Description: Marcus Jones reports on tension over school desegregation in Lowell. Jones reports that Robert Kennedy (Mayor of Lowell) called on supporters of school desegregation to show support by riding buses with students in Lowell today. Jones' report includes footage of Kennedy addressing supporters, including Evelyn Murphy (Lieutenant governor of Massachusetts), Luis Tiant (former Red Sox pitcher) and Grace Corrigan (mother of astronaut Christa McAuliffe). Jones reports that George Kouloheras (Lowell School Committee) is a leader of the anti-busing movement in Lowell. Jones reports that Kuoloheras is campaigning to elect anti-busing candidates to the Lowell School Committee in order to overturn the present school desegregation plan. Jones interviews Kouloheras. Kouloheras says that he hopes that new school committee will reject busing and find another way to integrate schools. Jones also interviews Michael Kennedy (Regional Manager, National School Bus Service, Inc.) and Donna Senior (Lowell parent) about the bus routes in Lowell. Jones notes that the coming elections will decide how school desegregation is implemented in Lowell. Jones' report is accompanied by footage of students and school buses in Lowell. This tape includes additional footage of school buses on the streets in Lowell. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Christy George reports on student enrollment plans in the cities of Cambridge and Lowell
0:59:06: Visual: Footage of Robert Kennedy (Mayor of Lowell) addressing an audience. Supporters of the mayor stand behind him, including Evelyn Murphy (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Luis Tiant (former Red Sox pitcher), and Grace Corrigan (mother of astronaut Christa McAuliffe). Kennedy says that he is glad to be with so many of "Lowell's friends." Marcus Jones reports that many supporters of school desegregation voluntarily rode school buses in Lowell today. V: Shots of Murphy, Tiant and Corrigan. Footage of Corrigan saying that she is happy to spend time with the schoolchildren of Lowell. Footage of Kennedy urges citizens to put aside their political differences and to ride the buses with Lowell schoolchildren. Jones reports that Kennedy called in supporters to build faith in the Lowell busing program. V: Shots of busing supporters walking on a sidewalk; of school buses on the street. Footage of Michael Kennedy (Regional Manager, National School Bus Service. Inc.) saying that he will need a few more weeks to finalize the bus routes in Lowell; that he will need to recruit bus drivers for the bus routes. Shot of a school bus pulling up to a school; of schoolchildren exiting the bus. Footage of Donna Senior (Lowell parent) saying that the bus routes are chaotic in Lowell; that there is a risk of someone getting hurt in the winter; that parents are waiting at bus stops until 4:00 or 5:00pm for their children to arrive home from school. Footage of George Kouloheras (Lowell School Committee) saying that the issue is political; that he is disappointed in the situation. Jones reports that Kouloheras opposes the city's busing plan; that Kouloheras is campaigning to elect anti-busing candidates to the Lowell City Council and to the Lowell School Committee; that these candidates may alter the state-mandated central enrollment plan. V: Shot of Kouloheras speaking to two white women on the street. Footage of Kouloheras saying that he hopes that four new members of the School Committee will be elected. Kouloheras says that he hopes that the new School Committee will reject busing and find another way to integrate schools. Jones notes that Robert Kennedy cast the swing vote which approved the city busing plan last spring. V: Footage of Robert Kennedy saying that the city can choose between taking control of desegregation or having the court make desegregation decisions. Jones stands in front of a school bus. Children board the bus. Jones reports that next Tuesday's elections are viewed as a referendum on the busing plan; that the election results will decide how the desegregation plan is implemented.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/26/1987
Description: Police, including Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) disperse a crowd in Monument Square in Charlestown after an anti-busing demonstration. A crowd is gathered in front of Bunker Hill Housing Project. Police and US Marshals are stationed across the street from the crowd. The police maneuver in the street. The crowd jeers at police and at least one bottle is thrown. The crowd retreats into the housing project. Police move up Bunker Hill Street. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) is present.
0:58:19: Visual: A large crowd of mostly students is gathered along a street in Monument Square. Police are stationed in the street, monitoring the crowd. Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) addresses the crowd through a bullhorn, telling them to go home. Crowd begins to disperse, chanting periodically. An MDC Police vehicle is visible. 1:01:02: V: A Boston Police truck with officers seated in back drives past Charlestown High School and stops. MacDonald issues instructions to them through a bullhorn. Police officers exit from the back of the truck and gather in front of the high school. MacDonald issues more instructions through a bullhorn. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) confers with an officer across from the school. 1:02:37: V: The crowd disperses, moving along Bunker Hill Street. Shot of Concord Street and the intersection of Concord and Bunker Hill Streets. DiGrazia walks down Concord Street. Residents watch the action on the street from their windows. Graffiti on Concord Street marks a boundary of 100 yards from the high school: "100 yds. - Freedom Ends Here." Shot up Concord Street to High School. 1:03:45: V: Police are assembled at the intersection of Concord and Bunker Hill Streets. A crowd is gathered outside of the Bunker Hill Housing Project on Bunker Hill Street. Shots of crowd outside housing project; of police assembled in street. 1:05:25: V: The crowd cheers as police march back up Concord Street toward the high school. Members of the press, including Gary Griffith (reporter), follow the police up Concord Street. The crowd in front of the housing project moves into the street. A voice yells into a bullhorn, "Ok kids, it's your neighborhood." The crowd mills about in front of housing project. 1:07:08: V: A few police officers walk down Concord Street toward the housing project. A large crowd is still gathered in front of the housing project. A group of US Marshals walk down Concord Street. DiGrazia surveys the scene from the top of Concord Street. Voices can be heard taunting the police. DiGrazia walks down Concord Street toward the housing project. A woman walks her father back to his house, so that he won't get hurt "when the bottles start." 1:09:06: V: The large crowd in front of the housing project cheers loudly. Shot of a US Marshal walking away from the crowd. Noise of a bottle breaking against the pavement. Police on Concord Street watch the crowd in front of the housing project. The noise of a helicopter is audible. MacDonald shouts instructions through a bullhorn to police. Two US Marshals in riot helmets walk down Concord Street. A group of police march in formation from Monument Square down Concord Street. DiGrazia stands with a group of officers at the end of Concord Street, across from the housing project. A helicopter circles overhead. The crowd thins as people move into the housing project. MacDonald advances toward a crowd of youth, turning the corner onto Bunker Hill Street. DiGrazia and a group of officers and US Marshals follow MacDonald. MacDonald shouts into the bullhorn. A group of police officers exit the housing project and take a right as they continue to walk up Bunker Hill Street. Cars pass slowly on Bunker Hill Street. Small groups of people are gathered on the sidewalks. Police officers and the media walk in the street. 1:13:49: V: Three US Marshals in riot helmets confer on Bunker Hill Street. Police officers walk up the street. The media are gathered on a street corner. Two officers stand at the side of the street. One officer adjusts his riot helmet.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: 11 B+W wire service photos of South Boston residents opposing busing. Helmet bearing legend "Southie is my home town." Man with loudspeaker in car. Van with sign flipped upside down "Boston Under Siege." "Forced busing? Never!" under three-leaf clover. South Boston Information Center and Home School Association storefront.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1979
Description: Bunker Hill Monument, exteriors of Charlestown High School, and Charlestown environs. A few police officers are stationed along Monument Square outside of Charlestown High School. Robert Murphy (Headmaster, Charlestown High School) stands in front of the school. School buses, accompanied by a police motorcycle escort, pull up in front of the school. African American students exit the buses and enter the school. Police officer tells camera operator that there is a standing order that the press has to remain across the street. A small number of photographers record the arrival of the buses from across the street. White students walks towards school and enter. Gary Griffith does several takes of reporter standup saying that the arrival of school buses at Charlestown High School was routine.
0:00:18: Visual: Shots of the Bunker Hill Monument; of the exterior of Charlestown High School. Two police officers stand outside of Charlestown High School. A white woman walks into the school. A muffled voice yells out, "No busing." Robert Murphy (Headmaster, Charlestown High School) stands out in front of the high school. Shot of Concord Street. Police motorcycles approach the school. Five police officers on motorcycles receive instructions from a police official. The motorcycles pull away. 0:03:41: V: School buses circle Monument Square and approach the high school. Police motorcycles escort the buses. A police officer stands near a Boston Police Department station wagon parked across the street from the high school. The officer watches the buses pull up in front of the school. African American students exit the buses and enter the school. Shot of the Hudson Bus Lines logo on one of the buses. The school buses pull away from the high school, accompanied by the police motorcycles. Murphy, a police officer, and a few school officials remain in front of the school. 0:07:06: V: White students walk toward the entrance of the school. Murphy and another school official greet a few of the students. A police officer is heard telling members of the media to move across the street. Two police officers stand casually on the corner of Bartlett Street and Monument Square. White students walk toward the school. Fewer than ten members of the media record the scene from the sidewalk across the street. A Hudson Bus Lines airport van pulls up in front of the school. An African American student is inside of the van. The van pulls away. The sidewalk in front of the school is empty. Some members of the media depart as two police officers walk up the opposite side of the street. Murphy speaks to two police officers on the corner of Bartlett Street and Monument Square. A man in a business suit speaks to a two-person camera crew. The street is quiet. Murphy and a police officer walk toward the school. 0:12:11: V: Gary Griffith stands outside of Charlestown High School. Griffith reports on the routine arrival of five buses at the high school this morning. He reports that there is no sign of unrest. The crew does two more takes of Griffith reporting on the story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1977
Description: South Boston environs. Graffiti written in large white letters on G Street reads, "Go home, Jerome. You failed." (Graffiti refers to South Boston High School Headmaster Jerome Wynegar.) African American and white members of a girls' softball team stand on the steps outside of South Boston High School. A few school officials, police officers and others, including Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs, Morgan v. Hennigan), are gathered on the steps of the school. Police are stationed along G Street as school buses pull up in front of the school. African American students exit the school and board the buses. The softball team boards a bus parked in front of the steps to the school. The buses depart.
0:00:31: Visual: Shots of East 6th Street in South Boston. Boston harbor is visible in the distance. Boston Police Department trucks are parked on G Street in front of South Boston High School. Graffiti in large white letters on the pavement of G Street reads, "Go home Jerome. You failed." (Graffiti refers to South Boston High School Headmaster Jerome Wynegar.) Police are gathered in groups along G Street. 0:02:28: V: A police cruiser with flashing lights leads two yellow school buses up East 6th Street. The buses head toward the high school, directed by a police officer. African American and white members of a girls softball team are gathered on the steps of the high school. Police officers, other students and school officials are also on the steps. Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs, Morgan v. Hennigan) stands on the steps, talking to an African American woman and two African American men. 0:04:01: V: A bus is parked in front of the steps of the high school. The softball players board the bus. A group of African American students exit the school and walk toward the school buses parked in front of the school. Two police officers seated on their motorcycles observe the scene. African American students continue to board the buses. A few white students are gathered on the steps of the high school. Police officers direct the school buses in front of the school to depart. The buses travel down G Street, followed by a police motorcycle. Members of the media record the departure of the buses. The bus carrying the softball team departs. The girls wave goodbye. 0:07:01: V: Two police officers confer in the school yard of the high school. Massachusetts State Police officers board a Massachusetts State Police bus in the school yard.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/12/1977
Description: South Boston High exterior. Parking space designated for press. Graffiti on street: “print the truth.” Two Boston police officers in front of school. Five school buses approach with lights blinking. Mostly black students stream off buses, go up steps to school entrance. Jerome Wynegar walks up. More buses arrive with black students. Long line of buses depart, descend hill. Students enter main hallway, walk through metal detector. Close-up on needle meter. Students in art class draw on large sheets of paper; teacher gives individual attention. Shots of empty classroom, with PA announcements being made in the background. Walking shot down dark hallway with lockers.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/08/1978
Description: South Boston High exterior on first day of school. Press photographers stand around outside waiting for something to happen. Three upperclassmen say it is quieter inside since desegregation furor has died down, and learning can take place. They discuss news programs in the school. Several takes of reporter standup. Graffiti “stop forced busing” still visible on street. School bus arrives, lets off two black girls. Interview in front of School Committee headquarters with woman from Citywide Education Coalition who appraises current state of Boston schools: parents are involved and important to educational improvement; vocational education is woefully lacking; must upgrade reading and basic skills. “City can someday have an attractive and credible public school system.” She cautions that just because it is quiet now compared to the first years of busing, people should not assume the school system is okay; it still needs criticism and community input. Editor's note: Content given off the record was edited out of this footage.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/06/1978
Description: State and Boston police and US marshals outside South Boston High School. Black students get off buses. Headmaster Jerome Wynegar. Girls in parochial school uniforms walk by. More black students get off buses, walk up to school. Police on motorcycles escort empty buses away from school. Mass of white students wait at iron fence. TV cameramen and news photographers stand by. Girl wearing Southie sweatshirt. White students are allowed to enter school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/13/1976
Description: Audio goes in and out. Boston police cars and police officers stationed on the street outside of Hyde Park High School. School buses arrive escorted by police cruiser with flashing lights. Ambulance waiting in parking lot. African American students exit the school and board buses. White Hyde Park residents watch the action on the street. A white student tells the camera crew that a fight broke out in the school. Police and media are gathered outside of the school. Hyde Park environs, with snow covering the ground. Shot of the side of the Channel 2 news van.
0:00:17: Visual: Exterior of Hyde Park High School. Snow blankets the ground. A line of police cars rings the street in front of the school. Police officers and school officials stand on the front steps of the school. Police officers are stationed on the streets surrounding the school. An ambulance idles on the street in front of the school. 0:02:57: V: A police cruiser with lights flashing escorts a line of buses up Central street. The buses pull up beside the school. A group of African American students approach the buses. A police car pulls away from the scene. White Hyde Park residents observe the action on the street from the porch of a house on Central Street. Groups of police officers confer on the street outside of the school. African American students exit from a side entrance of the school and board the buses. Shot of Hyde Park residents on porch of house. More African American students head toward the buses. Members of the media observe the students as they board the buses. 0:08:08: V: Officials confer on the street outside of the school. Police and the media survey the scene. Shot of the exterior of the school. Two of the buses pull away from the school, escorted by a Boston police cruiser with flashing lights. The buses proceed up Metropolitan Avenue. 0:10:34: V: A white student leans against a car outside of the school. A crew member asks him what happened in the school. The student says that a fight broke out; that he does not know how it started. A police cruiser leaves the scene. Groups of white residents observe the action from street corners. More buses pull away from the school and continue up Metropolitan Avenue, accompanied by a police cruiser. A white teenager walks up the street, away from the school. 0:13:17: V: Police officers direct traffic away from the school. Shot of a police officer grasping baton behind his back. The remaining buses pull away from the school, accompanied by a police cruiser. Police officers and the media continue to stand in front of the school. The ambulance pulls away. A police officer talks to a group of white teenagers. The teenagers walk up Westminster Street, away from the school. Two white female teenagers talk to a group of three police officers in front of the school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/10/1977
Description: The sound goes in and out at the beginning of this video. Exteriors of South Boston High School and South Boston environs. African American students board buses at South Boston High School. Boston Police officers are stationed near the school. Police cruisers escort buses to and from the school. Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) stands in the school yard. White students exit the school after the buses depart. A passerby tells the camera crew that their presence causes a disturbance.
1:00:09: Visual: Exterior of South Boston High School. A Boston Police cruiser is parked in the courtyard of the school, to the right of the steps. Shots of exterior of the school. A Massachusetts State Police cruiser is parked to left of the steps. A group of three white students exits the school. Shots of G Street; of rowhouses in front of the school on G Street; of the high school; of a "Wallace for President" sticker on a street sign. Two white students exit the school. 1:06:14: V: Shot of East 6th Street. The street is snowy. A Boston Police station wagon is parked in front of the high school. An officer exits the station wagon and walks toward the school. A small green and white bus maneuvers in the courtyard of the school. Shot of students walking down G Street, away from the school. A student closes the window on the second floor of the school. Shot of the exterior of the school. The green and white bus is idling in front of the school entrance. Shot of house on the corner of G Street and Thomas Park. A Boston Police station wagon pulls away from the school. A Boston Police cruiser pulls into the school yard. Two officers exit the car. Shot of one of the Boston Police cruisers in school yard; the cruiser is labeled "Tactical Patrol Force." 1:10:02: V: A police cruiser with flashing lights escorts a line of yellow school buses up G Street. The school buses pull up in front of the school. A few police officers station themselves along G Street. Small groups of minority students exit the school. One student stops to wave at the camera. African American students make their way toward the buses. There are a few Hispanic students among those boarding the buses. Audio of students talking to the camera crew. Students peer out of the windows of the buses. The buses pull away in single file. The small green and white bus pulls out of the school yard, into the street. One remaining school bus pulls away, followed by a Boston Police station wagon with its lights flashing. 1:17:34: V: Pan of houses on G Street. A lone African American male student waits in front of the school. White students slowly exit the school. Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) stands in the school yard, talking to officials and passersby. A few police officers remain in the school yard. Students file out of the school yard. An African American teacher confers with Wynegar. Audio of a voice speaking to the camera crew, "Do you realize that you're being here creates more of a disturbance than when you're not here?" A crew member responds. Bits of an ensuing conversation can be heard. A few white students linger on the steps of the school. Wynegar remains in the school yard. Students continue to exit the building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/15/1977
Description: Exterior of South Boston High School. Headmaster Jerome Wynegar in front of school. Students enter school. South Boston environs. Crowd of South Boston residents gathered on the street. Rolling shots taken from news van driving down the streets of South Boston. Anti- busing and racist graffiti: “Stop Forced Busing” “White Power” “Never Nigger”
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: Debate on the success of school desegregation, moderated by Jim Lehrer. Filmed in the auditorium of Dunbar High School in Washington D.C. Lehrer explains outline and rules for debate. Busing advocates include Arthur Flemming (Chairman of the US Commission on Civil Rights), Murray Saltzman, Frankie Freeman of US Commission on Civil Rights. Flemming begins debate with opening statement by the US Commission on Civil Rights. Lino Graglia of the Neighborhood Schools Association makes opening remark for anti-busing representative group. Sue Mills, Herbert Walberg of Neighborhood Schools Association. Coproduced by WGBH and WETA.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/15/1976
Description: Audio goes in and out. Hyde Park environs. Uniformed police are stationed outside of Hyde Park High School, including horse mounted officers. Students exit the school. African American students board buses. Buses depart with police motorcycle escort. Pam Bullard interviews Hyde Park High School teachers Terry Gaskill and Hugh Mullen discuss racial tension inside the school. The students have returned to school after a recent racial disturbance. Mullen says that the school was quiet; that the students segregated themselves along racial lines. Mullen says that a small group of students is responsible for the trouble at the school. Both teachers agree that the students do not act up when the police are present in the school. Tape 1 of 2.
0:58:01: Visual: Shots of a black dog on the porch of a house on Westminster Street, near Hyde Park High School; of a police horse standing on the grass while a police officer talks to a resident; of the exterior of Hyde Park High School. Police are stationed outside of Hyde Park High School. A police bus is parked in front of the school. Three police officers stand on the steps of the school, while one police officer directs traffic on the street. A police officer pulls up on a motorcycle. 1:00:44: V: A line of school buses pulls up Central Street and stops beside Hyde Park High School. Two mounted police officers survey the scene from the intersection. Several officers are stationed on the steps of the school. Cars pass by slowly. Another police officer arrives on a motorcycle. 1:05:19: V: Shot of the exterior of Hyde Park High School. African American and white students exit the school. African American students walk toward the school buses and board them. Police and the media survey the scene. 1:09:56: V: Groups of police officers appear in the front entrances of the school. Three of the buses pull away, escorted by police on motorcycles. The buses travel up Metropolitan Avenue. Three more buses follow, accompanied by a police officer on a motorcycle. Groups of students, school officials, and police remain on the steps of the school. The last bus pulls away, with a police motorcycle escort. Police officers exit the school and walk down the steps. Groups of people remain on the steps. Close up shot of a white woman police officer on a horse. A few police officers walk away from the school. 1:13:27: V: Pam Bullard sets up an interview with two Hyde Park teachers in front of the school. Terry Gaskill is African American and Hugh Mullen is white. Vehicle noise makes their voices inaudible at beginning of interview. Gaskill advocates an after school program or gathering place for both white and African American youth in Boston. He notes that African American and white students gather on the streets after school; that a group of angry white youth kicked his car last year as he drove to Hyde Park High School. Mullen says that the day went smoothly; that the school staff had to break up groups of students in order to get them into homeroom in the morning; that the strong police presence made a difference; that the police did not interfere with school activities. Gaskill says that the students were tense at the beginning of the day; that the atmosphere was quiet. Bullard asks about racial tension among the students. Mullen says that the students segregated themselves along racial lines today; that students of different races had been mixing somewhat before Friday's racial disturbance. Gaskill says that the first day of school was calm; that racial tension began to build up among the students as the week progressed. Mullen agrees that the first few days of school were quiet. He says that there is a small group of students who make trouble; that the situation at the school will not get better unless they can get rid of the small group of troublemakers. Mullen adds that the school has a large freshman class this year; that he had thought the presence of the younger students would help to ease the tensions of the previous year; that teachers will not be able to assess the situation until the police pull out of the school; that the students do not dare act out while the police are present. Gaskill agrees that students will not act out while police are in the building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/15/1976
Description: Boston School Committee meeting, with Mayor Kevin White in attendance, where he discusses school desegregation and states his support for the recently elected school committee. Says Judge Arthur Garrity should cede some control to that body.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/11/1976
Description: Exteriors of South Boston High School. South Boston environs. Large graffiti in crosswalk “Winegar [sic] we don't want you.” Black students stream off bus, walk toward front entrance. Jerome Wynegar stands by. Plainclothes US marshals with armbands and walkie-talkies. Police keep press photographers behind line.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: Kim Reid , a student at Brighton High School, sits with a group of students in a classroom. The students talk about school activities and look at yearbooks while discussing a movie they saw on television. Another group of students in the classroom also look at yearbooks. This tape also includes footage of Reid exiting Brighton High School and boarding a school bus outside.
1:00:00: Visual: Kim Reid (Brighton High School student) sits with a three white and Hispanic students in a classroom at Brighton High School. They talk about ordering sweatshirts to sell at school. The students talk about scheduling meetings after school. Another student points out that Kim needs to know about meetings in advance because she needs to arrange transportation home. The students talk about choosing a theme for their class night. A female student seated across from Kim looks at a yearbook. A racially diverse group of boys is seated near Kim's group. A white teacher arranges files and papers at her desk. Kim's group continues to talk to one another. Kim's group looks at a yearbook. Close-up shot of Kim. The students talk about the upcoming prom. Shots of a girl turning pages of the yearbook. Kim opens the yearbook in front of her. Kim says that she knows fewer people now than she did in the ninth grade. The group identifies and talks about the people in the yearbook. The group of boys also look at yearbooks. 1:08:24: V: Kim walks over to the teacher's desk. She looks for a book on the teacher's desk. The crew sets up a shot of Kim walking across the room with a book. Kim sits down with her group. Kim and the other students talk about a TV movie. Shots of the two other girls in Kim's group. Shots of the group of boys talking to one another. 1:14:00: V: Shots of the exterior of Brighton High School; of school buses waiting on Warren Street in front of the school. An African American male student jokes around with the camera crew. Kim descends the stairs toward the buses with a group of African American and Asian American students. The students wave and talk to the camera crew as they board the buses. A police officer stands against the fence on the sidewalk. Kim walks toward her bus. The camera crew does a three takes of Kim and other students boarding the buses.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1985
Description: Hope Kelly reviews the history of school desegregation in Boston. She notes that many critics cite the absence of middle-class and white students as a reason for the continued failure of the Boston Public Schools. She focuses on the Timilty Middle School in Boston, a magnet school with successful reading and math programs for its students. Kelly interviews teacher William Moran and principle Shirley Gonsalves about the school and its programs. Moran says that the students are successful. He adds that many come from disadvantaged backgrounds. Gonsalves talks about the benefits of school desegregation. Kelly reports that the Timilty School was named a National School of Excellence in 1989. Following the edited story is additional b-roll footage of students and teachers in classrooms at the Timilty School.
1:00:07: Visual: Shot of a school bus door closing. Shots of a school bus outside of the Timilty Middle School; of students on the bus; of white and African American students exiting the Timilty Middle School; of students boarding a bus outside of the school. Shots of African American and white students in a hallway of the school. Hope Kelly reports that busing for school desegregation began seventeen years ago in Boston; that busing was viewed as a way to bring equal opportunity to all students. Kelly notes that busing drove many middle-class white and African American parents away from the school system. Kelly reports that critics cite a lack of middle-class students as a reason for the continued failure of Boston Public Schools. V: Footage of William Moran (Timilty School) being interviewed. Moran says that all students can learn. Kelly reports that Moran grew up in the South End and Roxbury; that Moran attended Boston Public Schools and went to college. V: Shots of Moran walking through a corridor in the Timilty School; of Moran speaking to three students in the doorway of a classroom. Kelly reports that Moran is the seventh-grade coordinator at the Timilty Middle School; that Moran attended the Timilty School twenty years ago. Kelly reports that the Timilty Middle School ranks first city-wide in reading; that the Timilty Middle School is second city-wide in mathematics. Kelly notes that the students at the Timilty School do not come from advantaged backgrounds. V: Shots of a white teacher teaching students of diverse races in a well decorated classroom. Shots of the students in the classroom. Footage of Moran saying that students at the Timilty School low-income families; that many of the students live in housing projects. Moran says that the students come from disadvantaged neighborhoods across the city; that the school is a city-wide school. Kelly reports that most of the students at the Timilty School are non-white and poor. V: Shots of students walking in a corridor of the Timilty School. Footage of Shirley Gonsalves (Timilty School) being interviewed by Kelly. Gonsalves says that race and class are not the determining factors among the school's students. Gonsalves says that the school can do nothing about the relative poverty of its students. Kelly reports that Gonsalves is the assistant principal at the Timilty School; that she has worked in the Boston Public School System for seventeen years. V: Shot of Gonsalves walking through a corridor and up a set of stairs with a student. Kelly reports that Gonsalves began teaching in Boston during the first year of school desegregation. V: Footage of Gonsalves being interviewed. Gonsalves says that she grew up in the rural South where busing was used to maintain segregated schools. Gonsalves says that she rode a bus to school from the age of six to the age of eighteen. Shots of students walking in a corridor at the Timilty School. Kelly reports that there are low numbers of white students in the Boston Public School System; that 11% of students at the Timilty School are white. Kelly reports that Gonsalves believes that school integration has been a success. V: Shots of a white student entering a classroom at the Timilty School; of a white teacher standing with two African American students in a hallway. Footage of Gonsalves being interviewed by Kelly. Gonsalves says that students attended schools in their own neighborhoods with students of their own race before school integration. Gonsalves says that students were not exposed to other students of different backgrounds and from different neighborhoods. Gonsalves says that students need to learn about people of different backgrounds. Shots of a white teacher teaching to a class of middle school students; of an African American male student sitting at a desk in the classroom. Shots of other students in classrooms; of an African American female student writing on a chalkboard; of an African American boy reading a book at his desk. Shot of the white teacher teaching to students in the classroom. Kelly reports that the Timilty School is a magnet school; that classes are smaller at the Timilty School; that the schoolday at the Timilty School is 1.5 hours longer on four of five days per week. Kelly reports that the waiting list to enter the sixth grade class at the Timilty School had 200 names. Kelly reports that the Timilty School was named a National School of Excellence in 1989. V: Shot of Gonsalves and a student walking in the corridor.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/22/1991
Description: Pam Bullard reports on the Tobin Elementary School, which is located near the Mission Hill Housing Project.Bullard reports that 75 white children are bused into the Tobin school with no problems. Interviews with students and teachers talking about how much they like the school. Bullard reports that Charlie Gibbons, the principal, encourages teachers to develop innovative programs for students. During the report Principal Gibbons was in Puerto Rico learning about the schools there to better be able to serve the Latino students at his school. Bullard notes that the school has a good atmosphere and enjoys a good rapport with the community.
9:50:07: Visual: Shots of street sign for Tobin Ct.; of the Mission Hill Housing Project. Pam Bullard reports that the Mission Hill Housing Project is in one of Boston's toughest neighborhoods; that racial fighting occurred there two weeks before school opened; that the housing project is in the heart of a depressed neighborhood. Bullard reports that the Tobin Elementary School is located near the housing project. V: Footage of an African American male student (Derek) saying that he has attended the Tobin School for four years; that he knows all of the teachers and gets along with them; that the school is special because of the teachers, the kids, and the field trips. A white male student (Richard) says that Derek is his friend; that he likes the Tobin school; that he has fun taking the bus everyday; that he has met a lot of new people. Bullard reports that Charlie Gibbons (principal, Tobin School) and his assistant are in Puerto Rico; that they are learning about the Puerto Rican school system in order to understand the needs of Spanish-speaking students; that Gibbons and his assistant are paying for their own trips. V: Shots of Gibbons' office; of a button reading "I go to the best - Tobin School, Roxbury"; of a thank-you note written to Gibbons from the students. Bullard reports that the Tobin School has extensive reading and physical education programs set up with Boston University; that there is a program for dental care set up with the Harvard Dental school; that the Tobin School has one of the city's best bilingual programs; that the students receive a lot of individual attention. Bullard reports that Gibbons and the teachers at the Tobin set up most of these programs themselves. V: Footage of student reading Spanish; of a student writing on a chalkboard; of bilingual posters in a classroom. Footage of a teacher at a chalkboard; of students in classroom. A white female teacher says that the students respond well to the school's programs; that she tries to give the students individual attention; that she likes the students and the parents at the Tobin. Footage of children playing learning games. An African American female teacher says that she agrees with Gibbons that the Tobin is the best school in Boston; that the Tobin has a warm atmosphere, a good faculty and a lot of support from the community. An African American male student says that he likes the Tobin because he learns things. Bullard reports that the Tobin school is located in a predominantly African American neighborhood; that 75 white students have been bused in with no problems; that students and teachers like the school very much. V: Footage of children playing on a field outside of the school. The Church of Our Lady of Perpetual Help is visible.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/26/1976
Description: Some sound dropout at the beginning of the tape. Pam Bullard's 1978 review of school desegregation in Boston. The review focuses on the effects of desegregation on South Boston High School and the Joseph Lee School. Bullard reports that attendance is low at South Boston High School, but the school atmosphere and programs have improved. Bullard reports that the Joseph Lee School is a good example of a successfully integrated elementary school. The story includes footage of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) and interviews with Ruth Batson (African American community activist), Jerome Wynegar (headmaster, South Boston High School), David Finnegan (Boston School Committee), Robert Peterkin (headmaster, English High School). Bullard also interviews teachers and students at the Lee School and South Boston High School. The report ends with footage of students at the Lee School performing in a play of "The Wizard of Oz."
1:00:02: Visual: Shot of Boston skyline. Footage of Mayor Kevin White on September 9, 1974 calling on Boston residents to come together to make busing work. Footage of buses pulling up in front of South Boston High School on the first day of school in 1974. A crowd of antibusing protesters has gathered outside of the high school. The crowd jeers at the buses. Shots of the Boston Public Gardens. Footage of Ruth Batson (African American community activist) describing Boston as a "racist, violent city." She says that the violence stemming from school desegregation has spilled over into the streets and housing projects. Footage of police marching in formation on Bunker Hill Street in Charlestown. A large crowd is gathered outside of the Bunker Hill Housing Project. Pam Bullard reports that violence and racial hatred erupted in Boston when a federal court ordered the desegregation of schools in 1974. She notes that President Gerald Ford was forced to put the 82nd Airborne division on alert, in preparation for duty on the streets of Boston. Bullard reports that the toughest neighborhoods are quiet three years later; that African American and white children attend school together without incident. V: Shots of a lone police officer outside of South Boston High School; of African American and white children entering an elementary school. 1:01:39: Bullard reports that the effects of school desegregation will not be known for years; that some inconclusive studies have been made. V: Footage of African American and white students in an integrated elementary school classroom. Bullard notes that resistance to school desegregation in Boston has been overcome. V: Shots of a busy street in South Boston; of a young white boy outside of a church; of two elderly white residents sitting on a stoop in South Boston; of racist graffiti on a wall. Bullard reports that the fiercest opposition to court-ordered desegregation in the north took place in South Boston; that the opposition has calmed down since 1974. Bullard notes that school buses transporting students to and from South Boston High School are still accompanied by a police escort; that they are greeted by four police officers on duty at the high school. V: Shots of a police cruiser leading school buses up G Street to South Boston High School; of police officers outside South Boston High School; of African American students exiting the buses at South Boston High School. Bullard notes that metal detectors were installed at South Boston High School after the stabbing of a student three years ago. V: Footage of a student passing through a metal detector; of the halls of South Boston High School. Bullard reports that racial hatred and fear at South Boston High School have given way to a lingering uneasiness. V: Footage of a white teacher in a classroom in South Boston High School. He teaches to a classroom of eight African American and white students. Bullard notes that attendance is low at South Boston High School; that classes can be as small as four students. V: Shots of teachers teaching to very small classes at the high school. A teacher is heard saying that the official enrollment at South Boston High School is 600 students; that she estimates the enrollment to be 300 students. Shots of an African American teacher helping an African American female student at a desk; of students studying in classrooms; of teachers and students in sparsely populated classrooms. Bullard notes that the school was put under receivership by the federal court in 1975; that Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) was brought in by the court; that Wynegar and his staff have instituted many alternative programs at the school. V: Footage of Wynegar saying that there are fewer problems at South Boston High School because students are happy with the school programs. Shots of white and African American students studying in classrooms at the high school. Footage of a white female teacher saying that erratic attendance is the biggest problem at South Boston High School; that she finds herself repeating lessons for the benefit of students who were absent. Footage of Wynegar saying that South Boston High School ranks eleventh out of eighteen schools in attendance; that he though the school would rank last in attendance; that students appreciate the way they are treated at the school. Shots of students in classrooms; in the automotive shop. Footage of the white female teachers saying that alternative programs are attractive to students; that students also need to learn basic skills. 1:05:04: Bullard notes that there are divisions between those who support traditional classroom learning and those who support alternative programs. V: Shots of students in classrooms; of students in the lunchroom. Footage of an African American female student saying that South Boston High School is much better this year than in previous years; that students are getting along and are more focused on their classes. A white male student says that more students are attending school now. Another white male student says that students are getting along better. The white female teacher says that the atmosphere at the school has improved. Shots of the corridors in South Boston High School; of white and African American students playing basketball. Bullard says that there are no answers as to why the atmosphere at South Boston has improved; that innovative programs, low attendance and a wearing down of resistance to integration are all factors. V: Footage of white and African American students exiting South Boston High School; of school buses traveling down G Street away from the school. Footage of David Finnegan (Boston School Committee) saying that the community needs to realize that there are good solid programs in the Boston Public School System; that desegregation has added to the quality education provided by the schools; that the atmosphere in the schools is good, but can be improved. Bullard notes that even critics have conceded that the court-ordered magnet school programs have been good for the school system. V: Footage of African American and white students at a student art show; of the students' art projects. Bullard notes that there are opportunities in art and drama programs at the magnet schools; that there are opportunities for student internships; that there have been no racial problems at the magnet schools. Bullard reports that desegregation has been costly in financial and human terms; that the cost of the first year of desegregation was $20 million; that the second year of desegregation was $30 million; that police overtime ran up the cost of school desegregation. Bullard notes that costs have stabilized at $12 million over the past two years; that there is less of a need for police officers in the schools now. Bullard reports that Boston taxpayers have had to pay for expenses not covered by state and federal funds; that Boston taxpayers pay the highest property taxes in the nation. Bullard notes that the school budget remains at $175 million per year; that the city has lost 28,000 white students since 1972; that one expert says that 16,000 students were lost to desegregation. V: Shots of an empty classroom; of a teacher's attendance book; of a students in a sparsely populated classroom. Bullard adds that many students transferred to parochial schools, private academies and suburban schools; that many high school students dropped out. Bullard notes that the Lonegan family of South Boston refused to bus their children; that their daughter stayed out of school for a year. V: Footage of the Lonegan family. Mrs. Lonegan sits at a table in her home with her daughter Michelle and her son. Mrs. Lonegan says that she found a job making beds at a nursing home in order to pay her children's tuition at a private school. 1:09:07: Bullard reports that Christina Termini (student) lives in West Roxbury, but attends the Lee School in Dorchester. V: Footage of Termini leaving her home and walking to a bus stop. She boards the bus. Footage shot from the inside of the bus as it travels through the city. The white children on the bus sing songs. Audio of Termini's mother saying that the Lee School is ideal for Christina; that she has great confidence in the education her daughter receives at the Lee School. Shots of African American children walking to the Lee School from the Franklin Field Housing Project. Shots of a white student in French class at the Lee School; of integrated classrooms at the Lee School. Footage of a teacher saying that the children of the Lee School get along well; that racial differences are not important in the classroom. Bullard reports that attendance at the Lee School is low; that 600 students attend the school; that the school has 1,000 seats available; that white attendance could be higher. Bullard notes that the atmosphere at the school is excellent. V: Footage of the students performing "The Wizard of Oz" on stage. A young white female student says that she likes the facilities at the Lee School; that she has met a lot of friends. Footage of the white female teacher saying that she likes teaching at the Lee School. Footage of Robert Peterkin (headmaster, English High School) saying that many other urban school systems are experiencing the same problems as Boston; that desegregation has brought stability and strong programs to the system. Footage of Lee School students at their "Wizard of Oz" play. They sing "Ding, dong, the wicked witch is dead." Bullard reports that the Boston Public School System has made impressive progress since school desegregation began in 1974; that the system is no longer deliberately segregated and rife with political patronage. Bullard notes that parental involvement and stronger political leadership has improved the schools. V: Footage of Batson saying that the city has been forced to confront its racial problems through school desegregation. Shots of African American and white students entering an elementary school. Bullard reports that the federal court still runs the Boston Public School System. V: Footage of Batson saying that the process of desegregation has been valuable to some students. Shot of a Lee School student performing a song in the "Wizard of Oz" play. The audio of the student singing accompanies shots of a police officer in front of South Boston High School; of African American students entering South Boston High School; of Wynegar in front of South Boston High School; of a student passing through a metal detector; of African American and white students playing basketball; of an empty classroom; of the Lonegan family; of young African American and white students; of police cruisers leaving the school yard of South Boston High School. Children at the Lee School clap for the student performer on stage.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/01/1978
Description: White students exit South Boston High. About 25 Massachusetts uniformed state troopers board Massachusetts State Police bus. Massachusetts State Police Cruiser exits school parking lot. Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) stands in the school yard and talks to students.
1:00:08: Visual: White students exit South Boston High School in small groups. Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) stands in front of the school, talking to passersby. The students walk down G Street, away from the school . Snow blankets the ground. A Massachusetts State Police bus is parked in front of the school. About 25 state police officers file onto the bus. A state police car pulls out from the front of the school, into the street. Small groups of students, police, and officials remain in front of the school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/15/1977