Description: Marcus Jones reports on tension over school desegregation in Lowell. Jones reports that Robert Kennedy (Mayor of Lowell) called on supporters of school desegregation to show support by riding buses with students in Lowell today. Jones' report includes footage of Kennedy addressing supporters, including Evelyn Murphy (Lieutenant governor of Massachusetts), Luis Tiant (former Red Sox pitcher) and Grace Corrigan (mother of astronaut Christa McAuliffe). Jones reports that George Kouloheras (Lowell School Committee) is a leader of the anti-busing movement in Lowell. Jones reports that Kuoloheras is campaigning to elect anti-busing candidates to the Lowell School Committee in order to overturn the present school desegregation plan. Jones interviews Kouloheras. Kouloheras says that he hopes that new school committee will reject busing and find another way to integrate schools. Jones also interviews Michael Kennedy (Regional Manager, National School Bus Service, Inc.) and Donna Senior (Lowell parent) about the bus routes in Lowell. Jones notes that the coming elections will decide how school desegregation is implemented in Lowell. Jones' report is accompanied by footage of students and school buses in Lowell. This tape includes additional footage of school buses on the streets in Lowell. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Christy George reports on student enrollment plans in the cities of Cambridge and Lowell
0:59:06: Visual: Footage of Robert Kennedy (Mayor of Lowell) addressing an audience. Supporters of the mayor stand behind him, including Evelyn Murphy (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Luis Tiant (former Red Sox pitcher), and Grace Corrigan (mother of astronaut Christa McAuliffe). Kennedy says that he is glad to be with so many of "Lowell's friends." Marcus Jones reports that many supporters of school desegregation voluntarily rode school buses in Lowell today. V: Shots of Murphy, Tiant and Corrigan. Footage of Corrigan saying that she is happy to spend time with the schoolchildren of Lowell. Footage of Kennedy urges citizens to put aside their political differences and to ride the buses with Lowell schoolchildren. Jones reports that Kennedy called in supporters to build faith in the Lowell busing program. V: Shots of busing supporters walking on a sidewalk; of school buses on the street. Footage of Michael Kennedy (Regional Manager, National School Bus Service. Inc.) saying that he will need a few more weeks to finalize the bus routes in Lowell; that he will need to recruit bus drivers for the bus routes. Shot of a school bus pulling up to a school; of schoolchildren exiting the bus. Footage of Donna Senior (Lowell parent) saying that the bus routes are chaotic in Lowell; that there is a risk of someone getting hurt in the winter; that parents are waiting at bus stops until 4:00 or 5:00pm for their children to arrive home from school. Footage of George Kouloheras (Lowell School Committee) saying that the issue is political; that he is disappointed in the situation. Jones reports that Kouloheras opposes the city's busing plan; that Kouloheras is campaigning to elect anti-busing candidates to the Lowell City Council and to the Lowell School Committee; that these candidates may alter the state-mandated central enrollment plan. V: Shot of Kouloheras speaking to two white women on the street. Footage of Kouloheras saying that he hopes that four new members of the School Committee will be elected. Kouloheras says that he hopes that the new School Committee will reject busing and find another way to integrate schools. Jones notes that Robert Kennedy cast the swing vote which approved the city busing plan last spring. V: Footage of Robert Kennedy saying that the city can choose between taking control of desegregation or having the court make desegregation decisions. Jones stands in front of a school bus. Children board the bus. Jones reports that next Tuesday's elections are viewed as a referendum on the busing plan; that the election results will decide how the desegregation plan is implemented.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/26/1987
Description: Police, including Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) disperse a crowd in Monument Square in Charlestown after an anti-busing demonstration. A crowd is gathered in front of Bunker Hill Housing Project. Police and US Marshals are stationed across the street from the crowd. The police maneuver in the street. The crowd jeers at police and at least one bottle is thrown. The crowd retreats into the housing project. Police move up Bunker Hill Street. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) is present.
0:58:19: Visual: A large crowd of mostly students is gathered along a street in Monument Square. Police are stationed in the street, monitoring the crowd. Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) addresses the crowd through a bullhorn, telling them to go home. Crowd begins to disperse, chanting periodically. An MDC Police vehicle is visible. 1:01:02: V: A Boston Police truck with officers seated in back drives past Charlestown High School and stops. MacDonald issues instructions to them through a bullhorn. Police officers exit from the back of the truck and gather in front of the high school. MacDonald issues more instructions through a bullhorn. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) confers with an officer across from the school. 1:02:37: V: The crowd disperses, moving along Bunker Hill Street. Shot of Concord Street and the intersection of Concord and Bunker Hill Streets. DiGrazia walks down Concord Street. Residents watch the action on the street from their windows. Graffiti on Concord Street marks a boundary of 100 yards from the high school: "100 yds. - Freedom Ends Here." Shot up Concord Street to High School. 1:03:45: V: Police are assembled at the intersection of Concord and Bunker Hill Streets. A crowd is gathered outside of the Bunker Hill Housing Project on Bunker Hill Street. Shots of crowd outside housing project; of police assembled in street. 1:05:25: V: The crowd cheers as police march back up Concord Street toward the high school. Members of the press, including Gary Griffith (reporter), follow the police up Concord Street. The crowd in front of the housing project moves into the street. A voice yells into a bullhorn, "Ok kids, it's your neighborhood." The crowd mills about in front of housing project. 1:07:08: V: A few police officers walk down Concord Street toward the housing project. A large crowd is still gathered in front of the housing project. A group of US Marshals walk down Concord Street. DiGrazia surveys the scene from the top of Concord Street. Voices can be heard taunting the police. DiGrazia walks down Concord Street toward the housing project. A woman walks her father back to his house, so that he won't get hurt "when the bottles start." 1:09:06: V: The large crowd in front of the housing project cheers loudly. Shot of a US Marshal walking away from the crowd. Noise of a bottle breaking against the pavement. Police on Concord Street watch the crowd in front of the housing project. The noise of a helicopter is audible. MacDonald shouts instructions through a bullhorn to police. Two US Marshals in riot helmets walk down Concord Street. A group of police march in formation from Monument Square down Concord Street. DiGrazia stands with a group of officers at the end of Concord Street, across from the housing project. A helicopter circles overhead. The crowd thins as people move into the housing project. MacDonald advances toward a crowd of youth, turning the corner onto Bunker Hill Street. DiGrazia and a group of officers and US Marshals follow MacDonald. MacDonald shouts into the bullhorn. A group of police officers exit the housing project and take a right as they continue to walk up Bunker Hill Street. Cars pass slowly on Bunker Hill Street. Small groups of people are gathered on the sidewalks. Police officers and the media walk in the street. 1:13:49: V: Three US Marshals in riot helmets confer on Bunker Hill Street. Police officers walk up the street. The media are gathered on a street corner. Two officers stand at the side of the street. One officer adjusts his riot helmet.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: 11 B+W wire service photos of South Boston residents opposing busing. Helmet bearing legend "Southie is my home town." Man with loudspeaker in car. Van with sign flipped upside down "Boston Under Siege." "Forced busing? Never!" under three-leaf clover. South Boston Information Center and Home School Association storefront.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1979
Description: Bunker Hill Monument, exteriors of Charlestown High School, and Charlestown environs. A few police officers are stationed along Monument Square outside of Charlestown High School. Robert Murphy (Headmaster, Charlestown High School) stands in front of the school. School buses, accompanied by a police motorcycle escort, pull up in front of the school. African American students exit the buses and enter the school. Police officer tells camera operator that there is a standing order that the press has to remain across the street. A small number of photographers record the arrival of the buses from across the street. White students walks towards school and enter. Gary Griffith does several takes of reporter standup saying that the arrival of school buses at Charlestown High School was routine.
0:00:18: Visual: Shots of the Bunker Hill Monument; of the exterior of Charlestown High School. Two police officers stand outside of Charlestown High School. A white woman walks into the school. A muffled voice yells out, "No busing." Robert Murphy (Headmaster, Charlestown High School) stands out in front of the high school. Shot of Concord Street. Police motorcycles approach the school. Five police officers on motorcycles receive instructions from a police official. The motorcycles pull away. 0:03:41: V: School buses circle Monument Square and approach the high school. Police motorcycles escort the buses. A police officer stands near a Boston Police Department station wagon parked across the street from the high school. The officer watches the buses pull up in front of the school. African American students exit the buses and enter the school. Shot of the Hudson Bus Lines logo on one of the buses. The school buses pull away from the high school, accompanied by the police motorcycles. Murphy, a police officer, and a few school officials remain in front of the school. 0:07:06: V: White students walk toward the entrance of the school. Murphy and another school official greet a few of the students. A police officer is heard telling members of the media to move across the street. Two police officers stand casually on the corner of Bartlett Street and Monument Square. White students walk toward the school. Fewer than ten members of the media record the scene from the sidewalk across the street. A Hudson Bus Lines airport van pulls up in front of the school. An African American student is inside of the van. The van pulls away. The sidewalk in front of the school is empty. Some members of the media depart as two police officers walk up the opposite side of the street. Murphy speaks to two police officers on the corner of Bartlett Street and Monument Square. A man in a business suit speaks to a two-person camera crew. The street is quiet. Murphy and a police officer walk toward the school. 0:12:11: V: Gary Griffith stands outside of Charlestown High School. Griffith reports on the routine arrival of five buses at the high school this morning. He reports that there is no sign of unrest. The crew does two more takes of Griffith reporting on the story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1977
Description: South Boston environs. Graffiti written in large white letters on G Street reads, "Go home, Jerome. You failed." (Graffiti refers to South Boston High School Headmaster Jerome Wynegar.) African American and white members of a girls' softball team stand on the steps outside of South Boston High School. A few school officials, police officers and others, including Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs, Morgan v. Hennigan), are gathered on the steps of the school. Police are stationed along G Street as school buses pull up in front of the school. African American students exit the school and board the buses. The softball team boards a bus parked in front of the steps to the school. The buses depart.
0:00:31: Visual: Shots of East 6th Street in South Boston. Boston harbor is visible in the distance. Boston Police Department trucks are parked on G Street in front of South Boston High School. Graffiti in large white letters on the pavement of G Street reads, "Go home Jerome. You failed." (Graffiti refers to South Boston High School Headmaster Jerome Wynegar.) Police are gathered in groups along G Street. 0:02:28: V: A police cruiser with flashing lights leads two yellow school buses up East 6th Street. The buses head toward the high school, directed by a police officer. African American and white members of a girls softball team are gathered on the steps of the high school. Police officers, other students and school officials are also on the steps. Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs, Morgan v. Hennigan) stands on the steps, talking to an African American woman and two African American men. 0:04:01: V: A bus is parked in front of the steps of the high school. The softball players board the bus. A group of African American students exit the school and walk toward the school buses parked in front of the school. Two police officers seated on their motorcycles observe the scene. African American students continue to board the buses. A few white students are gathered on the steps of the high school. Police officers direct the school buses in front of the school to depart. The buses travel down G Street, followed by a police motorcycle. Members of the media record the departure of the buses. The bus carrying the softball team departs. The girls wave goodbye. 0:07:01: V: Two police officers confer in the school yard of the high school. Massachusetts State Police officers board a Massachusetts State Police bus in the school yard.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/12/1977
Description: South Boston High exterior. Parking space designated for press. Graffiti on street: “print the truth.” Two Boston police officers in front of school. Five school buses approach with lights blinking. Mostly black students stream off buses, go up steps to school entrance. Jerome Wynegar walks up. More buses arrive with black students. Long line of buses depart, descend hill. Students enter main hallway, walk through metal detector. Close-up on needle meter. Students in art class draw on large sheets of paper; teacher gives individual attention. Shots of empty classroom, with PA announcements being made in the background. Walking shot down dark hallway with lockers.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/08/1978
Description: South Boston High exterior on first day of school. Press photographers stand around outside waiting for something to happen. Three upperclassmen say it is quieter inside since desegregation furor has died down, and learning can take place. They discuss news programs in the school. Several takes of reporter standup. Graffiti “stop forced busing” still visible on street. School bus arrives, lets off two black girls. Interview in front of School Committee headquarters with woman from Citywide Education Coalition who appraises current state of Boston schools: parents are involved and important to educational improvement; vocational education is woefully lacking; must upgrade reading and basic skills. “City can someday have an attractive and credible public school system.” She cautions that just because it is quiet now compared to the first years of busing, people should not assume the school system is okay; it still needs criticism and community input. Editor's note: Content given off the record was edited out of this footage.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/06/1978
Description: State and Boston police and US marshals outside South Boston High School. Black students get off buses. Headmaster Jerome Wynegar. Girls in parochial school uniforms walk by. More black students get off buses, walk up to school. Police on motorcycles escort empty buses away from school. Mass of white students wait at iron fence. TV cameramen and news photographers stand by. Girl wearing Southie sweatshirt. White students are allowed to enter school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/13/1976
Description: Audio goes in and out. Boston police cars and police officers stationed on the street outside of Hyde Park High School. School buses arrive escorted by police cruiser with flashing lights. Ambulance waiting in parking lot. African American students exit the school and board buses. White Hyde Park residents watch the action on the street. A white student tells the camera crew that a fight broke out in the school. Police and media are gathered outside of the school. Hyde Park environs, with snow covering the ground. Shot of the side of the Channel 2 news van.
0:00:17: Visual: Exterior of Hyde Park High School. Snow blankets the ground. A line of police cars rings the street in front of the school. Police officers and school officials stand on the front steps of the school. Police officers are stationed on the streets surrounding the school. An ambulance idles on the street in front of the school. 0:02:57: V: A police cruiser with lights flashing escorts a line of buses up Central street. The buses pull up beside the school. A group of African American students approach the buses. A police car pulls away from the scene. White Hyde Park residents observe the action on the street from the porch of a house on Central Street. Groups of police officers confer on the street outside of the school. African American students exit from a side entrance of the school and board the buses. Shot of Hyde Park residents on porch of house. More African American students head toward the buses. Members of the media observe the students as they board the buses. 0:08:08: V: Officials confer on the street outside of the school. Police and the media survey the scene. Shot of the exterior of the school. Two of the buses pull away from the school, escorted by a Boston police cruiser with flashing lights. The buses proceed up Metropolitan Avenue. 0:10:34: V: A white student leans against a car outside of the school. A crew member asks him what happened in the school. The student says that a fight broke out; that he does not know how it started. A police cruiser leaves the scene. Groups of white residents observe the action from street corners. More buses pull away from the school and continue up Metropolitan Avenue, accompanied by a police cruiser. A white teenager walks up the street, away from the school. 0:13:17: V: Police officers direct traffic away from the school. Shot of a police officer grasping baton behind his back. The remaining buses pull away from the school, accompanied by a police cruiser. Police officers and the media continue to stand in front of the school. The ambulance pulls away. A police officer talks to a group of white teenagers. The teenagers walk up Westminster Street, away from the school. Two white female teenagers talk to a group of three police officers in front of the school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/10/1977
Description: The sound goes in and out at the beginning of this video. Exteriors of South Boston High School and South Boston environs. African American students board buses at South Boston High School. Boston Police officers are stationed near the school. Police cruisers escort buses to and from the school. Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) stands in the school yard. White students exit the school after the buses depart. A passerby tells the camera crew that their presence causes a disturbance.
1:00:09: Visual: Exterior of South Boston High School. A Boston Police cruiser is parked in the courtyard of the school, to the right of the steps. Shots of exterior of the school. A Massachusetts State Police cruiser is parked to left of the steps. A group of three white students exits the school. Shots of G Street; of rowhouses in front of the school on G Street; of the high school; of a "Wallace for President" sticker on a street sign. Two white students exit the school. 1:06:14: V: Shot of East 6th Street. The street is snowy. A Boston Police station wagon is parked in front of the high school. An officer exits the station wagon and walks toward the school. A small green and white bus maneuvers in the courtyard of the school. Shot of students walking down G Street, away from the school. A student closes the window on the second floor of the school. Shot of the exterior of the school. The green and white bus is idling in front of the school entrance. Shot of house on the corner of G Street and Thomas Park. A Boston Police station wagon pulls away from the school. A Boston Police cruiser pulls into the school yard. Two officers exit the car. Shot of one of the Boston Police cruisers in school yard; the cruiser is labeled "Tactical Patrol Force." 1:10:02: V: A police cruiser with flashing lights escorts a line of yellow school buses up G Street. The school buses pull up in front of the school. A few police officers station themselves along G Street. Small groups of minority students exit the school. One student stops to wave at the camera. African American students make their way toward the buses. There are a few Hispanic students among those boarding the buses. Audio of students talking to the camera crew. Students peer out of the windows of the buses. The buses pull away in single file. The small green and white bus pulls out of the school yard, into the street. One remaining school bus pulls away, followed by a Boston Police station wagon with its lights flashing. 1:17:34: V: Pan of houses on G Street. A lone African American male student waits in front of the school. White students slowly exit the school. Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) stands in the school yard, talking to officials and passersby. A few police officers remain in the school yard. Students file out of the school yard. An African American teacher confers with Wynegar. Audio of a voice speaking to the camera crew, "Do you realize that you're being here creates more of a disturbance than when you're not here?" A crew member responds. Bits of an ensuing conversation can be heard. A few white students linger on the steps of the school. Wynegar remains in the school yard. Students continue to exit the building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/15/1977
Description: Exterior of South Boston High School. Headmaster Jerome Wynegar in front of school. Students enter school. South Boston environs. Crowd of South Boston residents gathered on the street. Rolling shots taken from news van driving down the streets of South Boston. Anti- busing and racist graffiti: “Stop Forced Busing” “White Power” “Never Nigger”
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: Debate on the success of school desegregation, moderated by Jim Lehrer. Filmed in the auditorium of Dunbar High School in Washington D.C. Lehrer explains outline and rules for debate. Busing advocates include Arthur Flemming (Chairman of the US Commission on Civil Rights), Murray Saltzman, Frankie Freeman of US Commission on Civil Rights. Flemming begins debate with opening statement by the US Commission on Civil Rights. Lino Graglia of the Neighborhood Schools Association makes opening remark for anti-busing representative group. Sue Mills, Herbert Walberg of Neighborhood Schools Association. Coproduced by WGBH and WETA.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/15/1976
Description: Audio goes in and out. Hyde Park environs. Uniformed police are stationed outside of Hyde Park High School, including horse mounted officers. Students exit the school. African American students board buses. Buses depart with police motorcycle escort. Pam Bullard interviews Hyde Park High School teachers Terry Gaskill and Hugh Mullen discuss racial tension inside the school. The students have returned to school after a recent racial disturbance. Mullen says that the school was quiet; that the students segregated themselves along racial lines. Mullen says that a small group of students is responsible for the trouble at the school. Both teachers agree that the students do not act up when the police are present in the school. Tape 1 of 2.
0:58:01: Visual: Shots of a black dog on the porch of a house on Westminster Street, near Hyde Park High School; of a police horse standing on the grass while a police officer talks to a resident; of the exterior of Hyde Park High School. Police are stationed outside of Hyde Park High School. A police bus is parked in front of the school. Three police officers stand on the steps of the school, while one police officer directs traffic on the street. A police officer pulls up on a motorcycle. 1:00:44: V: A line of school buses pulls up Central Street and stops beside Hyde Park High School. Two mounted police officers survey the scene from the intersection. Several officers are stationed on the steps of the school. Cars pass by slowly. Another police officer arrives on a motorcycle. 1:05:19: V: Shot of the exterior of Hyde Park High School. African American and white students exit the school. African American students walk toward the school buses and board them. Police and the media survey the scene. 1:09:56: V: Groups of police officers appear in the front entrances of the school. Three of the buses pull away, escorted by police on motorcycles. The buses travel up Metropolitan Avenue. Three more buses follow, accompanied by a police officer on a motorcycle. Groups of students, school officials, and police remain on the steps of the school. The last bus pulls away, with a police motorcycle escort. Police officers exit the school and walk down the steps. Groups of people remain on the steps. Close up shot of a white woman police officer on a horse. A few police officers walk away from the school. 1:13:27: V: Pam Bullard sets up an interview with two Hyde Park teachers in front of the school. Terry Gaskill is African American and Hugh Mullen is white. Vehicle noise makes their voices inaudible at beginning of interview. Gaskill advocates an after school program or gathering place for both white and African American youth in Boston. He notes that African American and white students gather on the streets after school; that a group of angry white youth kicked his car last year as he drove to Hyde Park High School. Mullen says that the day went smoothly; that the school staff had to break up groups of students in order to get them into homeroom in the morning; that the strong police presence made a difference; that the police did not interfere with school activities. Gaskill says that the students were tense at the beginning of the day; that the atmosphere was quiet. Bullard asks about racial tension among the students. Mullen says that the students segregated themselves along racial lines today; that students of different races had been mixing somewhat before Friday's racial disturbance. Gaskill says that the first day of school was calm; that racial tension began to build up among the students as the week progressed. Mullen agrees that the first few days of school were quiet. He says that there is a small group of students who make trouble; that the situation at the school will not get better unless they can get rid of the small group of troublemakers. Mullen adds that the school has a large freshman class this year; that he had thought the presence of the younger students would help to ease the tensions of the previous year; that teachers will not be able to assess the situation until the police pull out of the school; that the students do not dare act out while the police are present. Gaskill agrees that students will not act out while police are in the building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/15/1976
Description: Boston School Committee meeting, with Mayor Kevin White in attendance, where he discusses school desegregation and states his support for the recently elected school committee. Says Judge Arthur Garrity should cede some control to that body.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/11/1976
Description: Exteriors of South Boston High School. South Boston environs. Large graffiti in crosswalk “Winegar [sic] we don't want you.” Black students stream off bus, walk toward front entrance. Jerome Wynegar stands by. Plainclothes US marshals with armbands and walkie-talkies. Police keep press photographers behind line.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: Kim Reid , a student at Brighton High School, sits with a group of students in a classroom. The students talk about school activities and look at yearbooks while discussing a movie they saw on television. Another group of students in the classroom also look at yearbooks. This tape also includes footage of Reid exiting Brighton High School and boarding a school bus outside.
1:00:00: Visual: Kim Reid (Brighton High School student) sits with a three white and Hispanic students in a classroom at Brighton High School. They talk about ordering sweatshirts to sell at school. The students talk about scheduling meetings after school. Another student points out that Kim needs to know about meetings in advance because she needs to arrange transportation home. The students talk about choosing a theme for their class night. A female student seated across from Kim looks at a yearbook. A racially diverse group of boys is seated near Kim's group. A white teacher arranges files and papers at her desk. Kim's group continues to talk to one another. Kim's group looks at a yearbook. Close-up shot of Kim. The students talk about the upcoming prom. Shots of a girl turning pages of the yearbook. Kim opens the yearbook in front of her. Kim says that she knows fewer people now than she did in the ninth grade. The group identifies and talks about the people in the yearbook. The group of boys also look at yearbooks. 1:08:24: V: Kim walks over to the teacher's desk. She looks for a book on the teacher's desk. The crew sets up a shot of Kim walking across the room with a book. Kim sits down with her group. Kim and the other students talk about a TV movie. Shots of the two other girls in Kim's group. Shots of the group of boys talking to one another. 1:14:00: V: Shots of the exterior of Brighton High School; of school buses waiting on Warren Street in front of the school. An African American male student jokes around with the camera crew. Kim descends the stairs toward the buses with a group of African American and Asian American students. The students wave and talk to the camera crew as they board the buses. A police officer stands against the fence on the sidewalk. Kim walks toward her bus. The camera crew does a three takes of Kim and other students boarding the buses.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1985
Description: Hope Kelly reviews the history of school desegregation in Boston. She notes that many critics cite the absence of middle-class and white students as a reason for the continued failure of the Boston Public Schools. She focuses on the Timilty Middle School in Boston, a magnet school with successful reading and math programs for its students. Kelly interviews teacher William Moran and principle Shirley Gonsalves about the school and its programs. Moran says that the students are successful. He adds that many come from disadvantaged backgrounds. Gonsalves talks about the benefits of school desegregation. Kelly reports that the Timilty School was named a National School of Excellence in 1989. Following the edited story is additional b-roll footage of students and teachers in classrooms at the Timilty School.
1:00:07: Visual: Shot of a school bus door closing. Shots of a school bus outside of the Timilty Middle School; of students on the bus; of white and African American students exiting the Timilty Middle School; of students boarding a bus outside of the school. Shots of African American and white students in a hallway of the school. Hope Kelly reports that busing for school desegregation began seventeen years ago in Boston; that busing was viewed as a way to bring equal opportunity to all students. Kelly notes that busing drove many middle-class white and African American parents away from the school system. Kelly reports that critics cite a lack of middle-class students as a reason for the continued failure of Boston Public Schools. V: Footage of William Moran (Timilty School) being interviewed. Moran says that all students can learn. Kelly reports that Moran grew up in the South End and Roxbury; that Moran attended Boston Public Schools and went to college. V: Shots of Moran walking through a corridor in the Timilty School; of Moran speaking to three students in the doorway of a classroom. Kelly reports that Moran is the seventh-grade coordinator at the Timilty Middle School; that Moran attended the Timilty School twenty years ago. Kelly reports that the Timilty Middle School ranks first city-wide in reading; that the Timilty Middle School is second city-wide in mathematics. Kelly notes that the students at the Timilty School do not come from advantaged backgrounds. V: Shots of a white teacher teaching students of diverse races in a well decorated classroom. Shots of the students in the classroom. Footage of Moran saying that students at the Timilty School low-income families; that many of the students live in housing projects. Moran says that the students come from disadvantaged neighborhoods across the city; that the school is a city-wide school. Kelly reports that most of the students at the Timilty School are non-white and poor. V: Shots of students walking in a corridor of the Timilty School. Footage of Shirley Gonsalves (Timilty School) being interviewed by Kelly. Gonsalves says that race and class are not the determining factors among the school's students. Gonsalves says that the school can do nothing about the relative poverty of its students. Kelly reports that Gonsalves is the assistant principal at the Timilty School; that she has worked in the Boston Public School System for seventeen years. V: Shot of Gonsalves walking through a corridor and up a set of stairs with a student. Kelly reports that Gonsalves began teaching in Boston during the first year of school desegregation. V: Footage of Gonsalves being interviewed. Gonsalves says that she grew up in the rural South where busing was used to maintain segregated schools. Gonsalves says that she rode a bus to school from the age of six to the age of eighteen. Shots of students walking in a corridor at the Timilty School. Kelly reports that there are low numbers of white students in the Boston Public School System; that 11% of students at the Timilty School are white. Kelly reports that Gonsalves believes that school integration has been a success. V: Shots of a white student entering a classroom at the Timilty School; of a white teacher standing with two African American students in a hallway. Footage of Gonsalves being interviewed by Kelly. Gonsalves says that students attended schools in their own neighborhoods with students of their own race before school integration. Gonsalves says that students were not exposed to other students of different backgrounds and from different neighborhoods. Gonsalves says that students need to learn about people of different backgrounds. Shots of a white teacher teaching to a class of middle school students; of an African American male student sitting at a desk in the classroom. Shots of other students in classrooms; of an African American female student writing on a chalkboard; of an African American boy reading a book at his desk. Shot of the white teacher teaching to students in the classroom. Kelly reports that the Timilty School is a magnet school; that classes are smaller at the Timilty School; that the schoolday at the Timilty School is 1.5 hours longer on four of five days per week. Kelly reports that the waiting list to enter the sixth grade class at the Timilty School had 200 names. Kelly reports that the Timilty School was named a National School of Excellence in 1989. V: Shot of Gonsalves and a student walking in the corridor.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/22/1991
Description: Pam Bullard reports on the Tobin Elementary School, which is located near the Mission Hill Housing Project.Bullard reports that 75 white children are bused into the Tobin school with no problems. Interviews with students and teachers talking about how much they like the school. Bullard reports that Charlie Gibbons, the principal, encourages teachers to develop innovative programs for students. During the report Principal Gibbons was in Puerto Rico learning about the schools there to better be able to serve the Latino students at his school. Bullard notes that the school has a good atmosphere and enjoys a good rapport with the community.
9:50:07: Visual: Shots of street sign for Tobin Ct.; of the Mission Hill Housing Project. Pam Bullard reports that the Mission Hill Housing Project is in one of Boston's toughest neighborhoods; that racial fighting occurred there two weeks before school opened; that the housing project is in the heart of a depressed neighborhood. Bullard reports that the Tobin Elementary School is located near the housing project. V: Footage of an African American male student (Derek) saying that he has attended the Tobin School for four years; that he knows all of the teachers and gets along with them; that the school is special because of the teachers, the kids, and the field trips. A white male student (Richard) says that Derek is his friend; that he likes the Tobin school; that he has fun taking the bus everyday; that he has met a lot of new people. Bullard reports that Charlie Gibbons (principal, Tobin School) and his assistant are in Puerto Rico; that they are learning about the Puerto Rican school system in order to understand the needs of Spanish-speaking students; that Gibbons and his assistant are paying for their own trips. V: Shots of Gibbons' office; of a button reading "I go to the best - Tobin School, Roxbury"; of a thank-you note written to Gibbons from the students. Bullard reports that the Tobin School has extensive reading and physical education programs set up with Boston University; that there is a program for dental care set up with the Harvard Dental school; that the Tobin School has one of the city's best bilingual programs; that the students receive a lot of individual attention. Bullard reports that Gibbons and the teachers at the Tobin set up most of these programs themselves. V: Footage of student reading Spanish; of a student writing on a chalkboard; of bilingual posters in a classroom. Footage of a teacher at a chalkboard; of students in classroom. A white female teacher says that the students respond well to the school's programs; that she tries to give the students individual attention; that she likes the students and the parents at the Tobin. Footage of children playing learning games. An African American female teacher says that she agrees with Gibbons that the Tobin is the best school in Boston; that the Tobin has a warm atmosphere, a good faculty and a lot of support from the community. An African American male student says that he likes the Tobin because he learns things. Bullard reports that the Tobin school is located in a predominantly African American neighborhood; that 75 white students have been bused in with no problems; that students and teachers like the school very much. V: Footage of children playing on a field outside of the school. The Church of Our Lady of Perpetual Help is visible.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/26/1976
Description: Some sound dropout at the beginning of the tape. Pam Bullard's 1978 review of school desegregation in Boston. The review focuses on the effects of desegregation on South Boston High School and the Joseph Lee School. Bullard reports that attendance is low at South Boston High School, but the school atmosphere and programs have improved. Bullard reports that the Joseph Lee School is a good example of a successfully integrated elementary school. The story includes footage of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) and interviews with Ruth Batson (African American community activist), Jerome Wynegar (headmaster, South Boston High School), David Finnegan (Boston School Committee), Robert Peterkin (headmaster, English High School). Bullard also interviews teachers and students at the Lee School and South Boston High School. The report ends with footage of students at the Lee School performing in a play of "The Wizard of Oz."
1:00:02: Visual: Shot of Boston skyline. Footage of Mayor Kevin White on September 9, 1974 calling on Boston residents to come together to make busing work. Footage of buses pulling up in front of South Boston High School on the first day of school in 1974. A crowd of antibusing protesters has gathered outside of the high school. The crowd jeers at the buses. Shots of the Boston Public Gardens. Footage of Ruth Batson (African American community activist) describing Boston as a "racist, violent city." She says that the violence stemming from school desegregation has spilled over into the streets and housing projects. Footage of police marching in formation on Bunker Hill Street in Charlestown. A large crowd is gathered outside of the Bunker Hill Housing Project. Pam Bullard reports that violence and racial hatred erupted in Boston when a federal court ordered the desegregation of schools in 1974. She notes that President Gerald Ford was forced to put the 82nd Airborne division on alert, in preparation for duty on the streets of Boston. Bullard reports that the toughest neighborhoods are quiet three years later; that African American and white children attend school together without incident. V: Shots of a lone police officer outside of South Boston High School; of African American and white children entering an elementary school. 1:01:39: Bullard reports that the effects of school desegregation will not be known for years; that some inconclusive studies have been made. V: Footage of African American and white students in an integrated elementary school classroom. Bullard notes that resistance to school desegregation in Boston has been overcome. V: Shots of a busy street in South Boston; of a young white boy outside of a church; of two elderly white residents sitting on a stoop in South Boston; of racist graffiti on a wall. Bullard reports that the fiercest opposition to court-ordered desegregation in the north took place in South Boston; that the opposition has calmed down since 1974. Bullard notes that school buses transporting students to and from South Boston High School are still accompanied by a police escort; that they are greeted by four police officers on duty at the high school. V: Shots of a police cruiser leading school buses up G Street to South Boston High School; of police officers outside South Boston High School; of African American students exiting the buses at South Boston High School. Bullard notes that metal detectors were installed at South Boston High School after the stabbing of a student three years ago. V: Footage of a student passing through a metal detector; of the halls of South Boston High School. Bullard reports that racial hatred and fear at South Boston High School have given way to a lingering uneasiness. V: Footage of a white teacher in a classroom in South Boston High School. He teaches to a classroom of eight African American and white students. Bullard notes that attendance is low at South Boston High School; that classes can be as small as four students. V: Shots of teachers teaching to very small classes at the high school. A teacher is heard saying that the official enrollment at South Boston High School is 600 students; that she estimates the enrollment to be 300 students. Shots of an African American teacher helping an African American female student at a desk; of students studying in classrooms; of teachers and students in sparsely populated classrooms. Bullard notes that the school was put under receivership by the federal court in 1975; that Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) was brought in by the court; that Wynegar and his staff have instituted many alternative programs at the school. V: Footage of Wynegar saying that there are fewer problems at South Boston High School because students are happy with the school programs. Shots of white and African American students studying in classrooms at the high school. Footage of a white female teacher saying that erratic attendance is the biggest problem at South Boston High School; that she finds herself repeating lessons for the benefit of students who were absent. Footage of Wynegar saying that South Boston High School ranks eleventh out of eighteen schools in attendance; that he though the school would rank last in attendance; that students appreciate the way they are treated at the school. Shots of students in classrooms; in the automotive shop. Footage of the white female teachers saying that alternative programs are attractive to students; that students also need to learn basic skills. 1:05:04: Bullard notes that there are divisions between those who support traditional classroom learning and those who support alternative programs. V: Shots of students in classrooms; of students in the lunchroom. Footage of an African American female student saying that South Boston High School is much better this year than in previous years; that students are getting along and are more focused on their classes. A white male student says that more students are attending school now. Another white male student says that students are getting along better. The white female teacher says that the atmosphere at the school has improved. Shots of the corridors in South Boston High School; of white and African American students playing basketball. Bullard says that there are no answers as to why the atmosphere at South Boston has improved; that innovative programs, low attendance and a wearing down of resistance to integration are all factors. V: Footage of white and African American students exiting South Boston High School; of school buses traveling down G Street away from the school. Footage of David Finnegan (Boston School Committee) saying that the community needs to realize that there are good solid programs in the Boston Public School System; that desegregation has added to the quality education provided by the schools; that the atmosphere in the schools is good, but can be improved. Bullard notes that even critics have conceded that the court-ordered magnet school programs have been good for the school system. V: Footage of African American and white students at a student art show; of the students' art projects. Bullard notes that there are opportunities in art and drama programs at the magnet schools; that there are opportunities for student internships; that there have been no racial problems at the magnet schools. Bullard reports that desegregation has been costly in financial and human terms; that the cost of the first year of desegregation was $20 million; that the second year of desegregation was $30 million; that police overtime ran up the cost of school desegregation. Bullard notes that costs have stabilized at $12 million over the past two years; that there is less of a need for police officers in the schools now. Bullard reports that Boston taxpayers have had to pay for expenses not covered by state and federal funds; that Boston taxpayers pay the highest property taxes in the nation. Bullard notes that the school budget remains at $175 million per year; that the city has lost 28,000 white students since 1972; that one expert says that 16,000 students were lost to desegregation. V: Shots of an empty classroom; of a teacher's attendance book; of a students in a sparsely populated classroom. Bullard adds that many students transferred to parochial schools, private academies and suburban schools; that many high school students dropped out. Bullard notes that the Lonegan family of South Boston refused to bus their children; that their daughter stayed out of school for a year. V: Footage of the Lonegan family. Mrs. Lonegan sits at a table in her home with her daughter Michelle and her son. Mrs. Lonegan says that she found a job making beds at a nursing home in order to pay her children's tuition at a private school. 1:09:07: Bullard reports that Christina Termini (student) lives in West Roxbury, but attends the Lee School in Dorchester. V: Footage of Termini leaving her home and walking to a bus stop. She boards the bus. Footage shot from the inside of the bus as it travels through the city. The white children on the bus sing songs. Audio of Termini's mother saying that the Lee School is ideal for Christina; that she has great confidence in the education her daughter receives at the Lee School. Shots of African American children walking to the Lee School from the Franklin Field Housing Project. Shots of a white student in French class at the Lee School; of integrated classrooms at the Lee School. Footage of a teacher saying that the children of the Lee School get along well; that racial differences are not important in the classroom. Bullard reports that attendance at the Lee School is low; that 600 students attend the school; that the school has 1,000 seats available; that white attendance could be higher. Bullard notes that the atmosphere at the school is excellent. V: Footage of the students performing "The Wizard of Oz" on stage. A young white female student says that she likes the facilities at the Lee School; that she has met a lot of friends. Footage of the white female teacher saying that she likes teaching at the Lee School. Footage of Robert Peterkin (headmaster, English High School) saying that many other urban school systems are experiencing the same problems as Boston; that desegregation has brought stability and strong programs to the system. Footage of Lee School students at their "Wizard of Oz" play. They sing "Ding, dong, the wicked witch is dead." Bullard reports that the Boston Public School System has made impressive progress since school desegregation began in 1974; that the system is no longer deliberately segregated and rife with political patronage. Bullard notes that parental involvement and stronger political leadership has improved the schools. V: Footage of Batson saying that the city has been forced to confront its racial problems through school desegregation. Shots of African American and white students entering an elementary school. Bullard reports that the federal court still runs the Boston Public School System. V: Footage of Batson saying that the process of desegregation has been valuable to some students. Shot of a Lee School student performing a song in the "Wizard of Oz" play. The audio of the student singing accompanies shots of a police officer in front of South Boston High School; of African American students entering South Boston High School; of Wynegar in front of South Boston High School; of a student passing through a metal detector; of African American and white students playing basketball; of an empty classroom; of the Lonegan family; of young African American and white students; of police cruisers leaving the school yard of South Boston High School. Children at the Lee School clap for the student performer on stage.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/01/1978
Description: White students exit South Boston High. About 25 Massachusetts uniformed state troopers board Massachusetts State Police bus. Massachusetts State Police Cruiser exits school parking lot. Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) stands in the school yard and talks to students.
1:00:08: Visual: White students exit South Boston High School in small groups. Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) stands in front of the school, talking to passersby. The students walk down G Street, away from the school . Snow blankets the ground. A Massachusetts State Police bus is parked in front of the school. About 25 state police officers file onto the bus. A state police car pulls out from the front of the school, into the street. Small groups of students, police, and officials remain in front of the school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/15/1977
Description: Press conference at City Hall. Boston Mayor Kevin White and Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia read prepared statements about the following day's school opening in the third year of court-ordered busing. White expresses confidence in a peaceful opening of schools. DiGrazia says that police have been instructed to use minimum force, but to act decisively against any disruptions of public order. Both men hope that police can be removed from schools as soon as possible. White notes that the atmosphere seems calmer this year than during the previous two years. White says that he would like to remove police from the schools as soon as possible because their presence hinders the development of a healthy learning environment. Reporters question them on the school opening. Shots of Pam Bullard listening to the press conference.
2:09:33: Visual: Members of the press are assembled for a press conference at City Hall with Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) and Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston). White begins reading a statement, then stops because there is a problem with sound. 2:11:53: V: White reads a prepared statement. He says that school opens tomorrow; that fewer students face assignments to new schools this year; that more students are attending the schools of their choice; that many schools are benefitting from programs linked with universities and businesses; that three new schools are opening; that he is confident that the school year will be productive. White says that the city is prepared to guarantee the safety of all schoolchildren; that he hopes to reduce the police presence at the schools this year; that police will restore order if disruptions occur. White urges citizens to share in the responsibility for a peaceful school opening; that the city will focus on improving schools this year. 2:14:32: V: DiGrazia reads a prepared statement. He expresses confidence in a peaceful school opening. He reports that police have received instructions to allow peaceful demonstrations, but to maintain public order; that police officers have been instructed to use minimum force and to treat those arrested with respect and courtesy. DiGrazia says that police will not tolerate any acts of violence or disruption; that these acts are often committed by only a few citizens. 2:15:56: V: White invites questions from the reporters. A reporter asks DiGrazia what kind of preparations have been made for additional police support. DiGrazia says that Massachusetts State Police will be assigned to South Boston; that MDC Police will be assigned to Charlestown; that US Marshals will be present for the opening of schools. DiGrazia says that the atmosphere on the streets seems calm; that a few citizens are engaging in disruptive behavior; that the atmosphere seems calmer than in the previous two years; that police presence will be less visible than last year; that additional police will stand by for support. DiGrazia says that the police have not received any indication that there will be outside agitators at the schools. DiGrazia says that he hopes there will be little overtime for police officers this year. DiGrazia says that uniformed State Police officers will be assigned to South Boston High School; that community service officers and juvenile officers will be assigned to monitor the other schools. 2:18:52: V: A reporter asks about cooperative efforts between the School Department, the city of Boston, and the Police Department. White says that the three entities have been working together on school desegregaton for three years; that differences about the school budget have not affected efforts to achieve a successful school opening. DiGrazia says that police will continue to enforce ordinances forbidding the assembly of more than three people along a bus route, or assemblies within 100 yards of schools. Shot of Pam Bullard. White says that he would like to remove police from schools as soon as possible; that police presence hinders a healthy learning atmospheres; that police can be removed if citizens refrain from disrupting the schools. A reporter asks DiGrazia to clarify the term "minimum force" in police conduct. DiGrazia says that he hopes police can dissuade citizens from engaging in disruptive behavior; that he would like to see the police removed from the schools as soon as possible. DiGrazia refuses to elaborate on minimum tolerance policy guidelines, but says that warnings will be given to disruptors before action is taken. DiGrazia says that the school department instituted the use of metal detectors at the schools; that they will be used again this year. DiGrazia refuses to give out information on the number of police officers assigned to the schools
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1976
Description: Charles Ray, the Headmaster of Roxbury High School, talking to students, parents and faculty members in the offices of Roxbury High School. Pam Bullard interviews Ray in the administrative offices of the school. Ray talks about how the school has changed since the beginning of school desegregation in 1974. He notes that white attendance is still low, but that it is improving. Ray describes the school's bilingual program, and the academic programs set up at the school in conjunction with Harvard University. He says that many students from Roxbury High School received college scholarships last year, and discusses their college opportunities. Ray talks about the atmosphere at the school, and the close relationships between the students and the faculty. He notes that very few students transfer out of the school. He adds that most students feel comfortable at Roxbury High School. Ray says that he tries to learn the names of every student in the school. Ray talks about the challenges of urban education. He says that he encourages pregnant students to remain in school as long as possible. Ray says that he would like to see a program set up to allow students to bring their children to school with them. Ray describes the school's building and facilities. Ray tells Bullard that it is important to treat each student with respect.
1:00:05: Visual: Charles Ray (Headmaster, Roxbury High School) speaks to an African American female student in the office of Roxbury High School. He tells the student what she needs to do in order to change school assignments. 1:01:37: V: Pam Bullard sets up an interview with Ray. Ray talks about some of the photographs in the school office. He notes that the photos were taken by students from the school. Ray talks to a student who has entered the office. The student asks Ray about the television crew in the school office. Bullard notes that the Boston Public Schools are beginning their fifth year of desegregation. Bullard asks Ray how things have changed in five years. Ray notes that Roxbury High School was paired with South Boston High School during the first year of desegregation. Ray notes that only a small percentage of students from South Boston attended Roxbury High School during the first year of school desegregation. Ray says that Roxbury High School was placed in the same district as Charlestown High School during the second year of school desegregation; that Roxbury High School has remained in that district. Bullard asks Ray about white attendance at Roxbury High School. Ray says that the school has more white students now than it had during the first year of school desegregation. He notes that sixty-three white students have been assigned to the school this year; that twenty-five white students are in attendance. Ray says that he would like the Boston School Department to assign more white students to the school. Ray says that Roxbury High School has a bilingual program for Asian and Spanish-speaking students. Bullard asks Ray about Roxbury High School's programs in conjuction with Harvard University. Ray explains that Roxbury High School has been paired with Harvard University by the federal court order governing school desegregation in Boston. Ray talks about a tutoring program in which Harvard students tutor Roxbury High School students. Ray talks about the Harvard Upward Bound Program. He adds that Harvard and Roxbury High School have set up programs for students in advanced math and sciences, reading, and art. Ray explains that teachers and advanced students can take courses at Harvard University. 1:06:46: V: Bullard notes that students who attend Roxbury High School tend to stay at the school and do not transfer out. Ray agrees that not many students transfer out of the school. He adds that most students like the school and the faculty. Bullard asks Ray if many students from Roxbury High School attend college. Ray says that 74 students graduated from Roxbury High School in 1978; that 37 of those students went on to college. He adds that many of the students received scholarships last year. Ray adds that the Girls High Alumni Association has contributed to a scholarship fund for the students. Ray notes that many Roxbury High School students have done well in their college careers. Bullard asks why Roxbury High School has been a successful school. Ray says that the teachers get to know the students and their families very well. Ray notes that the faculty know most of the students by name; that the students feel comfortable at the school. Ray adds that these close relationships are the key to the school's success. Bullard asks Ray if he knows the name of every student at the school. Ray says that he is learning the names of all of the incoming freshmen; that he makes an effort to talk to the students in the hallways. Ray adds that he knows the names of all of the returning students. Bullard notes that all of the students like Ray and speak highly of him. Ray talks about the importance of knowing the name of each student. He adds that the students know that the teachers and other faculty members care about them. 1:11:43: V: Bullard asks how urban education has changed in the past decade. Ray says that programs for special needs students have changed; that pregnant students now stay in school. Ray says that he encourages pregnant students to stay in school for as long as they can. He says that he encourages them to return to school as soon as possible. Ray adds that he would like to start a program that would allow students to bring their children to school with them. He says that it might be difficult for Roxbury High School to meet the safety requirements for such a program. Bullard asks Ray if he would have chosen to be assigned to Roxbury High School. Ray says that he likes Roxbury High School. He adds that the school is structurally sound and has good facilities; that he likes the layout of the building. Ray says that the faculty at the school have a good relationship with the community and with the parents. Ray adds that he likes the atmosphere at small high schools. He says that each student gets personal attention at Roxbury High School. Bullard asks Ray what he has learned over the course of his career. Ray says that he has learned the importance of treating each student with respect. He says that the students treat him respectfully in return. Bullard closes the interview. 1:16:38: V: Ray stands behind the counter of the office at Roxbury High School. He answers questions from a student about her school schedule. Ray confers with a teacher about two problem students. Ray tells the teacher that he will speak to the students. Ray talks to two more students about their school schedules. Ray confers with another teacher in the office.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/13/1978
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on controversy over a new student assignment plan for the Boston Public Schools, which minority members of the Boston School Committee spoke out against at a breakfast commemorating the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.. School Committee members John O'Bryant, Juanita Wade, Jean McGuire, and Gerald Anderson speak to the media. They do not believe that the plan will provide equitable education for all. The plan was proposed by mayor Ray Flynn. It will allow parents to choose which schools their children will attend. Interview with Flynn, who defends the proposal, saying that it's supported by parents. He adds that School Committee members have been asked for input on the plan. Vaillancourt also reports that Flynn has proposed the decentralization of the Boston School Department and selling off the headquarters of the Boston School Department. Vaillancourt reports that minority members of the School Committee may rescind their support for superintendent Laval Wilson if he supports Flynn's school choice proposal. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Elma Lewis in Marsh Chapel at Boston University on Martin Luther King Day and Carmen Fields interviews Robert Nemiroff about the playwright Lorraine Hansberry
1:00:26: Visual: Footage of city and state leaders including Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), Bernard Cardinal Law (Archidiocese of Boston), and Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) singing together at celebration in honor of the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader). Meg Vaillancourt reports that local leaders gathered over breakfast today to celebrate Martin Luther King's birthday. Vaillancourt notes that there was controversy at the breakfast over a new assignment plan for students in Boston Public Schools. V: Footage of Juanita Wade (Boston School Committee) speaking to the media. School Committee members John O'Bryant and Jean McGuire sit beside Wade. Wade calls the new plan "segregation redux." Wade says that the Boston Public Schools need to provide choice, equity, and a quality education right now. Footage of Flynn speaking to the media. Flynn says that the plan has the support of the citizens of Boston; that parents are looking for this kind of reform. Vaillancourt reports that the new plan would allow parents to choose which schools their children will attend; that parents have not been able to choose schools since school desegregation began in 1974. V: Shots of buses pulling up to the front of South Boston High School in 1974; of South Boston residents jeering at the buses. Shots of buses parked in front of South Boston High School; of African American students walking among the buses. Vaillancourt notes that the population of white students in Boston Public Schools has declined since 1974; that non-white students make up 70% of the student population in Boston Public Schools. Vaillancourt adds that the School System has been criticized for not providing students with a quality education. V: Shots of non-white students in a classroom; of an African American male student sitting in a classroom. Shot of Flynn. Vaillancourt reports that Flynn and two consultants have proposed a plan to improve the schools and to increase parental choice. V: Footage of School Committee members O'Bryant, Wade, McGuire, and Gerald Anderson sitting on a couch. African American community leaders, including Charles Yancey (Boston City Council), Eugene Rivers (African Peoples Pentecostal Church) and Louis Elisa (Boston chapter of the NAACP), stand behind them. Anderson addresses the media. Anderson says that the Boston School System needs to provide a quality education to all before it can claim to be equitable. Anderson says that the mayor needs to provide more funding to the schools. Shots of O'Bryant and other community leaders. Footage of Flynn being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks Flynn if he is surprised by the attitude of the African American community leaders. Flynn says that he has been working on the proposal for several months; that community leaders have had many opportunities to review and give input on the proposal. Footage of Anderson saying that he is offended by Flynn's attitude. Anderson notes that Flynn has said that the statements of the African American leaders are "bogus." Anderson says that the community leaders are standing up for their constituents; that Flynn's statements are "bogus." Footage of Flynn saying that the members of the School Committee have had input on the proposal; that the members of the School Committee voted twelve-to-one in favor of the plan. Flynn says that the School Committee members were told that they would have further opportunities to give input on the proposal. Footage of McGuire saying that Flynn's proposal will cost more money. McGuire says that the School Committee has not been given additional money to fund Flynn's proposal. Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Public School System spends more money per student than any other public school system in the nation. V: Shot of an African American teacher and student at the front of a classroom; of a white male student seated in a classroom; of an African American female student seated in a classroom. Vaillancourt notes that Flynn has come up with another controversial proposal to fund neighborhood schools; that Flynn has suggested the decentralization of the Boston School Department. Vaillancourt adds that the proposal would sell off the downtown headquarters of the Boston School Department on Court Street. V: Shots of the exterior of the Boston School Department headquarters. Footage of Flynn saying that the downtown headquarters of the School Department should be sold; that the money should be put into neighborhood schools. Footage of O'Bryant saying that the School System is going to end up back in court if it does not receive support from the city. Vaillancourt reports that Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) has supported Flynn's school choice plan; that Wilson's contract ends in June. V: Shots of a meeting in the chambers of the Boston School Committee; of Wilson speaking at a School Committee meeting. Vaillancourt reports that the African American members have voted to extend Wilson's contract in the past. Vaillancourt notes that Wilson's future support among the Committee's African American members may depend on his position on Flynn's school choice plan.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/16/1989
Description: Outside South Boston High School. Buses arrive. Mostly black students exit school and board buses. Police cruisers and motorcycles stationed in front of school. Interview with headmaster Jerome Wynegar who says despite some trouble and a severe lack of students, classes will go on, and faculty will try to keep up morale. He says “…kids come here to learn, believe it or not.” Several takes of reporter standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/18/1979
Description: Exterior South Boston High, first day of school on staggered opening schedule. Police on steps. Tilt up facade. White students walk up to school. Jerome Wynegar out front. Boston Police bus pulls up. Wynegar comments on insufficient buses to bring black students from distant neighborhoods because of contract dispute and the disruption of the staggered opening schedule. Press photographers. Person on the street interview with white mother, Evelyn Gorhan, who waited with daughter for bus that never came. Black mother, Edna Calhoun from Roxbury says she will not send her son to school until buses are available. Calhoun and another black woman, Frankie MacDonald, report rocks and expletives hurled at them. Shots of the children. “Nigers suck” graffiti on brick housing project.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1977
Description: Buses pull up to Roxbury High School. The buses are not full. Asian students exit the buses and enter the school. African American and Asian students approach the high school on foot. Shots of housing in the surrounding area. Exteriors of Joseph Lee Elementary school, which school children walking towards school. Buses pull up to the Lee Elementary School. White and African American students exit buses and enter the school. African American students and parents approach the school on foot. Racially integrated classes line up in the recess yard and enter the Lee School. The students wave at the camera as they enter the school.
1:00:16: Visual: A nearly empty bus pulls up to Roxbury High School. Asian students exit the bus and enter the school. African American students approach the school on foot. Shots of Greenville Street, in front of Roxbury High School. A second bus pulls up to the school. More Asian students exit the bus and enter the school. Shot of plaque above entrance, reading "Roxbury High School." Two police officers are stationed in front of the school. Asian and African American students approach the school on foot. 1:07:20: V: A small school bus is parked in front of the Joseph Lee Elementary School. Young students of various races exit the bus. African American students and parents approach the school entrance. African American and white students exit another small school bus and approach the school entrance. Two of the white boys are identical twins. An African American boy asks the camera crew questions. He walks in front of the camera in order to be on television. More African American students and parents approach the school. Closeup shots of young African American students who have approached the camera crew. 1:12:57: V: A school bus pulls up in front of the school. Mostly white and a few African American students exit the bus and are greeted by an African American teacher. The students enter the school. Another school bus pulls up. The same African American teacher greets more African American and white students as they exit the bus. The students enter the school. 1:17:10: V: African American and white students line up for class in the recess yard. A young white female student stands alone, looking lost. The racially integrated classes enter the school building. Many students address the crew or wave at the camera as they pass by.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/09/1976
Description: Police officers and US Marshals are present outside of Charlestown High School on the first day of school during the third year of court-ordered busing in Boston. The media is gathered across the street from the school, at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. Robert DiGrazia (Boston Police Commissioner) confers with police and surveys the scene outside of the school. A group of buses with a police motorcycle escort pulls up to the school. African American students exit the buses and enter the school. A crowd of white youth gathers near the school. Dennis Kearney (State Representative) and Robert Murphy (Headmaster, Charlestown High School) talk to the crowd of youths. DiGrazia and Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) confer near the crowd
0:00:05: Visual: Members of the media pass two police officers as they enter the enclosure surrounding the Bunker Hill Monument in Monument Square. Shot of three US Marshals walking toward Charlestown High School. An MDC Police officer exits a police vehicle parked near the high school. Shot of the exterior of Charlestown High School. A few police officers stand in front of the high school. Two US Marshals confer near the high school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: Commissioner Robert DiGrazia, Boston police and US marshals stationed outside South Boston High. Black students exit school, get on bus. Buses slowly come and go. Many officials mill about on sidewalk. Headmaster Jerome Wynegar talks to Joseph Jordan. Later, white students flow out of school en masse. Comments, some racist, from the crowd waiting outside the school can be overheard.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/14/1976
Description: African American and white students exit from separate buses and join other students entering West Roxbury High School. US Marshals stand in front of the school. Robert Donahue (District Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) greets students as they enter the school. More buses drop off students at the school. Robert DiGrazia confers with officials and enters the school. A white teacher affectionately greets some African American students as they arrive at school. Administrators use two-way radio to communicate with approaching buses. Donald Burgess (headmaster, West Roxbury High School) talks to students about bus schedules as they approach the school from the parking lot.
0:10:07: Visual: Robert Donahue (District Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) greets African American students as they exit a yellow school bus. A police officer stands near the bus as the students exit. White students exit a second bus pulled up behind the first bus. White and African American students from the separate buses walk toward the entrance of West Roxbury High School. Groups of white students gather in the courtyard. Three more buses pull up to the school. White students exit the first bus. African American students exit the second and third buses. Students walk toward the entrance of the school. A group of white male students is gathered to the side of the walkway. Donahue breaks up the group and they walk easily toward the school. Three US Marshals stand on the sidewalk in front of the school. Donahue greets the US Marshals. White students continue to stream into the school, walking past the US Marshals. Donahue talks and gestures good-naturedly with a white male student on crutches. Another school bus pulls up. African American students exit the bus and walk toward the school. Groups of African American and white students enter the school. 0:08:03: V: Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) speaks with officials gathered to the side of the walkway leading to the school. DiGrazia enters the school. White students are gathered outside of the school on the walkway. Donald Burgess (headmaster, West Roxbury High School) moves among the students with a walkie-talkie. Burgess encourages the students to enter the school. Students finish their cigarettes and make their way into the school. Members of the media film the inside of the school through a classroom window. 0:09:40: V: Another bus pulls up to the school. African American students exit the bus and walk toward the school. A teacher and a police officer supervise the students as they exit the bus. School officials and the police officer confer outside of the school. Donahue speaks into a walkie-talkie. A white teacher greets African American students affectionately as they exit the bus. He pats them on the shoulders and shakes their hands. A group of white female students walk up the steps from the school parking lot. They are followed by a group of white male students. Burgess speaks to the students as they walk up the steps. Donahue and Burgess confer about logistics. A large group of white and African American students make their way across the parking lot toward the school. Burgess speaks to some of the students about bus schedules as they approach the school. 0:16:50: V: US Marshals continue to stand in front of the school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/13/1976
Description: No audio at the beginning. Horse-mounted police officers, police cars, police bus. Police officers are gathered along G Street outside of South Boston High School. Exteriors of the school building. School buses, accompanied by a police motorcycle escort, pull up outside of the school. African American and white students exit the school. White students walk away from the school. African American students board the buses. The buses depart. Pam Bullard interviews four South Boston High School teachers: Jerry Power, Bob Healey, Bob Donovan, and Paul Grueter. The four teachers says that conditions in the school are improving, despite negative reports in the media. Donovan says that Judge Arthury Garrity (federal judge) is among those receiving inaccurate reports about the school. They discuss some of the good things that they think are happening in South Boston High despite the racial tensions.
1:00:04: Boston Police Department vehicles are lined up along the side of the road in South Boston. A mounted police officer exercises his horse. A horse stands in a yard with grass. 1:02:21: Visual: Boston Police Department vehicles are parked in the schoolyard of South Boston High School. Police are gathered along G Street in front of the high school. Shot of the exterior of South Boston High School. A Massachusetts State Police vehicle is parked in the schoolyard. A Boston Police station wagon is parked on G Street. 1:04:55: V: Buses pull up in front of South Boston High School. The buses are accompanied by a police motorcycle escort. White students exit the high school, walking out of the schoolyard. African American students exit the high school and walk toward the buses. A young African American male student raises a clenched fist and looks at the camera. Some white students continue to exit the school, along with African American students. Two African American female students pose for the camera and say, "Hi, mom." A few of the African American students wave at the camera as they walk to the buses. Police officers stand casually on the sidewalk in front of the buses. A white student walks by the camera crew and says, "We don't watch Channel 2 news." 1:10:13: V: A group of four police officers are gathered on G Street. They laugh casually at a joke. A female African American student rushes toward her bus. Police officers mount their motorcycles. The buses pull away from the school and travel down G Street with the police escort. 1:11:57: V: Shot of the exterior of South Boston High School. Pam Bullard exits the high school, followed by four white teachers. She sets up an interview in front of the school with Jerry Power (teacher, South Boston High School), Bob Healey (teacher, South Boston High School), Bob Donovan (teacher, South Boston High School), and Paul Grueter (teacher, South Boston High School). Donovan makes it clear to Bullard that each teacher is speaking as an individual; that they are not speaking for the faculty of the school. Bullard asks each of them to say and speak their names for the camera. Bullard tells them that negative reports have been circulating about the situation inside South Boston High School. Donovan asks where the negative reports are from. Bullard says that they are from the media. Donovan says that the situation is slowly getting better after a hectic beginning of the school year. Grueter agrees that the situation is improving. Healey says that sweep teams have been established in the corridors in order to get students to class; that the school corridors had been a problem until now. Donovan says that the school faculty took some drastic measures to control the situation inside the school. Power says that the atmosphere in the school has swung between periods of tension and periods of calm; that there has been a decrease in the number of suspensions and separations of students from the school. Bullard says that many school officials and teachers outside of South Boston High School are calling the school "a lost cause." Donovan says that the faculty and staff at South Boston High School are committed to educating the students and keeping the school open. Healey says that many people are not aware of the good programs at South Boston High School. He mentions the automotive shop, business courses, and computer courses. Power says that he was quoted in a Boston Herald article that was critical of the school. He says that his quote was taken out of context. He had meant to say that not all of the students are taking full advantage of the programs offered to them; that there are both white and African American students at the school who are not interested in getting an education. Donovan says that the faculty is not ashamed of their school; that Judge Arthur Garrity (federal judge) is among those receiving inaccurate information about the situation at South Boston High School; that Garrity received a letter from the CCC which contained inaccurate information about the school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/01/1976
Description: Interview with headmaster Jerome Wynegar about changes at South Boston High School in last two years in four areas: administration, discipline, curriculum review, community relations. He sees improvement in students' ability to learn with fewer disruptions than in first years of busing. He discusses the school's attempt to prepare students for their futures. He says more research is needed into educational methods for a changing world; experiential learning should be emphasized over traditional lectures. He endorses alternative programs because attendance is encouraged. reel 1 of 2
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/01/1978
Description: Christy George reports that the city of Lowell has chosen a central enrollment plan to accomplish school desegregation in its public schools. George notes that central enrollment plans are implemented through magnet schools; she adds that students choose schools according to the programs they offer instead of by location. George interviews Robert Kennedy (Mayor of Lowell). Kennedy says that the Lowell School Committee opted for a central enrollment plan in order to avoid court-ordered desegregation of the schools. George reports that the city of Cambridge uses a central enrollment plan and has become a national model for school desegregation. George interviews Peter Colleary (Director of Student Assignments, Cambridge Public Schools) about central enrollment in Cambridge Public Schools. George's report includes footage of a meeting between Colleary and school officials from Rochester, NY. The officials from Rochester ask questions about central enrollment in Cambridge. George notes that opponents to school desegregation in Lowell believe that central enrollment is a form of mandatory desegregation. George interviews George Kouloheras (Lowell School Committee) about his opposition to the central enrollment plan. George notes that Cambridge had a successful school system even before the adoption of the central enrollment plan. She adds that the Cambridge model may not work in every city. George's report includes footage of buses in front of schools in Lowell, footage of a girls' soccer game in Cambridge, footage of school children in classrooms, and footage of buses arriving at South Boston High School in 1976. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Marcus Jones reports on tension over school desegregation in Lynn
1:00:05: Visual: Shots from a moving vehicle of students in front of South Boston High School in 1976; of buses with police escort travelling up G Street to South Boston High School; of African American students exiting buses in front of South Boston High School. Christy George reports that the city of Lowell wants to avoid court-ordered school desegregation and forced busing. George reports that Lowell is opting for a voluntary school enrollment plan; that students choose three schools which they would like to attend; that students will be bused to one of those schools. V: Shots of elementary school students in a school cafeteria; of a bus pulling up to an elementary school. Footage of Robert Kennedy (Mayor of Lowell) saying that the Lowell School Committee acted responsibly; that the School Committee wanted to avoid court intervention in Lowell schools. Shots of a white teacher teaching in a racially integrated elementary school classroom in Lowell. Shots of students in the classroom. George reports that the central enrollment plan is implemented through magnet schools; that the magnet schools offer diverse programs; that students can choose the school which offers programs which appeal to them. George notes that racial balance can result from the magnet school system; that the system has worked well in the city of Cambridge. V: Footage of Peter Colleary (Director of Student Assignments, Cambridge Public Schools) saying that school choice has been successful for Cambridge Public Schools. George notes that Colleary matches Cambridge students with their schools; that some schools have increased minority enrollment from 9% in 1981 to 43% in 1987; that students are willing to choose schools outside of their neighborhoods. V: Shots of the Cambridge High School girls' soccer team playing a soccer game. Footage of Colleary saying that 65% of Cambridge Public School students do not attend schools in their districts. Shots of the exterior of Cambridge Rindge and Latin School. George notes that the city of Cambridge owns many of its own buses; that half of the bus drivers work for the city. dShots of a school bus; of the exterior of Cambridge Rindge and Latin School. George notes that the Cambridge Public School System has become a national model for desegregation. V: Shots of Colleary talking to a delegation from the public school system of Rochester, NY. Members of the delegation ask Colleary questions about the Cambridge Public School System. George notes that critics in Lowell see the Cambridge model as another form of mandatory desegregation. V: Shot of a school bus pulling away from an elementary school in Lowell. Footage of George Kouloheras (Lowell School Committee) saying that central enrollment plans "are a euphemism for forced busing." Kouloheras says that central enrollment does not improve the education in the schools. Footage of Colleary saying that 35% of Cambridge students are bused; that the students have chosen to attend schools outside of their districts. Colleary calls it "busing by choice." George stands in front of a school at dusk. George reports that Cambridge was providing good education in its schools before the implementation of the voluntary desegregation plan. George notes that the Cambridge model may not work in every city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/26/1987
Description: No audio at very beginning. Police officers and US Marshals are stationed outside of Charlestown High School. African American and white students exit the school. White students walk away from the school. African American students board buses and depart. Members of the media record the event from across the street, under Bunker Hill Monument. Gary Griffith does several takes of reporter standup from the South End. He gives an update on the senatorial race in the second Suffolk district. Elevated train tracks are visible on Washington Street. South End environs Shot of the Prudential Center. Washington St. street sign.
0:00:00: Visual: School buses pull up to the front of Charlestown High School. Graffiti on the front of the school has been painted over. A Boston Police Department cruiser pulls up behind the buses. A police officer on a motorcycle waits behind the buses. A US Marshal surveys the school from across the street. A group of officials and another US Marshal stand at the entrance of the school. Members of the media observe the scene from behind the fence at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. 0:01:49: V: An African American police officer is stationed at the corner of Monument Square and Concord Street. Shot of Concord Street. A group of white youth observe events at the school from across Monument Square. A girl sits on the fence watching the school. Three young men stand on the steps of a brownstone house on Monument Square. A group of police officers are stationed on Monument Square where the youth have gathered. Some members of the media stand at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. Shot of the Bunker Hill Monument. School buses and police motorcycle escorts remain parked in front of the school. Police radios are audible. Shots of Charlestown High School through the fence at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. 0:06:37: V: A police officer talks to school officials at the entrance of the school. Two white US Marshals and one African American US Marshal are gathered in front of the school. Police officials and a US Marshal confer at the corner of Monument Square and Bartlett Street. Police officers are stationed along Concord Street. Shot of the Bunker Hill Monument and the gathered media. 0:08:25: V: African American and white students exit the school together. Some white students walk away from the school. African American students and some white students head toward the buses. Shot of the exterior of Charlestown High School. A student makes a gesture of peace to the media. The video is overly bright during this scene. 0:12:02: V: Buses pull away from the school, followed by a police motorcycle and a police cruiser. White students are gathered at the corner of Concord and Bartlett Streets. Police officials leave the scene. Another group of white students is gathered on the corner of Bartlett Street and Monument Square. One girl makes a peace sign for the camera. Two police officers with riot helmets walk up the street. 0:14:24: V: Gary Griffith reports on the senatorial race in the second Suffolk district. He stands on a street corner. The Prudential Tower is visible in the distance. Griffith says that the election will be determined in the Democratic primary because there are no Republican or independent candidates; that the Democratic primary will take place in four days. Griffith makes a mistake in his delivery and does two more takes. The camera pans to Washington Street. Elevated train tracks run down the center of the street. Shot of the fire escape of a building on the corner of Washington Street. The windows of the building are boarded up. Shots of rowhouses and buildings along the street perpendicular to Washington Street. Shots of a garden behind a chain link fence. A colorful sign on the fence reads "Community Garden". Shot of the street and the Prudential Tower. Clothes are hanging out to dry on the fire escape of a building on the street. Shots of Washington Street and elevated train tracks. Shot of street sign for Washington Street. Shots of overgrown lot on the corner of Washington Street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/09/1976
Description: Mayor Kevin White releases report on racial violence in Boston. He does not comment on the findings because he has not yet reviewed them. The report was written by a committee consisting of 13 diverse members, chaired by Speaker Thomas McGee and Judge David Nelson. They met ten times over two months to interview 17 community leaders, both supporters and opponents of busing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/24/1976
Description: Review of the first few years of court ordered desgregation, including explosion of racism and violence, and the heavy police patrol required to keep things under control. Garrity is still in charge of the Boston schools. Although things are more quiet, and certain programs are working , like magnet schools, a high percentage of Boston students are still significantly under the national average. The Boston school system is also still overwhelmingly made up of minority students. Black parents propose ‘freedom of choice’ plan. Interviews with Robert Peterkin, Robert Spillane, and other officials. Classroom scenes of the current school system,highlighting Mildred Reed and her daughter Kim. They are Jamaica Plain residents, and Kim is bused to Brighton High School. Interview with Kim, where she talks about the benefits of being bused. Scenes of Kim getting on the bus, the bus ride, and in school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/11/1984
Description: David Boeri reports that the US Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that the Boston Public School System is desegregated. Boeri reports that the Marshall Elementary School is less racially integrated now than it was before court-ordered desegregation began in 1974. He notes that the school population was 50% white when the school opened in the 1970s; he adds that the school population is now 8% white. Boeri interviews Jack Wyatt (Teacher, Marshall Elementary School), Elaine Rundle (teacher, Marshall Elementary School) and Lou Tobaski (Principal, Marshall Elementary School) about school desegregation at the Marshall Elementary School. Boeri notes that there are no educational problems at the school. He adds that the school faculty has been successfully integrated. Boeri interviews Jane Bowden (parent). Bowden says that the school is excellent. Boeri notes that the school is not racially balanced but that it is in compliance with the court order. Boeri's report is accompanied by footage of students and teachers in classrooms at the Marshall Elementary School. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Marcus Jones reports on integration at the Lee Elementary School Lee School is a successful integrated school
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of a white teacher singing a song with elementary school students in a classroom at the John Marshall Elementary School. Most of the students in the class are African American. Shot of a white male student in the classroom. David Boeri reports that the Marshall Elementary School opened 17 years ago as a neighborhood school; that 50% of the students were African American and 50% of the students were white when the school opened. Boeri notes that 8% of the school population is white in 1987. Boeri adds that the US Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that the Marshall School is desegregated. V: Footage of Jack Wyatt (teacher, Marshall Elementary School) saying that the school is not racially balanced; that the school was racially balanced when it opened. Shot of a white male student standing at the front of the classroom. Footage of Elaine Rundle (teacher, Marshall Elementary School) saying that many of the bright African American students are bused to the suburbs through METCO (Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity). Shots of an African American teacher teaching to a classroom of African American students. Boeri reports that two buses transport children to and from the school; that one of the buses brings African American students to the school; that African Americans comprise 61% of the school's enrollment. V: Footage of Rundle saying that she does not know why African American students are bused to the school. Shot of African American students walking away from the school. Boeri says that there do not seem to be educational problems at the school. V: Footage of Boeri interviewing Jane Bowden (Marshall School parent). Bowden says that she did opposed busing at first; that she refused the opportunity to put her children in a different school. Bowden notes that the Marshall School is "excellent." Shot of Bowden's children getting into her car. Footage of Boeri interviewing Lou Tobaski (Principal, Marshall Elementary School). Tobaski says that the school has been able to convince the white parents to keep their children in the school; that the children are receiving a good education. Tobaski says that the school is mostly African American because the surrounding neighborhood has mostly African American residents. Boeri notes that African American and Hispanic residents have moved into the neighborhood surrounding the school. V: Footage of an African American teacher in a classroom with mostly African American students. Shots of individual students. Boeri notes that the school has received more money from the School Department because of desegregation; that the staff at the Marshall School is integrated. Boeri adds that the school is not racially balanced; that the school is in compliance with the court order. V: Footage of Tobaski saying that the Boston School Committee has done its best to integrate the public schools; that not much more can be done.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/29/1987
Description: Marcus Jones reports that Ione Malloy (author and teacher) has written a book about the busing crisis in Boston called Southie Won't Go. Jones notes that Malloy was a teacher at South Boston High School during the busing crisis. He adds that Malloy's book is based on her notes and journal entries from that time. Jones interviews Malloy on the front steps of South Boston High School. Malloy says that she lived in constant fear for her safety during the busing crisis at South Boston High School. She recalls a tense staff meeting in the wake of the stabbing of a white student at the school in 1974. Malloy reads a journal entry written at the time of the stabbing. Malloy says that she wrote about the situation as she experienced it. Malloy adds that students were sacrificed in the name of social ideas during the busing crisis. Jones notes that Malloy does not state her opinions outright in her book. He adds that her point of view comes across through her journal entries. Jones' report is accompanied by footage of school desegregation at South Boston High School in the 1970s.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of Ione Malloy (author and teacher) being interviewed by Marcus Jones outside of South Boston High School. Malloy says that the children were sacrificed in the name of social ideas. Jones reports that Ione Malloy spoke to him today about her new book, Southie Won't Go. Jones reports that armed troops patrolled South Boston High School during the busing crisis; that students and faculty were in constant fear for their safety. V: Footage of African American students exiting buses outside of South Boston High School. A police officere stands on the school grounds. Footage of Malloy being interviewed by Jones. Malloy says that she was in constant fear during the busing crisis. Malloy that her editors told her that she used the word "afraid" too often in her book. Jones reports that Malloy now teaches at the Boston Latin School. V: Shot of Massachusetts State Troopers standing at the entrance of South Boston High School as students enter. Footage of Malloy being interviewed. Malloy says that students were sometimes too afraid to move from their seats. Jones reports that Malloy says that she has not returned to South Boston High School in nine years. Jones notes that Malloy says that her recollections of the tensions inside the school are still vivid. V: Shots of the exterior of South Boston High School; of Malloy and Jones sitting on the steps of the school. Jones reports that Malloy recalls a heated staff meeting called in response to the stabbing of a white student in December of 1974. Jones notes that the victim's name was Michael Faith. V: Shot of a newspaper article with a headline reading, "Eight South Boston district schools shut down after stabbing, crowd-police clash." Footage of Malloy being interviewed by Jones. Malloy says that an African American teacher stood up at the meeting to say that Faith got what he deserved. Malloy says that a white aide from South Boston stood up to say that the African American teacher should get what he deserves. Malloy says that another African American teacher stood up to say that no one deserves to be stabbed. Malloy says that she was shaking during the meeting. Jones reports that Malloy's work is in the form of a diary; that her book is a condensed version of her original notes. Jones notes that Malloy left out her own personal opinions of the events. V: Shot of Malloy and Jones looking through a scrapbook of newspaper clippings of the busing crisis. Jones reports that Malloy does not state her opinions outright; that her journal entries speak for themselves. V: Footage of Malloy and Jones on the steps of South Boston High School. Malloy reads a journal entry about the stabbing of Faith. Malloy says that writing in her journal was a catharsis at the time. Malloy says that she would like to see justice done by telling the truth of the events as she experienced them. Malloy says that people can compare her account of the events with the rulings and opinions of the court. Shot of Jones and Malloy sitting on the steps of the school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/21/1986
Description: Interview with James Kelly, director of South Boston Information Center, about a demonstration at Carson Beach. He describes it as a visit by armed black militants from Columbia Point. Then he expounds on his strident views on busing and affirmative action. SBIC storefront and sign “Welcome to Boston. The city is occupied. A boycott exists. A tyrant reigns. Law is by decree. People are oppressed. The spirit of freedom still lives.” Kelly on the street, talking to a pedestrian. Kelly sitting at desk in back room answering phone.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/02/1977
Description: Children play in front of a house with a sign on the door reading "Remember Black Tuesday." The sign is emblematic of resistance to court-ordered busing in Boston. Older sister reads to younger children on steps.
1:00:00: Visual: Three young white children play on the steps of a house. A sign reading "Remember Black Tuesday" is posted on one of the doors. 1:00:34: V: An older white girl reads to two of the children on the steps of the house. Pam Bullard talks to one of the younger children, telling her to stay still for the camera. Close up shots of the younger children.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/09/1976
Description: South Boston High School headmaster Jerome Wynegar interviewed on end of federal receivership of his school. Calmly says he seldom encounters overt hostility. He expects no substantial change in programs and attitudes now that jurisdictional control has reverted to the city. Exteriors of South Boston Highs School, and shots of Wynegar outside the school. Several takes of the reporter standup. A very bitter and angry Robert Lunnin, member of the South Boston Marshals and the South Boston Information Center, interrupts reporter standup. Lunnin says Wynegar lies, exaggerates attendance; that resistance to forced busing comes from both students and parents; that desegregation will never work “especially with the housing situation” (referring to effort to integrate blacks into public housing). He vehemently pronounces “forced busing.”
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/30/1978
Description: Martin Nolan (Boston Globe) organizes a discussion during a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Paul Parks (former Massachusetts Secretary for Education) comments on the lack of effective communication between the two opposing sides during the busing crisis. Parks says that he is saddened to hear a desire for separatism in the remarks of Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist). Jim Conway (Charlestown resident) defends Gillen by saying that Gillen believes in neighborhood schools. Conway advocates school desegregation through school choice; he talks about the need to improve all of the schools across the city. Conway adds that Charlestown does not deserve its reputation as a racist neighborhood. Howard Husock (WGBH reporter) comments that parents are concerned about the education of their children. Husock talks about the benefits of a school choice plan, which could attract middle-class families back to the public schools. Elvira "Pixie" Palladino (former member, Boston School Committee) remarks that there are few members of the anti-busing movement at the meeting. Palladino says that the busing crisis only affected poor people in Boston. She adds that no "common ground" will be found until working-class white people are included in forums such as this one. Palladino asks how many people in the room respect and love her and the people she represents. Wayne Twymon (member of the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground) talks about his experiences as an African American student attending white schools. He says that it was not easy being bused into white schools. Twymon adds that he received a good education and has been successful. Twymon tells Palladino that he loves her. Tom Lindbergh (graduate student, Boston University) asks Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston) if the Archdiocese of Boston will admit to serving as a haven for white families looking to escape forced busing. Lindbergh accuses the Archdiocese of Boston of profiting from school desegregation. Groden responds that the Archdiocese tightened its student transfer policy after the first year of busing. He adds that parochial schools also admit minority students. Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 4 of 8.
1:00:00: Visual: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) pauses for a break during the Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the release of the book Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author) . Nolan speaks from a podium. Panelists are assembled at tables on either side of the podium. Panelists include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriuulum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe). 1:00:07: V: Nolan organizes a discussion between audience members and panelists. Paul Parks (former Massachusetts Secretary for Education) comments that the tragedy of the busing crisis was that people were unable to hear or understand the positions of their opponents; that neither side was communicating effectively with the other side. Parks says that he is sorry that Gillen has departed. Parks says that he heard a desire for "separatism" in Gillen's remarks. Parks says that he hopes that his children will reap the benefits of living in an integrated society. The audience applauds. Jim Conway (Charlestown resident) says that he cannot speak for Gillen; that Gillen was not a "separatist"; that Gillen was an opponent of "forced busing." Conway says that Gillen would not be opposed to achieving desegregation through school choice. Conway adds that Charlestown is unjustly perceived as racist by outsiders; that the first African American justice in the North sat in the Charlestown District Court in 1883. Conway notes that African American students attended Charlestown High School before the busing crisis; that there were no racial incidents at the school before the busing crisis. Conway says that the busing crisis "pitted the poor black against the poor white"; that only "the bigots" among both races were seeking confrontation. Conway says that Gillen was not "talking separatism"; that Gillen was expressing his belief in neighborhood schools. Conway says that he sent his children to private school because they were not going to receive a good education "at the end of the bus line"; that he is not sure if African American children are receiving a good education at Charlestown High School. Conway says that the schools need to be improved; that "liberal whites" are the first to abandon the schools at any sign of trouble. Conway mentions a "liberal" city official who moved out of Charlestown during the busing crisis so that he could send his children to a good school. The audience applauds politely after Conway finishes his remarks. 1:05:52: V: Howard Husock (WBGH reporter) says that he lives in Brookline, where his son can walk to the neighborhood school. Husock says that he would like to speak for those who are "vilified as yuppies." Husock says that he attended a meeting of nursery school parents in West Roxbury last year; that the parents were trying to plot a "strategy" about where to send their children to school; that the parents were looking at the racial quotas at each school; that some parents were considering paying tuition to send their children to public schools in Brookline. Husock says that the parents were only thinking about how to get a good education for their children. Husock asks if the school choice plan can be adapted in order to attract the influx of new middle class families to Boston. Husock says that it would be sad if a "new generation" of residents abandons the schools. Nolan says that the question will be put on hold until Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) can speak. 1:08:19: V: Elvira "Pixie" Palladino (former member, Boston School Committee) takes the microphone. Palladino says that she would like to address Groden's comments about love and "this so-called common ground." Palladino says that there is very little "common ground" in the room; that she only recognizes three people from the anti-busing movement. Palladino says that the anti-busing movement is not represented in the audience; that she does not see any "common ground." Palladino asks the audience, "How many of you are going to love me no matter what color I am?" Palladino refers to an African American man in the audience. She says that the man would not introduce himself to her after addressing her as she passed by him. Palladino says that the man did not show her respect; that there is little evidence of respect among the audience members. Palladino says that she does not see anyone in the audience who would stand up to say, "Pixie, I love you." The audience laughs along with Palladino. An audience member calls out, "Pixie, I'll say it." Pixie acknowledges the audience member. Palladino says that she does not have to read the book because she lived the book. Palladino says that "the common ground" in Boston is found in every parent's love for their children. Palladino says that African American parents supported the court order because they thought it was the right thing for their children; that the members of the anti-busing movement thought that they were doing the right thing; that both sides fought "with their minds and with their hearts." Palladino asks how many audience members make $11,000 per year. Palladino says that there is not one audience member who is as poor as the residents of Charlestown and South Boston. Audience members make noises of disagreement. Palladino says that forced busing only affected the poor; that busing remains a class issue. Palladino says that racism "is a two-way street." Palladino says working class white people need to be included in the audience at the town meeting; that no "common ground" will be found until the interests of working class white people are represented in meetings like this one. Palladino says that "common ground" currently exists only in parents' love for their children. The audience sits silently. Palladino asks why she gets no applause. The audience applauds as Palladino asks how many of them are going to kiss her and shake her hand after the meeting. The audience laughs along with Palladino. 1:12:41: V: Wayne Twymon (member of the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground) starts to speak. He tells Palladino that he loves her. Twymon says that he rode the bus to school for two years before the court orders; that he learned what it was like to be "black in a black neighborhood" and what it was like to be " black in a white neighborhood." Twymon says that he was "running from whites" before the court order; that now he is here talking to whites. Twymon says that he attended the Dearborn School, Brighton High School, East Boston High School and parochial school; that he received a good education at each school. Twymon says that it was not easy for an African American to attend a white school. Twymon notes that his mother bused him to white schools before Arthur Garrity (federal judge) did. The audience laughs and claps for Twymon. Twymon stands with both hands on his hips. Twymon says that he made more than $11,000 last year without "a name or a title." Twymon adds that Lukas' book has created a "common ground" in this room. Twymon says that he has not finished the book yet. Twymon gestures to Colin Diver (member of the Diver family portrayed in Common Ground). Twymon says that he was amazed by Diver; that Diver turned down a high-paying job in order to take a job for the "experience." Twymon tells Palladino that he visited the State House in 11th grade through a school program. Twymon tells Palladino that he had wanted to meet her, but that she did not show up. Palladino protests that she never "shirked her responsibilities" as a public official. Twymon and Palladino both speak at the same time. The moderator steps in. Twymon tells Palladino that he is pleased to meet her today. The audience applauds. 1:16:05: V: Tom Lindbergh (graduate student, Boston University) notes that he is a former high school teacher in Milton. Lindbergh says that he worked as a teacher in the Boston Public Schools for two years; that the Boston Public Schools had a student population of 96,000 in 1974; that the student population was 70% white. Lindbergh notes that the student population now hovers at 58,000; that the student population is 70% non-white. Lindbergh asks Groden if the Archidiocese of Boston will take responsibility for its mostly white parochial school system, which serves as a haven for those who wish to escape busing. Groden says that Lukas writes about the role of the parochial schools in the busing crisis in Common Ground. Lukas says that the parochial schools should have been more stringent in preventing transfers of students from public schools in order to escape busing. Groden notes that the Catholic Church has a right to operate schools to serve their religious beliefs. Groden says that many white students were able to attend parochial schools in neighboring communities; that the church's rules covering student transfers did not apply to those schools during the first year. Groden says that the church corrected the policy during the second year of busing. Groden says that parochial schools in Boston also provide opportunities and programs for minority students; that the parochial schools do contribute to life in minority communities. Lindbergh notes that parochial schools were closing down in 1972 due to a lack of funds; that there are now waiting lists to attend parochial schools. Lindbergh says that there are 115,000 students in parochial schools. He asks how many of those students are African American. Lindbergh says that the church needs to be held accountable for the large numbers of white students in parochial schools.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: David Boeri reports that E.W. Jackson is the manager of WLVG radio station in Cambridge and the pastor of the New Corner Baptist Church in Roxbury. Jackson addressed a community meeting in South Boston last night about the city's public housing desegregation plan. He attacked atheism, school busing, and seat belt laws in his speech, and called the city's housing desegregation plan a form of "social engineering." Interview with Jackson in the studios of WLVG. He discusses public housing integration and says that "freedom of choice" is more important than integrated developments. Boeri reports that Boston City Councilors James Kelly and Dapper O'Neil are leading the fight against the desegregation plan, but that interest in the issue is waning among South Boston residents. Interview with Neil Sullivan, policy advisor to mayor Ray Flynn, who helped develop the housing desegregation plan. Sullivan says that elements of choice have been preserved in the city's new public housing policy.
1:00:13: Visual: Shots of a light outside of the studio door at WLVG radio station; of a record by Amy Grant spinning on a turntable inside of the studio. Music plays on the soundtrack. David Boeri reports that E.W. Jackson is the manager of WLVG, a gospel radio station in Cambridge. V: Shots of Jackson in the offices of WLVG. Shots of a record spinning on a turntable; of the WLVG logo on a piece of paper. Audio of Jackson talking to a disc jockey about the playlist. Shot of Jackson in the studio. Boeri reports that Jackson is also the pastor of the New Corner Baptist Church in Roxbury; that Jackson visited a community meeting in South Boston last night; that 350 white residents attended the meeting. V: Shot of Jackson addressing a community meeting in South Boston on July 12, 1988. Members of the audience stand to applaud for him. Footage of Jackson ad dressing the meeting. Jackson says that South Boston residents have been "dumped on" by city leaders. Footage of Jackson sitting behind a desk, being interviewed by Boeri. Jackson chuckles when Boeri asks him if he had ever imagined bringing an audience of South Boston residents to their feet. Shots of Jackson addressing the community meeting. Boeri reports that Jackson attacked atheism, school busing, and seat belt laws in his speech at the meeting in South Boston. Boeri says that Jackson called the city's plan to desegregate public housing is an example of "social engineering." V: Shots of audience members at the community meeting. Footage of Jackson addressing the meeting. Jackson says that he can understand why the people of South Boston do not want bureaucrats telling them how to live their lives. The audience applauds. Boeri reports that James Kelly (Boston City Council) and Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council) are leading the fight against the city's desegregation plan for public housing; that interest in the struggle may be waning among South Boston residents. V: Shot of Jackson addressing the meeting. O'Neil sits beside the podium. Kelly is visible behind Jackson. Shot of empty seats at the back of the room. Footage of Boeri asking Jackson if he thinks he might have been "used" by Kelly and O'Neil. Jackson quotes the Bible as saying that it is good to be used for a good cause. Footage of Neil Sullivan (Policy Advisor to Mayor Ray Flynn) being interviewed by Boeri. Sullivan says that the attending the community meeting is a good way to get on television. Boeri reports that Sullivan says that Jackson has confused the issues. V: Footage of Jackson saying that tenants must be able to choose where they want to live; that freedom of choice is more important than integrated developments. Footage of Sullivan saying that the city's plan tries to preserve elements of choice in the new housing plan. Footage of Jackson saying that affordable and adequate housing is needed in every neighborhood. Footage of Sullivan saying that the city of Boston is working harder than any other major city on the issue of affordable housing. Footage of Jackson leaving the stage at the community meeting. Jackson shakes hands with several attendees of the meeting. Boeri reports that Jackson may have forged a new alliance with South Boston residents.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/13/1988
Description: Carmen Fields interviews Dr. Kenneth Clark (psychologist). Fields reports that Clark and his Mamie Phipps Clark (psychologist) performed studies using dolls to gauge ego and self-esteem in young African American children. Fields notes that the Clarks' research influenced the Supreme Court's 1953 landmark decision on school desegregation. Clark talks about his research, saying that African American children rejected the brown dolls because they had internalized society's negative stereotypes of African Americans. Clark discusses the use of the study by NAACP lawyers in the 1953 school desegregation case. Clark talks about the importance of school desegregation and the need for white and African American children to grow up with self-respect and respect for others. He says that children must be taught to act humanely toward others. Fields' report includes footage from the 1959 film Imitation of Life and footage from Eyes on the Prize. Fields' report also includes footage of school desegregation in South Boston and shots of dolls. Sound cuts out at the very end of the video.
1:00:10: Visual: Shot of a display of dolls and toys. Carmen Fields reports that Dr. Kenneth Clark (psychologist) and the late Mamie Phipps Clark (psychologist) used dolls in a 1939 psychological experiment; that the Clarks used dolls to gauge ego and self esteem in young African American children. Fields notes that the results of the experiments shocked the nation. V: Shots of Kenneth Clark being interviewed by Fields. Shots of a white doll; of an African American doll. Footage of Clark talking about how African American children internalize society's negative stereotypes of African Americans. Clark says that two out of three African American children rejected the brown dolls. Footage from the 1959 film, Imitation of Life. Footage of Clark saying that the children were forced to identify with the brown dolls they had rejected. Fields reports that the Supreme Court's 1953 decision on school desegregation was influenced by the Clarks' research. V: Shot of the exterior of the Supreme Court Building in Washington D.C. Footage of Clark saying that NAACP lawyers were interested in the study; that NAACP found parallels between the results of the study and the effects of segregated schools on African American chiildren. Fields reports that school desegregation has been accomplished in both southern and northern cities. V: Black and white footage from Eyes On the Prize. Shots of an African American girl being accompanied into a school; of the National Guard running in formation; of African American students entering a school; of an African American female student in a classroom; of an African American man walking with two white men. Shots of school buses pulling up to the front of South Boston High School in 1974; of South Boston residents jeering at the buses. Shots of police officers lined up on a streeet outside of a Charlestown Housing Project. Fields notes that Clark blames low self-esteem for many of today's educational problems including high drop-out rates and violence. V: Footage of Clark being interviewed by Fields. Clark says that society's problems cannot be solved by laws and court cases; that churches have not influenced people to act more humanely toward others. Clark says that children must be educated to act in a humane manner. Fields asks Clark how he responds to people who believe that desegregation did not work. Clark says that desegregation has never really been tried; that schools are still organized along racial lines. Clark says that schools are not set up to teach children to respect others. Fields asks if the doll study is still relevant today. Clark says that both white African American children need help in developing positive self-images in today's society. Shots of students in an integrated classroom; of white students in the classroom. Footage of Clark saying that racism is indicative of a lack of self-respect. Clark says that dolls can be used to communicate a sense of humanity and decency. Shots of white and African American dolls. Footage of Clark saying that some African American children in his doll study had good role models; that those children did not reject the brown dolls. Clark says that children can be taught to respect themselves and others.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/18/1988
Description: Mix of sound and silent footage. Preparations for the Clamshell Alliance Seabrook Occupation, a protest of the Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant. Man reads list of rules for peaceful occupation. Closeups of license plates and bumper stickers. Cathy Wolff holds press conference on international support for the demonstration, the nonviolence civil disobedience training received by the protesters, and direct action that might take place after the occupation. Man speaks at press conference on the need to protect the salt marsh area being bulldozed by construction. Silent footage of crowds at occupation. Helicopter flies overhead. Silent footage of the salt marshes and wildlife. Protest march towards Seabrook site, singing and chanting. Interviews with protesters. Police officer directs protesters. Occupation site and activities. Interview with occupation organizer. Protesters talk publicly with police officers about the arrest procedure that is likely occur. Police announce over megaphone that protesters who don't vacate will be arrested and charged with trespassing. Protesters are peacefully arrested. Interviews with protesters on getting arrested. School buses drive away loaded with arrested protesters. Crowds applaud arrested protesters as bus drives by.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/1977
Description: Pam Bullard interviews Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools). Fahey talks about the assignment of bus monitors and school aides for the coming school year. Fahey explains the roles of transitional aides, security aides and instructional aides. She says that there will also be more special needs aides and bilingual aides in the schools. Fahey comments on the need for all students to attend school in order to learn basic skills. She says that parents should be confident in the educational programs at the Boston public schools. Tape 2 of 2.
0:00:13: Visual: Pam Bullard interviews Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) in her office. Fahey sits behind her desk. Fahey says that bus monitors will ride the buses with students again this year; that parents have made it clear that they want bus monitors on the buses with their children. Fahey says that there will be just as many aides this year as in previous years; that there will be fewer transitional aides in the school buildings; that transitional aides will perform duties assigned to them by the headmasters of the schools. Fahey says that the transitional aides will be supplemented by security aides from the Safety and Security Department; that the security aides have additional training in dealing with crises. Fahey says that there will be many instructional aides in the classrooms; that instructional aides will be funded under Title I of the Emergency School Assistance Act; that instructional aides will work with elementary and middle school students in reading and math. Fahey says that there will be bilingual aides as well as aides for the special needs programs in the schools. Bullard asks Fahey what she would tell parents who are skeptical about the quality of the Boston Public Schools. Fahey says that it is important for parents to send their children to school; that parents who keep their children out of school are condemning their children to an unproductive future. Fahey says that the Boston Public Schools have strong educational programs; that school faculty and staff are always working to improve school programs; that students in the Boston Public Schools receive good instruction in basic skills like reading, math and communication. Bullard closes the interview. 0:04:53: V: Bullard and Fahey speak informally. Fahey says that Boston schools are no longer in the "numbers game." Fahey notes that the focus is no longer on desegregation; that her staff is focusing on assessing the performance of students and teachers; that the tension caused by school desegregation hindered classroom learning. Shot of a spreadsheet on Fahey's desk. The spreadsheet gives the racial breakdown of students in each grade level.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1976
Description: Pam Bullard interviews Kathleen Sullivan (Boston School Committee) about the quality of education in Boston. Sullivan says that she is frustrated because Boston schools have not improved since court-ordered desegregation began in 1974. Sullivan calls Arthur Garrity (federal judge) a "crazy judge." Sullivan says that the desegregation plans since 1974 have been disruptive. She says that neither African American nor white students have benefitted from school desegregation; that students should not be assigned to different schools each year. Sullivan and her assistant discuss Judge Garrity's latest order concerning the Boston schools. Bullard explains to Sullivan that she is putting together a piece which contrasts Sullivan's views on schools and court-ordered desegregation with the views of African American leader Melnea Cass
0:59:44: V: Pam Bullard interviews Kathleen Sullivan in her office. Bullard comments that Sullivan was elected to the School Committee because voters were impressed with her commitment to quality education and better schools. Bullard asks Sullivan how she would have fared if voters were less concerned with the state of the schools and more concerned with politics as usual. Sullivan says that she could have been re-elected. Sullivan says that parents are concerned about education; that a difficult economy coupled with the costs of school desegregation has made school improvement difficult. Sullivan says that the quality of education has not improved in the city since she was elected to the School Committee; that she feels frustrated in her efforts to improve the schools. 1:03:48: V: Bullard asks if it would damage Sullivan politically to admit that desegregation has improved Boston schools. Sullivan says that voters in Boston are beginning to accept desegregation as a fact; that the anti-busing movement has lost steam because people are tired; that voters would be happy to hear that schools have improved, even if the improvement was a direct result of desegregation and a "crazy judge on the scene." Sullivan says that there has been little improvement except in a few schools. Sullivan mentions that Roxbury High School, the Lewenberg School and the Curley School have seen improvement. Bullard asks why Sullivan never mentions the positive impact that desegregation has had on African American students, who now have access to an equal education. Sullivan says that she has been preoccupied with the budget this year; that she visited last year with African American students who had been assigned to three different schools in three years, and had not benefitted from the experience. Sullivan says that the school situation has begun to stabilize this year; that one can begin to talk about better education for African American students this year; that police presence in schools and community hostility to busing prevented a healthy school situation for African American students in 1974 and 1975; that she understands why African American parents might disagree with her because they wanted access to better schools for their children. Sullivan says that she hopes schools can be improved for all students; that she is worried because only 51,000 children attended Boston Public Schools last year, out of a school-age population of 117,000. Sullivan says that she taught African American students in Dorchester; that she thinks desegregation has been disruptive for those students; that the desegregation of Boston schools could have been beneficial for African American students and white students in 1974 and 1975 if it had been implemented differently. 1:10:34: V: An administrative assistant enters Sullivan's office to go over some papers with her. The assistant points out that Judge Garrity has ordered the School Committee to appoint a new Transitional Director of Program Development at South Boston High School. Sullivan and the assistant discuss Garrity's instructions. Sullivan and her assistant tell Bullard that Judge Garrity has approved 160 transfers out of 1,782 requests. Sullivan alludes to Garrity's heavy involvement in managing the Boston schools. 1:12:57: V: Bullard explains to Sullivan how she will edit the final piece. Shots of Sullivan's office. Bullard explains that she has also interviewed Melnea Cass (African American community leader) and wants the final piece to reflect the positions of the two women. Bullard says that both women are leaders, but that their positions on school desegregation reflect their ethnic heritage; that their positions are as far apart as the communities they represent. Sullivan points out that she has done a lot of work with African American students. Bullard says that Sullivan and Cass have a good working relationship because neither harbors strong racial prejudices; that both have friends of other races and backgrounds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1976
Description: Hope Kelly reports on school desegregation in Lowell. Kelly notes that the minority student population in the Lowell Public Schools has doubled over the past ten years. She adds that Lowell has become a magnet for immigrants from Southeast Asia. Kelly interviews students in the Lowell public schools about school desegregation. Kelly interviews Jane Mullen (guidance counselor) about the diversity of the school population. Kelly notes that students are currently bused in order to achieve racial balance in the schools. She reports that opponents of school desegregation are fighting for neighborhood schools. Kelly reviews the racial breakdown of the student population at the Bartlett School in Lowell. Kelly's report is accompanied by footage of ethnically diverse students in a classroom and school cafeteria. Kelly's report also includes footage of a bilingual class and footage of the Merrimac River. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Marcus Jones reports on school desegregation in Lynn, Massachusetts
1:00:07: Visual: Shots of industrial machinery in operation; of children playing at a playground; of industrial buildings; of two women sitting on a park bench; of historic buildings in Lowell; of a child looking out from a window of an apartment building; of the Merrimac River running through Lowell. Hope Kelly reports that tension in the city of Lowell stems from school desegregation. V: Shots of a bird on the shore of the Merrimac River; of an old brick building; of the water of the Merrimac River. Footage of a white female student saying that adults want students to be able to choose which schools to attend. Footage of a white male student sitting with an Asian American female student. The white male student says that adults are arguing about politics and where kids of different races should go to school. Shots of a students getting lunch in a school cafeteria. Footage of a Latino male student saying that it is good for students to meet different people from different backgrounds. Shots of students boarding a school bus. Kelly reports that opponents of school desegregation in Lowell are arguing for neighborhood schools. V: Shots of an African American female student in the cafeteria; of Asian American students in the school cafeteria. Footage of students in a classroom in the Bartlett School in Lowell. Shots of individual students. Most of the students are Asian American. Kelly reports that the student population of the Bartlett School in Lowell is 20% Latino and 25% Asian American. Kelly notes that the minority population in Lowell Public Schools has doubled in the past ten years; that the schools enroll 450 new bilingual students each year; that 100 new Southeast Asian immigrants come to Lowell every week. V: Shot of an Asian teacher in a third- and fourth-grade Cambodian bilingual classroom. The teacher teaches a lesson to the students. Footage of Mary Jane Mullen (guidance counselor) giving Kelly a tour of the school. Mullen says that there was a large Latino population in the school ten years ago; that there is still a significant Latino population; that there were many Greek-speaking students at the school ten years ago; that there are no longer many Greek-speaking students at the school. Footage of an Asian male student named Paul, who says that he is not very good at reading books; that homework is hard. Kelly reports that Paul is one of 160 Southeast Asian students at the Bartlett School. Footage of Kelly interviewing a group of students sitting at a table. A white male student talks about how people used to come to Lowell to work in the mills. Shots of a mill building with broken windows; of a renovated mill building. Kelly reports that Lowell has always had a significant immigrant population; that buses bring children to schools across the city in order to achieve a racial balance. Shots of students standing outside of a school building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/23/1987
Description: Pam Bullard interviews teachers Hugh Mullen and Terry Gaskill about racial tension and disturbances at Hyde Park High School. The teachers say that incidents occur in the hallways, bathrooms and cafeteria, but not in the classrooms. They discuss requests made by Hyde Park High School faculty to the school administration upon the reopening of the school after a racial disturbance. Mullen says that the school faculty has requested that outside community groups stay out of the schools until the situation is under control. Tape 2 of 2.
0:00:14: Visual: Pam Bullard interviews a white teacher, Hugh Mullen, and an African American teacher, Terry Gaskill, about racial tension at Hyde Park High School. Gaskill says that every student has grown up with racial prejudice; that most students do not want to get into trouble; that emotions run high when trouble begins and students are drawn in to the situation. Mullen says that most of the trouble happens in the hallways and bathrooms; that the atmosphere is calm in the classrooms and the gym. Gaskill adds that two fights have occurred this year in the gym; that neither stemmed from racial tensions. Mullen says that the Hyde Park High School Faculty Senate has asked for a stronger police presence and for more aides in the school building; that the school administration has granted their requests; that he hopes the school can be peaceful without police officers on duty. Pam Bullard talks informally to the teachers while the crew takes cutaway shots. Mullen says that there has been little interference from parents; that African American parents have had meetings since last week's racial disturbance; that he does not know what has come out of the school administration's meetings with parents. Mullen says that the faculty has requested outside community groups to stay out of the school until the situation is under control.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/13/1976
Description: Meg Vaillancourt interviews Robert Peterkin (Superintendent, Cambridge Public Schools) about school desegregation in Boston. Peterkin reviews desegregation in Boston, both the positive and negative outcomes. He talks about the challenges that lie ahead for desegregation. Peterkin discusses his belief in the potential for educational innovation and quality in a minority school system, stating that quality education will desegregate schools more effectively than a court order. He discusses the difficulties in moving from a "numerical desegregation" plan to a "freedom of choice" plan and notes that the Cambridge Public School System desegregated its schools through a "freedom of choice" plan. Peterkin says that busing was necessary to desegregate the Boston school system; notes that the city had been given opportunities to explore other desegregation models; that the resistance to busing was very strong. Peterkin discusses the magnet school concept and the need to institute valuable educational programs at every school. Peterkin talks about the problems with the court-ordered desegregation plan in Boston, but says that the positive result of equal access to the schools far outweighs the negative results. Peterkin discusses the prospect of more students returning to Boston schools in the future. Peterkin says that Arthur Garrity (federal judge) should end his supervision of Boston's schools; that the Boston School Department is able to assume the responsibility of continued desegregation of the schools, but that safeguards are required to prevent a return to discriminatory practices. Peterkin discusses his perceptions of what Martin Luther King would have thought about school desegregation in Boston.
1:00:02: Visual: Meg Vaillancourt interviews Robert Peterkin (Superintendent, Cambridge Public Schools) about school desegregation in Boston. Vaillancourt asks Peterkin to review desegregation in Boston. Peterkin says that school desegregation has given minority students access to better school programs; that school desegregation opened up the Boston Public School System. Peterkin talks about partnerships between the school system and businesses and universities in the community. Peterkin mentions the cooperation between the school system and human services agencies. Peterkin says that school desegregation exposed the educational shortcomings of the system. Peterkin says that school desegregation is still a difficult issue in Boston; that white and middle-class students have abandoned the school system; that the population of the Boston schools is overwhelmingly minority. Peterkin says that the desegregation effort needs to focus on educational programs; that Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) is focusing more on educational reform; that parents support the renewed focus on educational programs. Vaillancourt asks Peterkin if improvements in education are possible with a minority student population and an overwhelmingly white city government. Peterkin says that he resents the implication that educational innovation and quality are not possible in a minority school system. Peterkin notes that the school system must spend their resources wisely; that the quality of education will determine whether or not students will attend; that quality education will desegregate schools more effectively than a court order. 1:05:00: V: Vaillancourt asks Peterkin's opinion on the "freedom of choice" proposal. Peterkin says that the "freedom of choice" plan will not work until the quality of education improves in all schools across the city; that there is varying quality among the schools in Boston; that each neighborhood school needs to offer strong educational programs. Peterkin says that it will be difficult to switch from a "numerical desegregation" plan to a "freedom of choice" plan; that the "freedom of choice" plan will require an enormous leap of faith for the minority community and the court. Peterkin mentions that the Cambridge Public School System desegregated its schools through a "freedom of choice" plan. Vaillancourt asks Peterkin if busing was necessary for desegregation in Boston. Peterkin says that busing was necessary at the time; that the city had been given opportunities to explore other desegregation models; that the resistance to busing was very strong. Peterkin says that Arthur Garrity (federal judge) made efforts to improve the schools through magnet programs and partnerships with businesses; that parents are more willing to bus their children to a school with strong educational programs. Vaillancourt asks Peterkin if all schools should be follow the magnet school model. Peterkin says that there must be an effort to institute valuable educational programs in every school; that parents will send there children to schools with sound educational programs; that it is not necessary to make every school a magnet school. Vaillancourt asks about the problems with the court-ordered desegregation plan in Boston. Peterkin says that the schools were ignored recently by city officials and the community in the late 1970s and early 1980s; that many residents and city officials did not pay attention to the schools because of a fiscal crisis and low attendance; that a declining school system can adversely affect the whole city. Peterkin says that a reduced student population was a negative result of school desegregation; that the positive result of equal access to the schools far outweighs the negative result. 1:11:24: V: Vaillancourt asks Peterkin if students will return to the schools. Peterkin says that there has been a renewed commitment to the schools in the past few years; that improvements in the educational programs will prompt younger parents to consider sending their children to the Boston Public Schools. Peterkin notes that the decline in attendance has leveled off. Vaillancourt asks Peterkin if Garrity should end his supervision of the schools. Peterkin says that Garrity should end his supervision; that the Boston School Department is able to assume the responsibility of continued desegregation of the schools. Peterkin says that there need to be some safeguards in the system to prevent a return to discriminatory practices. Peterkin says that flexible guidelines must be established to guarantee the percentages of children in neighborhood schools; that educational standards must be guaranteed. Vaillancourt asks Peterkin what Martin Luther King would have thought about school desegregation in Boston. Peterkin says that King would have been disheartened by the violence and turmoil resulting from school desegregation; that King would have been encouraged by the positive changes in the system and in the city. The crew takes cutaway shots of Vaillancourt and Peterkin. Peterkin and Vaillancourt speak informally about the state of schools in Boston.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/17/1983
Description: Judy Stoia interviews Elvira "Pixie" Palladino about her reaction to the Supreme Court's refusal to hear arguments against court-ordered busing in Boston. She is angry about the decision and calls the members of the court a "pack of flaming liberals." Palladino urges the anti-busing movement to continue their protest through legitimate means, like demonstrations and picketing, without resorting to violence. Palladino says that the anti-busing movement will pressure elected officials to redress the grievances of the anti-busing movement. Palladino notes that she is more concerned with a politician's stance on busing than with his or her political party; that she would switch to the Republican Party if the party came out against busing. Palladino says that she is opposed to all forms of busing, including a metropolitian busing plan. Palladino accuses the courts of dictating to parents how they should raise their children; she says that forced busing in Boston represents "reverse discrimination."
0:34:47: Visual: Elvira "Pixie" Palladino is interviewed as she sits behind a table. She says that she is disappointed in the Supreme Court's refusal to hear arguments against court-ordered busing in Boston; that the Supreme Court is a "pack of flaming liberals" and "out of touch with reality"; that she would expect to hear about this kind of "judicial oppression" in the USSR, Cuba or China; that the "shocking" decision will result in increased "white flight" from Boston schools; that the Supreme Court is more interested in redressing the grievances of criminals than law-abiding citizens. Pam Bullard asks Palladino if this is the end of anti-busing action in the courts. Palladino says that they are waiting for an appeal to be heard on the receivership of South Boston High School; that she hopes the court will void the receivership of South Boston High School. Palladino says that the Supreme Court decision will probably result in further resistance to busing; that the anti-busing movement needs to unite in demonstrating against busing through whatever means are left open to them; that the anti-busing movement must concentrate on furthering anti-busing legislation and on electing officials who take an anti-busing position. 0:38:49: V: Bullard asks Palladino about being elected to public office through an anti-busing campaign. Palladino says that government is no longer "of, for and by" the people; that government is now "to" the people; that citizens must be vigilant in protecting their rights; that citizens must elect officials who represent their position on the issues. Bullard asks what recourse anti-busers have if the courts can strike down anti-busing legislation. Palladino says a grass-roots movement could unite the people and put pressure on elected officials. Bullard asks Palladino about the court case concerning Wilmington, Delaware (Evans v. Buchanan), in which suburbs could be forced to integrate their schools. Palladino says that she is opposed to metropolitanization; that she is opposed to forced busing in any form; that forced busing is a failed social experiment. Bullard quotes Palladino as saying that she would not be surprised if anti-busers reacted to the decision in a disruptive manner. Palladino says that she is opposed to violence in any form; that she has received sympathetic calls from anti-busers in Akron, Ohio and Tulsa, Oklahoma; that she is interested in organizing a "constructive" anti-busing reaction. Palladino says again that she would not be surprised if anti-busers react negatively to the decision; that anti-busers may be called on to act as "patriots" to save democracy; that she would like anti-busers to demonstrate their feelings through all legitimate means available. Palladino says that she has never committed an act of violence in her life; that the people of South Boston and Charlestown have been pushed to their limit; that no relief is in sight for the people. 0:43:51: V: Bullard asks Palladino if she feels conflicted as a public official, who must ask her constituents to obey a law she believes is wrong. Palladino says that she is not asking her constituents to do anything illegal; that demonstrating through legitimate means is a legal right; that anti-busers must demonstrate legally, work to further legislation and vote their consciences at the ballot box; that some parents have kept their children out of school for two years; that she fears for the safety of her own children. Palladino says that the government is denying people the basic right to raise their children as they see fit; that the Supreme Court should not dictate where parents send their children to school; that the situation in Boston is a blatant case of "reverse discrimination". Bullard asks Palladino if the anti-busing movement will lobby Tip O'Neill to their cause. Reporter notes that O'Neill will be the new Speaker of the US House of Representatives. Palladino says that O'Neill has not been receptive to the anti-busing movement in the past; that pressure will be brought to bear upon him to represent the anti-busing majority in Boston. Palladino says that voters are crucial to the careers of politicians. Bullard asks Palladino about her voting preferences. Palladino says that she has always voted for the Democratic party; that she would switch to the Republican party if they were to come out against forced busing; that a candidate's position on busing is more important than his or her party affiliation. Palladino says that she is committed to demonstrating against busing through legal means; that she would urge the anti-busing movement to demonstrate non-violently.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/14/1976
Description: Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts) addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Brown says that Lukas' novel brings perspective to the busing crisis. Brown commends Lukas on his exhaustive research into the history of each family portrayed in the novel. Brown talks briefly about the history of each family. He notes that Lukas's novel depicts the richness and struggle of everyday life. Marie Clark (parent and member of the Home and School Association) addresses the panel. Clark says that she speaks from the perspective of a parent who lived through the busing crisis. Clark says that she supports school integration, but opposed the court order. She adds that the court order was disruptive and too broad in scope. She urges audience members to support the Boston Public School system. She notes that the school system has improved as a result of desegregation. Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist) addresses the meeting. Gillen says that he remains opposed to busing. He adds that the federal court usurped the rights of the parents of Boston's schoolchildren. Gillen notes that the anti-busing movement was committed to protesting by legal and moral means. He says that he is glad to live in a society where protest and opposition to the law is allowed. Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston) addresses the audience. Groden says that the court orders did not allow for genuine input from parents. He says that a parents' movement could have overcome issues of race and class during the busing crisis. Groden talks about the need for grassroots leadership within the city and the need for a network of human connections across the city's neighborhoods. Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Brown, Clarke, Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Groden, Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 3 of 8
1:00:01: Visual: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the release of the book, Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author). Nolan speaks from a podium. Panelists are assembled at tables on either side of the podium. Panelists include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe). Nolan introduces Thomas Brown. Brown says that he is a historian; that many of the other panelists were participants in the busing crisis. Brown says that comments that Lukas focused on the history of the McGoff, Twymon, and Diver families, which were each portrayed in the book. Brown commends Lukas for his exhaustive research into the history of each family. Brown notes that Lukas probably uncovered facts which were previously unknown to each family. Brown talks about the way in whick Lukas shows how past history affects the contemporary events portrayed in the book. Brown says that Lukas's book brings needed perspective to the busing crisis. Brown says that the Diver family emerges from the violence of the colonial struggle in Boston; that the McGoff family is informed by the violent past of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Ireland; that the Twymon family emerges from the violent past of slavery. Brown says that the recent struggles of each family pale in comparison to the hardships and struggles of their past family histories. Brown notes that the trouble endured by the families during the busing crisis has been accompanied by social progress and change. Brown says that previous speakers have suggested that a common ground existed in the coalition which was formed around John F. Kennedy (former US President) in 1960. Brown suggests that Lukas' book is also "common ground." Brown says that Common Ground is a "loving" book which moves readers to tears; that it details the richness and struggles of everyday life. Brown says that readers can take away the love put into the book by Lukas; that the readers of the book can find "common ground." The audience applauds. 1:08:30: V: Nolan introduces Marie Clark. Clark says that she brings the perspective of a parent who lived through the busing crisis. Clark says that she was one among many parents who supported integration, but opposed the plan put forth by Arthur Garrity (federal judge). Clark says that the plan was disruptive and too broad in scope. Clark says that she objected to the disruption of schools which were already integrated; that she objected to African American students being bused to a new school at the start of each year; that she objected to students being denied access to programs because of racial quotas. Clarke says that wrongs were committed by people on both sides of the issue; that Boston has emerged from the busing crisis as a stronger city. Clarke says that the Boston Public Schools have improved as a result of desegregation; that "common ground" can be found in the children of Boston who attend the public schools. Clarke adds that the Boston Public School System needs the support of parents, the business community and suburbanites. Clarke says that the future of the city depends upon a strong school system. The audience applauds. 1:11:42: V: Nolan introduces Moe Gillen. Gillen says that many in the audience are familiar with his opinions on the busing crisis. Gillen says that "common ground" can be found in Lukas' book; that the book brings people together; that the book shows the "common heritage" of Boston residents. Gillen notes that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and Dennis Kearney (Suffolk County Sheriff) are in the audience; that Flynn and Kearney were representatives of the anti-busing movement. Gillen says that many in the anti-busing movement were committed to protesting the court orders in a "legal, moral way." Gillen praises anti-busing mothers for their commitment to their families; that many anti-busing parents set a good example for their children. Gillen says that he remains "adamently opposed to a government that takes and usurps the rights of parents." Gillen says that hindsight shows that the court orders were not successful. Gillen says that the busing crisis showed the strength of US society; that opponents to busing did not resort to "violence and anarchy," even though their "personal values" were at stake. Gillen says that he is thankful to live in the US instead of "some banana republic." Gillen invites audience members to address the issues during the discussion. The audience applauds. 1:16:08: V: Nolan introduces Father Michael Groden. Nolan talks about Groden's work as an advocate for the city's working lobstermen and his work on school issues during the busing crisis. Groden says that he wrote a letter to Garrity as he was completing his first term as director of the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC); that he wrote to Garrity about the "parent movement" withing the city schools. Groden says that he did not think the system allowed for genuine and enduring input from parents. Groden notes that a "common ground" presented itself through the opportunity for parents to come together and effect changes in the schools. Groden says that the opportunity to bring parents together was not fully exploited; that a parents' movement would have overcome issues of race and class. Groden says that a parents' movement needs to be organized in order to build connections in and across the neighborhoods of the city. Groden says that the roles of civic and religious leaders are discussed in Lukas's book. Groden says that the city was focused on "elitist" leadership instead of grassroots leadership. Groden notes that grassroots political and religious leadership is much more effective than "moral imperatives." Groden says that moral courage is born of faith and of a healthy set of relationships with others. Groden adds that Lukas' book benefits from Lukas' ability to communicate effectively with others. Groden says that Ray Flynn (mayor of Boston) has set the right tone for the city since his inauguration; that Flynn has "lived across the lines of color and, to some extent, class." Groden adds that "moral imperatives and gospel mandates" are clear in their message. Groden concludes by saying that "common ground" can only be found in a new "set of human connections." The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education) speaks at a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Lynch says that the irresponsibility of the Boston School Committee led to the busing crisis. She adds that the city's elected officials failed to protect the Consitutional rights of the city's minority population. Lynch says that the court must intervene when public officials neglect their duty. Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools) addresses the meeting. Marshall talks about the challenges faced by urban schools with poor students. Marshall notes that many critics believe that integration by race and social class is necessary for successful schools. He adds that the majority of students in the Boston Public Schools are poor and non-white. Marshall says that some schools in Boston are very successful. He notes that strong leadership, high educational standards and parental involvement are factors in the success of these schools. He adds that the current administration is committed to educating all students. Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) addresses the audience. Stith says that Boston is a better city for having dealt with racial issues during the busing crisis. Stith reminds the audience that class mobility is possible in our society, while race is still a fundamental problem. Stith says that it is important for teachers to love the students they teach in school, regardless of race. Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe) addresses the meeting. Winship predicts that Lukas's book will win a Pulitzer Prize. He compliments Lukas on the novel, and gives him some criticism. Winship says that he has no regrets about the way in which The Boston Globe covered the busing crisis. Winship says that the Boston Public Schools have improved as a result of school desegregation. Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Lynch, Marshall, Stith, and Winship. Tape 6 of 8
1:00:00: Visual: Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education) addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the release of the book Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author). Lynch is on a panel with Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former Editor, The Boston Globe). Lynch talks about the irresponsibility of Boston's elected officials, which led to the busing crisis. Lynch says that the Boston School Committee refused to file a school desegregation plans with the federal court in 1974; that the School Committee preferred to do nothing, and then blame someone else for the result. Lynch notes that elected public officials need to uphold the law; that they need to uphold the Constitutional rights of minorities. Lynch talks about the necessity of court intervention when elected officials neglect their duty. The audience applauds. Shots of the audience; of individual audience members. Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs, Morgan v. Hennigan) is in the audience. 1:02:01: Visual: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) introduces Kim Marshall. Marshall says that Lukas's book is extraordinary; that he has enjoyed reading it. Marshall notes that the Massachusetts Racial Imbalance Law defined a school as imbalanced if the student population was more than 50% African American; that the law did not define an all-white school as imbalanced. Marshall notes that research by Kenneth Clark (social scientist) led the US Supreme Court to rule that all-black schools were "inherently inferior." Marshall notes that the Coleman Report on school desegregation stated that the integration of social class was necessary to "quality education." Marshall quotes Christopher Jencks (author) as saying that schools cannot be improved until poverty is eradicated. Marshall says that the Boston Public Schools now have a majority students who are poor and non-white. Marshall quotes many critics as saying that the Boston Public Schools will not improve until the white and African American middle classes return. Marshall talks about the challenges faced by urban schools with poor students. Shots of audience members. Marshall says that some schools in poor urban areas are succeeding; that these schools share some characteristics: good principals, high standards for all of the students, clear curriculum standards, diagnostic testing, state-of-the-art teaching methods, a safe climate, and an active program which reaches out to parents. Marshall says that Boston schools can be improved using the above model; that Dr. Robert Spillane (former Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) began implementing this model four years ago. Marshall says that Spillane would never have been hired if school desegregation had not taken place. Marshall notes that many of Boston schools are improving under the leadership of new principals. Marshall adds that the school administration and staff does believe that all children can learn. Marshall pledges his support to Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent of Schools). The audience applauds. 1:08:55: V: Nolan introduces Reverend Stith. Nolan reports that Stith was recruited by Jesse Jackson (African American leader) to head his new organization, PUSH (People United to Save Humanity); that Stith refused the job because he did not want to leave Boston. Shots of individual audience members. Stith says that there are heroes and villains who emerge in an epic story like Common Ground; that many heroes could have had their own chapters in the book. Stith says that Arthur Garrity (federal judge) needs to be applauded as a hero; that Garrity forced the city of Boston to deal with the issue of race. Stith says that Boston's leaders avoided dealing with the issues of race before the busing crisis; that Boston is now a better place for having dealt with race issues through the busing crisis. Stith says that he recognizes the importance of class issues in our society. Stith reminds the audience that class mobility is possible in our society. Stith says that race is the "fundamental problem" facing our society. Stith points out that Common Ground tells the story of three families. Stith says that he would like to return to the point that Elvira Pixie Palladino made about love. Stith talks about the need for teachers to love the students that they teach. Stith says that the students need love in order to learn and thrive; that the love of teachers for their students must be colorblind. The audience applauds. 1:14:49: V: Nolan introduces Thomas Winship. Shots of Paul Parks (former State Secretary of Education); of other audience members. Nolan notes that a chapter of Lukas's book is devoted to Winship. Nolan talks about Winship's courage and commitment to the city of Boston, and his stewardship of The Boston Globe. Winship jokes that he likes Nolan's descriptions of him better than Lukas's descriptions of him. The audience laughs. Winship predicts that Lukas' book will win the Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction. Winship tells Lukas that he enjoyed the book immensely. Winship says that he disagrees with Lukas on a few minor points. Winship says that Lukas did not give enough coverage to John Kerrigan (former member, Boston School Committee). Winship says that Kerrigan was a key figure in the struggle against the court order, "post-Louise Day Hicks." Winship calls Kerrigan the "MVP of the street team." Winship says that he wishes Lukas had covered reactions to busing all over the city; that Lukas' coverage was focused on three neighborhoods. Winship says that he did not like the court-ordered busing plan; that Garrity had no choice in ordering busing as a remedy. Winship says that he has no big regrets about the way his newspaper chose to cover the busing crisis. Winship says that The Boston Globe should have tried to influence the court against the pairing of South Boston and Roxbury in the first phase of school desegregation. Winship says that the pairing of the two neighborhoods was a "dirty trick"; that the pairing placed an "unfair burden" on both neighborhoods. Winship admits that the student population in Boston schools has declined, but he adds that the schools have improved since the busing crisis. Winship notes that test scores are on the rise; that more students are attending college; that schools and athletic teams are integrated.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Marcus Jones reports that the Boston School Department has called the Lee Elementary School a model of a successfully integrated elementary school. Jones notes that test scores are improving at the school. He adds that there is a good relationship between school faculty and parents. Jones reviews the racial breakdown of the student population. Jones interviews Arthur Foster (Acting Principal, Lee School) and Jack Flynn (Lee School official) about the success at the school. Jones' report includes footage of students in racially integrated classrooms at the school. Jones interviews students and teachers at the school about school desegregation. Jones reports that the US Circuit Court of Appeals has declared that school integration is complete in Boston. He adds that the Lee School is an exception and that some schools have not been successfully integrated. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: David Boeri reports on integration at the Marshall Elementary School Marshall Elementary School is still segregated
1:00:06: Visual: Footage of a white teacher doing a lesson with a racially integrated class at the Joseph Lee School in Dorchester. Shots of individual students in the classroom. Marcus Jones reports that the Boston School Department calls the Lee School a "model" of how school desegregation should work. Jones notes that the US Circuit Court of Appeals has declared yesterday that school integration is complete in Boston. Jones notes that the population of the Lee School is 60% African American, 28% white and 12% other minorities. V: Shots of an African American female student; of a white male student; of an African American male student; of a white teacher at the chalkboard. Footage of Jones asking a white male student if he knows what desegregation is. The student says no. Footage of an African American female student saying she does not really know why some students are bused in from other parts of the city. Footage of Arthur Foster (Acting Principal, Joseph Lee School) saying that the students are learning and that the students get along well. Footage of a white teacher teaching to a racially integrated class. Jones reports that test scores are improving at the school; that there is a good relationship between the faculty and parents; that white parents are eager to send their children to the Lee School. V: Footage of a white male student saying that he likes the school; that there are students of all races in the school. Footage of Jack Flynn (Lee School official) saying that white parents are willing to have their children bused to the Lee School. Jones notes that school officials hope that yesterday's court decision will not bring changes for the school. V: Footage of a white female teacher saying that she hopes the city has matured; that she hopes the city can move beyond the court order. Footage of Flynn saying that the Lee School is an exception; that the School Department needs to make desegregation work better across the city. Jones notes that the court decided that the Boston Public Schools were as desegrated as possible; that some schools are more segregated now than they were before the court order. V: Shots of a classroom at the Lee School.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/29/1987
Description: Thomas Lindbergh (graduate student, Boston University) speaks during a discussion at a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Lindbergh accuses the Archdiocese of Boston of serving as a haven for white students who are trying to escape busing in Boston. Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston) questions the school population statistics, saying that many white students were already enrolled in parochial schools. Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston) addresses the meeting. Kiley reminds the audience that race and class are sensitive issues in school systems across the nation; he adds that court intervention is used as a last resort. Kiley talks about the reforms needed in other areas of society. He says that the people of Boston need to continue to work together to improve their city. Theodore Landsmark (attorney) addresses the audience. Landsmark talks about being the subject of Stanley Forman's Pulitzer prize-winning photographs. He says that he will always be remembered for being the victim of the attack at City Hall Plaza. Landsmark remarks on the absence of African Americans at the forum. He notes that many people of color consider Boston to be a racist city. Landsmark talks about the need for affirmative action programs to provide opportunities for people of color and working-class white people across the city. Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education) addresses the meeting. Lynch talks about the deliberate pattern of segregation in the Boston Public Schools before 1974. She accuses school officials and city officials of abdicating their responsibilities to the minority population of the city. Lynch says that the court had no choice but to intervene. Lynch adds that the people of Boston must take responsibility for electing these racist public officials to office. She notes that many politicians campaigned on deliberately racist platforms. Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Groden, Kiley, Landsmark, Lynch, Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 5 of 8.
1:00:11: Visual: Thomas Lindbergh (graduate student, Boston University) questions Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston) at a Town Meeting on Race and Class in Boston at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of the book Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas. Lindbergh accuses the parochial schools of providing a haven to white students who are trying to escape busing in Boston. Lindbergh says that people are using the schools as an "easy way out." The audience applauds. Groden says that the school population may have been inflated before the busing crisis; that many students were discovered to have already been in parochial schools before the busing crisis. Groden sits on a panel on stage with Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe). 1:00:53: V: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) introduces Robert Kiley. Nolan talks about Kiley's experience with the Central Intelligence Agency and reviews the positions he has held in the city of Boston. Kiley says that he is no longer a resident of Boston; that he lives in New York City now. Kiley talks about the problems in the New York City school system. Kiley says that race and class issues are a problem in New York City as well as Boston. Kiley reminds the audience that the court intervention is a last resort; that courts are forced to intervene when the legislative and executive branches of government fail to act; that lawsuits are affecting the government of cities across the nation. Kiley talks about how school desegregation in Boston became a national story. Kiley says that much remains to be done in order to achieve a just and equal society. Kiley says that court intervention usually occurs in the areas of education and corrections; that children and prisoners are powerless to fight the court intervention. Kiley talks about the need to end discriminatory hiring practices in banks and corporations. Kiley says that our economic institutions need reform; that the poor are ignored by these institutions. Kiley talks about the link between race and class in our society. He says that race and class are used to reinforce each other in our society. Kiley says that Bostonians are "battle-scarred"; that he hopes Bostonians are not "war-weary." Kiley says that people on both sides of the busing issue are now talking to one another and working together to provide leadership; that Bostonians need to keep working together; that the citizens of other cities will look to them as an example. The audience applauds. 1:08:33: V: Nolan introduces Theodore Landsmark. Nolan notes that Landsmark was attacked by white teenagers at City Hall Plaza; that the attack was captured in an award-winning photograph by Stanley Forman (photographer). Landsmark says that he is here due to an "anomaly." Landsmark notes that he will always be thought of in the context of Forman's photograph. Landsmark mentions that he is a photographer himself, but he is known for being the subject of a photograph, not the creator. Landsmark says, "I've won a Pulitzer, as it were, but I wasn't even invited to the awards ceremony." The audience laughs. Landsmark says that he was working on affirmative action issues in the 1970s; that he was not working specifically on school issues. Landsmark notes that there are some remarkable people in the audience; that this meeting provides an opportunity to assess what happened during the busing crisis; that the meeting provides an opportunity to think about the future. Landsmark says that most of the audience is committed to the city of Boston; that "common ground" can be found in this commitment to the city. Landsmark says that Elvira Pixie Palladino (former member, Boston School Commttee) was correct in pointing out the absence of working class white people; that African Americans are also underrepresented in the audience. Landsmark says that the some racist residents of Boston have succeeded in portraying the city as a racist city; that he has encountered people across the nation who consider Boston to be a racist city. Landsmark says that many young professionals will not consider coming to Boston because of its reputation. Landsmark says that people of color stay away from Boston because they do not know if they will have an opportunity to succeed professionally. Landsmark says that people of color are underrepresented as members of boards of directors and in various professions. Landsmark notes that the private sector is slow to change; tha the public sector has been trying to deal with issues of affirmative action. Landsmark says that there is a lack of role models for minority schoolchildren in Boston. Landsmark adds that this meeting is a chance for residents of Boston to stop and think about what changes need to be made in the city. Landsmark stresses the need for the private sector to provide opportunities for people of color and for working class whites. Landsmark adds, "the chances of the kids who attacked me ending up on a major corporate board in Boston are as slim as the chances of any black kid ending up on a board." Landsmark says that opportunities need to be opened for people of all classes in the city of Boston. Landsmark compliments Lukas on his book. The audience claps. 1:16:32: V: Nolan introduces Sandra Lynch. Lynch talks about the inevitability of the court's decision to find the Boston School Committee guilty of willful segregation of the Boston schools. Lynch says that the remedy ordered by Arthur Garrity (federal judge) was also inevitable; that Garrity is a "decent man" who was "vilified" for performing his job. Lynch says that public officials were remiss in not communicating the inevitability of the court order to city residents. Lynch adds that many public officials should have known that there was no way to prevent school desegregation. Lynch talks about "an abdication of responsibility" by school officials and city officials in the years leading up to the busing crisis. Lynch says that there was a deliberate pattern of segregation; that "forced busing" was used as a tool of school segregation before 1974; that schools were built to serve segregated neighborhoods. Lynch says that schools in the African American communities were "disgraceful"; that African American schools were not given adequate resources and facilities. Lynch says that elected public officials were not protecting the rights of the city's minorities; that moderate officials were voted from office when they made efforts to achieve racial peace. Lynch says that the people of Boston must take responsibility for electing these officials to public office. Lynch says that the people of Boston were not all victims of these public officials. Lynch says, "the people of Boston elected people to public office who campaigned on deliberately racist platforms." Lynch notes that class was an issue in the busing crisis; that class issues do not excuse the racism which was evident in the city. Lynch says that voters and public officials need to understand that the courts do not intervene until the elected public officials have failed to carry out their obligations.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Marcus Jones reports on school desegregation in Lynn, Massachusetts. Jones notes that an influx of immigrants and a change in housing patterns have tipped the racial balance in the public schools. Jones adds that Lynn made an attempt at school desegregation in the early 1980s by designating certain schools as magnet schools. Jones reviews that racial breakdown of the student population in Lynn Public Schools and in specific schools in the city. Jones interviews Clarence Jones (President, Lynn chapter of the NAACP), Albert DiVirgilio (Mayor of Lynn), Alexander Tennant (candidate for mayor of Lynn), James Leonard (Principal, Washington Community School), Robert Gerardi (Superintendent, Lynn Public Schools), and Michael Alves (Massachusetts Board of Education) about school desegregation in Lynn. Jones notes that there is some opposition from parents who want their children to attend neighborhood schools. Jones interviews parents Kathleen Sherkanowski and Rose McCusker. Jones reports that the State Board of Education has ordered the Lynn School Committee to implement a plan without delay. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Hope Kelly reports on school desegregation in Lowell
1:00:03: Visual: Shots of downtown Lynn; of shoppers in downtown Lynn; of traffic in downtown Lynn. Marcus Jones reports that Lynn has a population of 78,000; that housing patterns and an influx of immigrants have tipped the racial balance in public schools; that school desegregation has become an issue in the city. V: Shots of Boston Harbor; of Harvard Square; of students in Lowell; of a condominium building; of children boarding a school bus. Footage of Kathleen Sherkanowski (Lynn parent) saying that she wants her son to attend his neighborhood school. Footage of Clarence Jones (President, Lynn chapter of the NAACP) saying that the courts will need to take over the school system if the city of Lynn does not desegregate its schools. Footage of Alexander Tennant (candidate for mayor of Lynn) saying that Lynn is "one step away from receivership." Footage of Jones interviewing Albert DiVirgilio (Mayor of Lynn). DiVirgilio says that he will not let the desegregation issue tear apart the community; that he will work closely with all members of the community. Jones reports that DiVirgilio serves as Mayor of Lynn and as Chairman of the Lynn School Committee; that DiVirgilio taught in the Lynn School System for fourteen years. Jones notes that DiVirgilio was his student government advisor during Jones' own high school years. V: Shots of African American students exiting a bus in front of South Boston High School. Jones stands among a group of schoolchildren in the schoolyard of the Washington Community School. Jones notes that he was a student at the Washington Community School; that there were more white students than African American students when he attended the school. Jones adds that the student population at the Washington Community School in 1987 is 51% non-white; that the school has been classified as "racially isolated." V: Shots of students in a classroom at the Washington Community School. Jones reports that the Washington Community School has been racially imbalanced for almost ten years. Jones notes that James Leonard (Principal, Washington Community School) helped to coordinate Lynn's first attempt at school desegregation in the early 1980s. Jones adds that the Washington Community School was made into a magnet school in the early 1980s; that white students were to be bused voluntarily to the school. V: Shots of Tony Marino (former Mayor of Lynn) addressing a crowd; of the exterior of the Washington Community School. Footage of Jones interviewing Leonard. Leonard says that it is important to improve the quality of education in Lynn Public Schools. Footage of Marcus Jones interviewing Clarence Jones. Clarence Jones says that many minority parents are sending their children to private schools. Clarence Jones says that the Washington Community School is underfunded; that the school is a "disaster." Marcus Jones notes that Clarence Jones is his father. V: Shot of children playing outside of a school in Lynn. Jones notes that minority enrollment in Lynn Public Schools has doubled since 1981; that the population of Lynn Public Schools is currently 26% non-white. Jones notes that white enrollment has declined by 3,000 students. V: Shots of minority students in a classroom; of the exterior of the Washington Community School; of the exterior of the Ingalls Elementary School; of the exterior of the Connery Elementary School; of the exterior of the Harrington Elementary School. Jones notes that minority enrollment is over 50% in four elementary schools; that minority enrollment is 57% at the Harrington Elementary School. V: Shots of the exterior of Cobbet Elementary School; of the exterior of Eastern Junior High School; of students outside of Lynn Classical High School. Jones notes that Cobbet Elementary School, Eastern Junior High School and Lynn Classical High School have student populations which nearly qualify as racially imbalanced. Jones notes that a minority population above 36% classifies a school as racially imbalanced. Jones reports that eight of the city's schools are "majority isolated"; that the Sisson Elementary School had a 3% minority population last year; that the school has a minority population of 8% this year. V: Shots of mostly white students in a classroom at the Sisson Elementary School; of the students listening to a record on a turntable. Footage of Robert Gerardi (Superintendent, Lynn Public Schools) saying that most Lynn parents do not have a problem with school desegregation; that the parents want to maintain neighborhood schools. Footage of Rose McCusker (Lynn parent) saying that she does not want her children bused from their neighborhood. Shots of a racially integrated classroom in Lynn. Jones reports that the Lynn School Committee has issued its second desegregation plan in two years; that the State Board of Education has ordered the city of Lynn to implement its plan without delay. V: Shots of a white teacher in a Lynn classroom; of students in a school hallway; of students exiting a schoolbus. Footage of Michael Alves (Massachusetts Board of Education) saying that school desegregation should be resolved on the local level; that Boston spent fifteen years dealing with federal court orders on school desegregation. Footage of Clarence Jones saying that quality education is more important than racial confrontation.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/23/1987
Description: Exterior of the Joseph Lee School. Dorchester environs. Pam Bullard interviews Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) on the opening of schools for the 1976-77 school year. Before interview starts, they shoot cutaways. During interview Fahey talks about declining school enrollment, staffing, school programs, and the effects of court-ordered desegregation. Fahey admits that school desegregation and a low birthrate have caused the decline in school enrollment. Fahey discusses advancement in techniques for assigning students to schools to optimize programs tailored to students' needs. Fahey expresses confidence in the school system. She says that a federal grant will fund additional teachers and aides in the schools; that the court order has resulted in increased parental participation in the schools. Tape 1 of 2.
0:00:31: Visual: Shots of the exterior of the Joseph Lee School. Two African American women and three African American children walk toward the entrance. 0:02:33: V: More shots of the exterior of the Lee School. An African American woman and child walk through the parking lot. Shots of the playground behind the school. Two African American boys ride their bikes through the playground. 0:06:11: V: A Boston Police car moves slowly along Westview Street. The housing project on Westview Street is visible. Long shots of Westview Street. Shot of parking lot of housing project. An African American man moves slowly through the parking lot. Shot of houses across the street from the Lee School; of school from across Talbot Avenue. 0:10:14: V: The crew sets up cutaway shots for Pam Bullard's interview with Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools). 0:11:45: V: Bullard sets up an interview with Fahey in her office. Fahey asks her secretary to bring her some papers. 0:12:11: V: Fahey says that one of her goals is to develop a better management system for Boston schools; that management is done best by administrators in the schools, not from central administration. 0:13:07: V: Fahey looks at a sheet of statistics. Fahey says that there are 75,443 enrolled in the schools; that enrollment has declined; that enrollment is declining in schools across the nation due to a low birthrate. Fahey admits that desegregation has affected enrollment in Boston schools, but that the schools have not lost 20,000 students. Fahey says that the enrollment figure of 96,000 students has never been verified; that her administration has started to compile detailed data on student enrollment; that this data is allowing more effective management. Fahey says that her administration is tracking bilingual students in order to cluster them together in bilingual classes. Bullard asks if there is a shortage of teachers. Fahey responds that there are enough teachers; that staffing the schools has always been an issue; that the media are giving the issue a lot of attention this year. Fahey says that the Boston school system has received the largest federal grant ever awarded through the Emergency School Assistance Act; that the $7.2 million grant will go toward supplementary programs in basic skills; that the grant will bring additional teachers and aides. 0:17:41: V: Fahey says that she is confident in the teaching staff. She says that last year's court order brought good educational programs to the schools through links with universities and businesses; that the court order also encouraged strong parental participation; that she hopes the parental participation continues. Bullard remarks that some people believe that the desegregation order brought needed reforms to Boston schools. Fahey says that the court order did provide an opportunity to focus on new programs; that the court order resulted in increased parental participation. Fahey says that the Boston schools will be safe this year; that the transport of students will be efficient and safe; that bus monitors will continue to ride the buses.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1976
Description: First day of school in Boston, Phase IIB of court ordered desegregation. 1) Superintendent Marion Fahey is proud of faculty and students. Associate superintendent Charles Leftwich reports van and three buses were stoned. Mayor Kevin White says unlawful conduct will not be tolerated. 2) Gary Griffith reports on opening commotion at Charlestown High. One-third of enrolled students show up. Federal marshals and police outside. One arrest for disorderly conduct. Neighborhood crowd gathers in street. 3) Pamela Bullard at South Boston High. Black students get off bus to less tension than last year. Police are present but not in riot gear. 4) Art Cohen at Mackey Middle School where teacher student ratio is 1:18. Principal Lloyd Leake. 5) Bullard on magnet program encompassing 21 schools. Exterior, interior of English High. Gregory Anrig, state commissioner of education. Headmaster William Peterkin. 6) Karin Giger on bilingual program at Grover Cleveland Middle School. 7) Bullard talks to boycotting (white) Cormiers of Charlestown. Mother keeps son out of Timilty School where he was assigned to be bused; he has part-time tutoring. 8) Steve Curwood talks to participating (black) Price family from Roxbury, whose children are bused to white neighborhoods. 9) 5 Hyde Park High students, 3 minority, 2 white, discuss racial separation inside school. They expect conflict to be less than last year. 10) Steve Nevas was almost thwarted from covering a Kevin White press conference because mayor felt Nevas could not be objective. (He had investigated fundraising in White campaign.) White attempts to disassemble Channel 2 microphone and asserts he can exclude any reporter from access. Ed Baumeister says this raises First Amendment issue.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: The film Common Ground is based on a book about the history of school desegregation in Boston. Christy George reports that a group of people who were involved in school desegregation in Boston watched the film together last night. Afterwards, they hold a discussion of the film. Former Mayor Kevin White says that the film provoked strong reactions in everyone. City Councilor James Kelly and Former School Committee Member Elvira "Pixie" Palladino speak out against busing. George Walker, a member of the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground, speaks out against "closed communities." Jim Conway, a Charlestown resident, says that the film promotes a negative image of Charlestown. Lisa McGoff, a member of the McGoff family portrayed in Common Ground, and Cassandra Twymon, a member of the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground, also speak at the meeting. McGoff says that the film concentrates on the negative events of the busing crisis. Twymon says that the film gives an accurate portrayal of her experiences as an African American student in a white school. George's report includes footage from the film. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Jan von Mehren talks to students about school desegregation and race relations
1:00:03: Visual: Footage from the opening credits of the film, Common Ground from CBS/WHDH and Lorimar. Audio of Kevin White (former Mayor of Boston) saying that the film represents a piece of history; that no one should regret looking at piece of history. Christy George reports that the film, Common Ground, looks at the history of court-ordered school desegregation in Boston. George notes that a group of people who were involved in school desegregation in Boston watched the film together last night. V: Footage of White saying that everyone felt strong emotions after watching the film. V: Footage from the film, Common Ground. V: Footage of James Kelly (Boston City Council) addressing the gathering at the screening on March 19, 1990. Kelly says that there was something sacred about Boston's neighborhoods. Kelly says that busing for school desegregation "was not worth it." Footage of Cassandra Twymon (from the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground) addressing the gathering at the screening. Twymon says that she is sorry that some people are "embarrassed" about what they did to Boston's schoolchildren. V: Footage from the film Common Ground. V: Footage of Elvira "Pixie" Palladino (former Boston School Committee member) addressing the gathering at the screening. Palladino says that forced busing always has been wrong and always will be wrong. Footage of George Walker (member of the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground) addressing the gathering at the screening. Walker says that people need to realize that "closed communities" do not work. Walker addresses Palladino by name. V: Footage from the film Common Ground. V: Footage of Jim Conway (Charlestown resident) addressing the gathering at the screening. Conway says that men did not walk around Charlestown with open cans of beer while the mothers were demonstrating against busing. Conway says that the producers' image of Charlestown is not accurate; that the nation will see that image in the film. Footage of Lisa McGoff (member of the McGoff family portrayed in Common Ground) addressing the gathering at the screening. McGoff says that she did not attend any anti-busing meetings in barrooms; that the meetings did happen. McGoff says that bad things did go on in Charlestown. V: Footage from the film, Common Ground. George reports that Common Ground is a risky series for network television to air; that CBS is devoting four hours of prime time to the series. George reports that the movie is based on a book that tells the story of Boston's busing crisis through the experiences of three families. George reports that the book focuses on the experiences of Rachel Twymon, a widow who believed in the importance of education for her children. George reports that the book also focuses on the experiences of Alice McGoff, who believed in the importance of neighborhood communities. V: Footage from the film, Common Ground. George reports that the book also focuses on the adolescent experiences of Cassandra Twymon and Lisa McGoff. V: Footage of McGoff addressing the gathering at the screening. McGoff says that she and Twymon were kids who were trying to understand the situation as it happened. McGoff says that the film only shows the negative events during the busing crisis. McGoff says that the students were "guinea pigs"; that the success or failure of school desegregation has little to do with them. V: Footage from the film, Common Ground. V: Footage of Twymon addressing the gathering at the screening. Twymon says that people acted like the African American students were going to take over the school. Twymon says that she only wanted "to do her time" in school and return home. Twymon says that she did not want to deal with the added stress put on her by the busing crisis. Twymon says that she is glad the movie will air; that the movie gives an accurate portrayal of her experience. V: Footage from the film, Common Ground. George reports that the movie ends on a note of hope; that the argument at the screening continued after the film ended. V: Footage of Palladino addressing the gathering at the screening. Palladino says that now is not the time for this film. Footage of Walker saying that minorities are always told that the present is not the right time. Walker asks when the right time will come. Footage from the film, Common Ground.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/20/1990
Description: Racially integrated, open classrooms at the Joseph Lee School in Dorchester. The teachers are primarily white. The classes are racially integrated; the majority of students are African American. Pam Bullard interviews Frances Kelley (Principal, Joseph Lee School) about school attendance, the faculty and the atmosphere at the school. Kelley is optimistic about the coming year. Bullard interviews two Roxbury High School students about their experiences at the school. Both are enthusiastic about the school, report little racial tension among students, and comment on how helpful headmaster Charles Ray is to the students.
0:59:58: Visual: Racially integrated classes enter the Joseph Lee School in Dorchester. The doors close. A few latecomers knock on the door to be let in. 1:02:01: V: Frances Kelley (Principal, Joseph Lee School) talks to a teacher about attendance. A white teacher helps students in an open classroom. The class is integrated, although a majority of the students are African American. The teacher helps the students learn how to print their names. The students color in pictures on their worksheets. Shot of a white student and an African American student sitting together at a table. 1:08:19: V: Shot of open classrooms at Lee School. Several classes are conducted at once. A teacher tells her students to stand up behind their chairs. The students stand and push their chairs in. Another white teacher teaches her class to read the names of colors. The class is racially integrated. 1:12:20: V: Pam Bullard sets up an interview with Frances Kelley (Principal, Joseph Lee School) in the open classrooms. Kelley admits that a certain percentage of students have not returned to the Lee School this year; that her staff will begin contacting their parents. Kelley says that parents are supportive of the programs at the Lee School; that some are upset because bus routes were consolidated this year; that there is some confusion over bus stops. Bullard comments that the Lee School lost some faculty this year. Kelley says that her faculty likes the school; that some are worried about losing their jobs due to the shrinking student population. Kelley says that morale tends to be low in June; that morale is higher in September when teachers return to school. Kelley says that the faculty at the Lee School is young, enthusiastic, and innovative; that the children like the school and its programs. 1:15:28: V: Bullard sets up an interview with a non-white female student (Betty) and a white male student (Paul) about their experiences at Roxbury High School. Both students opted to return to Roxbury High School after attending the previous year. Betty says that she likes the school because it is close to where she lives and it has good programs; that there are no problems. Paul says that he returned to Roxbury High School to play football; that he gets along well with the teachers and had no problems during the previous year; that he does not mind taking a bus to school. Betty says that there is no tension among the students at the school. Paul agrees that there are no racial problems. Betty says that it is a small school; that the teachers will give individual attention to the students. Paul says that everyone at the school seems to get along; that the teachers are willing to help the students with problems they might have; that Charles Ray (Headmaster, Roxbury High School) is a good principal. Bullard talks to the students informally while the crew takes cutaway shots. Betty says that she likes the programs at the high school; that there is a new chemistry lab; that students have access to photography equipment. Paul says that he moved to Boston from California last year; that people had told him not to attend Roxbury High School; that he liked the school after visiting it for the first time. Bullard comments that Roxbury High School does not deserve its bad reputation.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/09/1976
Description: The Boston School Committee holds a meeting in the School Committee chambers. Members of the School Committee discuss school business. John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) reports on the need for school repairs; Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) reports on staffing issues. Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) interviews Kathleen Kelly (President, Boston Teachers Union) about a proposed school choice plan. Kelly says that many parents support a school choice plan because the current system allows little flexibility. Kelly says that the school choice plan must be considered carefully to prevent a return to segregated schools. Stevens interviews O'Bryant about the proposed school choice plan. O'Bryant says that the plan promotes greater access to schools across the city; that the current system is archaic and inflexible. Stevens interviews Barbara Gray (parent) about the proposed school choice plan. Gray says that parents should be allowed to choose a school with programs suited to the needs of their children. Gray says that the schools need to be improved; that the Boston Public Schools are not truly integrated because there are few white students. Stevens has extended conversations with interviewees while cutaways are shot. Takes of Stevens doing standup about supporters of the school choice plan working on an official proposal for the end of the month. The audio quality on this tape is uneven.
1:00:12: Visual: A Boston School Committee meeting is held in the chambers of the Boston School Committee. School committee members Jean McGuire, John O'Bryant, Jean Sullivan McKeigue, Kevin McCluskey, and Rita Walsh Tomasini are seated at the front of the room. Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) sits at the front with the members of the School Committee. Community members and the press are seated in the audience. O'Bryant talks about the need for $40 million to make school repairs. He says that the mayor, the Boston City Council, and the community must be made aware of the money needed for repairs. Shots of the various committee members. McKeigue agrees that school repairs are needed. A vote is taken on approving a draft of a letter to the mayor and the Boston City Council. O'Bryant thanks Spillane for his report. O'Bryant asks Spillane a question about staffing. Spillane says that more staff is needed before instituting a certain program. Audio is muffled. Shots of Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter); of members of the audience; of the stenographer; of the committee; of the audience. The committee members discuss school business. Audio remains muffled. Shot of the committee members from the perspective of the audience. 1:05:10: Visual: Spillane talks about setting objectives for the school Social Studies programs. Shots of the committee members; of the audience. Audio is muffled. The committee members take a vote. Committee members discuss school contract issues. Shot of Stevens; of Kathleen Kelly (President, Boston Teachers Union) speaking to another audience member; of audience members. 1:08:15: V: Stevens sets up an interview with Kelly. Stevens asks Kelly about a "freedom of choice" proposal supported by some African American parents. Kelly says that she has not yet seen the proposal; that many African American and white parents support a "freedom of choice" plan because the geocode system allows little flexibility; that parents are more interested in good education than racial statistics. Kelly says that a control mechanism must be put in place to prevent a return to segregated schools; that the plan must be given careful thought. Kelly says that the choice of educational programs is more important than the choice of school location. Stevens asks Kelly if busing is "almost dead." Kelly says that busing is no longer the only remedy for Boston schools; that busing can serve as a tool to further the goals of desegregation and educational quality. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and Kelly. Stevens and Kelly speak informally. 1:12:36: V: Stevens sets up an interview with O'Bryant. Stevens asks for O'Bryant's opinion of the "freedom of choice" proposal. O'Bryant says that parents are trying to reform the rigid geocode system; that students have been denied access to schools because of the geocode system. O'Bryant mentions students who have been denied access to the Trotter School. O'Bryant says that the parents are asking for more accessibility to the schools; that the "freedom of choice" proposal has been made into a bigger issue than it should be. O'Bryant says that the geocode system assigns students to schools based upon their residence; that the geocode system is archaic and inflexible; that the geocode system must be addressed in the consent decrees put forth by the court; that leaving the geocode system in place would have "disastrous" consequences. Stevens asks O'Bryant about NAACP intervention in the court case, and NAACP opposition to the "freedom of choice" plan. O'Bryant says that there is a lack of communication between the NAACP and supporters of the plan; that supporters of the plan want greater access to the schools. Stevens asks if the "freedom of choice" plan could result in a return to segregated schools. O'Bryant says that schools in Boston are already segregated because white parents refuse to send their children to most schools located in African American communities; that African American parents want greater access to quality schools all over the city. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and O'Bryant. O'Bryant says again that the "freedom of choice" plan does not represent a return to segregated schools. 1:16:13: V: Stevens sets up an interview with Barbara Gray (parent), who supports the "freedom of choice" plan. Gray says that the supporters of the plan want greater access to all of the schools; that supporters of the plan want an end to the rigid geocode system. Gray explains that the geocode system assigns children to schools according to address and race. Gray says that all of Boston schools need to have high standards; that the each of the schools should have different programs designed to suit specific needs; that students should be able to choose a school whose programs suit their needs. Gray says that education needs to be improved so that all of the schools are equally competitive and able to provide a good education. Stevens asks if the "freedom of choice" plan could result in a return to segregated schools. Gray says that she does not want to go back to segregated schools; that true integration does not exist in Boston because there are not enough white students in the school system; that white students might return to the system if the schools are reformed. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and Gray. Gray says that parents want more control over the education of their children. 1:19:59: V: Stevens records the closing segment of the story from outside of the headquarters of the Boston School Committee. She reports that the supporters of the "freedom of choice" plan are working on an official proposal for the end of the month; that the Massachusetts State Board of Education will propose an end to court intervention in the Boston School System. Stevens does two more takes of the closing segment.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/08/1982
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Mayor Ray Flynn has promised to integrate public housing projects in South Boston and to put a stop to discriminatory practices by the Boston Housing Authority (BHA). African American families have been passed over on the waiting list for apartments in South Boston housing projects. Flynn's plans to integrate public housing have angered his constituents in South Boston, who refer to housing integration as "forced housing." Vaillancourt's report is accompanied by footage of white residents of a South Boston housing project and by footage of South Boston residents during the busing crisis in 1974. Vaillancourt reports that Flynn and Doris Bunte of the BHA attended a community meeting in South Boston to talk about housing integration with South Boston residents. Flynn defends himself against the hostile comments of South Boston residents. City Councilor James Kelly addresses the meeting, denouncing housing integration. Interview with Neil Sullivan, policy advisor to Flynn who talks about public housing integration and Flynn's relationship with South Boston residents.
1:00:02: Visual: Shot of a white woman standing at the entrance to a housing project building in South Boston. Audio of Neil Sullivan (Policy Advisor to Mayor Ray Flynn) saying that the people of South Boston understand discrimination. Meg Vaillancourt reports that residents of South Boston may understand discrimination; that some residents of South Boston also practice discrimination. Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) discriminates against African American families; that no African American families live in any of the three public housing projects in South Boston. V: Shots of a white woman looking out of a window of an apartment in a housing project; of the Old Colony Housing Project in South Boston; of a sign reading, "Old Colony Public Housing Development." Shots of white project residents outside of a project building. Vaillancourt reports that African American families were passed over on the waiting list for project apartments in South Boston; that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has promised to integrate the public housing projects in South Boston. Vaillancourt notes that Flynn met with angry South Boston residents at a community meeting yesterday evening. V: Footage of Flynn addressing the crowd at the community meeting. South Boston residents are crowded into the room, seated at long tables. Doris Bunte (BHA) is on stage with Flynn. Flynn says that the issue is fair and equal access to public housing. Shot of a bumper sticker reading, "Stop 'forced' housing." Vaillancourt reports that the slogan, "Stop forced housing" evokes memories of the anti-busing protests in South Boston in the 1970s. V: Footage of school buses pulling up to South Boston High School in September of 1973. Angry South Boston residents yell and jeer at the buses. Vaillancourt reports that South Boston residents are angry about the integration of the area's three public housing projects. V: Shot of a white woman in the audience making an angry remark. Footage of James Kelly (Boston City Council) addressing the crowd. Kelly says that South Boston residents are going to be denied the right to live in public housing in their own neighborhood. Members of the crowd stand and cheer. Meg Vaillancourt reports that the controversy surrounding the integration of public housing projects creates an identity crisis for Flynn; that Flynn is in disagreement with his South Boston neighbors. V: Shot of Flynn walking to the stage at the community meeting. The crowd yells and boos Flynn. Vaillancourt notes that an audience member asked Flynn when he was moving to Roxbury. V: Shots of white female audience member standing to address Flynn; of another audience member raising her hand. Footage of Flynn saying that he and his family were born and raised in South Boston. The audience jeers. Footage of Sullivan saying that Flynn was probably hurt by the attitude of South Boston residents last night; that Flynn has never ducked this sort of confrontation. Sullivan says that Flynn could have refused to go to the meeting. Vaillancourt reports that Sullivan said that the public housing projects in South Boston could begin to be integrated by April. Vaillancourt notes that no whites will be forced to move out of the projects in order to achieve integration. V: Shot of an African American man raking leaves outside of a project building; of a white female project resident speaking to a reporter. Shots of a public housing project in South Boston; of Flynn at the community meeting; of Bunte addressing the community meeting. Footage of Flynn saying that no person will be displaced to serve the purposes of integration. Footage of Sullivan being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Sullivan says that the average Boston housing development has a turnover rate of 10% each year; that 10% is a higher turnover rate than most neighborhoods. Sullivan says that the goal of the Flynn administration is to sustain a good quality of life in the public housing projects. Shots of a white woman and white children in front of a project building; of a young white boy running around outside of a project building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/13/1988
Description: Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) holds a press conference on the closing of Hyde Park High after a disturbance. She says that the her staff is investigating the situation and will respond to a list of complaints drawn up by the faculty of the high school. Fahey says that the school faculty is concerned about disruptive students and renovations to the building. She will not comment on whether the disturbance was caused by racial tension. Fahey says that Elvira "Pixie" Palladino (Boston School Committee) had a right to visit the school. Fahey will not comment on the effect of Palladino's presence on the disturbance. Ann Foley (administrative assistant to Fahey) and Associate Superintendents Charles Leftwich and Paul Kennedy are also present at the press conference.
0:00:45: Visual: Media are gathered at Boston Schools Information Center as Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), Ann Foley (administrative assistant to Fahey), and Paul Kennedy (Associate Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) seat themselves. Foley says that Fahey will speak about the situation at Hyde Park High School. She requests the media to confine their questions to that situation. 0:01:26: V: Fahey announces that classes at Hyde Park High School will be suspended on the following day; that a group of officials and administrators will be convened to plan for the reopening of the school. Reporters ask questions about the school closing. Fahey says that Kennedy and Leftwich visited Hyde Park High School to confer with faculty, administrators, members of the biracial counsel and members of the Home and School Association. Fahey says that she made the decision to close the school based on information from that visit. Fahey says that Hyde Park faculty is preparing a list of concerns and problems which need to be addressed. Fahey says that the following day will be spent planning and addressing concerns about the school. Fahey says that she has not decided whether to request a larger police presence at Hyde Park High School. 0:03:32: V: Fahey says that she will not comment on the situation at the school until she has all of the information. Fahey says that she will determine tomorrow evening if the school will reopen on Friday. Fahey says that the school will reopen when the safety of the students can be guaranteed. Fahey says that damage to the building will be repaired before the school reopens. Fahey says that the incidents at Hyde Park were deplorable and that the situation at the school will be addressed. Fahey says that she does not know how many arrests were made; that her staff is investigating the situation in order to make a full report to her. 0:05:52: V: A reporter asks Fahey to comment on overcrowded classes and the closing of the top floor of the school. Leftwich says that some classrooms on the top floor are being refurbished; that the superintendent's staff is investigating the situation; that these complaints may have contributed to the situation at Hyde Park. Fahey says that she will not speculate on whether racial issues were the cause of the disturbance; that she will investigate the causes of the disturbance. Fahey says that her staff will assess the situation tomorrow and make plans to prevent such incidents in the future. Fahey says that she had not known about the concerns about Hyde Park faculty members before today; that faculty are concerned about disruptive students and renovations to the school building. Fahey says that students had been dismissed from school when she arrived there. Fahey says that she would address the students by saying that the faculty at Hyde Park is concerned about their well-being and education; that the biracial counsel will work hard to resolve problems at the school; that her administration is dedicated to resolving the situation at the school. 0:10:18: V: A reporter asks Fahey if Elvira "Pixie" Palladino played a destructive role in the situation at Hyde Park. Fahey says that Palladino had a right to be at the school as a member of the school committee; that she has not spoken to Palladino about the situation. A reporter asks Fahey if she is concerned that the concerns of Hyde Park faculty have not been addressed. Fahey says that she will investigate the situation. Fahey declines to answer a question unrelated to the situation at Hyde Park. She thanks the media and leaves the room with Leftwich, Kennedy, and Foley. Reporters talk among themselves as they clear the room. Shot of Fahey heading down a hallway toward the exit.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/21/1976
Description: Press conference on the court-ordered plan for Phase III desegregation of the Boston Public Schools. Elvira "Pixie" Palladino (Boston School Committee), Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) and John Nucci (East Boston community activist) are among the interested parties and reporters in attendance. Attendees read over the court order. Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) and Marvin Scott (Associate Dean of Education, Boston University) review the court order. They discuss efforts to desegregate Boston kindergartens. They announce the opening of the Mattahunt Elementary School and Madison Park High School. Smith and Dentler discuss the decision to close the McKinley School, the Storrow School and the Higginson Elementary School, because they remain segregated despite all efforts to integrate the student population.
0:00:13: Visual: People are seating themselves in a lecture hall before a press conference about the court-ordered plan for Phase III desegregation of Boston Public Schools. Elvira "Pixie" Palladino sits with several white women at a table at the front of the room. Walt Sanders (WBZ reporter) reads the paper at his seat, also near the front of the room. Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) greets people as they enter the room. The media set up cameras to record the press conference. 0:03:20: V: Marvin Scott (Associate Dean of Education, Boston University) and Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) seat themselves at the front of the room. The moderator announces that copies of the court-ordered Phase III desegregation plan will be passed out. Audience members approach him for copies of the report. Scott and Dentler wait as the moderator passes out the report. 0:05:51: V: The moderator introduces Dentler and Scott, and says that they will answer questions about the report. Dentler and Scott are seated at a table with microphones. They quietly confer with one another and check their watches. The press conference attendees quietly read over the report. John Nucci (East Boston community activist) quietly studies it. Leftwich flips through the report. An attendee asks Dentler how the plan will affect East Boston. Dentler says that he will answer questions after the attendees have had a chance to read over the report. 0:09:49: V: Smith says that the court order for Phase III desegregation focuses on stability and continuity. He says that he and Dentler will review the order and then take questions. Smith says that a third theme of the court order is the disengagement of the court from the schools. Smith refers to the court order and explains some statistics. He points out how some school assignments have changed from last year to this year. He makes reference to the assignment of students to examination schools. Dentler notes that kindergarten classrooms in Boston have never been desegregated; that neighborhood kindergarten classrooms remain more accessible to white students than to African American students; that fewer minority students enter kindergarten. Dentler adds that the Phase III desegregation plan aims to increase accessibility to neighborhood kindergarten for all; that some students will be assigned to citywide magnet kindergartens for desegregation purposes; that magnet kindergarten assignments are made with the idea that children will stay in the same building for the elementary school grades. Dentler says that the goal of kindergarten desegregation was first stated in the original court order. Smith mentions some of the details of student assignments to District 9 schools. Dentler says that the court aims to stabilize the high student turnover rate. He names the deadlines for initial assignments and corrective assignments of students. Dentler notes the statistic that one in three students transfers from one school to another under the current plan; that there will be limitations on student transfers. Dentler says that a high turnover rate is detrimental to classroom learning. Smith announces the opening of the Mattahunt Elementary School and Madison Park High School. Dentler announces the closings of four schools. He says that the McKinley School, the Storrow School, and the Higginson Elementary School will be closed because they have remained segregated despite all efforts to integrate the student population. Dentler notes that alternative plans to desegregate these schools are infeasible or unconstitutional; that the student populations in these schools are small. Dentler notes that there are 60 students enrolled in the McKinley School; that there are less than 100 students enrolled in the Storrow School; that there are less than 150 students at the Higginson School, not including kindergarten students.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/06/1977
Description: Mayoral candidates Ray Flynn and Mel King participate in a forum on education sponsored by the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC) at English High School. Flynn says that students graduating from Boston public schools must be prepared to compete in the workplace. He adds that there must be a working relationship between parents, teachers, administrators, and the community. King speaks about the workings of the school administration and advocates the inclusion of parents in the process. King and Flynn respond to questions about how they would have handled school desegregation if they had been mayor at the time. Both candidates answer questions about the role of the mayor upon the court's withdrawal from its supervisory role over the school system and about the school budget. Audience members include John O'Bryant of the Boston School Committee. Tape 2 of 2.
1:00:00: Visual: Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston) speaks at a forum on education sponsored by the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC) at English High School. The candidates' forum is held in conjuction with their annual meeting. Flynn says that students graduating from Boston public schools must be able to compete in the workplace. Long shot of candidates on stage from the back of the auditorium. Flynn says that there must be a working relationship between parents, teachers, administrators and the community. The audience applauds. 1:00:56: V: King speaks about the workings of the school administration. Jump cut in the videotape. Shots of John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee); of members of the audience. King says that parents must be included in the workings of the school system. Shot of the candidates on stage. An audience member asks what each candidate would have done about school desegregation if he had been mayor at the time. The audience member also asks about the role of the mayor when the court pulls withdraws from its supervisory role over the school system. King says that community control over schools is important; that community accountablility is an important aspect of community control; that members of the community must be held accountable for the state of neighborhood schools. King says that he had suggested a community approach to schools which could have prevented the kind of sweeping court order imposed by the federal court to accomplish school desegregation. King says that he would have tried to bring people together in support of school desegregation if he had been mayor at the time; that there were many people acting in opposition to the court order at the time of school desegregation. King says that he would provide leadership on the issue of quality, integrated education upon the withdrawal of the court. 1:05:08: V: Flynn responds to the same question about school desegregation. Flynn notes that the State Department of Education will continue to oversee the Boston Public School System after the withdrawal of the court. Flynn says that he will work with the State Department of Education to protect the Constitutional rights of public schoolchildren in Boston. Flynn says that political and moral leadership was absent during school desegregation in Boston. Flynn says that he would have defended the rights and the safety of Boston schoolchildren as mayor, even if he disagreed with the court order. Flynn notes that he was a state legislator at the time of school desegregation; that he was criticized at the time for standing up for his beliefs; that he was criticized for living in a certain community; that he acted responsibly on behalf of all of Boston's schoolchildren at the time. 1:07:15: V: An audience member asks about the school budget. Flynn says that it is important to educate children; that it is more expensive to remedy social problems resulting from poor education. Flynn says that he supported funding for Boston schools even when it was politically unpopular to do so; that he is committed to providing the necessary funds to assure a good school system. Flynn says that accountability is as important as funding; that the school system has too many administrators. King responds to the same question. King says that he is aware of the lack of resources available to teachers and students in the Boston Public School System; that the lack of resources is embarrassing for a school system with a large budget; that the school administrators must make a commitment to provide resources for students and teachers.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/13/1983
Description: Author J. Anthony Lukas addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Lukas talks about how the three families portrayed in his book represent the main elements of the coalition that formed around John F. Kennedy (former US President) in 1960. Lukas talks about the breakdown of that coalition. Lukas says that both race and class need to be considered when analyzing the busing crisis in Boston. Lukas says that Boston's middle and upper classes were largely exempt from busing; he adds that the legal system does not recognize social class as a relevant category. Lukas talks about the importance of school integration by race and social class. He notes that Arthur Garrity (federal judge) should not be made a scapegoat for his actions. Lukas says that Boston is a better city as a result of the busing crisis. He says that people must continue to struggle for social justice. Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly) addresses the meeting. Beatty talks about the history of the civil rights movement. He talks about white voters who felt alienated by the Democratic Party's support for the civil rights movement. Beatty says that a backlash against the civil rights movement combined with a failing economy caused many white voters to vote for the Republican Party in the 1970s. Beatty notes that many South Boston residents have voted Republican since the busing crisis. Beatty talks about the importance of civil rights legislation and says that the civil rights movement will help us to achieve a more just society. Panelists at the meeting include Beatty, Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 2 of 8
0:59:58: Visual: J. Anthony Lukas (author) addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the release of the book, Common Ground by Lukas . Lukas speaks from a podium. Panelists are assembled at tables on either side of the podium. Panelists include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe). Lukas talks about the McGoff, Twymon and Diver families portrayed in the book. Lukas mentions Colin Diver's admiration for John F. Kennnedy (former US President). Lukas talks about how the three families represent elements of the Kennedy coalition on 1960. Lukas says that the coalition fell apart during the busing crisis in Boston. Lukas recalls the antagonism felt by Boston Irish Catholics toward Edward Kennedy (US Senator) during the busing crisis. Lukas asks what happened to the coalition which had formed around John F. Kennedy. Lukas asks if the groups represented by the three families can find "common ground." Lukas says that his research has not led him to take sides on the issues; that his research has revealed the complexity of the issues. Lukas says that the "liberal agenda of the 1960s and 1970s" did not focus enough on class issues. Lukas adds that race and class need to be considered when analyzing the busing crisis in Boston. Lukas notes that Boston was on the brink of "racial war." Lukas mentions the attack on Theodore Landsmark (attorney) at City Hall Plaza. Lukas adds that the Boston Public School System was clearly segregated; that the Boston School Committee flagrantly violated the law in refusing to desegregate. Lukas says that Arthur Garrity (federal judge) had no choice but to order a remedy for the segregated schools; that Garrity deserves gratitude and respect from the city of Boston. Lukas notes that there was "a pervasive class bias" in the court orders issued by the judge. Lukas talks about the Supreme Court Decision (Milliken v. Bradley), which hampered Garrity from ordering a metropolitan busing plan. Lukas notes that Thurgood Marshall (US Supreme Court Justice) wrote a scathing dissent from the decision. Lukas says that Boston's middle and upper classes were largely exempt from busing. Lukas adds that the poor and vulnerable students were subject to the court orders during the busing crisis. Lukas talks about the need for integration by social class and by race. Lukas says that opponents to busing were able to exploit class resentment to strengthen resistance to busing. Lukas notes that poor Irish Catholics in Boston resented middle- and upper-class Irish Catholics more than they resented African Americans. 1:05:58: Visual: Lukas says that Garrity could not consider social class in the court orders; that the legal system does not recognize social class as a relevant category. Lukas says that the fourteenth amendment of the Constitution does not protect the poor. Lukas says that minorities have a right to sue for protection under the law. Lukas adds that the adversarial legal system is not the ideal system for achieving social progress. Lukas says that the court orders in the Boston school desegregation case resulted in desegregated schools; that the court orders did not achieve social justice. Lukas says that Garrity should not be made a "scapegoat for our own faintheartedness." Lukas says that the wealthy and powerful must stop putting the burden of integration on the poor and the young. Lukas talks about the beneficial effects of the court orders in Boston. Lukas says that Boston is a more "mature and united city" as a result of the busing crisis. Lukas says that US citizens must continue to fight for social justice. Lukas decries the "self-pitying mood" of liberals. Lukas says that many liberal programs from the 1960s and 1970s were successful; that some failed only because of a lack of resources. Lukas talks about the gulf between liberals and the working class in the 1960s and 1970s. Lukas talks about the the need for these groups to build coalitions and find "common ground." The audience applauds. 1:11:07: Visual: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) introduces Jack Beatty. Beatty talks about the evolution of John F. Kennedy's position on civil rights in the 1960s. Beatty mentions John Kennedy's commitment to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Beatty says that many of John Kennedy's advisors counseled him against the sponsorship of civil rights' legislation; that John Kennedy's advisors feared a backlash by white voters. Beatty quotes John Kennedy's speech advocating the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Beatty says that African Americans voted overwhelmingly for the Democratic Party in 1968; that many white voters switched their allegiance to the Republican Party. Beatty notes that most South Boston voters supported Hubert Humphrey (Democratic candidate for the US Presidency) in the primary elections of 1968. Beatty notes that South Boston has voted Republican since the busing crisis. Beatty adds that the median income in South Boston in 1980 was less than $11,000 per year. Beatty notes that forced busing was one of the issues which drove South Boston residents to vote for the Republican Party. Beatty says that that white Southerners tend to vote for the Republican Party; that racial issues are just as explosive in the North as they are in the South. Beatty accuses Republican leaders of exploiting race issues in debates over the federal budget; that Republican leaders have painted welfare as "relief for the black poor." Beatty adds that government aid to the middle classes costs more money than welfare programs. Beatty accuses Republican leaders of exploiting the white backlash against civil rights and racial issues. Beatty talks about the role of the failing economy in the demise of the Democratic Party. Beatty talks about the effects of inflation and unemployment on the white underclass. Beatty says that many anti-busing protesters were frustrated by their own circumstances of poverty and unemployment. Beatty talks about the ill effects of segregated schools on African American school children. Beatty talks about "the tragic spectacle" of the busing crisis. Beatty says that John Kennedy would have proceeded with civil rights' legislation, even if he could have foreseen the demise of the Democratic Party and the onset of the busing crisis in Boston. Beatty says that John Kennedy would have had the courage and vision to support the legislation; that John Kennedy would have realized the importance of civil rights' legislation. Beatty says that civil rights' legislation will allow us to achieve a just and integrated society.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Charlestown environs. Charlestown High School and Monument Square, Bartletts Street, Bunker Hill Street and St. Francis de Sales Church. Children ride bicycles in Monument Square. People are gathered in the park beside St. Francis de Sales Church. Shot from the park of the port. Racist, white supremacist and antibusing graffiti is visible on buildings on Medford and Main Streets. Shots of Medford and Main Streets. Pedestrians walking along streets. Children play at a playground. Audio goes in and out.
0:00:23: Visual: Shot across Monument Square of Charlestown High School. Shot of the top of the building, including school name carved into the stone. A broken window at the school has been patched up. The streets around Monument Square are quiet. A child rides his bike along the street. Shots of Bartlett Street, beside the school; of the Bunker Hill Monument. 0:05:35: V: Children ride their bikes in Monument Square. Shots of Bartlett Street; of racist graffiti on a building on Concord Street; of Concord Street. 0:09:24: V: Shot of Bartlett Street. Traveling shot up Bartlett Street. Traveling shot continues on to Elm Street and on to Bunker Hill Street. Traveling shot continues up Bunker Hill Street. Shot of St. Francis de Sales church. Cars are parked along both sides of Bunker Hill Street. An older man walks slowly along the sidewalk and stops in front of one of the houses. Two young men walk down the sidewalk of Bunker Hill Street. 0:14:26: V: Teenagers are gathered in the park beside St. Francis de Sales church. A group of people sit on steps in the park, looking at the view of the port. Gas tanks and industrial ships are visible in the port. Long shot of park and the port. Children play in the playground at the park. Shot of two children on swings with wrought iron fence in foreground. Shot of older man on a park bench with wrought iron fence in foreground. A girl takes a drink from a water fountain. 0:17:43: V: Traveling shot of Medford Street. Shot of a garage on Medford Street with white supremacist and antibusing graffiti. Traveling shot of Main Street. Mishawum Park apartments are visible. An older man sits with another person on the stoop of a dilapidated building. Shot of white supremacist and antibusing graffiti on a building at the corner of Essex and Main Streets. Video is distorted at end of tape.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/18/1976
Description: South Boston High School exterior. Background comments of pedestrians talking to camera operator and reporter. Pam Bullard interviews headmaster Jerome Wynegar on what programs his school will offer, including core curriculum and vocational education. Wynegar says racial problems have been aggravated by outside agitators. He adds that the school is enrolled to capacity, and cannot accommodate students who wish to return after dropping out. He says that the school should make sure to listen to the suggestions of the students, and those students who dropped out, to try to improve the school. He commends the faculty. Additional comments from Wynegar as they shoot cutaways. Shots of graffiti painted on pavement, which reads “Stop Forced Busing.” Several takes of reporter voice over and standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/17/1976
Description: Low quality sound at the beginning of the video. Judge Arthur Garrity speaks at a community meeting, calling for better communication among organizations involved in the school desegregation process. He takes questions about the role of the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC) and the organization of community forums to invite feedback on schools. Garrity talks about setting up hearings about the school desegregation plan for the 1976-77 school year. Audience members express confusion at the roles of the CCC and the Citywide Parents Advisory Council (CPAC). Garrity explains the role of the Racial Ethnic Parents Councils, set up through the CPAC. Garrity reads a letter about problems which need to be resolved at the Blackstone Elementary School. Hubie Jones (African American community activist) sits beside Garrity at the meeting
1:00:00: Audio on tape is muffled. Visual: Arthur Garrity (federal judge) speaks before a biracial community meeting about Boston schools and court-ordered desegregation. Garrity speaks about the importance of good communication between the organizations involved in the schools. He says that the parents on the Citywide Parents Advisory Council (CPAC) are interested in working with the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC) in organizing meetings about the schools. Garrity closes his talk by saying that he is offering suggestions, not directives. Hubert Jones (African American community activist) informally thanks Garrity. Garrity sits down in a chair next to Jones. 1:02:43: V: Garrity takes questions from audience members. Garrity responds to a question, saying that he will consult with all of the lawyers involved in the school desegregation case before putting anything into the court order; that he will schedule a series of hearings for the 1976-77 school year. Garrity says that the hearings might be held in late February or early March. A meeting member asks Garrity to comment on the group's idea to hold community forums in the neighborhoods, so that parents can give suggestions and air their grievances. Garrity agrees that the community hearings are a good idea. He suggests that a few members of the CCC and the CPAC should be present at the forums; that these members should be well informed in order to combat inaccurate information and false rumors; that members should feel free to ask him for the statistics and facts before going to the hearings. A meeting member asks Garrity if the CCC should have an attorney present for the court hearings. Garrity says that the CCC is not a party to the lawsuit; that the CCC might be seen as a distraction in the court. The member asks how the CCC can get feedback from the court. Garrity says that he is looking for constructive proposals for changes in the desegregation plan; that he hopes the community forums will provide these constructive proposals for change. Garrity adds that he receives other reports which do not call for action. A meeting member asks how Garrity would define the role of the CCC. Garrity says that he appreciates the efforts of CCC mediators in diffusing the tense situation in South Boston; that the most important function of the CCC is to monitor how the desegregation plan is carried out across the city. 1:13:41: V: A meeting member tells Garrity that members of the community see the CCC as a council which can take action and solve problems. Garrity responds that the CCC can publicize information and draw attention to problems. Garrity reads a letter that he received about problems at the Blackstone School. Garrity says that he hopes the CCC can delegate members to investigate problems at the schools in order to get them resolved. Garrity says that he would like the CCC to help solve these problems; that he would rather not try to resolve problems at individual schools through the court order. An audience member says that there is some confusion regarding the roles of the CCC and the CPAC. Garrity says that the Racial Ethnic Parents Councils under the CPAC exist to promote communication on racial issues in the schools; that the councils have also taken action on educational issues in the schools. Garrity notes that the CPAC has no staff or resources; that the CCC can support the CPAC and the Racial Ethnic Parents Councils. Garrity refers to a decision by the US Court of Appeals regarding the schools.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/14/1976
Description: Hope Kelly reviews the major events and key issues during the tenure of Boston superintendent of schools Laval Wilson. The Boston School Committee has voted to remove him from his post. Kelly adds that there are racial overtones in the vote to dismiss Wilson. Kelly notes that Wilson's opponents are all white. Kelly reviews Wilson's interview and selection, his record and the school bus drivers' strike. Kelly also discusses the school consolidation controversy and his contract renewal in 1989. The Boston Public Schools experienced a rise in achievement test scores and a decrease in the dropout rate under Wilson. Kelly's report is accompanied by footage illustrating these events during Wilson's tenure. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Controversy surrounds the Boston School Committee's decision to fire Laval Wilson and Meg Vaillancourt interviews Nthabiseng Mabuza about the release of Nelson Mandela
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) being interviewed by Eileen Jones (WGBH reporter) on July 19, 1985. Wilson says that he wants to convince the Boston Public School community that he is the best person for the job of superintendent. Shots of posters prepared by Wilson for his presentation to the Boston School Committee; of Wilson adjusting the position of the charts. Hope Kelly reports that Wilson interviewed for the position of superintendent in July of 1985. Kelly notes that Wilson showed little charisma; that he was well prepared for the interview. V: Footage of Wilson being interviewed by the Boston School Committee in the School Committee chambers on July 19, 1985. Wilson says that his planning skills are excellent. Shots of Wilson and the members of the School Committee. Kelly reports that Wilson stressed his planning skills; that Wilson was self-confident and stubborn. Kelly notes that Wilson did not mention his people skills or his passion. V: Footage of Wilson being interviewed by Jones on July 19, 1985. Wilson repeats that he classified himself "as a school superintendent." Shot of Wilson during his interview with the School Committee. Kelly reports that Wilson never made any reflections on race. V: Footage of Wilson being interviewed by the School Committee on July 19, 1985. Wilson says that he is an educator who happens to be African American. Footage of the members of the School Committee as they cast their votes for the position of superintendent on July 31, 1985. Jean McGuire (Boston School Committee) votes for Dr. Peter Negroni (candidate for superintendent of schools). School Committee members John O'Bryant and Thomas O'Reilly vote for Wilson. Kelly notes that Wilson had held the position of superintendent of schools in Rochester, New York, and Berkeley, California. Kelly reports that the Boston School Committee voted nine-to-four in favor of hiring Wilson. Kelly reports that Wilson became Boston's first African American superintendent of schools. Kelly adds that the Boston Public School System was rife with poverty and patronage in 1985. V: Footage from August 21, 1985. Wilson walks on Devonshire Street with a group of school officials, including John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee), Ellen Guiney (Citywide Education Coalition), John Grady (Boston School Committee), and Julio Henriquez (aide to School Committee member Daniel Burke). Footage of Wilson at a press conference of May 12, 1987. Wilson says that 20% of first-graders did not pass first grade last year. Kelly reports that a bus strike paralyzed the school system in Wilson's fourth month on the job. Kelly notes that students and parents became enraged at Wilson's plan to consolidate schools. V: Shot of buses parked outside of South Boston High School. African American students walk among the buses. Shot of a group of angry protesters. Shots of students and parents protesting outside of the Boston School Committee headquarters on Court Street. The students and parents hold signs. Shot of a jacket being held up in the air. Writing on the jacket reads, "Save our school." Kelly reports that Wilson threatened to resign over the school consolidation issue; that Wilson pursued a job offer from the New York City Public School System in 1987. Kelly notes that Wilson receives a salary of nearly $100,000 per year. Kelly adds that there were questions about his performance. V: Shot of Wilson at a press conference. Footage from a Boston School Committee meeting on October 11, 1988. Shot of Daniel Burke (Boston School Committee). Shot of Wilson saying that progress is being made. Shot of the audience at the meeting. Kelly reports that progress is being made in the school system; that achievement scores are rising. Kelly notes that the drop-out rate has declined to its lowest level in eleven years. V: Shots of Wilson in an elementary school classroom; of Wilson and school officials walking through a high school corridor. Footage from a Boston School Committee on April 11, 1989. Don Muhammad (Muhammad's Mosque) addressing the members of the School Committee. Muhammad says that Wilson's contract should be renewed; that Wilson has begun to turn the school system around. Shots of audience members crowded into the School Committee chambers; of the School Commitee members in the School Committee chambers. Kelly reports that Wilson's contract was renewed in 1989; that Wilson survived by one vote. Kelly reports that Wilson did not receive a ringing endorsement from the Boston School Committee; that Wilson had wanted a four-year contract in 1989; that he did not receive one. Kelly notes that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) suggested abolishing the Boston School Committee during the summer of 1989. V: Footage of Flynn at a press conference in May of 1989. Flynn says that the present system fails the schoolchildren and parents of Boston. Shot of the members of the School Committee seated at the front of the School Committee chambers. Kelly reports that Flynn wanted to replace the elected school committee with an appointed school committee. V: Footage from July of 1985. Wilson sits at a press conference with Flynn, Edward Doherty (President, Boston Teachers Union), Peggy Davis-Mullen (Boston School Committee), Rita Walsh-Tomasini (Boston School Committee) and other school officials. The officials stand up and raise their linked hands. Kelly reports that the debate over the schools has become divisive and political. Kelly reports that Flynn took no questions about Wilson today; that Flynn released a short statement. V: Footage of Wilson being interviewed by the School Committee on July 19, 1985. Wilson says that issues are more important than skin color. Kelly stands outside of the headquarters of the Boston School Committee. Kelly notes that the situation has racial overtones. Kelly reports that an all-white majority on the School Committee has voted to remove an African American superintendent from a school system with a 75% non-white student population.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/14/1990
Description: Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) speaks to an audience in the chambers of the Boston School Committee. He is introduced by Jean Sullivan McKeigue (President, Boston School Committee), who notes that the School Committee will vote on March 5 about whether to keep Spillane in the post of Superintendent. Spillane addresses the issues of school desegregation and school violence. Spillane says past students in Boston Public Schools had been denied a good education due to segregated schools and cynicism among educators. Spillane talks about the continued involvement of Arthur Garrity (federal judge) in the supervision of the Boston Public Schools. Spillane says that the Boston School Department must begin to take responsibility for school desegregation. Spillane reminds the audience that racial discrimination will not be tolerated in the Boston Public School system; that the climate in the schools must be improved. Spillane stresses the importance of faculty integration. Spillane talks about school discipline and the fair implementation of the disciplinary code. Spillane says that a monitoring process will assure that minority students are no longer singled out for disciplinary action. Spillane promises to establish a task force to investigate school violence. Spillane says that school desegregation will have been a failure if quality education cannot be assured. Spillane also talks about additional programs for students, teacher training, teacher evaluation and community involvement in the schools. John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) is interviewed by the media after the speech. O'Bryant says that Spillane has addressed school desegregation in a courageous manner; that he will vote for Spillane on March 5.
1:00:04: Press and members of the community are gathered in the Boston School Committee chambers. Jean Sullivan McKeigue (President, Boston School Committee) enters the room and announces that the vote on the office of school superintendent will take place on March 5. McKeigue introduces Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools). Spillane enters the room and sits down. Spillane thanks McKeigue. He acknowledges the fact that the School Committee will be voting on whether to continue his superintendency. Spillane addresses the need for community involvement in Boston schools. Spillane says that he started as superintendent seven months ago; that he was aware of the social, fiscal and educational problems faced by Boston schools; that he has tried to provide constructive leadership. Spillane says that the schools are working with reduced resources; that he is trying to address the educational and social needs of nearly 60,000 students. Spillane refers to school desegregation across the nation. He says that Boston public school students had been denied a good education due to segregated schools and a cynicism among educators. Spillane says that he would like to address two problems today: school desegregation and school violence. Spillane talks about Judge Arthur Garrity's efforts to produce agreement among the parties in the Boston school desegregation case (Morgan v. Hennigan). He says that these agreements aim to secure the advances made by eight years of school desegregation; that these agreements would form the basis of a final set of court orders; that Garrity would cease to supervise the schools after these consent decrees were put in place. Spillane says that the consent decrees provide an opportunity to assess the progress made in school desegregation. Spillane reviews the state of the Boston Public School System before desegregation. Spillane says that he would like to eliminate racial inequality while improving educational quality. Spillane says that he would like to institute a long-range plan for the schools; that the plan would be presented to Garrity through the consent decree process. Spillane says that Boston schools must take responsibility for school desegregation; that equal educational opportunities must exist for all students; that the staff must be integrated as well as the students. Spillane says that the schools require strong leadership, a clear curriculum, conscientious teaching and a safe school climate. Spillane says that students must be prepared for higher education or the job market; that schools must work with parents to improve education. Spillane says that racial discrimination cannot be tolerated in and out of school; that he will not tolerate those who say that some children cannot learn. Spillane says that teachers must work hard to educate all children. Spillane says that he supports the integration of school faculty; that school staff must represent a cross-section of American society; that minority staff have been denied access to jobs in the past. Spillane says that African Americans and other minorities will be represented in key positions in the school administration. 1:10:44: Spillane says that youth violence is a problem in Boston's schools and neighborhoods. Spillane says that order must be kept in the schools; that alternative programs must be provided for all students in need of them. Spillane says that violence can stem from a lack of success in school; that school staff must help students to learn and achieve as best they can. Spillane says that fair and equitable disciplinary action must be assured; that minority students may have been singled out for disciplinary action in the past. Spillane says that he will set up a process to monitor disciplinary action and insure fair implementation of the disciplinary code. Spillane says that he will establish a task force to investigate school violence; that the task force can make recommendations on how to counter school violence. Spillane notes that students who are not taught to read and write are victims of another kind of violence; that some students are not encouraged to learn; that all students must be prepared to function as active and contributing members of society. Spillane says that desegregation will be rendered ineffective if quality education is not assured; that urban schools can make a difference in the lives of their students. Visual: Shot of a young African American boy who is fidgeting in the back of the room. Spillane says that teacher training is important. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane talks about alternative programs for students with special needs. V: Jump cut in videotape. Shots of audience from Spillane's perspective. Spillane says that a fair process of teacher evaluation will be implemented; that assistance and training must be given to teachers; that superior performance should be recognized and inferior performance should be addressed. V: Shot from the back of the room of Spillane addressing the audience. Spillane talks about the need for high academic standards. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane says that he will continue to work with the business community on employment and training programs for students. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane talks about the need for good vocational education programs. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane addresses the need for strong bilingual education programs. Spillane says that the programs must be assessed to assure that they are meeting the needs of the students. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane says that education must be a priority in the city; that civic leaders, parents and school administrators must work together to improve the schools; that all groups concerned about the schools must be listened to. V: Jump cut in videotape. The audience claps for Spillane. V: Jump cut in videotape. John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) is interviewed by the media. He says that he is impressed with Spillane's growth since his stormy meeting with the school committee on February 8; that he will vote for Spillane. O'Bryant says that Spillane addressed school desegregation in a courageous manner; that very few high-profile officials talk about the beneficial effects of school desegregation in Boston; that few people give Garrity credit for instituting desegregation in Boston schools. O'Bryant says that he is optimistic about Spillane's ability to do the job. The media continues to question O'Bryant.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/02/1982
Description: Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe) speaks at a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Winship says that Boston is no longer portrayed as a racist city in the national media. He notes that the city is dedicated to healing its wounds. Martin Nolan organizes a discussion among audience members and panelists. Gerard Doherty (former State Representative) says that Irish Americans were fighting for their children's right to a good education. He adds that there were no racial problems in Charlestown before the busing crisis. Ron Formisano (Professor, Clark University) says that he is disappointed at the absence of the McGoff family and other members of the anti-busing movement. Nolan says that many leaders of the anti-busing movement declined invitations to attend the forum. Paul Grogan (Liaison to the Business Community for the Flynn administration) asks Lukas to comment on the leadership of Kevin White (former Mayor of Boston) and Arthur Garrity (federal judge). Lukas responds to Formisano, saying that the absence of the McGoff family is troubling. He says that he invited many members of the anti-busing movement to the forum. Lukas comments on White's career as mayor. He says that White was most effective in the early years of his tenure. He notes that White became less attentive to racial issues over the years, though he was effective in other areas. Lukas compliment's Garrity's courage and integrity. Lukas speculates as to whether a metropolitan solution to busing would have worked. He says that the court order should have tried to address class issues. Rachel Twymon (member of the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground) speaks to the audience. She says that children cannot be expected to attend school together until their parents can gather to discuss issues peacefully. Joan Diver (member of the Diver family portrayed in Common Ground) addresses the meeting. She compliments Lukas on his novel and says that his novel allowed her to understand different people's perspectives on the busing crisis. Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Winship. Tape 7 of 8
1:00:00: Visual: Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe) addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the release of the book, Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author). Winship speaks as a member of a panel including Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools) and Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church). Winship says that Boston is no longer portrayed as a "racist city" by the national media; that Boston is now seen as a city dedicated to healing its wounds. Winship says that "the court order made the city face the music, and the melody gets better and better as each day goes by." The audience applauds. 1:00:52: V: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) invites questions from the audience. Gerard Doherty (former State Representative from Charlestown) refers to the comments of Elvira Pixie Palladino (former member, Boston School Committee) about respect and the comments of Paul Parks (former State Secretary for Education) about listening to others. Doherty says that Lukas's book neglected to mention the great commitment to education on the part of most Irish Americans. Doherty notes that there were no racial problems in Charlestown before "forced busing"; that Irish Americans were fighting for their children's right to a good education. Doherty says that Irish Americans felt as if the right to education was being denied to their children through forced busing. Doherty says that Charlestown residents support equal rights for all; that Charlestown residents want a good education for their children in neighborhood schools; that education is "the way out" for most Charlestown residents. The audience applauds. 1:04:17: V: Ron Formisano (Professor, Clark University) introduces himself and says that he is working on a book about the anti-busing movement. He comments that the absence of the McGoff family (family portrayed in Common Ground) at today's gathering is symbolic of the "historic alliance" in Boston between white protestants and African Americans. Formisano says that the absence of the McGoff family is unfortunate; that neighborhood leaders are also absent from today's gathering. Formisano points out that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) is the only person present who was involved in "strenuous opposition" to the court order. Formisano asks if the leaders of the anti-busing movement were invited to the gathering. Nolan says that members and leaders of the anti-busing movement were invited to the gathering; that most declined to accept the invitation. Nolan says that Formisano is welcome to look over the list of invitees. 1:07:33: V: Paul Grogan (Liaison to the Business Community for the Flynn administration) asks if Lukas is disappointed in the leadership of Kevin White (former Mayor of Boston) and Arthur Garrity (federal judge) during the busing crisis. Grogan asks how each man could have responded differently to the situation. Lukas approaches the podium. He says that he is happy to respond to Grogan's question and to Formisano's question. Lukas says that he is honored to have a distinguished panel and audience gather to discuss his book; that the absence of the McGoff family is "a blight on the evening." Lukas says that he had wanted all three families to rise as one after he introduced them. Lukas notes that the McGoffs accepted his invitation; that he does not know why they are not here. Lukas says that three or four dozen people from Charlestown were invited to the gathering; that he does not know how many are here. Lukas says that his intention was to bring all Bostonians together; that he did not intend to host a gathering of "Harvard professors and government officials." Lukas expresses his regret that the effort was "partially unsuccessful." Lukas says that Grogan's question is difficult. Lukas notes that one of the panelists talked about "heroes and villains"; that he hopes that the search for "heroes and villains" is in vain. Lukas says, "heroes and villains make good fairytales but bad history." Lukas says that he believes that people can transcend their history. Lukas says that Lisa McGoff (member of the McGoff family portrayed in Common Ground) is one of the people in the book whose actions are heroic; that Lisa McGoff learned to transcend her past. 1:13:09: V: Lukas says that he sees no one in the book as either a hero or a villain. Lukas says, "Kevin White will go down in history as a better mayor than he is presently perceived to have been, but not so good a mayor as he thinks he was." The audience laughs and claps for Lukas. Lukas says that White was a good mayor for the first two or three years; that White was less effective when he pursued his ambitions to be a national politician. Lukas says that White became less committed to race issues during the course of his tenure. Lukas says that he hopes that he gave full coverage in the book to the racism and race issues which led to the busing crisis. Lukas compliments panelist Sandra Lynch on her "deeply moving" presentation on racism in Boston. Lukas says that White was not committed to issues of racial justice; that White was effective in other areas. Lukas says that "history will treat Arthur Garrity much better than Boston has treated him." Lukas adds that Garrity was a "scapegoat"; that Garrity truly had no other course than to order busing as a remedy. Lukas says that he admires Garrity's tenacity, integrity and courage; that Garrity is not a "risk-taker." Lukas says that he wishes that Garrity had tried a metropolitan busing plan. Lukas notes that the anti-busing movement would have seen him as more understanding of their position. Lukas says that there is a slim chance that a metropolitan plan might have worked. Lynch, who is sitting on the panel, indicates that it would not have been legally possible. The audience laughs. Lukas says that the class issue needed to be addressed; that an effort to metropolitanize busing would have addressed the class issue, even if the effort failed. Lukas expresses his great respect for Garrity, despite his criticism. The audience applauds. 1:17:52: V: Nolan introduces Rachel Twymon (member of the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground). Twymon says that there has been something left "unsaid." Twymon notes that Garrity enforced the law; that people are often "very lonely" when they take an unpopular stand, even if it is right. Twymon says that adults cannot expect their children to go to school together if the adults cannot gather to discuss the issues peacefully. The audience applauds. Joan Diver (member of the Diver family portrayed in Common Ground). Diver says that Lukas' book allowed her to "get into the heads" of other people. Diver talks about how she read and began to understand the perspective of each family. Diver says that the families were victims who experienced great pain; that the families were also "victimizers" who were fighting to protect their ideals, families or property. Diver says that Lukas' book is like "a window to the sky"; that the book provides understanding and wisdom which might lead readers to a "common ground." Shot of Joan and Colin Diver.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Steve Pearlstein (journalist) speaks at a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas' novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Pearlstein sums up the issues discusses at the forum. Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) addresses the audience. Wilson says that issues of race and class can be mediated through the public schools. He adds that public education is a means of upward mobility for poor students. Wilson says that the city of Boston must commit itself to providing quality education in the schools. He says that parents, institutions of higher education, the business community, and social agencies need to join him in the effort to improve the Boston Public Schools. John Cullinane (Chairman, John F. Kennedy Library Foundation) gives closing remarks and ends the meeting. Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriuculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 8 of 8
1:00:03: Visual: Steve Pearlstein (journalist) addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the release of the book, Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author). Pearlstein speaks from a podium. Panelists are assembled at tables on either side of the podium. Panelists include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriuculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former Editor, The Boston Globe). Pearlstein says that he is honored to be at the gathering with an audience of great intelligence and experience. Pearlstein sums up the issues discussed at the gathering. Pearlstein says that class issues were not given consideration during the busing crisis; that Arthur Garrity (federal judge) made the city of Boston face up to race issues; that many suffered during the busing crisis. Pearlstein refers to audience comments about dialogue between the opposing sides and the role of Kevin White (former Mayor of Boston). Pearlstein refers to Lynch's presentation. Pearlstein notes that Lynch's role as an attorney in the case was to deny that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts had any responsibility in the city of Boston's segregated school. Pearlstein notes that the Twymon children are very well behaved. Visual: Shots of the Twymon family in the audience. Pearlstein refers to comments by Joan Diver (member of the Diver family portrayed in Common Ground) and Elvira Pixie Palladino (member of the Boston School Committee). Pearlstein notes that the gathering disagreed on the role of Arthur Garrity (federal judge) and on changes in the city's racial climate. Pearlstein refers to comments by Gerard Doherty (Charlestown resident) and Lukas. Shots of Lukas; of the audience. Pearlstein talks about the viability of a metropolitan busing solution. Pearlstein says that suburbanites do not seem concerned about the state of Boston's schools. The audience applauds. Shots of the podium and the panelists from the back of the room. 1:06:42: V: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) introduces Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools). Wilson approaches the podium. Wilson says that he is pleased to be in Boston. Wilson reads a quote from Isaiah. Wilson says that the past must inform the future; that Boston residents must accept their differences and move forward. Wilson says that he would like to work with diverse groups from the community to benefit Boston's schoolchildren. Wilson quotes Jack Beatty, who writes about class and race issues in his review of Common Ground. Wilson says that class and race issues can be mediated through the public schools; that quality education can provide upward mobility for poor youngsters. Wilson says that the city's public policy must reflect its commitment to quality education for schoolchildren. Wilson says that he wants to focus the city's attention on education. Wilson says that society must take responsibility for its schools and for the education of its children. Wilson notes that students are graduating from US high schools with poor literacy skills. Wilson quotes from the study, "A Nation at Risk," which reports on the state of education in the US. The report warns of "a rising tide of mediocrity" in US schools. Wilson says that society must demand quality education for the students; that the students are the future leaders of the society. Wilson compares hiring practices by the Boston business community to a "donut." Wilson says that corporations hire workers from the communities outside of Boston, instead of from within the city. Wilson says that he wants to improve the education in Boston Public Schools; that parents, institutions of higher education, the business community, and social agencies need to join in that effort. Wilson says that the school system must help students to learn. Wilson asks for the cooperation of the audience in this effort. The audience applauds. 1:17:26: V: Shots of audience members including Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs, Morgan v. Hennigan) and Jim Conway (Charlestown resident). Nolan addresses the audience. He thanks the John F. Kennedy Library and introduces John Cullinane (Chairman, John F. Kennedy Library Foundation). Shots of the panelists. Cullinane thanks Mark Roosevelt (Executive Director, John F. Kennedy Library) for organizing the evening's events. Cullinane compliments Lukas on his book. Cullinane says that he is the son of poor Irish immigrants; that all parents want their children to succeed in life. Cullinane talks about how education is the first priority for many parents. Cullinane says that he wishes the book had talked more about each parent's commitment to education above all else. Shots of Lukas; of the audience. Cullinane talks about how race and class are issues all over the world. Cullinane thanks the audience and invites them for cocktails and refreshments afterwards. The audience applauds. Audience members rise and prepare to exit the auditorium.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Dr. Laval Wilson and members of the Boston School Committee assemble themselves at a press conference in Wilson's office. The media sets up a shot of Wilson and Nucci signing copies of Wilson's contract. Wilson and Nucci shake hands. Wilson shakes hands with each member of the School Committee. Wilson takes questions from reporters. Wilson talks about his enthusiasm for his new post. He says that his biggest challenge will be to familiarize himself with the issues and problems within the school system. A reporter asks Wilson about the politics of the school system. Wilson says that politics are always involved in public education. Wilson says that he and his family are making themselves at home in the city. Wilson answers reporters' questions about Arthur Garrity (federal judge) and his supervisory role over the Boston Public Schools. Wilson says that the city of Boston owes Garrity a debt of gratitude for his wisdom and leadership in the school desegregation case. Wilson talks about his meeting with Garrity in the courtroom. Wilson says that he is committed to integrated schools. Wilson adds that today's hearing in Garrity's courtroom was the last. He says that Garrity will soon turn over stewardship of the schools to Wilson and the School Committee. Meg Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Grady. Grady talks about the importance of Garrity's final hearings. He says that today is a "historic" day. Grady is optimistic about Wilson's selection as superintendent. Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Nucci. Nucci talks about the significance of Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. He says that the School Committee is ready to take on the responsibility of running the schools. Nucci adds that the School Committee is looking forward to working with Wilson as superintendent.
1:00:01: V: Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) walks over to a desk and lays out two copies of his contract. Microphones are set up on the desk. Shot of papers laid out on the desk. Wilson confers with Boston School Committee members John Nucci, Rita Walsh-Tomasini, John Grady, and Joe Casper. The School Committee members stand to the side of the desk. Wilson examines the papers with Nucci and Walsh-Tomasini. Boston School Committee members Abigail Browne and Jean McGuire walk behind the group with Wilson. Close-up shots of Wilson, Nucci and Walsh-Tomasini. Casper stands on the opposite side of the desk from the group with Wilson. The media sets up a shot of Wilson sitting at the desk with the members of the School Committee, including Kevin McCluskey, standing around him. Wilson takes his suitcoat off and settles into the desk. Wilson and Nucci each sign both copies of the contract. Wilson shakes hands with Nucci and each of the School Committee members. 1:03:12: V: Wilson sits down and takes questions from reporters. The School Committee members remain standing around his desk. A reporter asks Wilson if he has any second thoughts about coming to Boston. Wilson says that he is delighted to be in Boston; that he wishes he could have had more time to prepare for the coming school year. Wilson says that he will work with school staff to get to know the school system; that he will do his best to work with the School Committee and the mayor to benefit the schools. A reporter asks Wilson to name the biggest problem he faces. Wilson says that his biggest problem will be to get to know the system. Wilson says that he must understand the issues and the problems before he can address them. A reporter asks Wilson about the politics involved in the Boston Public School System. Wilson says that politics come with the territory of public education. Shot of the members of the media recording the event. A reporter asks Wilson about the insights given to him by the transition team. Wilson says that he has not yet received a briefing from the transition team. Shot of Grady. Wilson says that he is happy to be in Boston; that his three children will be attending Boston Public Schools; that he is in the process of looking for a home in the city. Wilson again shakes hands with Nucci and the members of the School Committee. 1:07:20: V: Wilson is interviewed by the media. Wilson talks about a conversation he had with Arthur Garrity (federal judge). Wilson says that Garrity told him that the problems in the school system may be exaggerated by the media. Wilson notes that the city of Boston owes Garrity a debt of gratitude for his wisdom and leadership in the school desegregation case. Wilson says that Garrity will soon turn over supervision of the school system to Wilson and the School Committee. A reporter asks Wilson about the challenges he will face in improving the schools. Wilson says that the community must commit itself to integrated schools; that all children must have equal access to the schools. A reporter asks Wilson how he felt while meeting with Garrity. Wilson says that the meeting was, in fact, "historic." Wilson adds that he appreciated the opportunity to talk to Garrity in the courtroom. A reporter asks how Garrity responded to Wilson's requests to meet with him privately. Wilson says that Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) told him that Garrity had decided not to meet privately with any of the superintendents of the Boston Public Schools; that Dentler told Wilson not to feel slighted if Garrity does not meet with him. Wilson adds that he had a productive conversation with Dentler. A reporter asks Wilson if today's hearing was the last in the Boston school desegregation case (Morgan v. Hennigan). Wilson says that Garrity indicated that today's hearing was the last. Wilson says that he will do his best to provide equal access to integrated schools; that another hearing can be avoided if the schools remain integrated. 1:10:45: V: Meg Vaillancourt sets up a meeting with Grady. Vaillancourt asks him if today's hearing was the final hearing. Grady says that Garrity indicated that today's hearing was the last one. Grady notes that it is a "historic" day for the Boston Public School System; that the Boston School Committee and the Boston School Department have worked hard to arrive at this day. Vaillancourt asks Grady about the challenges facing Wilson and the School Committee. Grady says that Wilson will need to move ahead in the same direction; that the schools have "turned the corner." Grady says that there is "an air of optimism" throughout the school system; that Wilson will be a capable superintendent. Vaillancourt thanks Grady. 1:11:57: V: Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Nucci. Vaillancourt asks Nucci about the withdrawal of Garrity. She notes that Garrity told the Boston School Committee to pay heed to the parents and teachers. Nucci says that the School Committee recognizes the contributions of parents and teachers over the past ten years. Nucci says that he is optimistic; that Garrity is confident in the School Committee's commitment to integrated schools; that Garrity is optimistic about the selection of Wilson as superintendent. Nucci says that it is time to close "a chapter in Boston's history." Vaillancourt notes that Dr. Robert Spillane (former Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) left because the School Committee switched to district representation. She asks if Wilson will face a challenge in dealing with the School Committee. Nucci says that Garrity has cited the district-elected School Commitee's commitment to desegregated schools. Nucci adds that the new School Committee has led to Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. Another reporter asks Nucci if any potential problems could prevent Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. Nucci says that there are only minor differences to be resolved. The reporter asks about the significance of Garrity's withdrawal. Nucci says that the judge will set the parameters for desegregation in his final court orders; that the Boston School Committee will be responsible for running the schools. Vaillancourt asks Nucci if a larger School Committee could hinder Wilson's ability to get his programs approved. Nucci quotes Spillane as saying that the size of the committee is less important than the quality of the people who serve on the committee. Nucci says that the School Committee will help Wilson in his new role as superintendent.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/21/1985
Description: Mayor Kevin White exchanges banter with journalist, and goes on to deliver statement on increasing Boston property tax (one-time levy at $16.40) to finance the $27.5 million deficit caused by court ordered desegregation, at Judge Arthur Garrity's request. City treasurer Jim Young elaborates on choosing assessment method over borrowing. Mayor White takes questions from reporters. White accuses school committee of mismanagement in busing effort. He also comments that the teachers will have to work knowing they are in a debt situation.
0:00:30: Visual: Members of the press wait for Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) to arrive at press conference at City Hall. Walt Sanders (WBZ) and Gary Griffith (WGBH) are among the reporters. White arrives, begins reading his statement and is interrupted by a knock on the door. He jokes lightheartedly about the interruption. 0:01:53: V: White reads a statement about the school deficit caused by desegregation and school mismanagement. He says that an additional $16.40 will be added to property taxes this year; that Boston's property tax is already the highest in the nation; that Judge Garrity has ordered the city to find new revenue sources to fund the court-ordered desegregation. White says that he is submitting three pieces of legislation to the city council: an appropriation order for $10 million to cover the costs of police overtime; an appropriation order for $17.5 million to keep the schools operating for the remainder of the term; legislation to raise new revenue through the property tax. White says that he is faced with an unpleasant task; that this tax levy is the most efficient way to raise funds; that the tax will be levied only once. White says that he hopes Garrity acts to overhaul the city's school system, personnel, and management; that mismanagement of the school system has caused the deficit. 0:06:50: V: James Young (Treasurer, City of Boston) explains that the taxpayers must pay for the expenditures of the city government; that a tax levy is the most prudent and cost-effective way to raise revenues. Young says that borrowing money to cover the deficit is not a financially sound course of action; that the appropriation orders will allow the city to continue paying for the police and schools; that the tax levy will cover the appropriations; that the tax levy is related to a home rule petition to be brought before the state legislature. 0:08:26: V: White takes questions from reporters. White says that he does not know how quickly the city council will respond; that the tax levy is the most responsible way to cover the deficit. A reporter asks if a lengthy review of the legislation by the city council will allow enough time for the money to be raised. White says that he does not know how long the city council will take to make a decision on the legislation; that he did his best to respond expeditiously to the request by Judge Garrity. A reporter brings up other suggestions of ways to fund the deficit. White says that there are only a few rational and responsible ways to raise the funds; that the tax levy is the easiest, fairest, and cheapest way to cover the deficit. White says that extra police overtime is directly related to the desegregation order and should be covered along with the school deficit; that the taxes will be levied only to cover expenses resulting from the court order; that the deficit does not reflect any of the busing costs from the previous year. 0:12:19: V: A reporter asks about a rumored $8 million surplus in the budget. Young refutes those numbers and says there is no surplus. White says that money needs to be allocated in order to cover the next School Department payroll on June 1; that presently there is no more money to cover School Department payroll; that payroll will be owed to employees if the hours are worked. Young admits that there will be short-term borrowing to cover the deficit until the tax is levied; that he does not know how much will be borrowed; that $5.5 million is needed to cover payroll in 2 weeks. White says that he will not comment on speculation that some city residents will not pay the tax. A reporter accuses White of waiting until the last possible moment to raise the funds. White says that he notified all parties of the shortfall six months ago; that Judge Garrity did not consider the shortfall to be an emergency situation; that he warned the School Committee to make cuts; that neither the court nor the School Committee responded to his warnings. White accuses the School Committee of "total mismanagement" of the desegregation process. White says that some people have profited from school desegregation; that the city absorbed the costs of desegregation without comment last year; that the school deficit must be brought to the attention of the taxpayers. 0:19:03: V: White says that he does not want to close the city schools; that he refuses to borrow money to cover the costs of mismanagement of the school system. White admits that school teachers are going to work with the knowledge that there is no money for payroll; that the management of the schools must be overhauled next year. White says that he is responding to a request from the court to cover the deficit.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1976
Description: Stanley Forman's Herald American photographs of Theodore Landsmark being attacked on City Hall plaza by Joseph Rakes and teenage boys from South Boston. Sen. Bill Owens addresses crowd, withdrawing vote of confidence for Kevin White's ability to ease Boston's racial tension and saying that Boston is not a safe city for people of color. Report of the reactions of Robert DiGrazia (police commissioner), Mayor Kevin White, and James Kelly (head of Home and School Association of South Boston).
1:00:17: Steve Nevas reads the news the set of The Ten O'Clock News. Behind Nevas is a photo of Ted Landsmark, after he was attacked at City Hall Plaza. Nevas reports that Boston police have identified four of the men who attacked Landsmark; that one of the youths from South Boston has been arrested for assault and battery; that police have issued a warrant for Joseph Rakes and two others involved in the attack yesterday. Nevas reports that the Massachusetts House of Representatives has passed a resolution condemning the attack; that Governor Michael Dukakis has issued a similar statement. 1:00:57: Pam Bullard reports that a group of white youths attacked Theodore Landsmark (attorney) as he passed through City Hall Plaza on his way to a meeting at City Hall yesterday. Bullard reports that the youths were at City Hall Plaza to protest busing with a group of 250 South Boston and Charlestown students. Visual: Still photographs of the attack on Landsmark at City Hall Plaza by Stanley Forman of the Boston Herald American. Bullard reports that the students involved in the protest were demanding an end to school desegregation; that several people were harassed by the youths at City Hall Plaza; that Landsmark suffered a broken nose and facial lacerations. Bullard reports that the African American community gathered today at City Hall Plaza; that African American leaders condemned police for failing to respond effectively to the attack; that leaders condemned the city's leadership for encouraging the growing violence. V: Footage of a crowd of African Americans and whites gathered at City Hall Plaza. State Senator William Owens addresses the crowd, saying that people of color are not safe in Boston; that people of color from other parts of the nation should stay away from Boston; that people of color must unite against the climate of racism in the city; that people of color in Boston should ask for federal protection because the city has failed to protect them. Bullard reports that African American leaders have accused Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) of encouraging violence by tolerating disruptions in the schools; that African American leaders have condemned the use of City Hall for anti-busing rallies. V: Footage of Owens saying that he is withdrawing his support of White. Bullard reports that African American leaders appear united in the belief that White and Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) have broke their promises to the African American community. V: Footage of White on September 3, 1975, saying that no breach of public safety will be tolerated by the city. Footage of DiGrazia on February 16, 1976, saying that violent behavior will not be tolerated; that those participating in violent behavior will be arrested and prosecuted. Bullard reports that White and DiGrazia say that they have not broken any promises; that DiGrazia is confident that Landsmark's attackers will be apprehended; that White had no comment on calls for his resignation by the African American community. Bullard reports that James Kelly (South Boston Home and School Association) blamed the violence on the liberal press. Bullard comments that the racial tension in Boston is worse than it has been in several months; that little effort is being made to ease the tension in the city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/06/1976
Description: Boston Police Department press conference with Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, Captain Morris Allen, and Captain Fred Conley. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) is the moderator. The speakers are seated at a table featuring an array of street weapons used against police in a riot in South Boston on the previous day. Press conference includes police department videotapes of a riot in South Boston on the previous day and of an unruly crowd at a Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC) meeting at English High School. DiGrazia announces that violence and disruptions of public order will no longer be tolerated by police.
0:00:16: Visual: Shot of bottles, baseball bats, pipes, bricks and other weapons lying on table. Some have exhibit tags attached to them. Microphones are also set up on the table for a press conference. Shot of a police map of the city of Boston. 0:03:31: V: Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) and others sit down at the table displaying the weapons. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) introduces the police officials on the panel: Captain Morris Allen, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, DiGrazia, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, Captain Fred Conley. Dunleavy announces that a short videotape will be shown. 0:05:02: V: A videotape plays on a television screen. The videotape shows a large crowd on a city street. Police officers in riot gear are stationed on the street. Dunleavy points out the weapons used by the crowd, and that the crowd has thrown tear gas at the police. The videotape shows a cloud of tear gas in the police ranks. Rioting crowd charges police, throwing bricks and other objects. Dunleavy says that the street on the videotape is East 6th Street in South Boston. V: The videotape shows crowd throwing rocks and other objects. The crowd retreats, still throwing objects, as police advance. Dunleavy announces that the next videotape was shot at English High School last Thursday at a meeting of the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC). V: The videotape shows a noisy crowd seated in an auditorium. Members of the CCC are seated on stage. The crowd chants and claps its hands, disrupting the meeting. Arthur Gartland (CCC) threatens to call in the police to establish order. Shot of members of press watching videotape on the television. 0:14:03: V: Shot of DiGrazia. Dunleavy shows photos of the aftermath of violence yesterday in South Boston, including photo of a police cruiser with rear window missing. He says that the weapons on the table were used against police in South Boston yesterday. DiGrazia says that a demonstration in South Boston turned violent yesterday; that citizens of Boston have a legitimate right to stage demonstrations against busing; that the actions of some are denying the rights of others; that the governor's wife was denied her right to speak at Faneuil Hall; that a US Senator has been harassed and threatened; that a presidential candidate was denied the right to speak out last week; that parents are prevented from holding meetings. DiGrazia says that there is a conspiracy against public order in Boston; that the police will no longer be tolerant of those disrupting the rights of others. DiGrazia says that the police will protect the rights of anti-busers and pro-busers alike; that arrests will be made and violators of the law will be prosecuted. 0:18:44: V: Reporters ask questions to DiGrazia and other police officers. DiGrazia says that a small number of people in the city are using the busing issue as an excuse to pursue vandalism and mayhem. DiGrazia says that the police department took a low visibility approach to busing in 1974; that they acted more forcefully in 1975; that they have been attempting to let people demonstrate against the law; that they will be more forceful from now on. A reporter asks if there is evidence of a conspiracy against the police. DiGrazia replies that the weapons on the table are evidence of a conspiracy; that police were letting the demonstration proceed until they were attacked by the crowd.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/16/1976
Description: Participants in the Procession Against Violence are assembled on City Hall Plaza. WGBH camera crew records the gathering from a rooftop above City Hall Plaza. Thomas O'Neill, Jr. (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Edward Kennedy (US Senator), Joseph Kennedy, Edward Brooke (US Senator) Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Kitty Dukakis, Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), Kathryn White and Ann Landers (advice columnist) are visible in the front of the crowd. Robert Golledge (Vicar, Old North Church) introduces the speakers. Humberto Cardinal Medeiros (Archdiocese of Boston) and Michael Haynes (Twelfth Street Baptist Church) lead the crowd in prayer. John Colburn (Episcopal Archdiocese), Roland Gittelsohn (Temple Israel), Michael Germinal Rivas (Chaplain, Boston University), and John Zanetos (Greek Orthodox Cathedral) are heard addressing the crowd. Paula Lyons (aide to Mayor Kevin White) leads the crowd in singing "God Bless America." Crowd breaks up and departs among marching band accompaniment. Tape 2 of 3
0:58:14: Visual: A crowd is assembled at City Hall Plaza for the Procession Against Violence. John Colburn (Episcopal Archdiocese) leads a prayer. Shot of the crowd. Thomas O'Neill (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Edward Kennedy (US Senator), Edward Brooke (US Senator), Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) and Kitty Dukakis are visible. Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), Kathryn White, and Ann Landers (advice columnist) are visible. Reverend Robert Golledge (Vicar, Old North Church) introduces Rabbi Roland Gittelsohn (Temple Israel). Gittelsohn addresses the crowd and condemns violence. Shots of crowds at City Hall Plaza. Marchers continue to stream into the plaza. 1:00:54: V: Michael Haynes (Twelfth Street Baptist Church) leads the crowd in prayer for peace. Overhead shot of massive crowd filling the plaza; of O'Neill, Joseph Kennedy, Edward Kennedy, Brooke, Michael Dukakis and Kitty Dukakis. 1:03:06: V: Golledge leads the crowd in the "Our Father." Shots of crowd; of Kennedy and Brooke. Golledge introduces Humberto Cardinal Medeiros (Archdiocese of Boston), who leads the crowd in prayer. The crowd applauds for Medeiros. Golledge introduces Reverend Michael Germinal Rivas (chaplain, Boston University). Rivas leads a prayer. Shots of the crowd. 1:06:32: V: Reverend John Zanetos (Greek Orthodox Cathedral) addresses the crowd. Shots of crowd; of Kevin White and Kathryn White. Golledge introduces Paula Lyons (aide to Mayor Kevin White). Lyons leads the crowd in singing"God Bless America". Shots of O'Neill, Joseph Kennedy, Edward Kennedy, and Brooke; of crowd in the plaza. Crowd slowly breaks up. Edward Kennedy and Joseph Kennedy make their way out with the crowd. Michael Dukakis and Edward Kennedy shake hands with White. Edward Brooke makes his way out of the plaza. The crowd breaks up and leaves the plaza. The marching band plays.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/23/1976
Description: Martin Nolan (Boston Globe) opens a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Nolan talks about the novel. Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) addresses the meeting. Flynn says that the novel is the first piece of journalism to report accurately on the busing crisis. Flynn says that he is pleased that the novel touches on class issues as related to school desegregation in Boston. Flynn talks about the poor institutional leadership that led to the deterioration of the Boston Public School System. He adds that parents were never consulted during the school desegregation process. Mark Roosevelt (Executive Director, John F. Kennedy Library) addresses the audience and compliments Lukas on his book. Lukas addresses the meeting. Lukas mentions the name of each family member portrayed in the novel. He asks them all to stand. He expresses his sadness at the absence of the McGoff family (family portrayed in Common Ground) from the meeting. Lukas notes each family's connection to John F. Kennedy (former US President). Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 1 of 8
0:59:58: Visual: A man addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the book Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author). The man speaks from a podium. Panelists are assembled at tables on either side of the podium. Panelists include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe). The man introduces Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe). Nolan reads from a glowing review of Common Ground, written by Robert B. Parker (author) for the Chicago Tribune. Nolan praises the book. He talks about the book's attention to the people it portrays. Nolan says that the book is not about the "movers and the shakers," but it is about "the moved and the shaken." Nolan jokes that everyone in the audience is a minor character in the book. Nolan introduces Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston). Nolan says that Flynn is always searching for common ground among the residents of Boston. The audience applauds. 1:03:39: V: Flynn says that he is honored to address the audience. Flynn says that Lukas' book is the first piece of journalism to report accurately on the "real Boston." Flynn notes the complexity issues portrayed in the book. Flynn says that the vast majority of Bostonians occupied a "middle ground" during the busing crisis. Flynn says that Lukas listened to the residents of Boston who lived through the busing crisis; that Lukas found the common ground among these people. Flynn says that there are more issues that unite people than there are issues which divide people. Flynn says that people are looking for the same opportunities in education and training. Flynn adds that people in Boston are still struggling under the weight of social and economic injustice. Flynn talks about the need to give "poor people" an opportunity to receive a good education. Flynn says that he is pleased that Lukas's book tackles the issues of class. Flynn says that the deterioration of the school system in Boston was a result of poor institutional leadership. Flynn adds that no one individual or organization was responsible for the lack of leadership; that it reflects poorly on everyone in the city. Flynn says that the institutional responses to problems in education were unsatisfactory to parents and schoolchildren. Flynn adds that the schools needed to be desegregated and reformed. Flynn says that parents of schoolchildren were never consulted during the desegregation process. Flynn says that the busing crisis divided people along class lines; that education became a secondary concern. Flynn adds that "a wall of legal paper clouded the city of Boston." Flynn says that parents were powerless to effect change in the desegregation process. Flynn talks about his respect for the people in the audience and on the panel at the town meeting. Flynn cautions the audience and panelists at the town meeting not to spend the day rehashing the history of the busing crisis. Flynn says that the city of Boston must move forward and continue to find its "common ground." The audience applauds. 1:11:28: V: Nolan runs through the program for the town meeting. Nolan notes that two panelists are missing; that there are audience members in a second theater; that those audience members will be included in the discussion period. Nolan adds that each panelists will speak about Lukas' book. Nolan paraphrases Flynn in urging the panelists to focus on how the city of Boston can reach "common ground." Nolan introduces Mark Roosevelt (Executive Director, John F. Kennedy Library). Roosevelt introduces J. Anthony Lukas. Roosevelt thanks the audience and the panelists. Roosevelt thanks Lukas for his contribution to the city of Boston. Roosevelt says that Lukas's book has helped Boston residents to understand their differences and to see their city more clearly. The audience applauds. 1:14:51: V: Lukas thanks Roosevelt for making the town meeting possible. Lukas talks about his roots in New York City. Lukas says that his "heart is in Massachusetts." Lukas says that many audience members helped him with the book. He thanks those people. Lukas makes special mention of the families portrayed in the book. Lukas says that he sees the families as "collaborators" on the book, not as "subjects." Lukas talks about the candor, generosity and courage of the families who allowed themselves to be portrayed in the book. Lukas mentions each family member by name, and then invites them to stand as one. Lukas expresses his sadness that no member of the McGoff family is present. Lukas mentions the names of Rachel Twymon, Rachel Twymon (daughter), Michael Twymon, Cassandra Twymon, Wayne Twymon, Valerie Twymon, Reverend George Walker, Hasan Sharif, Joan Diver, Colin Diver, Brad Diver, Ned Diver, George McKechnie, Ethleen Diver, Norman McKechnie, Judy McKechnie. The audience applauds for the family members when they stand up. 1:18:44: V: Lukas notes that it is fitting that the town meeting be held at the JFK Library. Lukas adds that all three families were "charter members" of the Kennedy Coalition twenty-five years ago. Lukas says that Alice McGoff can remember seeing John F. Kennedy (former US President) march in the Bunker Hill Day Parade in 1946. Lukas talks about McGoff's enduring allegiance to Kennedy. Lukas says that Rachel Twymon used to listen to Martin Luther King (African American civil rights leader) when he preached at the Twelfth Baptist Church in Roxbury. Lukas talks about Twymon's respect for the connection between King and Kennedy. Lukas notes that Joan Diver attended Kennedy's inauguration in 1960.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Judy Stoia interviews James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) about resistance to busing and his decision not to attend the Procession Against Violence. Kelly says that he has appealed to African American parents to put pressure on the NAACP to stop busing. Kelly says that many African American parents agree that "forced busing is the problem." Following interview is silent footage of helicopter and security detail among rooftops of City Hall Plaza. A WGBH camera crew overlooks City Hall Plaza and records the Procession Against Violence. Thomas O'Neill, Jr. (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Kitty Dukakis, Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Kathryn White, Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), Charles Barry (State Secretary of Public Safety), Dr. Charles Glenn (Massachusetts State Department of Education), Ann Landers (advice columnist), Joseph Kennedy, Edward Kennedy (US Senator), and Edward Brooke (US Senator) are among those at the front of the procession. Footage includes overhead shots of the crowd and audio of hecklers jeering at White and Kennedy. Reverend Robert Golledge and John Colburn address the crowd. Tape 1 of 3.
1:00:15: Visual: Judy Stoia sets up an interview with James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) near City Hall Plaza. Stoia asks Kelly about a message he delivered to African American parents. Kelly says that he urged African American parents to use their influence with the NAACP to stop forced busing; that both white and African Americans know that "forced busing is the problem"; that African American parents have encouraged the South Boston Information Center to continue the fight against busing. Kelly says that he made the plea to African American parents in order to help restore sanity to the city. Kelly says that he will not participate in today's Procession Against Violence because it will do nothing to remedy forced busing; that the mayor, state officials and "the liberals" need to take a stand against forced busing. Stoia probes Kelly's motives in boycotting the march. Kelly says that his statement to African American parents will be more effective than a march around the city by "the liberal establishment." Kelly says that white parents want a good education for their children in neighborhood schools; that the "liberal establishment" and the media need to realize that "good education for all kids" is more important than "quality integrated education." Kelly says that he hopes white parents and African American parents can work together to solve some of the problems in the city. Stoia thanks Kelly. The crew takes some cutaway shots of Stoia asking questions. 1:05:09: V: A small crowd begins to gather for the procession against violence at City Hall Plaza. A few people look down on the plaza from rooftops. Helicopters circle above City Hall Plaza. A crowd mills about on the plaza. A small crowd is gathered around some seating. A marching band plays. 1:07:44: V: Groups of people walk toward City Hall Plaza. Police officers are visible. One officer directs traffic. The music of a marching band is audible, then it stops. Marchers begin to fill the street, moving toward the plaza. Four men in uniform lead the march, carrying an American flag and a Massachusetts state flag. A crowd of people stream into the plaza. A woman yells, "Kevin, stop forced busing." A man yells, "Hey, you hypocrite." Thomas O'Neill (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Kitty Dukakis, Kathryn White, Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), Charles Barry (State Secretary of Public Safety), Dr. Charles Glenn (Massachusetts State Department of Education) and Ann Landers (advice columnist) are among those visible at the front of the marchers. Some of the crowd jeers. A man yells, "Kennedy, you faker." The officials at the front of the march greet Elma Lewis and others informally as they proceed to the front of the plaza. A woman yells, "Stop forced busing. A large crowd continues to stream into the plaza. Shots of the assembled crowd. The WGBH crew tries to locate and identify public figures. A helicopter circles overhead. 1:15:25: V: A marching band begins to play. The stream of marchers continues into the plaza. Shots of assembled crowd. A woman yells, "Stop forced busing. A voice is heard addressing the crowd, calling for "a peaceful community in Boston." Shot of the crowd. O'Neill, Joseph Kennedy, Edward Kennedy (US Senator) and Edward Brooke (US Senator) are visible. Audio is difficult to hear. Reverend Robert Golledge (Vicar, Old North Church) addresses the crowd from the podium. Golledge introduces the band from the St. William's School in Dorchester. Assembled in front of the podium, the band strikes up the national anthem. Shots of the media photographing the event; of the crowd filling the plaza; of officials at the front of the crowd. John Colburn (Episcopal Archdiocese) leads the crowd in prayer.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/23/1976
Description: Steve Nevas interviews George Wallace about his campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination. Nevas asks Wallace if he expects to do well with anti-busing voters in Massachusetts. Wallace comments on his chances in the Massachusetts primary, his relationship with the Democratic Party establishment and his role at the Democratic convention. He describes his feelings towards other Democratic perspective candidates Hubert Humphrey and Edward Kennedy. Wallace says that he has never campaigned much in Massachusetts; that he is happy to have the opportunity to present his ideas to the Massachusetts voters. Wallace denounces the "expansion" of the federal government, and calls busing a social experiment. Wallace gives his opinions on the political positions of Ralph Nader (consumer advocate) and Ronald Reagan (Governor of California). He talks about his previous campaigns for the presidential nomination.
15:33:22: Visual: Steve Nevas sets up an interview with George Wallace (Governor, State of Alabama) on his campaign for the presidency of the United States. Wallace is seated in a wheelchair. Nevas asks Wallace to comment on predictions that he will win the Massachusetts primary; that voters who are against busing will vote for him. Wallace says that he would be surprised if he won the Massachusetts primary. He says that too much time and money has been spent on busing in Boston; that busing is a "social experiment"; that the government needs to focus on unemployment and inflation. Wallace says that he did not campaign in Massachusetts in 1972; that he has not had a lot of contact with Massachusetts voters. Nevas again brings up the predictions that Wallace will win the state. Wallace says that his ideas have been distorted through propoganda; that many voters in Massachusetts have misunderstood his ideas. Wallace says that winning the Massachusetts primary would be a great victory for him. Nevas asks Wallace about the candidacy of Ronald Reagan (Governor, State of California). Wallace says that he is not familiar with the details of Reagan's plan to cut $90 billion from the federal budget; that he agrees with Reagan on increased state control over government spending; that the people of Massachusetts should have more control over how school money is spent. Nevas asks Wallace about Ralph Nader (consumer advocate) and his proposal that large corporations be chartered by the federal government. Wallace says that he does not support any idea giving the federal government more authority; that he believes in the enforcement of anti-trust laws. Wallace adds that the federal government already has too much authority; that the people of Massachusetts had no recourse when federal judges ordered forced busing; that state governments should have more authority in most matters. 15:38:25: V: Nevas remarks that a poll showed Wallace in second place after Sargent Shriver (presidential candidate) in Massachusetts. Wallace says again that he does not expect to do well in Massachusetts. Wallace adds that government attention has been focused on busing; that busing is a "social experiment"; that the voters of Massachusetts are concerned about other issues. Wallace says that he is campaigning in Massachusetts because it has an early primary election; that voters in the northeast have been unfamiliar with his ideas until now. Nevas asks Wallace if he would support Hubert Humphrey (US Senator) or Edward Kennedy (US Senator) as the Democratic nominee for president. Wallace says that Kennedy has never declared his candidacy; that Humphrey is not campaigning. Wallace notes that the national Democratic Party does not support his candidacy for president; that the Democratic Party is organizing a strategy to defeat his candidacy; that the Democratic Party is out of touch with working people. Wallace adds that there is a conspiracy against him in the Democratic Party. Nevas asks about the possibility of Wallace running for president as a third party candidate. Wallace says that many Democratic nominees are adopting his positions against busing and big government; that his positions are compatible with the platform of the national Democratic Party. Wallace says that he will work to ensure that his positions are represented at the Democratic convention in New York City over the summer. Wallace notes that many leaders are paying attention to his positions; that his ideas represent those of the working people of the nation. Wallace says that he is not at all interested in the vice-presidency. He adds that the other candidates have already stated that they will not offer him the vice-presidential nomination. 15:45:25: V: Nevas asks him if he would disclose his full medical report if the other candidates did so. Wallace responds that a medical writer for the New York Times has examined his medical report and given him a clean bill of health; that his confinement to a wheelchair does not affect his ability to be president. Nevas asks Wallace to comment on the movement for an uncommitted slate of delegates within the Democratic Party. Wallace says that some of the uncommitted delegates could pledge their votes to him. Nevas asks Wallace if he is in favor of streamlining the presidential campaign process. Wallace says that the state primaries could be consolidated into regional primaries. Nevas states that Wallace has run for president more than once. Wallace responds that he ran for president once in 1968; that he ran in three primaries in 1964 in order to make a statement against the left-wing politics of the other Democratic candidates; that he was shot in 1972 and did not finish the campaign. Nevas asks Wallace why he is seeking the presidency. Wallace says that he wants the working people of the nation to be represented in the government. Wallace notes that he has been warning people about the expanding reach of the federal government; that the people of Massachusetts experienced this kind of intrusive governmental intervention during the busing crisis. Nevas says that many people see him as a segregationist. Wallace says that he is not against people of color; that African Americans in Alabama have voted for him overwhelmingly; that he is against big government, not people. Wallace says that he grew up during a time when the segregation of races was accepted as the best solution; that segregation was sanctioned by the courts back then. Wallace adds that segregation is illegal now and it is no longer an issue. Nevas closes the interview. The camera crew takes cutaway shots of Nevas questioning Wallace. Wallace asks Nevas if he would be surprised if Wallace did well in the Massachusetts primary election. Nevas says that he would not be surprised if Wallace did well. Wallace says that he has not conducted any polls of Massachusetts voters. Wallace says that he expects to do well in Michigan and Pennsylvania; that it is hard to predict how voters will react to him. Wallace notes that people in Massachusetts made fun of his ideas years ago; that now Massachusetts voters take him seriously.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/27/1976
Description: Christy George reports that City Councilor James Kelly objects to an interfaith, interracial prayer service to be held in South Boston because he fears that the meeting could be seen as an endorsement of the city's plan to integrate South Boston housing projects. Kelly has called for the meeting to be moved to another location. Interview with Father Thomas McDonnell of St. Augustine's Church in South Boston and Reverend John Borders of the Morningstar Baptist Church. McDonnell and Borders say that South Boston is not a racist neighborhood. Interview with Jim Kelly. George quotes Kelly as saying that he opposes forced busing, racial quotas, and forced housing. Community leaders have met with Mayor Ray Flynn to discuss the peaceful integration of public housing projects, and hold a press conference. Doris Bunte of the Boston Housing Authority, Charles Stith of the Union United Methodist Church, John O'Bryant of the Boston School Committee, and Don Muhammad of the Nation of Islam, Roxbury speak at the press conference. George reports that Bernard Cardinal Law (Archdiocese of Boston) endorses the meeting. George notes that Flynn is pushing for housing integration over the objections of South Boston residents. Footage of Flynn at a community meeting in South Boston and footage of anti-busing activity in South Boston in 1977.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of Father Thomas McDonnell (St. Augustine's Church in South Boston) and Reverend John M. Borders, III (Morningstar Baptist Church in Mattapan) sitting together for an interview in South Boston. McDonnell says that both men believe in the power of prayer. Christy George reports that religious leaders want to hold an interfaith, interracial prayer meeting at St. Monica's Church in South Boston; that James Kelly (Boston City Council) has taken out a half-page advertisement in the South Boston Tribune; that the ad calls on the Catholic Church to move the prayer meeting to another location. George reports that Kelly fears that the prayer meeting could be seen as an endorsement of the city's plan to desegregate public housing projects in South Boston. V: Shot of the exterior of St. Monica's Church; of Kelly's advertisement in the South Boston Tribune; of a statue in front of the church. Footage of McDonnell saying that racism is a moral issue. Borders says that prayer is a means to change the people's hearts. Footage of police arresting two women on G Street in South Boston on May 12, 1977. Shots of police cruisers escorting school buses along a city street; of a housing project in South Boston. Shots of a sign for the Old Colony Housing Project; of a white woman and children in front of a housing project building. George notes that South Boston became a battleground during school desegregation. George reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has announced that the public housing projects in South Boston will be integrated; that Flynn alienated many South Boston voters by pushing for public housing integration. V: Shot of Flynn approaching the stage at a community meeting in South Boston on January 12, 1988. The crowd jeers and boos as Flynn walks on to the stage. Shot of audience members seated at long tables. Footage of Kelly at the community meeting. Kelly says that South Boston residents will serve time for civil rights violations if the public housing projects are integrated. The crowd applauds Kelly. George reports that community leaders met with Flynn today to talk about peaceful desegregation of the projects; that attendees at the meeting expressed thinly disguised scorn for Kelly. V: Shot of Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) speaking at a press conference. Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) and two other African American community leaders stand behind her. Footage of John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) at a press conference. A reporter asks him if Kelly's name was mentioned in the meeting with Flynn. O'Bryant replies, "Who's he?" George reports that Kelly believes that affirmative action is reverse racism. George quotes Kelly as saying that "assigning the needy to public housing based on race is morally and legally wrong." V: Shot of Kelly at his desk. A quote from Kelly is written out in text on-screen. Footage of Kelly saying that supporters of equal opportunity must oppose forced busing, racial quotas, and forced housing. Footage of Stith saying that there are some elected officials who insist on keeping the city divided; that religious leaders are making an effort to unite the city. Footage of Minister Don Muhammad (Nation of Islam, Roxbury) saying that not all Irish residents are racist; that African Americans in Roxbury are not all drug addicts. George reports that Bernard Cardinal Law (Archdiocese of Boston) endorsed the prayer meeting. George quotes Law as saying that publicity "could lead to the erroneous impression that racial discrimination is a problem of geography, which it is not. . . . Racial discrimination is a problem of the human heart." V: Shot of Law addressing an audience. A quote from Law is written out in text on-screen. George reports that one of the goals of the prayer meeting is to debunk the myth of South Boston as a racist neighborhood. V: Shot of a white family walking in front of St. Monica's Church. Footage of Borders saying that Kelly does not represent the views of all South Bostonians. Borders says that he had no problems in South Boston when he drove to today's interview at the church. George reports that religious leaders say that the prayer meeting is not about politics; that the controversy surrounding the meeting has become political despite the efforts of religious leaders.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/20/1988
Description: W. Arthur Garrity (federal judge) speaks at a meeting of the Citywide Educational Coalition (CWEC). Jane Margulis (CWEC) introduces Garrity. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), Sidney Smith (Headmaster, English High School), and Ellen Guiney (CWEC) sit on stage. Garrity talks about his efforts to wrap up the school desegregation case. He says that there are a few lingering matters to be handled before he withdraws. Garrity thanks the CWEC for providing factual and reliable information about school desegregation. Garrity talks about a "sea of misinformation" surrounding school desegregation. He refutes rumors that he was involved in hiring teachers and buying supplies. Garrity compliments John Coakley (Boston School Department) on his career in the Boston School Department; he mentions Coakley's integrity and dedication to his job. Garrity sums up the challenges facing the Boston Public Schools; he says that school integration is an ongoing process. Reel 1
0:59:59: Visual: Arthur Garrity (federal judge) speaks at English High School at the annual meeting of the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC). Garrity is at the end of his involvement in the Boston school desegregation case. Jane Margulis (CWEC) introduces Garrity. Garrity sits on stage, with a group of officials including Laval Wilson (Superintendent of Boston Public Schools), Sidney Smith (Headmaster, English High School), and Ellen Guiney (CWEC). Margulis tells a few anecdotes as she introduces Garrity. Garrity shakes her hand and kisses her on the cheek as he approaches the podium. 1:02:17: V: Garrity thanks Margulis. Garrity tells a story about how he and Margulis spoke at a seminar about school desegregation in Virginia. Garrity says that members of the audience were so impressed with Margulis that she received a job offer on the spot from a school system in Texas. Garrity says that he has not come to talk about the final court orders that he handed down on September 3. Garrity reads from the canon of judicial conduct, which instructs a judge not to comment publicly on court proceedings. Garrity reminds the audience that the court case is not entirely over; that the Boston Teacher's Union has filed an appeal of the court orders issued on September 3. Garrity says that he has extended the time period in which other appeals may be filed. Garrity adds that there is another court hearing on Friday to discuss support services for the Boston Latin School. Garrity talks about a motion filed by the city of Boston to modify one of the court orders dealing with emergency school repairs. 1:07:57: V: Garrity says that he has come to thank the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC). Garrity commends the CWEC for gathering and disseminating factual information since the beginning of desegregation. Garrity says that there was "a sea of misinformation" during that time period. Garrity cites an article from The New York Times written on September 6. The article says that Garrity was involved in hiring teachers and buying supplies. Garrity says that it is "laughable" to think that he was involved in those areas of the school system. Garrity notes that he was only involved in the hiring of one person; that he helped to hire Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School). Garrity says that he wanted to acknowledge the debt owed to the CWEC by the court. Garrity adds that he wanted to meet Laval Wilson; that Wilson has a good reputation as a school administrator. Garrity says that he wanted to be present to honor John Coakley (Boston School Department). Garrity says that the Boston school desegregation case "is nothing else if not a hundred stories." Garrity talks about referring to one of the school desegregation plans filed in court as "the Coakley plan," because it was written by Coakley. He adds that a friend counseled him to stop calling it the "Coakley plan" so as not to ruin Coakley's future in the Boston School Department. Garrity says that he had recently written a a memo connected to one of the court orders, in which he commended Coakley's conscientious job performance. Garrity talks about Coakley's integrity and dedication to his job. Garrity says that there never would have been a student assignment system without Coakley. 1:12:56: V: Garrity says that school desegregation is an ongoing process. Garrity talks about the many tasks facing the Boston Public School System. Garrity talks about differences between the city of Boston and the state over the budget for facilities and school repair. Garrity talks about the need to determine which schools will get money to improve facilities. Garrity talks about the question of the Latin Schools. Garrity notes that the Boston Globe recently printed a letter from Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) on the subject of the Latin Schools. Garrity denies charges printed in the newspapers that he vetoed a plan to improve the Latin Schools. Garrity adds that no plan has been filed to improve the Latin Schools. Garrity says that critics have misread the court orders; that planning must be undertaken for the Latin Schools. Garrity talks about the challenges involved in plans to improve vocational and occupational education. Garrity notes that the Boston School Committee faces some deadlines in its plans to improve vocational education. Garrity stresses that there is much work remaining to be done in the schools; that "the challenges of the future are greater than the challenges of the past." Garrity commends Rita Walsh-Tomasini (Boston School Committee) for advocating the formation of a committee to work with parents' organizations in the schools.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/23/1985
Description: Police officers and members of the media are gathered on G Street in front of South Boston High School. Graffiti written in large white letters on the pavement of G Street reads, "Go home, Jerome. You failed." (Graffiti refers to South Boston High School headmaster Jerome Wynegar.) Police are stationed along G Street. A small crowd on the steps of a house jeers at police. News crews with ENG cameras and microphones approach. The crowd refuses to disperse. Police officers in riot helmets assemble in front of the house. Four women and two men are put into police vans. Two of the women struggle with the police, and one man is dragged into the van. The crowd retreats into the house on G Street. James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) talks to a woman about the conflict between the crowd and police. Joseph Jordan (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) confers with police officials outside of South Boston High School.
0:00:24: Visual: Exterior of South Boston High School. Shots of the front of the building; of the school name carved into the stone at the top of the building. Police officers and media are gathered on the sidewalk in front of the school. A fading green shamrock is painted on the pavement of the school yard. Police officers confer about logistics. Boston Police Department vehicles are parked in the school yard. A Boston Police Department truck pulls in front of the of the high school. 0:02:23: V: Police officers are stationed along G Street. Close-up shot of the Boston Police Department insignia on a police officer's uniform. A crowd of white residents is gathered on the on the steps of a house on G Street, not far from the school. White teenagers are gathered outside of the Hill Stop Delicatessen on G Street, near the school. A police officer directs traffic along G Street. A group of police officers are gathered on G Street, near the crowd on the steps of the house. A police officer exits a car parked in the school yard of the high school. A Boston Police Department truck passes by the high school with its lights flashing. The truck pulls to the side of G Street, near the house where the crowd has gathered. Members of the media follow the truck down the street. A police officer gestures to the truck to pull up closer. A woman sits on the hood of a car, surrounded by police officers. 0:05:15: V: The crowd gathered on the steps of the house yells and makes gestures at the police officers. The woman sitting on the car speaks angrily to the police officers. She refuses to move from the car and says that she is not creating a scene. Police officers try to disperse the crowd of media gathered on the street. The crowd on the steps of the house is heard jeering at police. Graffiti written in large white letters on the pavement in the middle of G Street reads, "Go home Jerome. You failed." (Graffiti refers to South Boston High School Headmaster, Jerome Wynegar.) A crowd of onlookers gathers outside of the delicatessen, across the street from the crowd. Police and the media remain in the street. The crowd on the steps of the house begins to sing. 0:06:48: V: A second Boston Police Department truck exits the school yard of South Boston High School and pulls up behind the first truck on G Street. A group of helmeted police officers walks down G Street from the school. The police officers spread out across the street as they walk toward the house where the crowd has gathered. The police instruct onlookers to move down the street, away from the scene. Police officers and officials watch as the helmeted officers disperse the crowd of onlookers. Police officers stand in front of the small crowd assembled on the steps of the house. The police put the woman who had been sitting on the hood of the car into the police truck. The crowd cheers for the woman. One man yells, "Where is the civil rights commission?" A woman runs from the crowd to stop police from putting a second woman into the police truck. Police force both women into the truck, and hold the doors closed. The women inside the truck beat on the doors from the inside. The crowd jeers at police. A young man yells, "Three girls!" 0:10:11: V: A police officer walks down G Street from the high school. Other police officers remain in front of the crowd on the steps of the house. The crowd and the police exchange remarks. The crowd refuses to go indoors. A man is led by police into the second police truck. Police drag a second man from the crowd into the police truck. A police officer pushes the crowd from the steps into the house as another woman is led to the truck by police officers. The woman says, "This is a violation of civil rights." 0:12:11: V: Most of the crowd on the steps has disappeared into the house on G Street. Members of the crowd look out of the window at the action on the street. James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) stands on the steps of the house, listening to a woman describe the conflict between the crowd and the police. The police truck drives slowly down G Street. Police line the sides of the street. A group of police officers confers in the middle of G Street. The media observes the police and the dwindling crowd from the sidewalks. There are still a few people gathered on the steps of the house on G Street. Shot of a quiet side street. Residents sit outside of their houses, enjoying the sun. 0:14:19: V: Joseph Jordan (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) confers with officers outside of South Boston High School. Shot of the exterior of South Boston High School. A few youth are gathered on the steps.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/12/1977
Description: Boston Police Department press conference with Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, Captain Morris Allen, and Captain Fred Conley. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) is the moderator. The speakers are seated at a table featuring an array of street weapons used against police in a riot in South Boston on the previous day. DiGrazia says that violence and disruptions of public order will no longer be tolerated. He says that the police department is actively investigating participants in the violence at the previous day's demonstration in South Boston. DiGrazia says that the police are gathering evidence against the South Boston Marshals and others for engaging in violent actions. DiGrazia notes that the demonstrators in South Boston knowingly violated the restrictions of their parade permit. Some drop out in the middle of the video. Reel 2 of 2.
1:00:03: Visual: Press conference with Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston), Captain Morris Allen, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, and Captain Fred Conley. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) is the moderator. DiGrazia and the police officers sit at a table displaying bottles, rocks, pipes and bricks which were used against police in a demonstration in South Boston the day before. DiGrazia takes questions from reporters. A reporter comments that one anti-busing organization has decided to take to the streets. DiGrazia replied that statements like that will be considered conspiratorial and could be used against the organization in court. DiGrazia says that the police will use whatever force is necessary to keep order. DiGrazia says that the police department has been working with the state police and the MDC police since 1974; that the Boston police will continue to rely on those police forces for support. DiGrazia says that he is compiling facts and evidence to be presented before a grand jury; that the police will arrest those who participate in violence or who violate the civil rights of others. DiGrazia says that a parade permit was granted to demonstrators in South Boston yesterday; that the demonstrators knowingly violated the permit when they marched up to the high school to confront police. 1:02:52: V: A reporter asks DiGrazia if the police department has the support of the mayor. DiGrazia says that the mayor supports police efforts to enforce the law and protect the community. DiGrazia says that he is concerned with the lack of prosecutions of those violating the court order; that he was pleased when the US Justice Department began investigating cases in 1975; that he is particularly dismayed at the lack of prosecutions in the South Boston District Court. DiGrazia says that he does not know where the demonstrators in South Boston procured tear gas. DiGrazia says that the police is now taking a more forceful approach against disruptors of public order. A reporter asks if past policies of tolerance were a mistake. DiGrazia says that they began with a low visibility policy in September of 1974; that the policy worked in all areas of the city except South Boston; that in 1975, they changed tactics and were more forceful; that the police have been tolerant of demonstrations up until now; that they will no longer tolerate violence during demonstrations. DiGrazia says that expenses are not an issue when city residents are injured and property is damaged; that the money will be made available to the police to deal with these problems. 1:06:02: V: A reporter asks DiGrazia about how the police handled demonstrators at the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC) meeting. Shot of weapons on table. DiGrazia says that police tried to take their cues from Arthur Gartland (CCC), who ran the meeting; that from now on, police will act when they think it is necessary. DiGrazia says that he has not been in contact with Judge Garrity about the change in police deparment tactics. Dunleavy adds that a list will be made available of the 80 police officers injured in yesterday's demonstration in South Boston; that 13 arrests were made at the demonstration. DiGrazia says that the police department's new policy on demonstrations will not affect the way police handle their duties in and around the schools. DiGrazia says that he will not station more police in South Boston permanently; that he will send more officers there if it is necessary. A reporter comments that demonstrators were using radios to monitor police activity. A reporter asks if police department will change radio frequencies to avoid being monitored. DiGrazia says that police department may explore other means of communications in order to avoid radios altogether. 1:09:24: V: DiGrazia invites the reporters to question the other officers who were all present at the demonstration in South Boston on the previous day. A reporter asks if it is a small group of people who are actively participating in violence. DiGrazia replies that he has seen demonstrations with as few as 150 people; that 1,000 people were present at yesterday's demonstration; that there is a group of 300-400 "hoods" who are leading the violence; that the police department is gathering evidence on the participation of the South Boston Marshals in violent acts. DiGrazia says that the police department is actively investigating actions connected to yesterday's demonstration; that he will not put a time limit on the investigation. DiGrazia thanks the media and leaves. 1:10:41: V: DiGrazia exits. Members of the media talk among themselves. Jordan talks to members of the press informally. 1:12:07: V: Judy Stoia stands next to map of South Boston. Allen refers to the map as he charts out the course of the previous day's demonstration. Allen says that one group of marchers began at the Broadway MBTA station and proceeded up West Broadway to Perkins square; that the other group of marchers began at the Andrews MBTA station and marched up Dorchester Avenue to Perkins Square;that the marchers were supposed to proceed to the Dorchester Heights Monument. Allen says that the marchers chose to march up East Broadway to G Street, heading toward the front of the high school; that there were over 2,000 marchers gathered in Perkins Square. Stoia and crew prepare to leave.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/16/1976
Description: Participants in the Procession Against Violence are assembled at City Hall Plaza. A WGBH camera crew records the event from the back of the crowd. Edward Brooke (US Senator), Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), and Kathryn White are visible at the front of a large crowd gathered on City Hall Plaza. Robert Golledge (Vicar, Old North Church) introduces the speakers and is heard leading the crowd in the Lord's Prayer. Michael Haynes (Twelfth Street Baptist Church) and Humberto Cardinal Medeiros (Archdiocese of Boston) lead the crowd in prayers. Michael Germinal Rivas (Chaplain, Boston University) and John Zanetos (Greek Orthodox Cathedral) are heard addressing the crowd. Paula Lyons (aide to Mayor Kevin White) leads the crowd in singing "God Bless America." The crowd breaks up and departs. Judy Stoia and Pam Bullard ask white, Asian American and African American attendees why they attended the Procession Against Violence. Interviewees speak out against violence and talk about the importance of the march. Tape 3 of 3.
0:58:46: Visual: Paricipants in the Procession Against Violence are gathered at City Hall Plaza. A WGBH crew is on the ground with the crowd. Audio of the police leading a man away from the crowd. The media and the members of the St. William's School band mix with the crowd. Shots of crowd members. 0:59:49: V: Michael Haynes (Twelfth Street Baptist Church) addresses the crowd from the podium. Shots of Haynes at podium; of assembled speakers behind him. Haynes leads the crowd in a prayer for peace. Shot of Edward Brooke (US Senator) from behind. The Reverend Robert Golledge (Vicar, Old North Church) leads the crowd in the Lord's Prayer. Shots of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) and Kathryn White reciting the Lord's Prayer; of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) from behind; of Brooke. Golledge introduces Humberto Cardinal Medieros (Archdiocese of Boston), who leads the crowd in prayer. Shots of Medeiros at podium; of speakers assembled behind Medeiros; of marching band in front of podium; of crowd. Sirens wail during Medeiros' prayer. A fire truck is visible, passing by the plaza. Golledge announces Reverend Germinal Rivas (Chaplain, Boston University). Rivas leads the crowd in prayer. Shots of crowd; of police strolling through crowd; of media documenting the procession; of Kevin White and Kathryn White listening to Rivas. 1:08:21: V: John Zanetos (Greek Orthodox Cathedral) addresses the crowd. Traveling shot through assembled crowd. Shots of crowd at far edge of plaza, listening to the prayer. Golledge announces that Paula Lyons (aide to Mayor Kevin White) will lead the crowd in singing "God Bless America." Shots of crowd singing "God Bless America." The crowd applauds. The crowd breaks up and begins to leave the plaza. Shots of people leaving the plaza. Stoia is heard interviewing a man about why he marched. The man says he is concerned about the violence and he thinks it is important to support non-violent action. 1:13:41: V: The crowd breaks up. Pam Bullard interviews members of the crowd. An Asian American woman says that she is a student at the University of Massachusetts; that she is concerned about violence and felt it was important to support the march. A white male student says he is glad that a lot of people came out for the march; that he thinks it is important for the people of Boston to show that they do not support violence. A female student says that she came because she opposes violence; that the march was important. An older white male from Cambridge says that he came out to support peace. Bullard asks a young boy why he came to the march. He says that he came because his mother said so. A young African American man says that the march is "a black and white thing." A young white man says that he feels badly about the violence; that he hopes to help find a solution. Another young white man says that the march promotes unity; that he is glad that there was a good turnout. An African American woman says that she hopes the march helps to stop the violence; that she wants her nieces to be able to go to school safely; that she does not think the march will help the situation. Bullard interviews an African American family about the march. The mother says that she does not support violence. The father says that a lot of people attended the march; that it should help the situation; that he marched in order to express his objection to violence. One of their sons says that he marched because his parents did. 1:18:25: V: Bullard asks an older white man why he participated in the march. The man says that the city must be saved; that it is important for residents to show solidarity with one another; that the march will not solve the problem, but it can help. An older woman says that the violence in the city is getting worse; that the march was important because it brought citizens, city officials, and the clergy together; that the judicial system must be improved; that the courts must punish perpetrators of violence.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/23/1976
Description: Reel 2 of 1983 Boston Mayoral Debate, held at Simmons College. Candidates are Larry DiCara, Ray Flynn, Robert Kiley, Dennis Kearney, David Finnegan and Mel King. The moderator is professor Carroll Miles. Journalists on the panel are Andy Hiller, Michael Rezendes, William Robinson, J. Jordan. Robert Kiley finishes his opening remarks. Mel King, Fred Langone and Eloise Linger maker their opening remarks. Robert Kiley talks about restoring the faith of residents in city government and making the city government work efficiently. He talks about the need to eliminate corruption, the need to establish sound fiscal management and the need to reduce crime. Kiley says that the Boston Public School System must be reformed. Mel King discusses his professional experience and long history of work within the community. King talks about the importance of crime prevention and the need to work with community youth. King states his intention to change the climate of fear in the city. King mentions his proposals for addressing unemployment in the city, including the "Boston jobs for Boston people" program. Fred Langone talks about his years of service to the city and his experience in dealing with the city's finances. Langone condemns the fiscal mismanagement of the present administration. Linger addresses US government foreign policy, school desegregation and racism, women's rights and the anti-abortion referendum. Linger talks about the housing shortage and other social problems. She advocates less spending on defense and more spending on housing and other social issues.
0:59:20: Robert Kiley (candidate for mayor) speaks at a mayoral debate at Simmons College. Kiley talks about restoring the faith of residents in city government; about making city government work efficiently. Kiley says that corrupt practices must be eliminated from city government; that sound fiscal management must be established. Kiley notes that crime must be reduced; that the school system needs reform; that the Boston Public School System has the highest dropout rate and absentee rate of any urban school system in the nation. Kiley says that he has the background, skills and experience to govern the city; that he has proven experience in government; that he has tackled difficult problems in the city like school desegregation and reform of the MBTA. Kiley says that the next mayor must adopt a system of government based on merit and professionalism. Kiley proposes that all candidates make a voluntary pledge not to accept contributions from city or county employees. Kiley notes that he has made a financial disclosure statement. He proposes that all candidates do the same. Kiley adds that the city needs a mayor with a sense of integrity, decency and a commitment to justice. The audience applauds. 1:03:55: Carroll Miles (professor, Simmons College) introduces Mel King (candidate for mayor). King says that he has been working in the Boston community for thirty years; that he is currently teaching at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); that he served as a state representative for ten years. King says that crime prevention is important; that he would put people on the streets to work with community youth; that he wants to change the climate of fear in the city. King says that he campaigned for mayor in 1979; that he advocated a "Boston jobs for Boston people program during that campaign; that the program guaranteed 50% of Boston jobs for Boston residents. King notes the high unemployment rates in East Boston, Charlestown, South Boston, Roxbury. King says that 85% of the jobs in Boston are now held by non-residents; that the Occupational Resource Center should serve as a training center for unskilled Boston workers; that this program would make a difference in the lives of city residents. The audience applauds. 1:08:55: Miles introduces Frederick Langone (candidate for mayor). Langone says that the present administration has had deficits exceeding $25 million per year; that the deficits persisted despite relief from the state government; that the state government has assumed welfare costs, half of the MBTA budget and the full costs of running the Suffolk County Court. Langone reminds voters that he was able to expose the fiscal mismanagement and extravagances of the present administration. Langone talks about his knowledge and experience in dealing with the city finances. Langone decries the sale of the Soren Water Commission. Langone talked about his involvement in resolving disputes about the Tregor Bill. Langone says that he was the first to speak out against the present proposal to defer tax breaks for real estate owners. Langone says that he has served the city for twenty years; that he has the courage to defend his positions. Langone notes that there is a movement to depress the Central Artery. He reminds voters that he made a suggestion to depress the Central Artery thirty years ago. Langone closes by saying that he has a strong record of service to the city. The audience applauds. Visual: Shot of Langone and Eloise Linger (mayoral candidate, Socialist Workers Party). 1:14:10: Miles introduces Linger. Linger says that she is familiar with the problems of working people; that she is a working mother employed as a stitcher in the garment industry; that she recently went off unemployment. Linger addresses US government foreign policy. She accuses the federal government of dragging the nation into a "new Vietnam" in Central America. She says that the "war machine" of the federal government puts a drain on resources; that these resources could be used to remedy social problems. Linger says that racism exists in Boston at the highest levels; that she is opposed to attempts to roll back gains made in school desegregation. Linger proposes to extend busing for school integration and to hire more teachers for the schools. Linger says that the present city administration has encouraged racist violence through its failure to publicly condemn the killers of William Atkinson. Linger says that there is growing opposition to women's rights at the highest levels; that she is opposed to the pending anti-abortion referendum; that opposition to women's rights at the highest levels encourages rapists and other violent attacks on women. Linger says that a government of working people could solve the problem of unemployment; that "the rich rule and rob Boston." Linger advocates less spending on defense and more spending on housing and other social issues. Linger advocates putting people to work to build affordable housing, public transportation, public health care clinics and new schools. Linger says that the elimination of the Pentagon budget could pay for needed programs. Linger says that banks, corporations and insurance companies in Boston enjoy huge tax breaks at the expense of working people; that the working people of the city have a right to know where the money is. Linger closes by urging everyone to attend the demonstration against US policy in Central American on May 14, and to attend her campaign rally on May 7 in Kenmore Square. Linger holds up a flyer for the campaign rally. The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/25/1983
Description: Profile of Robert Spillane, superintendent of Boston Public Schools as he prepares to leave Boston for a post in Virginia. Vaillancourt reports on Spillane's accomplishments in improving the Boston Public School System and cutting the school budget deficit. Interview with Spillane where he compliments the teaching staff in the Boston Public Schools and talks about his opinion of Arthur Garrity. He says that Garrity's stewardship of the school system was a disaster. Interview with Peter McCormick, the President of the Bank of New England, about Spillane's good relationship with the business community. Vaillancourt speculates about whether Spillane will one day pursue a career in politics.
1:00:21: Visual: Footage of Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) speaking to an audience. Spillane says that the quality of every school must be improved in order for school desegregation to be considered a success. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Spillane took over as Superintendent of the Boston Public Schools four years ago; that Boston was undergoing school desegregation. V: Shot of a young African American boy watching an anti-busing march. White protesters chant, "Here we go, Southie." Shot of a police officer pushing an angry white man against a car. Vaillancourt reports that the quality of education was very low. Vaillancourt notes that school officials admitted that more than one-third of the graduates from Boston Public Schools could not read. V: Shots of students descending an elevator at English High School. Shot of an African American male student reading at a his desk; of two white male students sitting together in a classroom; of students in a classroom. Shots of a group of students sitting together in a study hall; of a teacher in the study hall. Vaillancourt reports that there were six superintendents during the first seven years of school desegregation in Boston. Vaillancourt reports that Spillane was committed to changing the schools in Boston. V: Shot of Spillane seating himself as he prepares to speak to an audience. The audience applauds. Vaillancourt reports that Spillane instituted the first changes to the school curriculum in fifteen years; that promotion standards were established; that students' test scores began to improve. V: Shot of two elementary school students seated in front of computers. A teacher looks over the shoulder of one of the students. Vaillancourt reports that Spillane shares credit for success with his staff. V: Footage of Spillane being interviewed. Spillane says that there is an excellent teaching staff in the Boston Public Schools. Spillane says that the rising levels of student achievement reflect the dedication of the teaching staff. Spillane says that he provided help and direction. Spillane says that he challenged the teachers by publishing the test scores of each school. Shots of Spillane in his office. Vaillancourt reports that Spillane is known as the "velvet hammer." V: Shot of a hammer with a velvet grip on display in Spillane's office. Vaillancourt reports that Spillane is credited with pushing Arthur Garrity (federal judge) aside; that Spillane allowed the Boston School Department to take charge of the schools once again. Vaillancourt notes that Garrity is slowly handing over his control of the Boston Public Schools. V: Shot of Garrity at a community meeting in January of 1976. Vaillancourt reports that Spillane has few kind words for Garrity. V: Footage of Spillane being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Spillane says that Garrity was a "disaster"; that Garrity was not a good manager of the schools. Spillane says that Garrity did what was necessary to desegregate the schools; that Garrity tried to manage the schools as well. Spillane says that a federal judge has no qualifications to manage a school system. Vaillancourt reports that Spillane considers his ability to manage the school system as his strength. Vaillancourt reports that the school budget had tripled in the decade before Spillane's arrival. Vaillancourt reports that Spillane cut the school deficit from $30 million to $3 million within one year. Vaillancourt notes that Spillane got Boston businesses involved in the schools; that Boston businesses have given over $5 million in additional funds to the schools. Vaillancourt adds that the Boston Public Schools have the largest private endowment in the nation. V: Footage of a woman introducing Spillane to an audience. Spillane rises from his seat, shakes the woman's hand and prepares to address the audience. The audience applauds. Shots of audience members. Footage of Spillane receiving an award in front of an audience. Footage of Peter McCormick (President, Bank of New England) being interviewed. McCormick says that Spillane is highly respected by the business community. McCormick says that Spillane understands the problems of the business community; that Spillane has been willing to be flexible. McCormick says that the business community responded in kind to Spillane. Vaillancourt reports that Spillane is leaving Boston for Virginia; that Spillane will make an additional $30,000 per year in his new job. Vaillancourt reports that Spillane made $70,000 per year in Boston; that his salary is considered low. V: Footage of Spillane talking with a small group of people. Spillane shakes hands with an Asian American woman. Footage of Spillane being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Spillane says that superintendents are like athletes in that they have a short span of time in which to perform well and make money. Spillane says that there is a good market for superintendents. Vaillancourt reports that some are speculating that Spillane is looking for a political appointment in Washington DC. in the future. Vaillancourt notes that Spillane is a former Deputy Commissioner of Education in New York. V: Shot of Spillane socializing with a group of people at a gathering. Footage of Spillane being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Spillane says that public service is a great opportunity; that he loves public service. Spillane says that he may enter politics in the future; that he might like to be a city councillor or school committee member someday.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/28/1985
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that South Boston residents are opposed to the city's plans to integrate public housing projects. Residents are hostile to Mayor Ray Flynn when he attends a community meeting in South Boston to discuss plans for integration, with Doris Bunte of the Boston Housing Authority. Vaillancourt notes that South Boston residents have not changed their attitudes in the face of evidence that the BHA practices discrimination against African American tenants of public housing. Interviews with South Boston public housing residents about public housing integration. Many residents are opposed to integration. Some fear that the quality of life in the projects will decline after the housing projects are integrated. Others say that racial violence will be a result of integration. A few residents are not bothered by the prospect of integration. Vaillancourt notes that the controversy over public housing integration evokes memories of the busing crisis in the 1970s. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Officials attempt to explain the new rules for the Boston Housing Authority's revised public housing tenant selection policy.
1:00:02: Visual: Footage of a white female South Boston resident looking out of the window of a housing project apartment. The woman says that she would like her neighborhood to remain white. Meg Vaillancourt reports that South Boston residents remain hostile to the idea of integration of public housing projects. V: Shots of white residents outside of a housing project in South Boston. Footage of a white female resident saying that South Boston should stay white; that there will be trouble if the housing projects are integrated. Footage of another white female South Boston resident saying that white residents have not received fair warning about the placement of African American families in white housing projects. Shots of white children playing with a hose outside of a housing project in South Boston. Vaillancourt reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) announced plans to integrate South Boston housing projects in October; that Flynn tried to explain the policy at a community meeting in South Boston in January. V: Footage of Flynn and Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) the community meeting in January of 1988. Flynn addresses the crowd. A white woman shouts out a comment. Footage of Flynn approaching the stage as the crowd jeers at him. Vaillancourt notes that the audience at the community meeting was hostile to Flynn. Vaillancourt stands in front of a housing project building in South Boston. Vaillancourt reports that there is mounting evidence of discrimination against African American families requesting apartments in public housing projects. Vaillancourt notes that the mounting evidence has not changed the attitudes of white South Boston residents. V: Footage of Vaillancourt interviewing a white male South Boston resident. The man says that there will be trouble if African Americans move into the South Boston housing projects. Footage of another white male South Boston resident saying that the residents want their neighborhood to remain as it is. Footage of a white female South Boston resident saying that she will not be bothered if an African American family moves into her building. She says that African American families need housing as much as white families do. The woman says that some people do not feel the same way as she does; that she hopes no one will bother the African American families who move into the project. Shots of white residents outside of a project building; of a white baby playing in a wading pool outside of a project building. Vaillancourt reports that the city's housing policy has kept the housing projects segregated for fifty years; that the city is now changing its policy. Vaillancourt reports that some residents feel that the new policy will be biased. V: Footage of a white female South Boston resident sitting in a wading pool. The woman says that the city should not make tenants identify their race; that the city should place tenants in an apartment without knowing their race. Shots of the woman and two children in the wading pool. Vaillancourt notes that talk of integration in South Boston raises memories of the busing crisis in the 1970s. V: Footage of a white male South Boston resident saying that school desegregation caused the decline of the Boston School System; that most South Boston residents send their children to private schools. The man says that he will move out of public housing if African American families move in to the projects. Shots of female parochial school students walking toward a housing project building. Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) has not announced when the first African American family will move into the projects.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/16/1988
Description: Theodore Landsmark (attorney) speaks to the media at a press conference. His face is in bandages. Landsmark gives an account of the attack he sustained on City Hall Plaza, perpetrated by white teenagers attending an anti-busing rally. He commends the actions of Clarence Jones (Deputy Mayor, City of Boston), who came to his aid after the attack. Landsmark talks about the media's coverage of his attack. Landsmark says that he will seek full prosecution of his attackers, and adds that he will bring suit against members of the Boston School Committee and the Boston City Council. He condemns white city leaders who "incite and encourage" racist violence. Landsmark calls for an end to racism and race discrimination in the city. He accuses the white power structure of ignoring the problems of minority citizens.
1:00:04: Visual: A group of African American men greet each other at the entrance of the room where Theodore Landsmark (attorney) will hold a press conference. Landsmark enters the room. His nose and face are bandaged with white tape. An African American woman hands him a note as he enters. Landsmark sits down behind a table with microphones. An African American man sits beside him. A group of African American men and women, and a few white people, stand behind him as he speaks. Reporters sit at the other side of the table and stand around the room. The reporters take notes as Landsmark speaks. 1:02:00: V: Landsmark notes that there has been conflict among the media over coverage of the press conference; that he wants both union and non-union members of the media to cover the press conference; that the media needs to work out the union issues outside of the press conference. Landsmark greets the media and reads a statement. He says that the press conference will be brief because he needs to get some rest; that he lost a lot of blood in the attack. Landsmark says that he is concerned that the publicity generated by the attack may distort some of the crucial issues which need to be discussed. Landsmark runs through the sequence of events on the day of the attack. Landsmark says that he was on his way to an affirmative action committee meeting with the Boston Redevelopment Authority; that he was beaten and kicked by a crowd of young people coming from an anti-busing rally at City Hall. Landsmark refutes rumors that Clarence Jones (Deputy Mayor, City of Boston) had been with him and ran away from the scene. Landsmark says that he regrets the circulation of the false reports regarding Jones; that Jones was the only person who left City Hall to aid him after the attack. Landsmark says that he will seek full prosecution of the youth involved in the attack; that he will take action in civil and criminal court against members of the Boston City Council and the Boston School Committee; that he would like to see an end to the use of City Hall as "a sanctuary for racism and a resource center for those who would incite and encourage racist violence." Landsmark says that some city officials perpetuate discrimination against people of color in Boston on a daily basis. Landsmark expresses gratitude to members of the African American and white communities for the many acts of kindness and courage shown to him after the attack. Landsmark adds that meaningful gestures by the white community before the attack could have prevented the violence. Landsmark says that he is grateful for the support of the Black Caucus, the Board of Directors of the Contractors Association of Boston, and the Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association. Landsmark thanks the newspaper and TV cameramen for capturing the attack on film. He says that he wishes that somebody had come to his aid, but is grateful for the record of the attack provided by the journalists. Landsmark says that without the photos, the attack would have been recorded "as just another scuffle on the street." Landsmark says that racism is to blame for the attack; that racism in the city of Boston has been fueled by selfish politicians; that politicians continue to ignore the social and economic problems of the city. Landsmark says that he will work to solve these problems in the African American community; that solving these problems will benefit all citizens. Landsmark says that the attack lays bare the problems of the city; that the problems go beyond issues of safety in the street or busing. Landsmark notes that the attack has been called "an isolated incident" by J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant US Attorney General). Landsmark says that he does not agree; that people of color must be allowed to participate on an equal basis in all areas and levels of business and city government. Landsmark says that the issue of racism must not be subordinated; that the white power structure is indifferent to people of color in the city; that businesses and government must work together to improve the economic situation of people of color in Boston. 1:15:29: V: Reporters ask Landsmark questions after his statement. A reporter asks him to specify city officials against whom he will bring suit. Landsmark says that he will not name the officials because he does not want to jeopardize any of the lawsuits. A reporter asks him if he will bring suit against Louise Day Hicks (Boston City Council). Landsmark says that he will not comment except that his attackers were violating truancy laws; that his attackers were marching on City Hall Plaza without a parade permit. Landsmark notes that Hicks invited the protestors into her office to escape from the cold; that police officers were on duty near City Hall Plaza, but did not arrive on the scene until after the attack. Landsmark says that he cannot comment on how the police department should have deployed its personnel to control the unlicensed protest on City Hall Plaza by the students. A reporter asks Landsmark if he agrees with the Black Caucus' decision to call for the resignation of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston). Landsmark says that the Black Caucus is looking for better leadership from White on issues of affirmative action, busing, and unemployment. Landsmark says that he has received calls from around the country; that many are appalled by the incident on City Hall Plaza; that the city can take action to prevent more violent incidents.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/07/1976
Description: Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) holds a press conference to discuss his victory the previous day in the mayoral election. White discusses his potential role as a national spokesman on urban issues. White says that he has no plans to assume a national role. White predicts great success in his next term; rejects Boston's reputation as a racist city; guarantees the safety of all citizens in the city; discusses the city's affirmative action program as it relates to his administration; and says his administration will not tolerate racial violence. White notes the community's responsibility to speak out against racial violence; discusses the recent shooting of Darryl Williams (African American Jamaica Plain student). White talks about former city employee James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) and the need to be sensitive in making appointments to city jobs. White discusses the city's poor racial climate, and assesses the extent to which he is responsible for it, and his belief that other cities are more racist than Boston. White talks about his support base in the mayoral election and about his opponent, Joseph Timilty. He discusses the US Senate race and notes that he has not been asked to endorse Edward Kennedy (US Senator) or any other candidates. White expresses confidence in the vitality of the city and talks about his priorities for the next term, including tax reform and the development of the North Station area. White is very relaxed and has a good rapport with the media.
0:00:11: Visual: Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) walks into a small room where a press conference will be held. He greets the members of the media informally, saying "Hi everybody." He jokes with the media about having forgotten his tie. White sits down on a couch. Microphones are set up on the coffee table in front of him. White says that he is pleased about his victory. A reporter asks White if he and Henry Maier (Mayor of Milwaukee) will join Dick Hatcher (Mayor of Gary, Indiana) as national spokesmen for urban issues. White says that he will speak out on urban issues as he always has; that he has no plans to assume a national role. White adds that there are mayors in other cities who will become influential and make themselves heard. He mentions Bill Green (Mayor of Philadelphia) and Don Frasier (Mayor of Minneapolis). Another reporter asks White if he will be eclipsed by these new urban mayors. White makes a joke, "the old gray mare, he is what he used to be." White says that he will speak out on national issues which affect Boston. A reporter asks what the next four years will bring to Boston. White says that the next term will be the greatest of his terms as mayor. He mentions that Bob Ryan (Director, Boston Redevelopment Authority) is optimistic about new building projects. A reporter comments on Boston's reputation as the most racist city in the nation. White says that Boston's reputation as a racist city is not correct. He notes that he cannot rid the city of racism and hypocrisy. White guarantees that people of all colors and nationalities will be able to walk the streets safely by the end of his term. A reporter asks White if he will hire more African Americans to key positions in the city administration. White says that there is a good affirmative action program in place; that the African American community supported him in the election. White says that racial violence will not be tolerated in the city. He says that the residents of Charlestown helped to apprehend the youth involved in the shooting of Darryl Williams (Jamaica Plain student); that the residents of Charlestown did not want to be seen as harboring racist criminals. White says that his administration will not tolerate racial violence. 0:06:24: V: White notes that the Charlestown Business Association held a press conference within hours of the Williams shooting; that they condemned racial violence in the press conference; that people in the community need to speak out against racist violence. White says that he will enlist his supporters in the neighborhoods to speak out. A reporter asks White if he will be more sensitive about whom he puts on the city payroll after the "Jimmy Kelly affair." White says that he is always sensitive about whom he puts on the city payroll; that the media will always disagree with his hiring decisions. White notes that James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) resigned from his city job; that he was not fired. The reporter asks if it is a good idea to have Kelly representing the city by holding a city job. White says that he was not willing to fire Kelly in order to court African American voters during the campaign. White says that he wanted to be elected on his record, not for his ability to play upon the emotions of voters. White adds that Kelly was qualified to do the job for which he was hired; that hiring Kelly was not a mistake. White says that he does not want to fire city workers because of their beliefs, even if their beliefs are unpalatable. 0:09:32: V: A reporter asks White if he feels responsible for the poor racial climate in the city. White says that he cannot change it all by himself; that he has never ducked a crisis. White adds that the city will not come together until more people become active; that the voters need to elect good people to the Boston School Committee and the Boston City Council. A reporter asks White how Boston got its reputation as a racist city. White says that racism is a national problem; that problems in Boston get more media coverage than problems in other cities. White mentions that there are severe racial problems in Detroit and other cities; that many affluent communities are very racist. White says that Boston has lived through busing and has learned from it; that there are racial problems in Boston; that he does not think of Boston as the most racist city in the US. A reporter asks White about low voter turnout in the election. Jump cut on videotape. 0:13:14: V: White says that he expanded his political base in this election; that he did not lose support in areas where he has always been popular. He expresses confidence in the vitality of the city. White says that he has not been approached for an endorsement of Edward Kennedy (US Senator) or any other candidates for US Senate. White jokes with reporters about not needing to talk to the media now that he has been reelected. A reporter asks White about his priorities for the next term. White talks about tax reform and the development of the area around North Station. A reporter asks White why he did not attend Kennedy's announcement at Faneuil Hall this morning. Jump cut on videotape. 0:15:16: V: White talks further about the race for the US Senate. A reporter asks White to analyze the campaign strategy of Joseph Timilty (former mayoral candidate). White says that he does not like to pick apart the strategy of an opponent. White says that both he and Timilty knew that Timilty had a good chance to win the election. A photographer focuses on White and takes his photo. A reporter asks if he will lay off workers from the city payroll. White deflects the question with a joke. He has a good rapport with the reporters. White closes the press conference. He commends the reporters on their professionalism, saying that they treated both him and Timilty fairly. White and the reporters prepare to leave the room. White speaks informally to Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) and others.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1979
Description: Deborah Wang reports that a delegation of forty residents from Yonkers, New York, visited Boston to learn about the city's approach to public housing. The delegation toured Boston's model housing projects, which contain a mix of low-, middle- and upper-income units. Wang reports that the city of Yonkers is divided over the issue of mixed-income public housing and affordable housing. She reviews the public housing situation in Yonkers. Wang's report includes footage of the city of Yonkers and footage of the Yonkers delegation discussing housing at a meeting with Amy Anthony (Secretary of Communities and Development for the City of Boston). Charles Cola (Yonkers City Council), Anthony DiPopallo and JoAnne Gardner (Yonkers resident) talk about public housing in Yonkers and in Boston. Boston Mayor Ray Flynn addressed the delegation about Boston's efforts to provide affordable housing for city residents. Members of the delegation, including Peter Chema and Mel Ellen, talk about their impressions of the visit.
1:00:08: Visual: Footage of Yonkers residents exiting a bus in a Boston neighborhood. Deborah Wang reports that a delegation of forty residents from Yonkers, NY, arrived in Boston to see how Boston has solved its public housing dilemma. V: Footage of Yonkers from "We the People." Shots of a school bus traveling on a street in Yonkers; of a residential street in Yonkers; of housing projects in Yonkers. Wang reports that the city of Yonkers has agreed to build 800 units of affordable housing in the city's predominantly white East End; that the city's affordable housing had all been built in the less affluent West End. Wang reports that the city of Yonkers is divided over the issue of affordable housing. V: Footage of Charles Cola (Yonkers City Council) saying that he wanted to see how public housing works in Boston; that he hopes to accomplish the same thing in Yonkers. Footage of Anthony DiPopallo (Yonkers resident) talking about the integration of public housing in Yonkers. Footage of JoAnne Gardner (Yonkers resident) saying that the city of Yonkers needs to need to build affordable housing according to the wishes of neighborhood residents. Gardner says that she does not want to be bused across town to live. Amy Anthony (Secretary of Communities and Development) responds to Gardner. Anthony says that the Yonkers residents need to look at what was done in Boston and then apply it to their own neighborhoods. Wang reports that delegation from Yonkers toured the city of Boston's model housing projects; that the housing projects contain a mix of low-income, middle-income and upper-income units. Wang reports that the city of Boston has been ordered to build 800 units of mixed-income housing; that the city of Boston has been building mixed-income housing for years. V: Shots of construction site; of the exterior of a housing development in Mission Hill. Wang reports that the city helped to build 165 units of mixed-income housing in Mission Hill; that half of the units will go to low- and moderate-income residents. V: Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) addressing the delegation from Yonkers. Flynn talks about one of the housing developments. Flynn talks about the efforts of the city and the community to turn a vacant lot into a housing development. Shots of the delegation from Yonkers as they tour a housing development. Wang reports that the politicians in the Yonkers delegation were impressed. V: Shot of Flynn speaking to members of the delegation. Footage of Peter Chema (Yonkers City Council) saying that it is helpful to see successful mixed-income housing developments. Chema says that the visit to Boston has allayed some of the fears of opponents of mixed-income units in Yonkers. Footage of Mel Ellen (Yonkers resident), DiPopallo and other members of the delegation standing near their bus. Ellen says that a Boston housing development would be a "slum" in East Yonkers. Footage of Ellen talking to a reporter. Ellen says that the government is using Yonkers to experiment with new forms of public housing; that the residents of Yonkers have no recourse if the "experiment" does not work. Footage of Anthony saying that the Boston tour has given the Yonkers delegation an idea of what is possible. Shot of a drawing of a drawing of an urban cityscape.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/23/1988
Description: Christopher Lydon introduces a report on "the five Bostons," which includes analysis of voter turnout and voting habits in the various neighborhoods of Boston. The neighborhoods include Italian Boston, black Boston, liberal Boston, Irish East and Irish West. The report analyzes voter support for mayoral candidates in each neighborhood and includes interviews with voters in each neighborhood. Lydon notes that Italian Boston includes East Boston and the North End. Lydon talks about the remote location of East Boston. His report includes interviews with Anna De Fronzo (East Boston community activist) and George DiLorenzo (former State Representative). Lydon reports that Kevin White (Mayor of Boston) has a lot of support in East Boston; that Dennis Kearney (candidate for mayor of Boston) is a favorite in the neighborhood. Lydon explains that liberal Boston is a mix of wealthy residents, students, blue-collar families and young professionals; that voter turnout is often low. Lydon interviews John Winthrop Sears (former candidate for governor of Massachusetts), Thomas Vallely (State Representative) and Veronica Smith (Allston community activist). Lydon notes that the support of voters in liberal Boston is split among a several candidates. Lydon reports on a renewal of political activity in black Boston, and notes that there is a high percentage of newly registered voters in the African American neighborhoods. The report includes interviews with Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) and Kay Gibbs (South End political activist). Stith and Gibbs talk about the candidacy of Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) as well as opposition to King's candidacy, led by Mel Miller (publisher, The Bay State Banner). Lydon reports that Irish East has the highest voter turnout in the city. He interviews Thomas Driscoll (South Boston political consultant) and Paul White (State Representative) for the report. Lydon notes that the support of voters in Irish East is split between Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston) and David Finnegan (candidate for mayor of Boston). Lydon reports that Irish West is a residential neighborhood with many middle-class residents. The report includes interviews with Richard Sinnott (Hyde Park Tribune), Joseph Timilty (State Senator), and Maura Hennigan (Boston City Council). Lydon notes that the support of Irish West voters is split between Flynn and Finnegan; that King may receive the votes of Latino residents. Lydon reports that White is a West Roxbury native, but never had the full support of neighborhood residents.
1:00:09: The logos of The Ten O'Clock News underwriters New England Telephone and Shawmut Brokerage Services are displayed. Opening credits for The Ten O'Clock News. Christopher Lydon introduces a report on "The Five Bostons." 1:00:58: Anna De Fronzo (East Boston community activist) compares East Boston's remote location to that of Siberia. Visual: Shot of a map of Boston with East Boston highlighted in yellow. Lydon reports that the Italian population of Boston lives in the North End and East Boston. V: Shots of three older men sitting near a wall; of a yard with a Virgin Mary statue in East Boston; of the Boston skyline viewed from a street in East Boston. Lydon reports that "Italian" Boston has 8% of the city's registered voters; that "Italian" Boston has good voting habits and could account for 10% of the votes in the mayoral race. Lydon reports that there is no political issue to rally the residents of East Boston this year; that controversy over school desegregation and airport expansion have died down. V: Shots of older women in East Boston; of Logan airport as viewed from East Boston; of streets in East Boston. Lydon reports that Italian American candidates have always found favor in East Boston; that Dennis Kearney (candidate for mayor of Boston) is a resident of Eagle Hill and has a lot of support in East Boston. V: Shot of Kearney campaign sign. Footage of East Boston residents voicing their support for Kearney. Lydon reports that there are residents of ethnicities other than Italian; that many East Boston residents will vote for one of their own. Lydon reports that Eloise Linger (Socialist candidate for mayor of Boston) has more supporters in East Boston than Lawrence DiCara (candidate for mayor of Boston); that Linger lives in East Boston while DiCara lives in Dorchester. V: Footage of De Fronzo saying that Italian Americans are apt to vote for candidates of other nationalities. Lydon stands on an East Boston street with the Boston skyline visible. He reports that Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) gained support in East Boston when he supported action by the anti-airport movement; that East Boston received attention from the White administration in return for their support of White. V: Traveling shot of an East Boston street. Footage of George DiLorenzo (Former State Representative from East Boston) talking about the great number of jobs given to East Boston residents by White. DiLorenzo says that White appointed three city commissioners from East Boston; that other mayors did not give key positions to East Bostonians. DiLorenzo says that the White political organization in East Boston was the strongest political organization that he has ever seen; that John "Dee Dee" Coviello (East Boston political organizer) is responsible for uniting the community behind White. Footage of De Fronzo saying that she does not think any of the candidates will garner the kind of support that White had in East Boston; that some of the candidates will ignore East Boston if elected mayor. 1:05:57: V: Footage of Lydon interviewing John Winthrop Sears (former Republican candidate for governor of Massachusetts). Sears says that his part of Boston is progressive and not afraid of change. Shot of a map of Boston with "liberal" Boston highlighted in blue. Shots of a street in the Back Bay; of Kenmore Square; of an upscale apartment building. Lydon says that "liberal" Boston stretches from Chinatown through Beacon Hill and the Back Bay to Kenmore Square and Cleveland Circle. Lydon reports that "liberal" Boston is multi-ethnic; with many single residents including students and the elderly. Lydon stands on a leafy street lined with brownstones. He reports that "liberal" Boston is made up of white precincts which do not vote according to racial lines; that "liberal" Boston never supported Louise Day Hicks (former Boston City Councilwoman). Lydon reports that "liberal" Boston usually has a large population with a poor voter turnout. V: Footage of Lydon interviewing residents about their voting habits. Most residents do not vote or have not yet registered to vote. Footage of Sears talking about residents of "liberal" Boston who vote in other states. Sears says that the inheritance laws in Massachusetts have driven wealthy voters to declare a primary residence elsewhere. Footage of Thomas Vallely (State Representative from the Back Bay) saying that the Back Bay community is made up of wealthy residents; that his constituents voted for Proposition 2 1/2; that the Back Bay has a vibrant gay community; that his constituents seem more concerned with national politics than local politics. Shot of a resident at DeLuca's Market in Beacon Hill. Lydon stands on the corner of Commonwealth and Harvard Avenues in Allston. Lydon reports that there are blue-collar families, students and the elderly in Allston; that young professionals are moving into the area. Lydon reports that Thomas Gallagher (State Representative) came to Allston as an out-of-state student; that he beat a local politician for the office of state representative. V: Footage of Veronica Smith (Allston community activist) saying that Gallagher is popular with the students and young professionals. Smith says that she cannot predict which mayoral candidate is the most popular in Allston. Footage of Sears saying that DiCara is popular among many voters now that Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston) has dropped out of the race. Footage of Vallely analyzing his constituents response to the candidacies of Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston), Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston), and David Finnegan (candidate for mayor of Boston). Lydon reports that "liberal" Boston will lose a mayor when White leaves office. V: Footage of White walking his dog in the Boston Public Gardens. Footage of Vallely saying that White was a "friend" to the community. Footage of Sears saying that White's presence in the neighborhood will be missed; that White is tired after a long political career. 1:12:46: V: Footage of Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) talking about a renewal in African American political activity in Boston and around the nation. Shot of a map of Boston with "black" Boston colored in pink. Lydon reports that "black" Boston comprises 20% of the city; that "black" Boston has spread from Mission Hill to Mattapan and Dorchester. V: Shots of a train on elevated tracks along Washington Street; of White campaigning in African American neighborhoods. Lydon says that "black" Boston had been a cornerstone of White's coalition during his four mayoral campaigns. Lydon reports from a street corner in "black" Boston. A train passes by on the elevated tracks behind him. Lydon reports that "black" Boston usually has a low voter turnout; that "black" Boston has high percentage of newly registered voters this year. Lydon says that the percentage of African American registered voters is now slightly higher than the percentage of white registered voters. V: Footage of African American residents voicing their support for Mel King. Shots of African American residents getting on an MBTA bus; of a Bay State Banner editorial endorsing David Finnegan. Lydon reports that Bruce Wall (African American minister) and Mel Miller (publisher, The Bay State Banner) have not supported King's candidacy. V: Footage of Stith talking about Miller's endorsement of Finnegan. Stith says that most voters are supporting King. Footage of Kay Gibbs (South End political activist) saying that African American voters believe in King's candidacy; that African American mayors have been elected in city's across the nation; that Miller has been discredited because he is a Finnegan supporter who has never supported an African American candidate for any city office. Lydon reports that King is not well rooted in African American church life; that many African Americans were turned off by his wardrobe. V: Shots of King; of a religious service in an African American church; of African American churchgoers outside of a church. Footage of Gibbs saying that middle-class African Americans had reservations about King at first; that all African American voters are now confident in King's ability to represent the African American community. Gibbs says that King does not think like a middle-class candidate; that he sees himself as a "champion of the underdog." Lydon reports that the African American community has undergone a change in its thinking about political candidates. V: Footage of Stith saying that increased voter turnout and political participation establishes the African American community as a political entity; that the African American community benefits from King's campaign even if he loses. 1:19:01: V: Footage of "Irish East" voters voicing their support for Flynn and Finnegan. Lydon reports that "Irish East" includes Charlestown, South Boston and parts of Dorchester. V: Shots of streets in South Boston and Dorchester. Lydon reports that "Irish East" has the highest voter turnout in the city; that "Irish East" has 1/8th of the city's population and 1/5th of the city's registered voters; that it will account for 1/4th of the voter turnout in the mayoral primary. V: Traveling shot of the Boston skyline. Lydon reports from a street in South Boston. Boston Harbor is visible behind him. Lydon reviews the voting patterns of "Irish East" in recent presidential and gubernatorial elections. Lydon says that "Irish East" often votes for losing candidates like George McGovern (presidential candidate in 1972), Gerald Ford (presidential candidate in 1976) and Ed King (Massachusetts gubernatorial candidate in 1982). Lydon reports that "Irish East" has voted for unsuccessful mayoral candidates like Joe Powers, Louise Day Hicks and Joseph Timilty. Lydon reports that "Irish East" has two of their own as candidates for mayor this year. V: Footage of "Irish East" voters voicing support for Flynn and Finnegan. Footage of Thomas Driscoll (South Boston political consultant) saying that there might be confusion between the "old" Flynn and the "new" Flynn; that Flynn is now a progressive candidate; that the "old" Flynn was an anti-busing, anti-abortion candidate. Footage of Paul White (State Representative from Dorchester) saying that Finnegan has a lot of support in the Dorchester community. White talks about Finnegan's connections to St. Ann's parish. Shots of South Boston. Footage of Driscoll talking about strong neighborhood connections in South Boston. Driscoll predicts that Flynn will get 60% - 75% of the vote in South Boston. Lydon reports from the corner of Adams Street and Gallivan Boulevard in Dorchester. Lydon says that "Irish East" has been out of political favor for a long time; that they now have two strong mayoral candidates. V: Footage of White talking about how Dorchester would benefit from having a Dorchester native as mayor of Boston. White says that Dorchester would claim Finnegan as a native son, even though he now lives in West Roxbury. 1:25:08: V: Footage of Richard Sinnott (Hyde Park Tribune) talking about the neighborhoods of Roslindale and West Roxbury. Shot of a map of Boston with "Irish West" colored in green. Lydon reports that the "Irish West" neighborhoods include the"city suburbs" west of the orange line; that a majority of the residents are Irish American; that there are also Polish, Greek and Lebanese residents. V: Shot of Casa Beirut restaurant. Traveling shot of a residential street in "Irish West." Lydon reports that most residents own their own homes in "Irish West"; that Brighton is included in "Irish West." Lydon notes that "Irish West" traditionally has a very high voter turnout. V: Shots of residents boarding an MBTA bus; of residents walking on a street. Lydon reports that many "Irish West" voters are civil servants, police officers, and teachers; that politics are important to these voters. V: Footage of Sinnott saying that the community benefits from good city services; that "Irish West" voters are not concerned with "linkage"; that displacement and housing for the elderly are important issues in the community. Footage of Joseph Timilty (State Senator) saying that property values declined during the busing crisis; that property values have risen again. Lydon reports that the Forest Hills area has some Latino voters and "new gentry"; that some of these voters may vote for Mel King. V: Shots of urban streets; of Latino children playing on a sidewalk. Lydon reports from a street in front of a church in "Irish West." Lydon notes that most "Irish West" voters support either Ray Flynn or David Finnegan; that Finnegan seems to be the favorite in "Irish West." Lydon notes that Finnegan moved from Dorchester to West Roxbury to raise his family; that Finnegan has connections in "Irish East" and "Irish West." Lydon notes that most of Boston's Irish mayors have come from "Irish West." Lydon mentions former Boston mayors White, John Collins, Maurice Tobin and James Michael Curley. V: Footage of Maura Hennigan (Boston City Council) saying that Curley's legacy lives on in Jamaica Plain. Footage of "Irish West" voters voicing support for Finnegan and Flynn. A few voters voice support for Mel King and Dennis Kearney. Footage of Sinnott saying that White never had the full support of the "Irish West" community; that White was a good mayor. Lydon reports from a park. A football team practices on a field behind him. Lydon says that White was a West Roxbury native; that White always had to fight for votes in "Irish West"; that residents have mixed feelings about White. V: Footage of Timilty saying that White will be remembered fondly with the passage of time. Footage of Sinnott saying that White was "a working mayor as well as a dancing mayor." 1:30:29: V: Footage of city residents voicing support for the candidate of their choice. Closing credits roll. The logos of The Ten O'Clock News underwriters New England Telephone ,and Shawmut Brokerage Services are displayed.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/10/1983