give us the deed." David Boeri reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) refused to meet with the demonstrators; that the demonstrators are fighting for affordable housing in Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan. V: Footage of Peggy Jackson (ACORN demonstrator) saying that her organization can build affordable housing if they are given one lot to build on. Boeri reports that the demonstrators say that the housing that the city calls "affordable" is not affordable for Roxbury residents; that the median income in Roxbury is $13,000. V: Footage of Jackson talking to Neil Sullivan (Director of housing policy for Flynn). Jackson says that fewer than 500 units of the city's affordable housing are affordable for Roxbury residents. Sullivan says that fewer than 500 housing units were built by the White administration between 1981 and 1983. Boeri reports that Sullivan blames the housing crisis on Kevin White (former Mayor of Boston) and a lack of federal money. Boeri reports that the Flynn adminstration is bundling low-income units with high-income units; that the Flynn administration is using the high-income units to subsidize the low-income units. V: Shots of Jackson; of the demonstrators. Footage of Sullivan saying that the Flynn administration has built over 500 low-income and moderate-income units in the first 6 months of 1986. The demonstrators respond that they cannot afford these units. Boeri reports that the demonstrators will have to incorporate themselves as non-profit developers before they can bid on a vacant lot. V: Footage of Sullivan telling the demonstrators that other groups have incorporated themselves and are bidding on land. Jackson tells Sullivan that the demonstrators do not have time to incorporate themselves; that another 3,000 people will be homeless before they are able to complete the legal paperwork. Shot of Sullivan. Boeri reports that the ACORN demonstrators ended up walking out; that the demonstrators say that they will take over the land next week. V: Footage of the demonstrators leaving the mayor's office.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/14/1986
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that a disproportionate number of African Americans have been infected with the HIV/AIDS virus. Vaillancourt reports that higher rates of transmission in the African American community are due to behavioral factors. Vaillancourt analyzes the differences in AIDS transmission between the white community and the African American community. Footage of Denise Cartier-Bennia giving a talk on educating people about AIDS in the African American community. Vaillancourt quotes statistics concerning HIV/AIDS infection rates. Report is accompanied by footage of African American residents of Roxbury and footage from interviews with people on the street.
1:00:07: Visual: A reporter on conducts interviews with African American men and women. An African American man says that he is "scared to death." An African American woman says that she doesn't know if "it is stronger on the white end or if it's stronger on the black end." Another African American man at Downtown Crossing says that no African American stars have died of AIDS; that he fears the development of an"unwarranted stigma" on the African American community due to AIDS. Shots of African Americans walking on a commercial street. Meg Vaillancourt reports that a disproportionate number of African Americans have been diagnosed with AIDS in the US. V: A chart list statistics on screen. The statistics read that 25% of AIDS victims are African American. Vaillancourt reports that African Americans represent 12% of the population. Shot of an African American woman with her back to the camera. Statistics read that African American women are 13 times more likely to get AIDS than white women; that Hispanic women are 11 times more likely to get AIDS than white women. Shots of an African American infant being examined by a white female doctor. Statistics read that 82% of infants with AIDS are African American; that 91% of infants with AIDS are non-white. Footage of Denise Cartier-Bennia (professor) saying that AIDS is affecting whole families in the African American community. Shot of a group of African Americans waiting for public transportation. Vaillancourt reports that the mode of transmission for AIDS is different in African American and white communities. V: Statistics read that homosexual/bisexual AIDS patients are 73%white, 16% African American and 11% Hispanic. Statistics read that heterosexual AIDS patients are 50% African American, 25% Hispanic and 25% white. Footage of Cartier-Bennia speaking. Shots of a group of African American teenagers crossing an urban street; of a drug user preparing a dose of heroin. Vaillancourt reports that Cartier-Bennia has studied the factors contributing to the high rate of AIDS in the African American community. V: Statistics read that African American women are 5 times more likely to get AIDS from contact with a drug user than from contact with a bisexual man. Shot of a group of African Americans boarding an MBTA bus. Vaillancourt reports that the immigration of infected immigrants from Haiti and Africa may be escalating the problem. V: Shots of military recruits laying down barbed wire in a field. Statistics read that 0.9 out of 1000 white military recruits test positive for the AIDS antibody; that 3.9 out of 1000 African American military recruits test positive for the AIDS antibody. Footage of Cartier-Bennia talking about the appearance of the AIDS antibody in military recruits. Cartier-Bennia says that one out of every 250 recruits was infected; that 10% to 30% of these recruits will eventually develop AIDS. Cartier-Bennia says that the African American community is in a "precarious position." Vaillancourt reports from a street corner. Groups of African Americans wait for public transportation across the street. Vaillancourt notes that AIDS is not an African American disease; that behavior creates the risk of transmission, not race. V: Footage of Cartier-Bennia saying that risky behavior leads to aids; that knowledge may be the most effective weapon against AIDS; that African American and Hispanic politicians have been silent on the subject of AIDS and the minority community. Shot of a group of African Americans boarding an MBTA bus. Footage of Cartier-Benia talking about the unwillingness of African American churches to discuss AIDS. Shot of an African American man crossing a street. Footage of Cartier-Bennia saying that AIDS is another problem which needs to be tackled by minority communities if they want to survive into the year 2000. Shots of African American children; of African Americans on the street; of African Americans waiting for public transportation.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/17/1987
Description: Massachusetts has decided to allow businesses and insurance companies to test people for the AIDS antibody. Critics complain that the proposed policy favors insurance companies over patients. Paula Gold, Massachusetts Secretary of Consumer Affairs, speaks at a press conference. She says that testing will be allowed under limited circumstances and controlled conditions. The Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts is a strong opponent of the policy. Don Polk of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts speaks at a press conference. He condemns involuntary testing except for clear public health reasons. He believes that the policy does not contain appropriate measures to ensure patient confidentiality and is discriminatory against African American life insurance policy holders. He states that the proposed policy fails to take into account the discrepancy in life expectancy between African American AIDS victims and white AIDS victims. The Urban League believes that the new state policy de-emphasizes public health education campaigns, which are important in minority communities. Public health informational brochures and African Americans at a bus stop. Following the edited story is footage of public health education literature. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Boston City Council delays vote on school reform
1:00:01: Visual: Shots of medical laboratory workers undertaking the processes involved in testing vials of blood. Callie Crossley reports that businesses and insurance companies have been lobbying for the right to test for the AIDS antibody. Crossley reports that Paula Gold (Secretary of Consumer Affairs) and the administration of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) have decided to allow testing for life insurance. V: Footage Gold at a press conference. Gold says that testing will be allowed under limited circumstances and under controlled conditions. Crossley reports that critics complain that the proposed policy favors insurance companies; that Peter Hiam (former Insurance Commissioner) resigned in protest of the policy. Crossley reports that the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts also disagrees with the proposed policy. V: Footage of Don Polk (Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts) at a press conference. Polk says that involuntary testing of any segment of the population should only take place for clear public health reasons; that involuntary testing will have a "chilling effect" on those who have a reason to seek testing; that involuntary testing includes tests taken as a precondition for life insurance. Shot of a white audience member at the press conference. Crossley adds that Polk says that some provisions of the policy discriminate against African Americans; that African Americans are more likely to purchase life insurance policies for under $100,000. Crossley reports that the new provisions state that purchasers of life insurance policies under $100,000 will not get payment if they die of AIDS within two years of purchasing a policy. V: Shots of African Americans waiting for public transportation in Roxbury; of an African American man crossing the street; of African Americans boarding an MBTA bus. Footage of Polk at the press conference. Polk refers to evidence that African American AIDS patients have an average life expectancy of three to nine months after their initial diagnosis; that white victims have an average life expectancy of two years. Polk says that the proposed policy fails to take into account the discrepancies between African American and white life expectancies. Shot of an African American woman in the audience. Crossley reports that a spokesperson from Gold's office said that Gold "did not feel that the regulations discriminated against blacks." V: Shot of Gold speaking at a press conference. Crossley notes that Polk does not think that the proposed regulations go far enough in guaranteeing confidentiality. V: Shot of an African American man taking notes at Polk's press conference. Polk says that there are confidentiality measures in the regulations; that there is no enforcement mechanism to ensure adherence to those measures; that we live in an age of "rapid information processing." Shot of a "public health fact sheet" released by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health; of public health informational brochures about the AIDS virus. Crossley says that the Urban League accuses the new regulations of taking emphasis away from public health education and initiatives. Crossley notes that Polk says that public health campaigns are important in minority communities; that African Americans make up 25% of the 25,000 current AIDS victims. Crossley reports that the Urban League will recommend at a public hearing that the new proposed policy be rejected.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/03/1987
Description: Abbie Hoffman is posthumously remembered for his career as a political activist. Footage of Hoffman's theatrics from political rallies and appearances from 1960s-1980s. Clips of reporters talking to Hoffman during his last activism and trial participation in Northampton, Mass.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/13/1989
Description: Deborah Wang reports that minority workers are underrepresented in the advertising industry. Wang interviews Bink Garrison (President of Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson) about the lack of minority workers in the industry. Wang's report includes footage of workers in the offices of Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson (advertising firm). Wang reports that Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson is participating in industry efforts to attract students into the industry. Wang notes that the Ad Club at English High School teaches students about advertising. Wang reports that Ad Club students wrote and acted in a public service announcement last year. Wang's report includes footage of the public service announcement produced by the Ad Club. Wang's report also features interviews of Pam Piligian (Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson) and students working in the Ad Club. B-roll follows of workers at the offices of Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson, interiors of the lobby, closeups on advertisements.
1:00:13: Visual: Footage of white workers in the offices of Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson advertising agency. Deborah Wang reports that most of the workers at the Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson advertising agency are white. V: Shots of workers discussing projects and working at their desks. Footage of Bink Garrison (Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson) being interviewed by Wang. Garrison says that Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson is typical of the advertising industry; that it is hard to break into the advertising industry. Shot of a young African American male working on a project at Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson. Footage of Garrison saying that talented minority students do not often choose to enter the advertising industry because entry-level salaries are low. Wang reports that minority workers are underrepresented in the advertising industry. Wang reports that the Ad Club at English High School teaches students about advertising and the advertising industry. V: Footage of white and minority students working on ads and discussing projects at the Ad Club. The students are in a classroom. Wang reports that students from the Ad Club wrote and acted in a public service announcement last year. V: Footage of the public service announcement about the importance of a high school diploma. Footage of an African American male student and an African American female student practicing lines for another public service announcement. Footage of Pam Piligian (Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson) saying that the students will be producing public service announcements for radio this year; that the kids are enthusiastic about the project. Footage of Michelle Wilcox (11th grade student) saying that the advertising projects allow her to express herself and her opinions. Wang reports that the advertising industry is trying to recruit minority workers through efforts like the Ad Club; that the industry is working to provide internships and mentors to students. Wang notes that the industry leaders hope that a few of the students will end up choosing a career in advertising. V: Footage of Garrison saying that the program introduces students to the industry; that the program allows students to become acquainted with the business world. Shots of minority students in the Ad Club.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/01/1989
Description: Meg Vaillancourt interviews Sterling Anderson of the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) outside of the Dudley Branch Library about the lack of affordable housing in the Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan areas. Anderson says that the city is not doing enough to provide affordable housing for low-income residents. Anderson questions the city's definition of low-income. He adds that most residents do not make enough money to meet the city's definition of low-income. Anderson and a group of ACORN protesters march to the offices of the Boston Redevelopment Authority on Washington Street in Dudley Square. Anderson and the protesters enter the office and confront Ricardo Millet of the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) about the city's affordable housing policies. The protesters read a list of demands including that 70% of all new developments in the area must target low and moderate-income residents. The protesters demand information on all new planned developments in the Roxbury/Dorchester/Mattapan neighborhoods. Millet discusses the city's affordable housing policy with the protesters. He gives them handouts including a list of planned developments in the area. Millet says that the BRA is trying to provide affordable housing despite a lack of subsidies from the federal government.
1:00:14: Visual: A fire engine pulls out onto Washington Street. Elevated train tracks are visible. An African American firefighter operates the rear of the truck. Cars pull to the side of a congested street to let another fire engine pass. 1:01:22: V: Meg Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Sterling Anderson (ACORN). Vaillancourt asks about the march organized by ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now) to protest the affordable housing policies of the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA). Anderson says that redevelopment in the areas of Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan is not geared toward the current residents of those areas; that ACORN is trying to put pressure on the mayor and the BRA to include housing for current residents. Anderson says that most of the residents of those areas do not make more than $13,000 per year; that one-bedroom apartments are selling for $18,000 in one of the new developments. Anderson says that Ray Flynn (mayor of Boston) deserves credit for developing housing; that these efforts are insignificant if the residents of these areas cannot live in the new housing. Anderson talks about how poor people have been thrown out of areas like the South End. Anderson says that the residents need housing, not shelters; that the city needs to commit itself to affordable housing. Anderson says that the city defines low income as a salary of $18,000 to $23,000 per year; that the city defines a moderate income as an income of $23,000 per year. Anderson says that he defines low income as under $13,000; that he defines moderate income as $13,000 to $24,000 per year. Vaillancourt asks if the city is really serving its lower income residents. Anderson says that the city is not serving those residents; that a lot of people cannot afford housing; that the city is pushing low-income residents out of the areas of Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan. Vaillancourt asks if race is the issue. Anderson says that it is an economic issue; that the low-income residents of Roxbury are African American; that there are low-income whites with the same problems in South Boston, Chelsea, and East Boston. Vaillancourt asks if Anderson doubts Flynn's commitment to the neighborhoods. Anderson says that he respects Flynn; that Flynn needs to understand that low-income residents are committed to fighting for affordable housing; that he needs to help these people. Anderson says that he cannot afford to give up on the fight for affordable housing; that he will have no place to live in five years if he does not put up a struggle. Anderson says that shelters are not the answer to the housing problem; that poor people do not want to live in shelters. Anderson says that there are some people who benefit from shelters; that the majority of people with low incomes are intelligent and hard-working. Anderson says that he hears the same statistics from the city at every meeting on affordable housing; that the city needs to make a commitment because working people cannot afford housing right now. The crew takes cutaway shots of Vaillancourt and Anderson. Anderson says that the BRA says the same thing at every meeting; that public housing advocates are always pushing for more low-income housing. Anderson says that 70% of the housing in the areas of Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan needs to be for low- and moderate-income people. Anderson says that people in these areas have no place to live, despite the BRA's commitment to affordable housing; that developments in these areas should be priced at $35,000 instead of $65,000. 1:08:18: V: Housing protesters gather on the sidewalk on Washington Street, outside of the BRA's Dudley Office. The elevated train tracks are visible. The protesters chant, "We want housing. We won't wait. 2, 4, 6, 8." The protesters gather behind a banner reading, "ACORN." Shot of the BRA sign above the entrance to the office. The protesters march slowly into the BRA offices. The protesters chant, "What do we want? Housing. When do we want it? Now." The majority of the protesters are African American. The protesters file into the building. 1:10:48: V: The housing protesters enter a large room swith chairs set up for a meeting. The protesters chant, "2, 4, 6, 8. We want housing. We won't wait." The protesters stand at the side of the room, holding protest signs and chanting. Shot of a sign reading, "Third notice: Please be advised that you are required to build affordable housing." Shots of individual protesters. Ricardo Millet (BRA) sits in one of the chairs in the meeting room. He watches the protesters with interest. Millet invites the protesters to sit down. Anderson says that the protesters will remain standing. Anderson addresses Millet. Anderson says that there is a housing shortage in the areas of Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan; that the BRA housing policy is ineffective; that residents of these areas need housing that they can afford. Anderson says that the newly developed housing target people with incomes of at least $23,000 per year; that most residents make less than $13,000 per year. Anderson says that the BRA and the city of Boston need to make a commitment to low-income housing; that 70% of the new development needs to target low-income residents. Anderson demands information on new developments planned for the Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan areas. Anderson says that the BRA has not been forthcoming with that information; that the BRA needs to work with developers work with developers who have committed to building low-income housing. 1:14:34: V: An African American woman addresses Millet. She reads a list of ACORN demands: the cessation of development on Fountain Hill by June 15 unless the development is 70% affordable to those with low- and moderate-incomes; 70% of all new housing must target low- and moderate-income residents; that ACORN wants information on plans for new development in the area. Another protester says that the 70% quota applies to housing in the Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan areas; that many residents of these areas make less than $13,000 per year; that an average income is more than $26,000 per year. The protester says that the voices of the poor must be heard. The protesters applaud. Anderson asks for a map of planned developments in the Roxbury/Mattapan area. Anderson says that the protesters will not allow new developments to be built if they cannot live in them. Millet stands to face the protesters. He listens as Anderson speaks. 1:16:10: V: Millet addresses the protesters. He invites the protesters to sit down and to discuss the issues with him. Anderson says that the protesters have been sitting in meetings for months; that the protesters want a list of the planned developments in the area. Millet says that he has never been asked for a list of the planned developments before now. Millet offers to provide the protesters with a list of projects currently undertaken by the BRA. Millet gives copies of a handout to the protesters. Millet notes that the BRA, under the Flynn administration, has approved 912 units of housing. Millet adds that the handout includes a list of approved projects as well as their locations, developers and affordablility. Shot of the printed handout. Millet says that 60% of the units in the approved developments are affordable to low- and moderate-income people. Shot of statistic on the handout reading, "60.4% of units below market rate." Anderson asks Millet to define low- and moderate-income. Millet says that the BRA will work with the protesters on the issue of low-income housing; that the BRA and the city want to respond to the needs of low-income people. Millet notes that it is hard to achieve these goals because the federal government has stopped subsidizing housing. Millet adds that the city has done well to achieve a 60% affordability rate in its new projects. Millet gives out copies of another handout. Millet explains that the handout covers the BRA's and the city's positions on affordable housing; that the handout describes the problem of affordable housing. Millet notes that the city is aware of the housing shortage. Anderson says that he gets the same responses every time he meets with the city and the BRA about housing; that no one is responding to their concerns. Shot of the crowd of protesters. Millet says that he has met with ACORN representatives in the past; that the BRA agrees with ACORN on the need to provide affordable housing; that the BRA is trying to achieve these goals without subsidies from the federal government. Millet stresses the fact that the BRA is committed to achieving these goals; that the BRA is trying their best to build affordable housing; that the BRA's achievement of a 60% affordabliltiy rate is remarkable.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/28/1986
Description: Marcus Jones reports that some African American leaders, including Jesse Jackson, are promoting the use of the term "African American" instead of the term "black." Comedian Charles Cozart on the Arsenio Hall Show. Interview with Northeastern lecturer Robert Hayden, who promotes the use of the term. Hayden says that it is an accurate term that reflects the roots and history of African Americans. Interview with Elma Lewis, the Director of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, who believes that the term "black" is more inclusive. Lewis says that not all black people in the US are Americans. Interviews with students and teachers at the Ellis School in Roxbury about which term they prefer. Following the edited story is additional footage of Jones speaking to students and teachers at the Ellis School. Jones answers questions about his report on Jackie Robinson and the race relations of the time. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Meg Vaillancourt reports that the Boston School Committee is deeply divided over whether to renew the contract of Laval Wilson
1:00:11: V: Footage from the Arsenio Hall Show. Charles Cozart (comedian) tells jokes in front of the audience. Marcus Jones reports that the African American community is debating the use of the term "black." Jones notes that Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) is urging the use of the term "African American" instead of "black." V: Shots of Jackson addressing an audience. Shots of African Americans in the audience. Footage of Robert Hayden (Lecturer, Northeastern University) saying that many people of color have been calling themselves "African Americans" for years. Hayden says that many universities have departments of African American studies. Hayden says that people of African descent were living in Boston in the eighteenth century; that those people referred to their community as "African." Hayden says that the term is "accurate" and "useful." Footage of Elma Lewis (Director, National Center of Afro-American Artists) being interviewed by Jones. Lewis says that she does not have to follow the trend. Jones notes that Lewis is opposed to using the term "African American." V: Footage of Lewis saying that Africa is a whole continent. Lewis says that the terms "Nigerian American" or "Jamaican American" are more appropriate than "African American." Lewis says that the term "black American" is more inclusive. Footage of Jones addressing a class at the David A. Ellis School in Roxbury. Jones asks how many of the students are aware of the debate surrounding the term "African American." A few students raise their hands. Jones says that he asked students and teachers at the Ellis School in Roxbury about the terms "African American" and "black." V: Shots of students. Footage of an African American female student saying that it does not matter which term is used. Footage of a Latina teacher saying that there should be no mention of race in identification terms. Footage of an African American teacher asking if the term would be extended to "Afro-English" for blacks living in England. Footage of an African American male student saying that he likes the term "brown." Footage of a female student saying that it doesn't matter. Footage of Hayden saying that the term might inspire some to think about their African roots. Hayden says that some people might begin to look into their family histories. Footage of Lewis saying that it is important to teach children to be proud of their African roots. Lewis says that not all black people in the US are American; that all black people in the US are black. Shots of African Americans walking on a street; of a group of students walking away from a school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/15/1989
Description: Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge exhibit a collection of Norman Rockwell's paintings in celebration of Black History Month. The paintings in the exhibit depict African Americans, often in subservient positions, as well a his later works depicting moments in the Civil Rights Movement and African American history. People from the museum give historical context. Closeups on many of the paintings. Following the story is b-roll of the exhibit and individual paintings.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Maureen Hart Hennessey (curator, Rockwell Museum) saying that American painter Norman Rockwell's work tells a lot about how America viewed the civil rights movement. Hennessey points out that there was often a lag time between the occurrence of an actual event and the publishing of a Rockwell painting portraying the event. Hennessey says that it took time before these events entered "the mainstream consciousness." Shots of the Rockwell paintings, The Problem We All Live With and Murder in Mississippi. Shots of visitors on a tour of the Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA. Carmen Fields reports that the Rockwell Museum is commemorating Black History Month by exhibiting Rockwell's work featuring African Americans. V: Shots of paintings on display for the exhibit. Fields notes that Rockwell's first piece of work featuring an African American was from 1934. V: Footage of a tour guide at the Rockwell Museum speaking to visitors. She stands in front of a painting. The tour guide talks about illustrations for the Saturday Evening Post done by Rockwell. The tour guide notes that the Saturday Evening Post was aimed at white readers; that African Americans were often pictured in a subserviant position or not at all. Shots of two pieces of art hanging on the wall of the museum. Fields says that Peter Rockwell was the model for The Boy in the Dining Car, which was on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post in the 1940s. V: Shot of The Boy in the Dining Car. Footage of Hennessey being interviewed by Fields. Hennessey says that the painting focuses on the white boy in the painting; that many people are more drawn to the African American waiter who is standing beside the table in the painting. Hennessey notes that most white Post readers encountered African Americans as workers in subserviant positions. Fields reports that none of Rockwell's work from the late 1940s to the early 1960s featured people of color; that Rockwell was caught up in the turbulence of the 1960s while working for Look Magazine. Fields notes that one of Rockwell's most famous paintings portrays school desegregation in the South. V: Shots of a male tour guide at the Rockwell Museum talking to visitors. Shots of visitors in the gallery. Shots of paintings in the gallery. Shot of the painting, The Problem We All Live With. Footage of Hennessey saying that Rockwell paid great attention to detail. Hennessey talks about Rockwell's efforts to capture the details of the painting, The Problem We All Live With. Footage of a tour guide at the Rockwell Museum speaking to visitors about the painting, Murder in Mississippi. Shots of the tour guide; of the painting. The tour guide talks about the details of the painting. Fields reports that Look Magazine opted to publish a less detailed version of the painting, Murder in Mississippi; that the original was too graphic. V: Shot of a less detailed version of the painting. Fields reports that Rockwell used his neighbors as models for his paintings of African Americans; that his neighbors were the only African Americans in the area. V: Shots of black and white photographs of Rockwell's models. Footage of Hennessey talking about an African American family who lived in Stockbridge. Hennessey says that the children of the family were used as models in the paintings The Problem We All Live With and New Kids in the Neighborhoodl Shot of the painting, New Kids in the Neighborhood. Fields reports that Rockwell has been described as apolitical; that his works were commissioned by others. V: Shot of a black and white photo of Rockwell sitting in front of his painting, The Golden Rule. Shots of the painting The Golden Rule. Audio of Hennessey saying that Rockwell was a "social commentator." Hennessey says that Rockwell could have retired when he left the Saturday Evening Post in 1963; that Rockwell began doing paintings about the civil rights movement after 1963. Hennessey says that she believes that Rockwell supported the civil rights movement.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/24/1989