Description: AFSCME state workers on strike, marching with placards outside Saltonstall building. Reporter interviews employees, Teresa Cincotta, Tom Knightly, Pamela Knights, and Shirley Lumpkins, about short-term and long-term expectations of the strike. Prison guards on strike outside MCI Concord. Prison workers gather around tree. Guard tower seen through chain link fence.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/21/1976
Description: Exteriors of the Massachusetts State House. AFSCME (American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees) state workers on strike, picketing outside State House with placards. Closeup on Beacon St. street sign.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/21/1976
Description: Interviews with Dorchester residents on Dorchester Fair Share's effort to get HUD or city of Boston to sell vacant properties to people who would rehabilitate them and pay taxes. B-roll of abandoned house on Bowdoin Street, Dorchester. Trashed interior. Other houses with boarded up windows.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/19/1976
Description: Interview with Li'l Abner cartoonist and political satirist Al Capp in his Cambridge home. He talks about evading his father's creditors, and scheming to take semesters at various arts schools around the city. He says he likes the Boston view of the world, and talks about the influence Boston has had on his work. He talks about turning conservative. He criticizes American presidents, calling Gerald Ford ‘clumsy’ and Jimmy Carter ‘weak.’ He talks about working on Li'l Abner with a team of men.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/04/1977
Description: Allston Brighton environs. Busy intersection of Commonwealth Avenue and Harvard Street. Storefronts of Macy's Liquors, Ken's Pub, Great Scott, Gladstone's. People get off green line trolley, close up on the T logo. Cars drive by, pedestrians cross the street and walk down the sidewalk. Cleveland Circle storefronts (small markets, CVS, bank, hardware). Beacon Street traffic approaches head on. Massachusetts Turnpike traffic in Allston; freight containers in adjacent rail yard.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/26/1979
Description: Electric power station in Allston. Grid of insulators, transformers and cables. Danger High Voltage sign. Line of utility poles and railroad tracks along Massachusetts Turnpike (Interstate 90) looking toward TV38 (WSBK) transmission tower.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/30/1976
Description: Back Bay Amtrak station entrance. Train, viewed from above, starts up and moves slowly along tracks. Train histle and bells. Railroad bed. Commuter train pulls up, passengers board. Two trains pass in opposite directions. Looking down tracks to old and new Hancock buildings. Orange line elevated structure along Washington Street. T train passes overhead with typical clunking sound; congested vehicular traffic below. Camera moves on complex steel skeleton of tracks above.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/04/1977
Description: Andrew Young, Ambassador to the United Nations, speaks at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He takes questions about the UN, divestment from South Africa, the Middle East peace process and the Carter Administration. He also discusses his transition from the civil rights movement to politics. Young has a good rapport with the students in the audience.
0:00:44: Visual: Andrew Young (Ambassador to the United Nations) speaks at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. A representative from the school sits on stage while Young speaks. Young talks about the Trilateral Commission. He says that the Trilateral Commission "is the rich people of the world getting together to talk." Young says that UN has been criticized for being a part of the "Western Bloc"; that five members of the UN Security Council are western nations; that the UN must make policy with all nations in mind. Young describes UN efforts to initiate an arms embargo against South Africa; that the UN resolution on South Africa was not as strong as many would have liked; that the resolution is effective because all of South Africa's trading partners have agreed on it. Young mentions the "North-South dialogue." He says that it is important for nations to deal with issues like trade, debt relief and foreign aid as a group; that the Trilateral Commission is a negotiating group. Young says that there are competition and adversarial relationships among members of the Trilateral Commission; that the members of the Trilateral Commission are competing with each other, not with the Third World. 0:04:12: V: Young responds to an audience member's question about the UN Security Council. Young says that the US, France and England are permanent members of the Security Council; that France and Canada hold two of the rotating seats. Young has a good rapport with the crowd. The crowd laughs at his jokes. An audience member asks about UN policy in Africa. Young says that he does not think pressure should be put on US corporations to divest from South Africa. Young adds that companies would continue to invest in South Africa through complicated transactions using foreign subsidiaries. Young notes that the students at Harvard should be learning all about the complicated finances of multi-national corporations. Young says that nothing would change through divestment; that US corporations are complicit with the government of South Africa; that change can be wrought through the guilt felt by these corporations. He notes that the students should continue to put pressure on Harvard's Board of Directors to divest from South Africa. He says that students should be idealistic, while administrators like him must be realistic. An audience member asks about the Carter Administration's policy in the Middle East. Young says that Jimmy Carter (US President) has been willing to expend political capital pushing for a peace settlement in the Middle East. Young says that Carter has never tried to impose peace on the parties involved in the conflict. Young says that Anwar Sadat (President of Egypt) has moved boldly to move the peace process forward; that the Carter Administration must work with Sadat; that the USSR must be forced to participate in the peace process; that the USSR will undermine the peace process if they are not involved. Young notes that Sadat and the Soviets have had a difficult relationship. 0:12:55: V: An audience member asks how he can remain morally conscious when the policy he conducts for the US is not always morally conscious. Young says that protest movements in the 1960s have led to a reawakening of the nation's moral conscience; that the Carter Administration was voted into office by morally conscious voters. Young notes that it is easier to protest than it is to govern; that the Carter Administration is staffed with idealistic, moral people of all races and ethnicities. Young notes that he chose to enter politics to put his ideals into action; that effective change can be made through politics as well as protest. Young talks about his experiences in the civil rights movement and the movement against the Vietnam War. Young says that there was a logical progression from the protest movements of the 1960s to the politics of change in the 1970s. Young says that he took his post in order to effect change in foreign policy; that foreign policy issues and domestic policy are closely related; that he has not compromised his ideals in performing his job. Young jokes that he tries to stand up for what is right while doing his job; that he might be looking for a new job someday because of that; that perhaps Harvard will hire him if he ever needs a job. The audience laughs at the joke. 0:18:30: V: An audience member asks Young if he has seen an increase in "television diplomacy." Young says that he has seen an increase in "television diplomacy." Young responds to another audience question. Young says that the Carter Administration is staffed with people who are advocating change; that these people were outside of politics before. Young notes that Ernie Green (Assistant Secretary for Manpower) was one of the students who integrated Little Rock High School in 1958; that Green is working hard to create jobs within the African American communities; that he has been working on the problem for only six months. Young notes that an African American lawyer from Harvard helped prepare the brief for the Bakke court case. Young notes that Patricia Harris is Carter's Secretary for Housing and Urban Development. Young says that African American organizations needs to work within the structure of the government; that the activists in the civil rights movement were working with the Kennedy Administration in the early 1960s.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/06/1977
Description: Nantucket shore sunset. Several takes of reporter standup. Reporter interviews John Clay, engineering officer who was working on the Argo Merchant oil spill. Clay points out the effects of the oil spill on the major fishing areas off the coast of Massachusetts, including the Georges Bank. Nantucket shore with ice and snow, seagulls.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/22/1976
Description: Bud Collins interviews Arthur Ashe at Longwood Cricket Club about playing tennis on different court surfaces. Ashe wears Hard Rock Cafe t-shirt. Game play from match in US Pro tournament: Ramirez vs Dominguez.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/27/1978
Description: Low quality sound at the beginning of the video. Judge Arthur Garrity speaks at a community meeting, calling for better communication among organizations involved in the school desegregation process. He takes questions about the role of the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC) and the organization of community forums to invite feedback on schools. Garrity talks about setting up hearings about the school desegregation plan for the 1976-77 school year. Audience members express confusion at the roles of the CCC and the Citywide Parents Advisory Council (CPAC). Garrity explains the role of the Racial Ethnic Parents Councils, set up through the CPAC. Garrity reads a letter about problems which need to be resolved at the Blackstone Elementary School. Hubie Jones (African American community activist) sits beside Garrity at the meeting
1:00:00: Audio on tape is muffled. Visual: Arthur Garrity (federal judge) speaks before a biracial community meeting about Boston schools and court-ordered desegregation. Garrity speaks about the importance of good communication between the organizations involved in the schools. He says that the parents on the Citywide Parents Advisory Council (CPAC) are interested in working with the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC) in organizing meetings about the schools. Garrity closes his talk by saying that he is offering suggestions, not directives. Hubert Jones (African American community activist) informally thanks Garrity. Garrity sits down in a chair next to Jones. 1:02:43: V: Garrity takes questions from audience members. Garrity responds to a question, saying that he will consult with all of the lawyers involved in the school desegregation case before putting anything into the court order; that he will schedule a series of hearings for the 1976-77 school year. Garrity says that the hearings might be held in late February or early March. A meeting member asks Garrity to comment on the group's idea to hold community forums in the neighborhoods, so that parents can give suggestions and air their grievances. Garrity agrees that the community hearings are a good idea. He suggests that a few members of the CCC and the CPAC should be present at the forums; that these members should be well informed in order to combat inaccurate information and false rumors; that members should feel free to ask him for the statistics and facts before going to the hearings. A meeting member asks Garrity if the CCC should have an attorney present for the court hearings. Garrity says that the CCC is not a party to the lawsuit; that the CCC might be seen as a distraction in the court. The member asks how the CCC can get feedback from the court. Garrity says that he is looking for constructive proposals for changes in the desegregation plan; that he hopes the community forums will provide these constructive proposals for change. Garrity adds that he receives other reports which do not call for action. A meeting member asks how Garrity would define the role of the CCC. Garrity says that he appreciates the efforts of CCC mediators in diffusing the tense situation in South Boston; that the most important function of the CCC is to monitor how the desegregation plan is carried out across the city. 1:13:41: V: A meeting member tells Garrity that members of the community see the CCC as a council which can take action and solve problems. Garrity responds that the CCC can publicize information and draw attention to problems. Garrity reads a letter that he received about problems at the Blackstone School. Garrity says that he hopes the CCC can delegate members to investigate problems at the schools in order to get them resolved. Garrity says that he would like the CCC to help solve these problems; that he would rather not try to resolve problems at individual schools through the court order. An audience member says that there is some confusion regarding the roles of the CCC and the CPAC. Garrity says that the Racial Ethnic Parents Councils under the CPAC exist to promote communication on racial issues in the schools; that the councils have also taken action on educational issues in the schools. Garrity notes that the CPAC has no staff or resources; that the CCC can support the CPAC and the Racial Ethnic Parents Councils. Garrity refers to a decision by the US Court of Appeals regarding the schools.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/14/1976
Description: At press conference Celtics general manager Red Auerbach introduces new owners John Y. Brown and 'silent partner' Harry Mangurian. Brown expresses his wish for Red Auerbach to stay with the Celtics. He says he's an active owner and talks about how he became an owner and his plans for the Celtics. He answers other questions from the press. Red Auerbach smokes a cigar throughout. Press asks Auerbach about the decision he has to make about whether to stay with the Celtics. Leprechaun logo on Celtics banner.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/12/1978
Description: Back Bay environs with snow. Commonwealth Avenue mall. Facades of townhouses, street lanterns. Traffic, Kasanoff's bakery truck. Massachusetts Avenue. Prudential Tower. White Hen Pantry Food Store, College House Pharmacy, The Hawk Shops, Chester A. Baker Pharmacy. White Fuel sign atop flatiron building. Kenmore Square storefronts: The Fatted Calf, Strawberries, CVS, Paperback Booksmith, Bottled Liquors, Kenmore Army & Navy Store. Citgo sign.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/06/1977
Description: Downtown exteriors of Boston banks. Monolithic view of Federal Reserve Bank from Summer Street. High rises in financial district. Keystone building. Severe angle view of Shawmut. Revolving clock at entrance to State Street Bank. Hornblower & Weeks, Hemphill, Noyes sign. First National Bank of Boston. Gillette headquarters along water.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/25/1977
Description: Bernadette Devlin McAliskey (Irish Republican activist) holds a press conference in Boston as part of a 13-city tour of the United States. Devlin speaks about her recent candidacy for the European parliament and says that her speaking tour is intended to help defray debts incurred during her campaign. Devlin's campaign was organized around a human rights platform. Devlin notes that international organizations have condemned the human rights abuses in Northern Ireland but that the United Nations and western countries will not speak out against Great Britain. Devlin expresses cynicism towards politicians and doubts about an American political response to the situation in Northern Ireland. She equates the oppression in Northern Ireland to the inequalities that exist in the United States and notes that Irish Americans engage in oppression of African Americans in Boston. Devlin compares the dearth of Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland to the lack of white working class support for busing in Boston; recounts the history of the Irish conflict from the Irish elections in 1918; and discusses changes that must be made by Great Britain in Northern Ireland. Devlin discusses her activities in the years since she left parliament; the use of violence by Catholics in Northern Ireland; the death of Lord Louis Mountbatten (British official). She accuses the international press of hypocrisy; answers questions about her speaking schedule and her life in Ireland.
0:58:09: Visual: Bernadette Devlin McAliskey (Irish Republican activist) prepares for a press conference as part of a 13-city tour of the United States. She sits at a small table in front of a microphone and takes questions from reporters. The press conference takes place in an informally furnished room; the walls are covered with handmade political posters. A reporter asks Devlin if she is doing the speaking tour to pay off debt accumulated during her recent campaign for a seat in the European parliament. Devlin says that her candidacy focused on human rights issues; that her candidacy was announced only three weeks before the election; that she ran on behalf of the H-Block political prisoners. Devlin says that her political party still has a debt of $10,000 after the elections; that she has come to the US to raise money through speaking engagements and from contributions. Devlin says that she has raised about $3,000 so far. A reporter asks Devlin's opinion on US involvement in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that Amnesty International, the International Red Cross and the European Court of Human Rights have all condemned the human rights abuses in Northern Ireland; that Jimmy Carter (US President) condemns human rights abuses all over the world, but ignores the deprivation of human rights in Northern Ireland. Devlin questions Carter's sincerity on human rights issues. Devlin says that the United Nations and western countries will not speak out against Great Britain; that she is trying to raise awareness of the situation among the white population of the US. The reporter asks Devlin if she expects a response from Irish Americans and Irish American politicians. Devlin says that she has a cynical view of politicians; that Edward Kennedy (US Senator) and Carter might speak out against the situation in Northern Ireland if they thought it would win them some votes; that she is not sure if Irish American politicians will take any action. Devlin says that the Irish American community has been made to feel guilty about giving money to Ireland; that they are made to feel like they are supporting violence. Devlin says that US politicians do not want Irish Americans to take interest in the situation in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that there are enough Irish Americans in the US to pressure the US government to take some firm action about Northern Ireland; that Irish Americans might become aware of the inequalities in US society if they started to think about the oppression in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that it saddens her to see Irish Americans involved in the oppression of African Americans in Boston. Devlin says that Irish Americans would get themselves on the "right side" of the civil rights struggle in the US if they understood the situation in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that Catholics in Northern Ireland were inspired by the civil rights movement in the US; that they identify with the struggles of African Americans. Devlin says that Irish Americans appear to be actively involved in the oppression of African Americans. Devlin says that she could probably raise money more easily if she avoided discussing the role of Irish Americans in the oppression of African Americans; that she is not willing to keep silent for money. Devlin says that she hopes Irish Americans will become more aware of their contradictory behavior; that many fled oppression in Ireland only to become oppressors in the US. 1:07:11: V: Devlin says that there is little Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland. She compares the amount of Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland to the amount of white working class support for busing in Boston. Devlin says that Great Britain needs to withdraw the undemocratic veto given to Protestants in Northern Ireland in 1921; that Great Britain needs to support change in Northern Ireland. Devlin reviews the history of the Irish conflict from the Irish elections in 1918 to the partition of the country by Great Britain. Devlin accuses Great Britain of partitioning the country in order to create a Protestant majority where there was none before. A reporter asks Devlin what she did during the years before the most recent election. The reporter comments that Devlin had not been visible on the political scene. Devlin responds that she has never stopped working for her cause; that the media ignored her activities because she was no longer a member of the British Parliament. Devlin says that the world took no notice of the violence used by Great Britain to oppress Catholics in Northern Ireland before 1969; that the oppressed Catholics are adopting the methods of violence used by Great Britain. Devlin questions why the Catholics are condemned for using violence, when they are only reacting to the violence used to oppress them. Devlin says that the international media have portrayed Lord Louis Mountbatten (British official) as a brave soldier and an aristocrat; that the oppressed peoples of the British Empire see Lord Mountbatten as a symbol of oppression. Devlin adds that public figures who represent the oppression of the British Empire will inevitably become targets of the oppressed. Devlin questions why the life of Mountbatten is worth more than the lives of all the Irish people who have died at the hands of the British; that the Irish victims fought for their country as Mountbatten did; that they were portrayed as terrorists by the international press. Devlin accuses the international press of hypocrisy. She says that the Irish people will not be "chastened" by the press coverage of Mountbatten's death. Devlin adds that if Great Britain was not occupying Northern Ireland, Mountbatten would be alive today. A reporter asks Devlin about Princess Margaret of England's comment that the Irish are "pigs." Devlin responds with a translation of an old Irish saying that "a pig thinks the whole world is pigs." Devlin answers questions about her speaking schedule and her life in Ireland. Devlin says that she has three children; that she does not have a regular job; that she works in the resistance movement. Devlin adds that she works with Catholics whose welfare benefits have been taken away by the British government. Devlin says that the money she raises will pay off her party's campaign debt. She adds that if the debt is paid, the rest of the money will go to a fund to benefit Irish prisoners.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/19/1979
Description: No audio through first half of video. Aftermath of blizzard of '78. Sunny day on impassable highway with abandoned, buried cars. Snow removal by bulldozer. Tire skidding. Driver cleans off covered car. Interview with John Tarbox, a driver from Rockland, MA who was stranded. He gets in his still buried car and starts it up. Interview with Donald Jones, a young army man from California, who has never seen snow. State police cruiser, helicopter.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/09/1978
Description: Blizzard of '78. Snow falling and blowing. People digging out on Western Avenue. Plow on Storrow Drive. Chains on truck tires. Students and dogs on Harvard Square streets blanketed with snow. Cross-country skiers and people on snowshoes. Shots inside the news van, with radio reports on blizzard in the background. People trudge along Mt. Auburn St. and Mass. Avenue in Cambridge; some carry provisions on sleds. Massachusetts Avenue street sign. Man shovels out storefront. Deep snow banks. Tractor trailer jackknifed on Mass Ave. bridge over Charles River. People wait in line in front of White Hen Pantry.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/07/1978
Description: Ride along Blue Hill Avenue. Decrepit, boarded up and abandoned storefronts. Many defunct businesses. Vacant lot. Zion Apostolic and Immanuel Pentecostal Churches. Warren Street intersection. Bridge Free Medical Van. Houses on Supple Road. Prince Hall Masonic Lodge. Sign for the Mayor's Office of Housing. Street sweeping vehicle. Mayor Kevin White walks with Julian Bond through neighborhood with press entourage. White answers questions about his candidacy and housing policy decisions as mayor especially involving the Boston Housing Authority, and says urban revitalization will come to reality within 3-5 years but need more federal $$. White and Bond meet local business owners and community members.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/20/1979
Description: Damaged remains of bombed prop jet outside Eastern Airlines hangar at Logan Airport. Yellow Massport fire truck. Fire fighters spraying wreckage. Group of men examine ruined fuselage and wing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/02/1976
Description: No audio. First half runs in black and white, second half in color. Exteriors of Boston City Hall, wide and close shots. People crossing plaza, and going through revolving door at entrance to City Hall. Municipal workers exit building; some carry briefcases.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/11/1977
Description: Boston City Hospital patient admitting desk with English and Spanish signs in corridor. Ambulance bay and emergency entrance sign. One ambulance departs with flashing lights and siren. Several takes of reporter standup on an investigation involving the hospital.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/03/1976
Description: Boston Garden seating plan showing ticket prices from $4 to $10 for Celtics games. Team photos from 1956-1957, 1964-1965, 1972-1973. Empty seats and concession stand. Interview with Celtics vice president Jeff Cohen.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/26/1979
Description: Mass of spectators gathered at Prudential Center finish line of Boston Marathon. David Ives watches. Cloudy, cold day. Airplanes fly around trailing message banners. First wheelchair finisher George Murray rolls in with police escort. Press photographers truck. Bill Rodgers wins a close race in 2:10:15. Randy Thomas and Kevin Ryan cross line. Rodgers climbs up to platform for Gov. Michael Dukakis, Mayor Kevin White and Will Cloney to congratulate him with laurel wreath and medal. He is then surrounded by press horde and police. More top runners cross. Bob Hall places third in wheelchair division. Other runners cross the finish line.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/17/1978
Description: Short interviews with runners at start line of Boston Marathon in Hopkinton on why they entered: John Dorice of Michigan, Raul Romero and Mitch Feingold of San Diego, Dusty Burke of Houston. Several helicopters circle overhead. Shots of legs and track shoes. Runners packed together awaiting start. John (The Elder) Kelley, wearing Cape Cod Track Club shirt, at start line. Mass of spectators, some up in trees; many wear parkas on this chilly day.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/17/1978
Description: Several takes of reporter standup on the Boston Public Library having to shut down the bookmobile. Exteriors of Boston Public Library older (McKim) building. Pan of the inscription “The Commonwealth requires the education of the people as the safeguard of order and liberty.” Move to the attached modern building entrance. Interiors of the Library. Sign reads “Effective Sunday, February 13, the Library will be closed on Sundays until further notice.” Patrons in line at circulation desk in lobby. Librarian stamps due dates on borrowing cards. Patrons at reading tables in research room.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/15/1977
Description: Start of Boston marathon. Bill Rodgers crosses finish line with police escort. Shots of runners and moving feet clad in running shoes.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/17/1978
Description: Some sound dropout at the beginning of the tape. Pam Bullard's 1978 review of school desegregation in Boston. The review focuses on the effects of desegregation on South Boston High School and the Joseph Lee School. Bullard reports that attendance is low at South Boston High School, but the school atmosphere and programs have improved. Bullard reports that the Joseph Lee School is a good example of a successfully integrated elementary school. The story includes footage of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) and interviews with Ruth Batson (African American community activist), Jerome Wynegar (headmaster, South Boston High School), David Finnegan (Boston School Committee), Robert Peterkin (headmaster, English High School). Bullard also interviews teachers and students at the Lee School and South Boston High School. The report ends with footage of students at the Lee School performing in a play of "The Wizard of Oz."
1:00:02: Visual: Shot of Boston skyline. Footage of Mayor Kevin White on September 9, 1974 calling on Boston residents to come together to make busing work. Footage of buses pulling up in front of South Boston High School on the first day of school in 1974. A crowd of antibusing protesters has gathered outside of the high school. The crowd jeers at the buses. Shots of the Boston Public Gardens. Footage of Ruth Batson (African American community activist) describing Boston as a "racist, violent city." She says that the violence stemming from school desegregation has spilled over into the streets and housing projects. Footage of police marching in formation on Bunker Hill Street in Charlestown. A large crowd is gathered outside of the Bunker Hill Housing Project. Pam Bullard reports that violence and racial hatred erupted in Boston when a federal court ordered the desegregation of schools in 1974. She notes that President Gerald Ford was forced to put the 82nd Airborne division on alert, in preparation for duty on the streets of Boston. Bullard reports that the toughest neighborhoods are quiet three years later; that African American and white children attend school together without incident. V: Shots of a lone police officer outside of South Boston High School; of African American and white children entering an elementary school. 1:01:39: Bullard reports that the effects of school desegregation will not be known for years; that some inconclusive studies have been made. V: Footage of African American and white students in an integrated elementary school classroom. Bullard notes that resistance to school desegregation in Boston has been overcome. V: Shots of a busy street in South Boston; of a young white boy outside of a church; of two elderly white residents sitting on a stoop in South Boston; of racist graffiti on a wall. Bullard reports that the fiercest opposition to court-ordered desegregation in the north took place in South Boston; that the opposition has calmed down since 1974. Bullard notes that school buses transporting students to and from South Boston High School are still accompanied by a police escort; that they are greeted by four police officers on duty at the high school. V: Shots of a police cruiser leading school buses up G Street to South Boston High School; of police officers outside South Boston High School; of African American students exiting the buses at South Boston High School. Bullard notes that metal detectors were installed at South Boston High School after the stabbing of a student three years ago. V: Footage of a student passing through a metal detector; of the halls of South Boston High School. Bullard reports that racial hatred and fear at South Boston High School have given way to a lingering uneasiness. V: Footage of a white teacher in a classroom in South Boston High School. He teaches to a classroom of eight African American and white students. Bullard notes that attendance is low at South Boston High School; that classes can be as small as four students. V: Shots of teachers teaching to very small classes at the high school. A teacher is heard saying that the official enrollment at South Boston High School is 600 students; that she estimates the enrollment to be 300 students. Shots of an African American teacher helping an African American female student at a desk; of students studying in classrooms; of teachers and students in sparsely populated classrooms. Bullard notes that the school was put under receivership by the federal court in 1975; that Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) was brought in by the court; that Wynegar and his staff have instituted many alternative programs at the school. V: Footage of Wynegar saying that there are fewer problems at South Boston High School because students are happy with the school programs. Shots of white and African American students studying in classrooms at the high school. Footage of a white female teacher saying that erratic attendance is the biggest problem at South Boston High School; that she finds herself repeating lessons for the benefit of students who were absent. Footage of Wynegar saying that South Boston High School ranks eleventh out of eighteen schools in attendance; that he though the school would rank last in attendance; that students appreciate the way they are treated at the school. Shots of students in classrooms; in the automotive shop. Footage of the white female teachers saying that alternative programs are attractive to students; that students also need to learn basic skills. 1:05:04: Bullard notes that there are divisions between those who support traditional classroom learning and those who support alternative programs. V: Shots of students in classrooms; of students in the lunchroom. Footage of an African American female student saying that South Boston High School is much better this year than in previous years; that students are getting along and are more focused on their classes. A white male student says that more students are attending school now. Another white male student says that students are getting along better. The white female teacher says that the atmosphere at the school has improved. Shots of the corridors in South Boston High School; of white and African American students playing basketball. Bullard says that there are no answers as to why the atmosphere at South Boston has improved; that innovative programs, low attendance and a wearing down of resistance to integration are all factors. V: Footage of white and African American students exiting South Boston High School; of school buses traveling down G Street away from the school. Footage of David Finnegan (Boston School Committee) saying that the community needs to realize that there are good solid programs in the Boston Public School System; that desegregation has added to the quality education provided by the schools; that the atmosphere in the schools is good, but can be improved. Bullard notes that even critics have conceded that the court-ordered magnet school programs have been good for the school system. V: Footage of African American and white students at a student art show; of the students' art projects. Bullard notes that there are opportunities in art and drama programs at the magnet schools; that there are opportunities for student internships; that there have been no racial problems at the magnet schools. Bullard reports that desegregation has been costly in financial and human terms; that the cost of the first year of desegregation was $20 million; that the second year of desegregation was $30 million; that police overtime ran up the cost of school desegregation. Bullard notes that costs have stabilized at $12 million over the past two years; that there is less of a need for police officers in the schools now. Bullard reports that Boston taxpayers have had to pay for expenses not covered by state and federal funds; that Boston taxpayers pay the highest property taxes in the nation. Bullard notes that the school budget remains at $175 million per year; that the city has lost 28,000 white students since 1972; that one expert says that 16,000 students were lost to desegregation. V: Shots of an empty classroom; of a teacher's attendance book; of a students in a sparsely populated classroom. Bullard adds that many students transferred to parochial schools, private academies and suburban schools; that many high school students dropped out. Bullard notes that the Lonegan family of South Boston refused to bus their children; that their daughter stayed out of school for a year. V: Footage of the Lonegan family. Mrs. Lonegan sits at a table in her home with her daughter Michelle and her son. Mrs. Lonegan says that she found a job making beds at a nursing home in order to pay her children's tuition at a private school. 1:09:07: Bullard reports that Christina Termini (student) lives in West Roxbury, but attends the Lee School in Dorchester. V: Footage of Termini leaving her home and walking to a bus stop. She boards the bus. Footage shot from the inside of the bus as it travels through the city. The white children on the bus sing songs. Audio of Termini's mother saying that the Lee School is ideal for Christina; that she has great confidence in the education her daughter receives at the Lee School. Shots of African American children walking to the Lee School from the Franklin Field Housing Project. Shots of a white student in French class at the Lee School; of integrated classrooms at the Lee School. Footage of a teacher saying that the children of the Lee School get along well; that racial differences are not important in the classroom. Bullard reports that attendance at the Lee School is low; that 600 students attend the school; that the school has 1,000 seats available; that white attendance could be higher. Bullard notes that the atmosphere at the school is excellent. V: Footage of the students performing "The Wizard of Oz" on stage. A young white female student says that she likes the facilities at the Lee School; that she has met a lot of friends. Footage of the white female teacher saying that she likes teaching at the Lee School. Footage of Robert Peterkin (headmaster, English High School) saying that many other urban school systems are experiencing the same problems as Boston; that desegregation has brought stability and strong programs to the system. Footage of Lee School students at their "Wizard of Oz" play. They sing "Ding, dong, the wicked witch is dead." Bullard reports that the Boston Public School System has made impressive progress since school desegregation began in 1974; that the system is no longer deliberately segregated and rife with political patronage. Bullard notes that parental involvement and stronger political leadership has improved the schools. V: Footage of Batson saying that the city has been forced to confront its racial problems through school desegregation. Shots of African American and white students entering an elementary school. Bullard reports that the federal court still runs the Boston Public School System. V: Footage of Batson saying that the process of desegregation has been valuable to some students. Shot of a Lee School student performing a song in the "Wizard of Oz" play. The audio of the student singing accompanies shots of a police officer in front of South Boston High School; of African American students entering South Boston High School; of Wynegar in front of South Boston High School; of a student passing through a metal detector; of African American and white students playing basketball; of an empty classroom; of the Lonegan family; of young African American and white students; of police cruisers leaving the school yard of South Boston High School. Children at the Lee School clap for the student performer on stage.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/01/1978
Description: Outdoor press conference with Brock Adams, US Secretary of Transportation, flanked by Sens. Edward Brooke and Edward Kennedy, on southwest corridor mass transit project. Fred Salvucci stands behind them. $669 million in federal funds approved. An additional $1 billion will be invested through public/private initiatives for urban development contingent with relocation of the orange line. Kennedy and Brooke make grateful remarks. Reps. Mary Good and James Craven. Mel King appears (in t-shirt and baseball cap) to acknowledge the efforts of community activists. This very large scale public works project will create jobs and keep the neighborhoods from being physically divided along racial lines. Adams answers question on air traffic congestion expected at large airports.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/11/1978
Description: Senator Edward Brooke concedes the Senate race to Paul Tsongas in the ballroom of the Copley Plaza Hotel. With him on the stage are supporters including State Sen. William Owens, his mother Helen Brooke, community leader Elma Lewis, and campaign field director Thomas Trimarco. Sharon Stevens reports from behind the cheering crowd, anticipating Brooke's speech; Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) is on the stage, waiting to interview Brooke after the speech. Brooke thanks the crowd, his family, and his campaign staff. Brooke congratulates Tsongas for waging an honorable campaign. Brooke says that he will do his best to assure the smooth transition of the Senate seat and that he continues to support full equality and justice for all. Brooke thanks voters for giving him the opportunity to have served as both State Attorney General and US Senator and assures those who did not vote for him that he has no bitterness toward them. Brooke shakes hands and answers questions from the press as he slowly makes his way off stage surrounded by an entourage. B-roll of Brooke supporters in ballroom after the speech.
0:58:17: Visual: Shot of Edward Brooke (US Senator) at a podium, waving to a cheering crowd in the ballroom of the Copley Plaza Hotel. A large campaign banner behind him reads, "Brooke - United States Senator." William Owens (State Senator), Helen Brooke (Edward Brooke's mother), Elma Lewis (African American community leader), Thomas Trimarco (field director for Brooke's campaign) and other supporters are all on stage with Brooke. Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) stands behind the cheering crowd, anticipating Brooke's speech. 0:59:15: V: Brooke thanks the crowd, which continues to cheer for him. Brooke says that preliminary results show Paul Tsongas (candidate for US Senator) to be the victor. Brooke congratulates Tsongas for waging an honorable campaign. Brooke says that he will do his best to assure the smooth transition of the Senate seat. Brooke thanks his campaign workers and contributors for their support. Brooke notes that there are US Senators who will continue to fight for senior citizens, minorities, the poor, and the handicapped. Brooke says that he continues to support full equality for women and equal justice for all. Brooke thanks voters for giving him the opportunity to have served as both State Attorney General and US Senator. Brooke assures those who did not vote for him that he has no bitterness toward them. Brooke says that he leaves the Senate with the feeling that there is much left to be accomplished; that he remains committed to the causes he has supported. Brooke paraphrases Lillian Hellman, saying that "I could never cut my consciensce to fit the fashion of any year." Brooke commends his supporters for their hard work, faith and courage. Brooke thanks his family, his campaign manager, John Volpe (chairman of Brooke's campaign committee), and Trimarco. Brooke says that he regrets not having spent enough time with the voters of Massachusetts during the campaign. He notes that his Senate responsibilities kept him in Washington D.C. during much of the campaign. Brooke says that he wishes Tsongas well; that he is sorry he did not deliver a victory for his campaign workers and supporters. Brooke says that he is very happy that a woman has been elected to the US Senate. He jokes about going out to look for a job and wishes his supporters well. 1:09:35: V: Brooke shakes hands with members of the crowd. Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) is on the stage with a microphone, waiting to interview Brooke. The crowd continues to clap for Brooke. Stevens recaps Brooke's speech. Brooke is still on the stage, talking to members of the media. The crowd remains on the floor. 1:11:11: V: Brooke remains on the stage. He waves to supporters. Members of the media surround him. He answers questions about the race and his future plans. A jazz band plays and the noise of the crowd is audible. Brooke attempts to move off of the stage. The media continue to surround him. Brooke waves at the crowd as he moves slowly off the stage. Flashbulbs go off as the media take his photograph. 1:15:51: V: Shot of a sign reading, "We still love you Ed. You're the best.". Shots of campaign supporters on the floor; of members of the crowd. Shots of the media and their equipment in the corner of the room. Members of the crowd mill about in the ballroom. Shot of the jazz band playing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1978
Description: Senator Edward Brooke holds a press conference at the offices of Robert McGrath (attorney for Edward Brooke) to address a story about his personal finances that appeared in the Boston Globe. Brooke admits to making a false statement about the receipt of a personal loan in an out-of-court deposition for his divorce. Brooke says that he did not commit perjury by making a "misstatement" in the divorce proceedings; that he did not inflate his financial liability in the divorce settlement. Brooke discusses the divorce settlement and says that it is "fair and equitable." Brooke denies allegations by the Boston Globe that he spends more than he earns. Brooke describes the sources of his income, including details of the purchases and estimated values of his properties. Brooke apologizes to constituents and asks for their forgiveness and understanding. The media asks probing questions about his personal life and finances. Brooke admits that his daughter is responsible for leaking the story to the press.
11:27:58: Visual: Members of the media are gathered in a small room at the offices of Robert McGrath (attorney for Edward Brooke). The media waits for the arrival of Edward Brooke (US Senator). Members of the press are crowded into the small room. Some are sitting and some are standing. Camera crews set up cameras and microphones. Walt Sanders (WBZ) is among the reporters. 11:30:19: V: Brooke arrives and stands at the front of the room. McGrath stands at his side. Brooke says that the story in The Boston Globe about his personal finances is mostly correct. He notes that there was an error in the caption. Brooke says that he has never admitted to swearing falsely about a $49,000 loan. Brooke apologizes for making a "misstatement and a mistake." He asks for forgiveness and understanding from his constituents. Brooke admits that he never received a $49,000 loan from A. Raymond Tye (Boston liquor wholesaler). He adds that he made a false statement about the receipt of the loan in an out of court deposition for his divorce case. Brooke says that he does owe $49,000; that $2,000 is owed to Tye; that the remaining money belonged to his mother-in-law; that the money was in his control and spent according to the wishes of his mother-in-law. Brooke adds that his divorce is a private matter; that he does not want to discuss the $47,000 debt; that the debt is a family matter. Brooke notes that the out of court deposition was never signed; that McGrath and Monroe Inker (attorney for Brooke's wife) stated in the deposition that the debt was a matter to be settled privately. Brooke states that the depositions were never entered into court. He apologizes for having made a misstatement about the loan. 11:34:57: V: A reporter asks Brooke about allegations that he has been spending more than he has earned. Brooke says that those allegations in The Boston Globe story are untrue; that he has never spent more money than he has earned. Brooke adds that he made rough estimates of his living expenses in a financial statement for the divorce; that his income is comprised of his salary, honoraria received from speaking engagements, stocks, and rental fees from his properties on St. Martin and Martha's Vineyard. Brooke discusses details of the purchases and estimated values of his properties on Martha's Vineyard and St. Martin, his home in Newton, and his apartment in Washington D.C. Brooke notes that he bought his home in Newton with funds realized from the sale of his first home in Roxbury. He adds that he is regularly paying off a $125,000 loan which he received to pay for the property in St. Martin; that he is also paying a mortgage on his apartment in Washington D.C. Brooke says that he has no cash and securities holdings, despite reports to the contrary by The Boston Globe. Brooke notes that he has one checking account from which he pays all of his bills. He says that he would like to put an end to rumors about his "vast holdings." Brooke adds that there is nothing wrong with making a profit from a "sane" investment in real estate. 11:39:16: V: A reporter asks Brooke if he committed perjury in making a "misstatement" in the divorce proceedings. Brooke says that he did not commit perjury; that he admitted under oath to owing $49,000; that he misstated the party to whom he owed the money. The reporter insists that Brooke committed perjury by saying that he owed all of the money to Tye. Brooke insists that he did not commit perjury; that he stated the correct amount of money owed; that he said the money was owed to Tye in order to avoid bringing a private family matter into the court settlement. The reporter asks if his misstatement inflated his financial liability in the divorce settlement. Brooke says that he had always intended to pay back the money; that he had spent the money for his family with his mother-in-law's consent; that he did not inflate his liability because he was obligated to pay back the money. Brooke notes that his wife knew about the debt to his mother-in-law; that the debt did not affect the settlement. Brooke adds that the settlement gave his wife their home in Newton and the property in St. Martin as well as an annual alimony payment of $18,000 and all health and medical insurance. Brooke explains that he has assumed all mortgage payments for the property in St. Martin given to his wife in the settlement; that the divorce settlement was fair and equitable. Brooke says that divorce settlements are very painful; that he does not know how The Boston Globe gained access to the depositions; that he has never read the depositions. Brooke says that he wants to clarify the facts surrounding the divorce settlement because of inaccuracies in the story by The Boston Globe. Brooke says that he thinks his constituents will forgive him; that he has a strong record of public service. Brooke says that his mistakes in the divorce proceedings were not related to public funds or to his performance as US Senator. Brooke adds that he has never tried to cheat his wife; that he has never received any money through dishonest means. Brooke says that he will not take legal action against The Boston Globe; that their story was substantially correct. Brooke notes that he never admitted to falsely swearing about his finances under oath, as was reported in the Globe. Brooke says again that he made a "mistake and a misstatement." Brooke says that the depositions were not provided to the Globe by him or his attorney; that the depositions must have been provided by his wife or her attorney; that the depositions were never filed in court; that he never read them; that they exist for the sole purpose of reaching a financial agreement in the divorce settlement. A reporter asks Brooke if someone has "an axe to grind" about the settlement. Brooke says that someone peddled this story to the news media all over the state of Massachusetts and in Washington D.C.; that the release of the story coincides with his bid for reelection to the US Senate; that he feels like he is being "blackmailed." Brooke says that he thinks the story is being used in an attempt to force him to give up more to his wife in the divorce settlement. Brooke notes that he has given "three-fourths" of his assets to his wife in the settlement; that the settlement is fair and equitable. Brooke admits that his daughter, Remi, is responsible for leaking the story to the media. A reporter asks Brooke if his mother-in-law "holds the note" to the personal debt. Brooke responds that there is no note. Brooke explains that his mother-in-law received an insurance settlement of $100,000 from a car accident which left her paraplegic. Brooke says that this money was spent according to the wishes of his mother-in-law; that she gave him control of this money; that much of this money was spent on her doctor's bills and expenses; that he has been paying this money back and owes about $30,000. A reporter notes that Brooke sponsored legislation forcing full financial disclosure from US Senators. Brooke says that he has always fought against corruption in government; that full financial disclosure by US Senators is ethically important. A reporter asks Brooke if he has received a "bum rap." Brooke says no.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/26/1978
Description: Visuals related to the district attorney's inquiry into the finances and divorce case of Senator Edward Brooke. Shots include court drawings, newspaper headlines, and articles from The Boston Globe, photographs of A. Raymond Tye (Boston liquor wholesaler) and Brooke, and the typed cover of the district attorney's inquiry.
1:54:07: Visual: Shots of court drawings relating to an inquiry into the divorce case of Edward Brooke (US Senator). The drawings include Brooke sitting in the courtroom, lawyers approaching the judge's bench and testimony being given. 1:56:50: V: Shot of newspaper articles and headlines about the Brooke case. One Boston Globe article has a headline reading, "Brooke admits to swearing falsely on $49,000 loan." Another article includes a photo of A. Raymond Tye (Boston liquor wholesaler). 1:57:44: V: Shot of the typed cover page of the district attorney's inquiry into the Brooke divorce case. 1:58:32: V: Shot of another court drawing related to the inquiry into the Brooke divorce case. The drawing shows the judge sitting at the bench. The stenographer is seated in front of the judge. The lawyers stand in the courtroom. 1:59:24: V: Shots of the front page of The Boston Globe from Tuesday, August 22, 1978. A headline reads, "Brooke case: Fraud found, he's cleared. Medicaid to in-law held illegal by state panel." 2:00:39: V: Shots of a still photo of Brooke.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/22/1978
Description: John Buckley announces Republican candidacy for governor of Massachusetts. Speaks about taxes and correctional institutions. In a second speech, he addresses the successes of Massachusetts, including the invention of the telephone, the safety razor, the Polaroid camera, and the pacemaker, the establishment of the first public school, and the founding of the first university.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/06/1978
Description: Interview with Buckminster Fuller. He discusses his work with gang members in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, teaching them the mathematics to build geodesic domes. He discusses the way the United States treats older people and medical treatment. He talks about human potential, productivity, and the ability to receive and process information. He discusses paranormal ideas and scientific discoveries. He talks about his daughter who died when she was four. He says that he has no fear of death. He talks very quickly throughout the interview. Reporter Art Cohen poses for cutaways and reasks several of the questions after the interview.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/10/1977
Description: Footage of the Bunker Hill Monument against a blue sky. Children play on the surrounding grass slope. Pans to adjacent columned building with US and Massachusetts State flags. Footage of the USS Constitution ("Old Ironsides") in Charlestown Navy Yard. “Welcome aboard” sign; masts without sails; shipmates with striped shirts. Early US flag with 15 stars hangs from bowsprit. Visitors ascend gangplank. National Park Service booth with attendant. Boston Naval Shipyard plaque. Aft view of ship.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/02/1976
Description: Suffolk County District Attorney Garrett Byrne gives press conference to ask Chief Justice Robert Bonin to remove himself from child sexual abuse case because of involvement in fundraising for defendant.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/06/1978
Description: Campaign brochures for candidates opposing Rep. Tip O'Neill in eighth congressional district. Barnstead, Florenzo DiDonato, Leo Kahian. Interview with Tip O'Neill about his campaign and the U.S. economy. O'Neill shakes hands and talks with constituents.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/22/1976
Description: African American beachgoers are escorted onto Carson Beach in South Boston by Metropolitan District Commission (MDC) police officers. Officers are posted on the beach, forming a ring around the African American beachgoers. Police officers station themselves at the edge of the water as children play. Police officers line up near the recreation building, observing the action on the beach. Three MDC police boats patrol the water. Three white males are escorted from the beach. White beachgoers stand around, observing the scene.
0:00:26: Visual: Four Metropolitan District Commission (MDC) police officers escort a small group of African American youth on to Carson Beach in South Boston. There are white swimmers and sunbathers on the beach. The Boston skyline is visible in the distance. A group of older white men sit under a shelter near the road. Cars pass by slowly on the road. Groups of white people sit under the shelters or sunbathe on the sand. 0:01:50: V: A larger group of African Americans walk on to the beach, accompanied by police officers. The group of African Americans ranges in age from young kids to adults. The group walks along the beach, heading toward the recreation building. Young African American children play in the water along the shore. Police officers stand casually on the beach as the African American beachgoers get settled . An older white man greets some of the African American youth. White beachgoers are seated near the African American beachgoers. Many whites stare at the African Americans. MDC police officers are lined up near the recreation building, observing the scene on the beach. 0:06:25: V: White residents and beachgoers are standing up, watching the African American beachgoers and the police on the beach. Police officers walk among the crowd. A police officer escorts a white man from the beach. A large line of MDC police officers circles approaches the recreation building to join the other group of officers. Approximately 50 police officers stand in front of the recreation building. Two helmeted police officers escort another white man from the beach. Another group of police officers walks toward the beach. A group of 20 more African Americans are escorted onto the beach by a police officer. 0:09:31: V: An older white man with a walkie talkie walks down the beach toward the crowd. Police officers stand at the edge of the water while African American children play. A few white beachgoers mill about near the police officers. Most white beachgoers sit separately from the African American beachgoers. Other white beachgoers observe the scene from further up the beach. A group of police officers stands in front of the recreation building. A group of five African American adults walk down the beach toward the African American beachgoers. They are followed by a police officer. 0:12:05: V: African American beachgoers are seated in small groups on the beach. A line of police officers forms a ring around them. A group of white beachgoers stands nearby. Shot of a young white boy sitting by himself on the beach. African American children play in the water. MDC police officers stand at the edge of the water. White beachgoers stand near the police officers, watching the African American children. The African American beachgoers enjoy themselves. Police stand by. The media record the scene. White beachgoers stand around in groups. Two MDC Police boats patrol the water. 0:15:33: V: A line of MDC police officers with riot helmets stands in front of the recreation building. MDC police officers observe the action on the beach from the MDC boats in the water. A line of police cordons off the African American beachgoers from the white beachgoers. Members of the media and white bystanders stand near the African American beachgoers. White beachgoers sit and stand apart from the African American beachgoers. Two police officers escort a young white man from the beach. A group of African American beachgoers heads toward the recreation building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/03/1977
Description: Presidential candidate Jimmy Carter enters North End Post 144, Veterans of Foreign Wars hall, shakes hands. A man introduces Carter; he also points out local politicians in attendance. Carter addresses a small crowd. He calls himself a 'Washington outsider' and appeals to them as same. Carter takes questions from the audience. He lays out his plans for national defense. He talks about the nuclear positions of the United States and the Soviet Union. Exteriors of the VFW.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/17/1976
Description: Tight shots of many customers' hands paying for merchandise with dollars at checkout counter of discount store. Sound effect of old fashioned cash register. Transaction with BankAmericard (Visa). Cashier places credit card and charge slip on sliding metal plate to make impression of number; then checks printed list of invalid account numbers. Reporter explains different ways to pay including cash and check, and the increasing availability of charge cards or electronic money.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/11/1977
Description: Celtics vs Houston Rockets with Moses Malone. John Havlicek, Scott, Curtis Rowe, JoJo White, Dave Cowens. Souvenirs for sale. Fans entering Boston Garden. Audience says tickets cost about $9 per seat. They discuss ticket pricing and player salary.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/06/1977
Description: Boston Celtics vs Houston Rockets at Boston Garden. Red Auerbach sits with Celtics owner Harry Mangurian. Quarterly statistics hoisted on cord to announcer's booth above court. Interview with Houston owner George Maloof.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/12/1979
Description: Boston Celtics vs. Houston Rockets. K.C. Jones and Satch Sanders coach these teams. Game play shot from courtside. Players include: Dave Cowens, Sidney Wicks, JoJo White, Kevin Stacom, Curtis Rowe, John Havlicek, Cedric Maxwell, Saunders, Bing, Boswell. Buzzing from commentary can be heard in the background. Crowd cheers.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/11/1978
Description: Charles Park Reservation along the Charles River watershed near the Dedham/Needham line. Woodsy area with snow cover. Footage from a moving car. Camera operator directs driver to get a better shot. Closeups on signs, including Dedham/Needham town line.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/23/1977
Description: Charles Street Jail exteriors. A reporter asks members of administration about issues with the Charles Street Jail and Deer Island regarding the possibility of a new combined facility. Stated problems with building a new jail include security and the size of the proposed site. Charles Street physical plant issues include plumbing, recreation facilities, eating facilities, kitchen facilities, and noise level.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/25/1977
Description: Bunker Hill Monument, exteriors of Charlestown High School, and Charlestown environs. A few police officers are stationed along Monument Square outside of Charlestown High School. Robert Murphy (Headmaster, Charlestown High School) stands in front of the school. School buses, accompanied by a police motorcycle escort, pull up in front of the school. African American students exit the buses and enter the school. Police officer tells camera operator that there is a standing order that the press has to remain across the street. A small number of photographers record the arrival of the buses from across the street. White students walks towards school and enter. Gary Griffith does several takes of reporter standup saying that the arrival of school buses at Charlestown High School was routine.
0:00:18: Visual: Shots of the Bunker Hill Monument; of the exterior of Charlestown High School. Two police officers stand outside of Charlestown High School. A white woman walks into the school. A muffled voice yells out, "No busing." Robert Murphy (Headmaster, Charlestown High School) stands out in front of the high school. Shot of Concord Street. Police motorcycles approach the school. Five police officers on motorcycles receive instructions from a police official. The motorcycles pull away. 0:03:41: V: School buses circle Monument Square and approach the high school. Police motorcycles escort the buses. A police officer stands near a Boston Police Department station wagon parked across the street from the high school. The officer watches the buses pull up in front of the school. African American students exit the buses and enter the school. Shot of the Hudson Bus Lines logo on one of the buses. The school buses pull away from the high school, accompanied by the police motorcycles. Murphy, a police officer, and a few school officials remain in front of the school. 0:07:06: V: White students walk toward the entrance of the school. Murphy and another school official greet a few of the students. A police officer is heard telling members of the media to move across the street. Two police officers stand casually on the corner of Bartlett Street and Monument Square. White students walk toward the school. Fewer than ten members of the media record the scene from the sidewalk across the street. A Hudson Bus Lines airport van pulls up in front of the school. An African American student is inside of the van. The van pulls away. The sidewalk in front of the school is empty. Some members of the media depart as two police officers walk up the opposite side of the street. Murphy speaks to two police officers on the corner of Bartlett Street and Monument Square. A man in a business suit speaks to a two-person camera crew. The street is quiet. Murphy and a police officer walk toward the school. 0:12:11: V: Gary Griffith stands outside of Charlestown High School. Griffith reports on the routine arrival of five buses at the high school this morning. He reports that there is no sign of unrest. The crew does two more takes of Griffith reporting on the story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1977
Description: Charlestown environs. Charlestown High School and Monument Square, Bartletts Street, Bunker Hill Street and St. Francis de Sales Church. Children ride bicycles in Monument Square. People are gathered in the park beside St. Francis de Sales Church. Shot from the park of the port. Racist, white supremacist and antibusing graffiti is visible on buildings on Medford and Main Streets. Shots of Medford and Main Streets. Pedestrians walking along streets. Children play at a playground. Audio goes in and out.
0:00:23: Visual: Shot across Monument Square of Charlestown High School. Shot of the top of the building, including school name carved into the stone. A broken window at the school has been patched up. The streets around Monument Square are quiet. A child rides his bike along the street. Shots of Bartlett Street, beside the school; of the Bunker Hill Monument. 0:05:35: V: Children ride their bikes in Monument Square. Shots of Bartlett Street; of racist graffiti on a building on Concord Street; of Concord Street. 0:09:24: V: Shot of Bartlett Street. Traveling shot up Bartlett Street. Traveling shot continues on to Elm Street and on to Bunker Hill Street. Traveling shot continues up Bunker Hill Street. Shot of St. Francis de Sales church. Cars are parked along both sides of Bunker Hill Street. An older man walks slowly along the sidewalk and stops in front of one of the houses. Two young men walk down the sidewalk of Bunker Hill Street. 0:14:26: V: Teenagers are gathered in the park beside St. Francis de Sales church. A group of people sit on steps in the park, looking at the view of the port. Gas tanks and industrial ships are visible in the port. Long shot of park and the port. Children play in the playground at the park. Shot of two children on swings with wrought iron fence in foreground. Shot of older man on a park bench with wrought iron fence in foreground. A girl takes a drink from a water fountain. 0:17:43: V: Traveling shot of Medford Street. Shot of a garage on Medford Street with white supremacist and antibusing graffiti. Traveling shot of Main Street. Mishawum Park apartments are visible. An older man sits with another person on the stoop of a dilapidated building. Shot of white supremacist and antibusing graffiti on a building at the corner of Essex and Main Streets. Video is distorted at end of tape.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/18/1976
Description: No audio at very beginning. Police officers and US Marshals are stationed outside of Charlestown High School. African American and white students exit the school. White students walk away from the school. African American students board buses and depart. Members of the media record the event from across the street, under Bunker Hill Monument. Gary Griffith does several takes of reporter standup from the South End. He gives an update on the senatorial race in the second Suffolk district. Elevated train tracks are visible on Washington Street. South End environs Shot of the Prudential Center. Washington St. street sign.
0:00:00: Visual: School buses pull up to the front of Charlestown High School. Graffiti on the front of the school has been painted over. A Boston Police Department cruiser pulls up behind the buses. A police officer on a motorcycle waits behind the buses. A US Marshal surveys the school from across the street. A group of officials and another US Marshal stand at the entrance of the school. Members of the media observe the scene from behind the fence at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. 0:01:49: V: An African American police officer is stationed at the corner of Monument Square and Concord Street. Shot of Concord Street. A group of white youth observe events at the school from across Monument Square. A girl sits on the fence watching the school. Three young men stand on the steps of a brownstone house on Monument Square. A group of police officers are stationed on Monument Square where the youth have gathered. Some members of the media stand at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. Shot of the Bunker Hill Monument. School buses and police motorcycle escorts remain parked in front of the school. Police radios are audible. Shots of Charlestown High School through the fence at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. 0:06:37: V: A police officer talks to school officials at the entrance of the school. Two white US Marshals and one African American US Marshal are gathered in front of the school. Police officials and a US Marshal confer at the corner of Monument Square and Bartlett Street. Police officers are stationed along Concord Street. Shot of the Bunker Hill Monument and the gathered media. 0:08:25: V: African American and white students exit the school together. Some white students walk away from the school. African American students and some white students head toward the buses. Shot of the exterior of Charlestown High School. A student makes a gesture of peace to the media. The video is overly bright during this scene. 0:12:02: V: Buses pull away from the school, followed by a police motorcycle and a police cruiser. White students are gathered at the corner of Concord and Bartlett Streets. Police officials leave the scene. Another group of white students is gathered on the corner of Bartlett Street and Monument Square. One girl makes a peace sign for the camera. Two police officers with riot helmets walk up the street. 0:14:24: V: Gary Griffith reports on the senatorial race in the second Suffolk district. He stands on a street corner. The Prudential Tower is visible in the distance. Griffith says that the election will be determined in the Democratic primary because there are no Republican or independent candidates; that the Democratic primary will take place in four days. Griffith makes a mistake in his delivery and does two more takes. The camera pans to Washington Street. Elevated train tracks run down the center of the street. Shot of the fire escape of a building on the corner of Washington Street. The windows of the building are boarded up. Shots of rowhouses and buildings along the street perpendicular to Washington Street. Shots of a garden behind a chain link fence. A colorful sign on the fence reads "Community Garden". Shot of the street and the Prudential Tower. Clothes are hanging out to dry on the fire escape of a building on the street. Shots of Washington Street and elevated train tracks. Shot of street sign for Washington Street. Shots of overgrown lot on the corner of Washington Street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/09/1976
Description: Police officers and US Marshals are present outside of Charlestown High School on the first day of school during the third year of court-ordered busing in Boston. The media is gathered across the street from the school, at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. Robert DiGrazia (Boston Police Commissioner) confers with police and surveys the scene outside of the school. A group of buses with a police motorcycle escort pulls up to the school. African American students exit the buses and enter the school. A crowd of white youth gathers near the school. Dennis Kearney (State Representative) and Robert Murphy (Headmaster, Charlestown High School) talk to the crowd of youths. DiGrazia and Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) confer near the crowd
0:00:05: Visual: Members of the media pass two police officers as they enter the enclosure surrounding the Bunker Hill Monument in Monument Square. Shot of three US Marshals walking toward Charlestown High School. An MDC Police officer exits a police vehicle parked near the high school. Shot of the exterior of Charlestown High School. A few police officers stand in front of the high school. Two US Marshals confer near the high school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: Police, including Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) disperse a crowd in Monument Square in Charlestown after an anti-busing demonstration. A crowd is gathered in front of Bunker Hill Housing Project. Police and US Marshals are stationed across the street from the crowd. The police maneuver in the street. The crowd jeers at police and at least one bottle is thrown. The crowd retreats into the housing project. Police move up Bunker Hill Street. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) is present.
0:58:19: Visual: A large crowd of mostly students is gathered along a street in Monument Square. Police are stationed in the street, monitoring the crowd. Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) addresses the crowd through a bullhorn, telling them to go home. Crowd begins to disperse, chanting periodically. An MDC Police vehicle is visible. 1:01:02: V: A Boston Police truck with officers seated in back drives past Charlestown High School and stops. MacDonald issues instructions to them through a bullhorn. Police officers exit from the back of the truck and gather in front of the high school. MacDonald issues more instructions through a bullhorn. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) confers with an officer across from the school. 1:02:37: V: The crowd disperses, moving along Bunker Hill Street. Shot of Concord Street and the intersection of Concord and Bunker Hill Streets. DiGrazia walks down Concord Street. Residents watch the action on the street from their windows. Graffiti on Concord Street marks a boundary of 100 yards from the high school: "100 yds. - Freedom Ends Here." Shot up Concord Street to High School. 1:03:45: V: Police are assembled at the intersection of Concord and Bunker Hill Streets. A crowd is gathered outside of the Bunker Hill Housing Project on Bunker Hill Street. Shots of crowd outside housing project; of police assembled in street. 1:05:25: V: The crowd cheers as police march back up Concord Street toward the high school. Members of the press, including Gary Griffith (reporter), follow the police up Concord Street. The crowd in front of the housing project moves into the street. A voice yells into a bullhorn, "Ok kids, it's your neighborhood." The crowd mills about in front of housing project. 1:07:08: V: A few police officers walk down Concord Street toward the housing project. A large crowd is still gathered in front of the housing project. A group of US Marshals walk down Concord Street. DiGrazia surveys the scene from the top of Concord Street. Voices can be heard taunting the police. DiGrazia walks down Concord Street toward the housing project. A woman walks her father back to his house, so that he won't get hurt "when the bottles start." 1:09:06: V: The large crowd in front of the housing project cheers loudly. Shot of a US Marshal walking away from the crowd. Noise of a bottle breaking against the pavement. Police on Concord Street watch the crowd in front of the housing project. The noise of a helicopter is audible. MacDonald shouts instructions through a bullhorn to police. Two US Marshals in riot helmets walk down Concord Street. A group of police march in formation from Monument Square down Concord Street. DiGrazia stands with a group of officers at the end of Concord Street, across from the housing project. A helicopter circles overhead. The crowd thins as people move into the housing project. MacDonald advances toward a crowd of youth, turning the corner onto Bunker Hill Street. DiGrazia and a group of officers and US Marshals follow MacDonald. MacDonald shouts into the bullhorn. A group of police officers exit the housing project and take a right as they continue to walk up Bunker Hill Street. Cars pass slowly on Bunker Hill Street. Small groups of people are gathered on the sidewalks. Police officers and the media walk in the street. 1:13:49: V: Three US Marshals in riot helmets confer on Bunker Hill Street. Police officers walk up the street. The media are gathered on a street corner. Two officers stand at the side of the street. One officer adjusts his riot helmet.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: Building which houses the offices of the Boston Housing Authority in Charlestown. Rundown buildings in the Bunker Hill Housing Project in Charlestown. Many of the buildings have boarded up windows or broken windows. Trash is visible along the sidewalks and walkways in front of the buildings. Shots of a series of photographs of a meeting between Joseph Timilty and Jimmy Carter. Interview with John Vitagliano (Boston Housing Inspection Commissioner). He says that the city of Boston must renovate its existing public housing instead of building new public housing. Vitagliano believes that a program of private-housing subsidies would be superior to the present public housing program. He says that the disastrous environment in public housing developments contributes to a cycle of poverty; that public-housing tenants and private landlords would benefit from a private-housing subsidies program. Vitagliano suggests that public-housing projects be shut down and sold to private developers. He admits that Boston's public housing projects are de facto segregated
1:00:02: Visual: Footage of the exterior of the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) building on Bunker Hill Street in Charlestown. The building is brick and covered with ivy. There are a few, small broken windows on the building. An elderly white woman enters the building. Shots of Bunker Hill Street; of the housing project buildings on Bunker Hill Street. 1:02:58: V:Shots of boarded up windows in a housing project building in Charlestown; of other housing project buildings. A street sweeping vehicle passes slowly in the street. The cameraman jokes about the rarity of seeing a street sweeper in Boston. A police cruiser drives slowly down the street. Shot of a housing project building at 90 Decatur Street. Shot of a boarded up window on the building. Obscene graffiti is written on the board which covers the window. Shots of broken windows in an apartment in another housing project building. Shot of a young white boy playing with a garden hose outside of the building at 90 Decatur Street. The bottom windows of the building are all boarded up. Shots of a nearby housing project which looks to be in better condition. Shots of the housing project building with broken windows. Trash is visible on the ground around the housing project buildings. 1:07:41: V: Shots of black and white photos of a meeting between Jimmy Carter (US President) and Joseph Timilty (State Senator). 1:09:32: V: Footage of John Vitagliano (Boston Housing Inspection Commissioner) being interviewed by Marjorie Arons in his office. Arons notes that there are substantial numbers of substandard public housing units in Massachusetts. Arons asks how decent housing will be provided. Arons asks if new buildings will be built or if old buildings will be rehabilitated. Vitagliano says that many federal programs are geared toward building new housing in cities; that these programs are not geared to the needs of older cities like Boston. Vitagliano says that the city needs funds to rehabilitate existing housing. Vitagliano says that five or ten older buildings in the city could be rehabilitated for the same amount of money needed to build one new building. Vitagliano notes that the cost of new housing continues to increase. Arons asks if there are enough housing units being built, or if people are unable to afford to buy housing. Vitagliano says that most people cannot afford to buy newly built homes. Arons asks about providing tenants with subsidies which would allow them to buy a private home. Vitagliano says that subsidies for private housing purchases allows public-housing tenants to escape the "ghetto environment" of public housing projects. Vitagliano says that subsidies for private housing purchases put tenants in a "normal" neighborhood environment; that these subsidies allow tenants to break out of the cycle of poverty. Vitagliano says that the environment in public housing projects is a "disaster." Vitagliano says that subsidies for private housing purchases provide benefits for homeowners who rent to these tenants. Vitagliano says that public-housing tenants could be matched up with private homeowners to fill vacant apartments; that smaller landlords would not face vacancies. Arons asks if subsidies for private housing purchases would have an inflationary effect on rents. Arons notes that there may not be enough private housing options for public-housing tenants. Vitagliano says that a small inflationary trend could result. Vitagliano says that a program which subsidizes private housing purchases would cost no more than the present program. Vitagliano notes that 10% of the city's population is housed in public housing projects under the present program. Vitagliano says that a tremendous amount of money is spent on the maintenance of existing public-housing units. Vitagliano says that the public housing buildings occupy valuable land in the city; that the city could be receiving tax money on that land if it were held privately. Vitagliano says that the city could sell the land to private developers if the public housing units were shut down. Vitagliano says that private developers could develop commercial buildings or private housing; that the city would receive tax money on those buildings. Vitagliano says that he has no detailed analysis to prove that a subsidies would cost less than public housing. Vitagliano says that he suspects that subsidies would cost no more than public housing. Arons asks if a housing subsidy program would have a short-term inflationary effect on rents. Vitagliano says that it is difficult to predict what would happen. Vitagliano says that any negative short-term effects would be balanced out by long-term benefits. Arons comments that some middle-income tenants receive housing aid under the present program. Arons asks if the middle-income tenants would be left out if subsidies for private housing were only provided to welfare recipients. Vitagliano says that money should not be diverted from welfare to housing; that money from another program should be diverted to fund both welfare and housing. Arons asks if subsidies for private housing would provide a reason to extend the rent control program. Vitagliano says that the concept of private housing subsidies is still theoretical; that he does not want to guess at the effect of subsidies on rent control. Arons closes the interview. The crew takes cutaway shots of Arons and Vitagliano. Arons asks how minorities and large families would fare in the private housing market if they were provided with subsidies. Vitagliano says that the public housing developments in Boston are just as segregated as the private housing market. Vitagliano says that the court has criticized Boston's segregated housing projects. Vitagliano admits that there are very few racially mixed housing projects in Boston. Vitagliano says that minorities and large families would have no more trouble in the private housing market than they have in the BHA system. Arons talks with the cameraman.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/21/1977