Description: On the 15th anniversary of Ms., Gloria Steinem, Marlo Thomas, and Ruth Westheimer hold a press conference on the magazine, it's magazine's evolution, and changes in the feminist movement. Interviews with many women on if they read Ms., what they think about the way it has changed, or what they read instead.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/23/1987
Description: A day in the life of The Ten O'Clock News
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/21/1988
Description: David Boeri reports on a demonstration by members of ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now), outside of the offices of Mayor Ray Flynn. Demonstrators advocate for more affordable housing in Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan. Footage of Peggy Jackson (ACORN demonstrator) and Neil Sullivan (Director of housing policy for the Flynn administration) debating the administration's affordable housing policy. Boeri notes that the demonstrators demanded the deed to a vacant lot in order to develop affordable housing themselves.
1:00:03: Visual: Shot of a multi-colored, hand-drawn sign reading, "Welcome to the mayor's office." A group of demonstrators stand outside of the mayor's office chanting, "Mayor Flynn, come on out." One of the demonstrators holds a sign reading, "ACORN: Housing Now." The demonstrators are affiliated with ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now). V: Shot of an office telephone; of the demonstrators. Shot of a sign reading, "Shelter is our need. Give us the deed." David Boeri reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) refused to meet with the demonstrators; that the demonstrators are fighting for affordable housing in Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan. V: Footage of Peggy Jackson (ACORN demonstrator) saying that her organization can build affordable housing if they are given one lot to build on. Boeri reports that the demonstrators say that the housing that the city calls "affordable" is not affordable for Roxbury residents; that the median income in Roxbury is $13,000. V: Footage of Jackson talking to Neil Sullivan (Director of housing policy for Flynn). Jackson says that fewer than 500 units of the city's affordable housing are affordable for Roxbury residents. Sullivan says that fewer than 500 housing units were built by the White administration between 1981 and 1983. Boeri reports that Sullivan blames the housing crisis on Kevin White (former Mayor of Boston) and a lack of federal money. Boeri reports that the Flynn adminstration is bundling low-income units with high-income units; that the Flynn administration is using the high-income units to subsidize the low-income units. V: Shots of Jackson; of the demonstrators. Footage of Sullivan saying that the Flynn administration has built over 500 low-income and moderate-income units in the first 6 months of 1986. The demonstrators respond that they cannot afford these units. Boeri reports that the demonstrators will have to incorporate themselves as non-profit developers before they can bid on a vacant lot. V: Footage of Sullivan telling the demonstrators that other groups have incorporated themselves and are bidding on land. Jackson tells Sullivan that the demonstrators do not have time to incorporate themselves; that another 3,000 people will be homeless before they are able to complete the legal paperwork. Shot of Sullivan. Boeri reports that the ACORN demonstrators ended up walking out; that the demonstrators say that they will take over the land next week. V: Footage of the demonstrators leaving the mayor's office.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/14/1986
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that a disproportionate number of African Americans have been infected with the HIV/AIDS virus. Vaillancourt reports that higher rates of transmission in the African American community are due to behavioral factors. Vaillancourt analyzes the differences in AIDS transmission between the white community and the African American community. Footage of Denise Cartier-Bennia giving a talk on educating people about AIDS in the African American community. Vaillancourt quotes statistics concerning HIV/AIDS infection rates. Report is accompanied by footage of African American residents of Roxbury and footage from interviews with people on the street.
1:00:07: Visual: A reporter on conducts interviews with African American men and women. An African American man says that he is "scared to death." An African American woman says that she doesn't know if "it is stronger on the white end or if it's stronger on the black end." Another African American man at Downtown Crossing says that no African American stars have died of AIDS; that he fears the development of an"unwarranted stigma" on the African American community due to AIDS. Shots of African Americans walking on a commercial street. Meg Vaillancourt reports that a disproportionate number of African Americans have been diagnosed with AIDS in the US. V: A chart list statistics on screen. The statistics read that 25% of AIDS victims are African American. Vaillancourt reports that African Americans represent 12% of the population. Shot of an African American woman with her back to the camera. Statistics read that African American women are 13 times more likely to get AIDS than white women; that Hispanic women are 11 times more likely to get AIDS than white women. Shots of an African American infant being examined by a white female doctor. Statistics read that 82% of infants with AIDS are African American; that 91% of infants with AIDS are non-white. Footage of Denise Cartier-Bennia (professor) saying that AIDS is affecting whole families in the African American community. Shot of a group of African Americans waiting for public transportation. Vaillancourt reports that the mode of transmission for AIDS is different in African American and white communities. V: Statistics read that homosexual/bisexual AIDS patients are 73%white, 16% African American and 11% Hispanic. Statistics read that heterosexual AIDS patients are 50% African American, 25% Hispanic and 25% white. Footage of Cartier-Bennia speaking. Shots of a group of African American teenagers crossing an urban street; of a drug user preparing a dose of heroin. Vaillancourt reports that Cartier-Bennia has studied the factors contributing to the high rate of AIDS in the African American community. V: Statistics read that African American women are 5 times more likely to get AIDS from contact with a drug user than from contact with a bisexual man. Shot of a group of African Americans boarding an MBTA bus. Vaillancourt reports that the immigration of infected immigrants from Haiti and Africa may be escalating the problem. V: Shots of military recruits laying down barbed wire in a field. Statistics read that 0.9 out of 1000 white military recruits test positive for the AIDS antibody; that 3.9 out of 1000 African American military recruits test positive for the AIDS antibody. Footage of Cartier-Bennia talking about the appearance of the AIDS antibody in military recruits. Cartier-Bennia says that one out of every 250 recruits was infected; that 10% to 30% of these recruits will eventually develop AIDS. Cartier-Bennia says that the African American community is in a "precarious position." Vaillancourt reports from a street corner. Groups of African Americans wait for public transportation across the street. Vaillancourt notes that AIDS is not an African American disease; that behavior creates the risk of transmission, not race. V: Footage of Cartier-Bennia saying that risky behavior leads to aids; that knowledge may be the most effective weapon against AIDS; that African American and Hispanic politicians have been silent on the subject of AIDS and the minority community. Shot of a group of African Americans boarding an MBTA bus. Footage of Cartier-Benia talking about the unwillingness of African American churches to discuss AIDS. Shot of an African American man crossing a street. Footage of Cartier-Bennia saying that AIDS is another problem which needs to be tackled by minority communities if they want to survive into the year 2000. Shots of African American children; of African Americans on the street; of African Americans waiting for public transportation.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/17/1987
Description: Massachusetts has decided to allow businesses and insurance companies to test people for the AIDS antibody. Critics complain that the proposed policy favors insurance companies over patients. Paula Gold, Massachusetts Secretary of Consumer Affairs, speaks at a press conference. She says that testing will be allowed under limited circumstances and controlled conditions. The Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts is a strong opponent of the policy. Don Polk of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts speaks at a press conference. He condemns involuntary testing except for clear public health reasons. He believes that the policy does not contain appropriate measures to ensure patient confidentiality and is discriminatory against African American life insurance policy holders. He states that the proposed policy fails to take into account the discrepancy in life expectancy between African American AIDS victims and white AIDS victims. The Urban League believes that the new state policy de-emphasizes public health education campaigns, which are important in minority communities. Public health informational brochures and African Americans at a bus stop. Following the edited story is footage of public health education literature. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Boston City Council delays vote on school reform
1:00:01: Visual: Shots of medical laboratory workers undertaking the processes involved in testing vials of blood. Callie Crossley reports that businesses and insurance companies have been lobbying for the right to test for the AIDS antibody. Crossley reports that Paula Gold (Secretary of Consumer Affairs) and the administration of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) have decided to allow testing for life insurance. V: Footage Gold at a press conference. Gold says that testing will be allowed under limited circumstances and under controlled conditions. Crossley reports that critics complain that the proposed policy favors insurance companies; that Peter Hiam (former Insurance Commissioner) resigned in protest of the policy. Crossley reports that the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts also disagrees with the proposed policy. V: Footage of Don Polk (Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts) at a press conference. Polk says that involuntary testing of any segment of the population should only take place for clear public health reasons; that involuntary testing will have a "chilling effect" on those who have a reason to seek testing; that involuntary testing includes tests taken as a precondition for life insurance. Shot of a white audience member at the press conference. Crossley adds that Polk says that some provisions of the policy discriminate against African Americans; that African Americans are more likely to purchase life insurance policies for under $100,000. Crossley reports that the new provisions state that purchasers of life insurance policies under $100,000 will not get payment if they die of AIDS within two years of purchasing a policy. V: Shots of African Americans waiting for public transportation in Roxbury; of an African American man crossing the street; of African Americans boarding an MBTA bus. Footage of Polk at the press conference. Polk refers to evidence that African American AIDS patients have an average life expectancy of three to nine months after their initial diagnosis; that white victims have an average life expectancy of two years. Polk says that the proposed policy fails to take into account the discrepancies between African American and white life expectancies. Shot of an African American woman in the audience. Crossley reports that a spokesperson from Gold's office said that Gold "did not feel that the regulations discriminated against blacks." V: Shot of Gold speaking at a press conference. Crossley notes that Polk does not think that the proposed regulations go far enough in guaranteeing confidentiality. V: Shot of an African American man taking notes at Polk's press conference. Polk says that there are confidentiality measures in the regulations; that there is no enforcement mechanism to ensure adherence to those measures; that we live in an age of "rapid information processing." Shot of a "public health fact sheet" released by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health; of public health informational brochures about the AIDS virus. Crossley says that the Urban League accuses the new regulations of taking emphasis away from public health education and initiatives. Crossley notes that Polk says that public health campaigns are important in minority communities; that African Americans make up 25% of the 25,000 current AIDS victims. Crossley reports that the Urban League will recommend at a public hearing that the new proposed policy be rejected.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/03/1987
Description: Abbie Hoffman is posthumously remembered for his career as a political activist. Footage of Hoffman's theatrics from political rallies and appearances from 1960s-1980s. Clips of reporters talking to Hoffman during his last activism and trial participation in Northampton, Mass.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/13/1989
Description: Deborah Wang reports that minority workers are underrepresented in the advertising industry. Wang interviews Bink Garrison (President of Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson) about the lack of minority workers in the industry. Wang's report includes footage of workers in the offices of Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson (advertising firm). Wang reports that Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson is participating in industry efforts to attract students into the industry. Wang notes that the Ad Club at English High School teaches students about advertising. Wang reports that Ad Club students wrote and acted in a public service announcement last year. Wang's report includes footage of the public service announcement produced by the Ad Club. Wang's report also features interviews of Pam Piligian (Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson) and students working in the Ad Club. B-roll follows of workers at the offices of Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson, interiors of the lobby, closeups on advertisements.
1:00:13: Visual: Footage of white workers in the offices of Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson advertising agency. Deborah Wang reports that most of the workers at the Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson advertising agency are white. V: Shots of workers discussing projects and working at their desks. Footage of Bink Garrison (Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson) being interviewed by Wang. Garrison says that Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson is typical of the advertising industry; that it is hard to break into the advertising industry. Shot of a young African American male working on a project at Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson. Footage of Garrison saying that talented minority students do not often choose to enter the advertising industry because entry-level salaries are low. Wang reports that minority workers are underrepresented in the advertising industry. Wang reports that the Ad Club at English High School teaches students about advertising and the advertising industry. V: Footage of white and minority students working on ads and discussing projects at the Ad Club. The students are in a classroom. Wang reports that students from the Ad Club wrote and acted in a public service announcement last year. V: Footage of the public service announcement about the importance of a high school diploma. Footage of an African American male student and an African American female student practicing lines for another public service announcement. Footage of Pam Piligian (Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson) saying that the students will be producing public service announcements for radio this year; that the kids are enthusiastic about the project. Footage of Michelle Wilcox (11th grade student) saying that the advertising projects allow her to express herself and her opinions. Wang reports that the advertising industry is trying to recruit minority workers through efforts like the Ad Club; that the industry is working to provide internships and mentors to students. Wang notes that the industry leaders hope that a few of the students will end up choosing a career in advertising. V: Footage of Garrison saying that the program introduces students to the industry; that the program allows students to become acquainted with the business world. Shots of minority students in the Ad Club.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/01/1989
Description: Meg Vaillancourt interviews Sterling Anderson of the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) outside of the Dudley Branch Library about the lack of affordable housing in the Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan areas. Anderson says that the city is not doing enough to provide affordable housing for low-income residents. Anderson questions the city's definition of low-income. He adds that most residents do not make enough money to meet the city's definition of low-income. Anderson and a group of ACORN protesters march to the offices of the Boston Redevelopment Authority on Washington Street in Dudley Square. Anderson and the protesters enter the office and confront Ricardo Millet of the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) about the city's affordable housing policies. The protesters read a list of demands including that 70% of all new developments in the area must target low and moderate-income residents. The protesters demand information on all new planned developments in the Roxbury/Dorchester/Mattapan neighborhoods. Millet discusses the city's affordable housing policy with the protesters. He gives them handouts including a list of planned developments in the area. Millet says that the BRA is trying to provide affordable housing despite a lack of subsidies from the federal government.
1:00:14: Visual: A fire engine pulls out onto Washington Street. Elevated train tracks are visible. An African American firefighter operates the rear of the truck. Cars pull to the side of a congested street to let another fire engine pass. 1:01:22: V: Meg Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Sterling Anderson (ACORN). Vaillancourt asks about the march organized by ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now) to protest the affordable housing policies of the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA). Anderson says that redevelopment in the areas of Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan is not geared toward the current residents of those areas; that ACORN is trying to put pressure on the mayor and the BRA to include housing for current residents. Anderson says that most of the residents of those areas do not make more than $13,000 per year; that one-bedroom apartments are selling for $18,000 in one of the new developments. Anderson says that Ray Flynn (mayor of Boston) deserves credit for developing housing; that these efforts are insignificant if the residents of these areas cannot live in the new housing. Anderson talks about how poor people have been thrown out of areas like the South End. Anderson says that the residents need housing, not shelters; that the city needs to commit itself to affordable housing. Anderson says that the city defines low income as a salary of $18,000 to $23,000 per year; that the city defines a moderate income as an income of $23,000 per year. Anderson says that he defines low income as under $13,000; that he defines moderate income as $13,000 to $24,000 per year. Vaillancourt asks if the city is really serving its lower income residents. Anderson says that the city is not serving those residents; that a lot of people cannot afford housing; that the city is pushing low-income residents out of the areas of Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan. Vaillancourt asks if race is the issue. Anderson says that it is an economic issue; that the low-income residents of Roxbury are African American; that there are low-income whites with the same problems in South Boston, Chelsea, and East Boston. Vaillancourt asks if Anderson doubts Flynn's commitment to the neighborhoods. Anderson says that he respects Flynn; that Flynn needs to understand that low-income residents are committed to fighting for affordable housing; that he needs to help these people. Anderson says that he cannot afford to give up on the fight for affordable housing; that he will have no place to live in five years if he does not put up a struggle. Anderson says that shelters are not the answer to the housing problem; that poor people do not want to live in shelters. Anderson says that there are some people who benefit from shelters; that the majority of people with low incomes are intelligent and hard-working. Anderson says that he hears the same statistics from the city at every meeting on affordable housing; that the city needs to make a commitment because working people cannot afford housing right now. The crew takes cutaway shots of Vaillancourt and Anderson. Anderson says that the BRA says the same thing at every meeting; that public housing advocates are always pushing for more low-income housing. Anderson says that 70% of the housing in the areas of Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan needs to be for low- and moderate-income people. Anderson says that people in these areas have no place to live, despite the BRA's commitment to affordable housing; that developments in these areas should be priced at $35,000 instead of $65,000. 1:08:18: V: Housing protesters gather on the sidewalk on Washington Street, outside of the BRA's Dudley Office. The elevated train tracks are visible. The protesters chant, "We want housing. We won't wait. 2, 4, 6, 8." The protesters gather behind a banner reading, "ACORN." Shot of the BRA sign above the entrance to the office. The protesters march slowly into the BRA offices. The protesters chant, "What do we want? Housing. When do we want it? Now." The majority of the protesters are African American. The protesters file into the building. 1:10:48: V: The housing protesters enter a large room swith chairs set up for a meeting. The protesters chant, "2, 4, 6, 8. We want housing. We won't wait." The protesters stand at the side of the room, holding protest signs and chanting. Shot of a sign reading, "Third notice: Please be advised that you are required to build affordable housing." Shots of individual protesters. Ricardo Millet (BRA) sits in one of the chairs in the meeting room. He watches the protesters with interest. Millet invites the protesters to sit down. Anderson says that the protesters will remain standing. Anderson addresses Millet. Anderson says that there is a housing shortage in the areas of Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan; that the BRA housing policy is ineffective; that residents of these areas need housing that they can afford. Anderson says that the newly developed housing target people with incomes of at least $23,000 per year; that most residents make less than $13,000 per year. Anderson says that the BRA and the city of Boston need to make a commitment to low-income housing; that 70% of the new development needs to target low-income residents. Anderson demands information on new developments planned for the Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan areas. Anderson says that the BRA has not been forthcoming with that information; that the BRA needs to work with developers work with developers who have committed to building low-income housing. 1:14:34: V: An African American woman addresses Millet. She reads a list of ACORN demands: the cessation of development on Fountain Hill by June 15 unless the development is 70% affordable to those with low- and moderate-incomes; 70% of all new housing must target low- and moderate-income residents; that ACORN wants information on plans for new development in the area. Another protester says that the 70% quota applies to housing in the Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan areas; that many residents of these areas make less than $13,000 per year; that an average income is more than $26,000 per year. The protester says that the voices of the poor must be heard. The protesters applaud. Anderson asks for a map of planned developments in the Roxbury/Mattapan area. Anderson says that the protesters will not allow new developments to be built if they cannot live in them. Millet stands to face the protesters. He listens as Anderson speaks. 1:16:10: V: Millet addresses the protesters. He invites the protesters to sit down and to discuss the issues with him. Anderson says that the protesters have been sitting in meetings for months; that the protesters want a list of the planned developments in the area. Millet says that he has never been asked for a list of the planned developments before now. Millet offers to provide the protesters with a list of projects currently undertaken by the BRA. Millet gives copies of a handout to the protesters. Millet notes that the BRA, under the Flynn administration, has approved 912 units of housing. Millet adds that the handout includes a list of approved projects as well as their locations, developers and affordablility. Shot of the printed handout. Millet says that 60% of the units in the approved developments are affordable to low- and moderate-income people. Shot of statistic on the handout reading, "60.4% of units below market rate." Anderson asks Millet to define low- and moderate-income. Millet says that the BRA will work with the protesters on the issue of low-income housing; that the BRA and the city want to respond to the needs of low-income people. Millet notes that it is hard to achieve these goals because the federal government has stopped subsidizing housing. Millet adds that the city has done well to achieve a 60% affordability rate in its new projects. Millet gives out copies of another handout. Millet explains that the handout covers the BRA's and the city's positions on affordable housing; that the handout describes the problem of affordable housing. Millet notes that the city is aware of the housing shortage. Anderson says that he gets the same responses every time he meets with the city and the BRA about housing; that no one is responding to their concerns. Shot of the crowd of protesters. Millet says that he has met with ACORN representatives in the past; that the BRA agrees with ACORN on the need to provide affordable housing; that the BRA is trying to achieve these goals without subsidies from the federal government. Millet stresses the fact that the BRA is committed to achieving these goals; that the BRA is trying their best to build affordable housing; that the BRA's achievement of a 60% affordabliltiy rate is remarkable.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/28/1986
Description: Marcus Jones reports that some African American leaders, including Jesse Jackson, are promoting the use of the term "African American" instead of the term "black." Comedian Charles Cozart on the Arsenio Hall Show. Interview with Northeastern lecturer Robert Hayden, who promotes the use of the term. Hayden says that it is an accurate term that reflects the roots and history of African Americans. Interview with Elma Lewis, the Director of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, who believes that the term "black" is more inclusive. Lewis says that not all black people in the US are Americans. Interviews with students and teachers at the Ellis School in Roxbury about which term they prefer. Following the edited story is additional footage of Jones speaking to students and teachers at the Ellis School. Jones answers questions about his report on Jackie Robinson and the race relations of the time. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Meg Vaillancourt reports that the Boston School Committee is deeply divided over whether to renew the contract of Laval Wilson
1:00:11: V: Footage from the Arsenio Hall Show. Charles Cozart (comedian) tells jokes in front of the audience. Marcus Jones reports that the African American community is debating the use of the term "black." Jones notes that Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) is urging the use of the term "African American" instead of "black." V: Shots of Jackson addressing an audience. Shots of African Americans in the audience. Footage of Robert Hayden (Lecturer, Northeastern University) saying that many people of color have been calling themselves "African Americans" for years. Hayden says that many universities have departments of African American studies. Hayden says that people of African descent were living in Boston in the eighteenth century; that those people referred to their community as "African." Hayden says that the term is "accurate" and "useful." Footage of Elma Lewis (Director, National Center of Afro-American Artists) being interviewed by Jones. Lewis says that she does not have to follow the trend. Jones notes that Lewis is opposed to using the term "African American." V: Footage of Lewis saying that Africa is a whole continent. Lewis says that the terms "Nigerian American" or "Jamaican American" are more appropriate than "African American." Lewis says that the term "black American" is more inclusive. Footage of Jones addressing a class at the David A. Ellis School in Roxbury. Jones asks how many of the students are aware of the debate surrounding the term "African American." A few students raise their hands. Jones says that he asked students and teachers at the Ellis School in Roxbury about the terms "African American" and "black." V: Shots of students. Footage of an African American female student saying that it does not matter which term is used. Footage of a Latina teacher saying that there should be no mention of race in identification terms. Footage of an African American teacher asking if the term would be extended to "Afro-English" for blacks living in England. Footage of an African American male student saying that he likes the term "brown." Footage of a female student saying that it doesn't matter. Footage of Hayden saying that the term might inspire some to think about their African roots. Hayden says that some people might begin to look into their family histories. Footage of Lewis saying that it is important to teach children to be proud of their African roots. Lewis says that not all black people in the US are American; that all black people in the US are black. Shots of African Americans walking on a street; of a group of students walking away from a school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/15/1989
Description: Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge exhibit a collection of Norman Rockwell's paintings in celebration of Black History Month. The paintings in the exhibit depict African Americans, often in subservient positions, as well a his later works depicting moments in the Civil Rights Movement and African American history. People from the museum give historical context. Closeups on many of the paintings. Following the story is b-roll of the exhibit and individual paintings.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Maureen Hart Hennessey (curator, Rockwell Museum) saying that American painter Norman Rockwell's work tells a lot about how America viewed the civil rights movement. Hennessey points out that there was often a lag time between the occurrence of an actual event and the publishing of a Rockwell painting portraying the event. Hennessey says that it took time before these events entered "the mainstream consciousness." Shots of the Rockwell paintings, The Problem We All Live With and Murder in Mississippi. Shots of visitors on a tour of the Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA. Carmen Fields reports that the Rockwell Museum is commemorating Black History Month by exhibiting Rockwell's work featuring African Americans. V: Shots of paintings on display for the exhibit. Fields notes that Rockwell's first piece of work featuring an African American was from 1934. V: Footage of a tour guide at the Rockwell Museum speaking to visitors. She stands in front of a painting. The tour guide talks about illustrations for the Saturday Evening Post done by Rockwell. The tour guide notes that the Saturday Evening Post was aimed at white readers; that African Americans were often pictured in a subserviant position or not at all. Shots of two pieces of art hanging on the wall of the museum. Fields says that Peter Rockwell was the model for The Boy in the Dining Car, which was on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post in the 1940s. V: Shot of The Boy in the Dining Car. Footage of Hennessey being interviewed by Fields. Hennessey says that the painting focuses on the white boy in the painting; that many people are more drawn to the African American waiter who is standing beside the table in the painting. Hennessey notes that most white Post readers encountered African Americans as workers in subserviant positions. Fields reports that none of Rockwell's work from the late 1940s to the early 1960s featured people of color; that Rockwell was caught up in the turbulence of the 1960s while working for Look Magazine. Fields notes that one of Rockwell's most famous paintings portrays school desegregation in the South. V: Shots of a male tour guide at the Rockwell Museum talking to visitors. Shots of visitors in the gallery. Shots of paintings in the gallery. Shot of the painting, The Problem We All Live With. Footage of Hennessey saying that Rockwell paid great attention to detail. Hennessey talks about Rockwell's efforts to capture the details of the painting, The Problem We All Live With. Footage of a tour guide at the Rockwell Museum speaking to visitors about the painting, Murder in Mississippi. Shots of the tour guide; of the painting. The tour guide talks about the details of the painting. Fields reports that Look Magazine opted to publish a less detailed version of the painting, Murder in Mississippi; that the original was too graphic. V: Shot of a less detailed version of the painting. Fields reports that Rockwell used his neighbors as models for his paintings of African Americans; that his neighbors were the only African Americans in the area. V: Shots of black and white photographs of Rockwell's models. Footage of Hennessey talking about an African American family who lived in Stockbridge. Hennessey says that the children of the family were used as models in the paintings The Problem We All Live With and New Kids in the Neighborhoodl Shot of the painting, New Kids in the Neighborhood. Fields reports that Rockwell has been described as apolitical; that his works were commissioned by others. V: Shot of a black and white photo of Rockwell sitting in front of his painting, The Golden Rule. Shots of the painting The Golden Rule. Audio of Hennessey saying that Rockwell was a "social commentator." Hennessey says that Rockwell could have retired when he left the Saturday Evening Post in 1963; that Rockwell began doing paintings about the civil rights movement after 1963. Hennessey says that she believes that Rockwell supported the civil rights movement.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/24/1989
Description: Mayor Ray Flynn welcomes a delegation of African diplomats to Boston at a ceremony in City Hall. Irene Smalls (Director of Public Information for Flynn) and Flynn present a book about Boston to each diplomat. Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) addresses the delegation. He reads a proclamation from the Boston City Council, welcoming the diplomats to Boston. City Councilors David Scondras, Bruce Bolling and Maura Hennigan are introduced to the delegation. The ambassador from Gambia thanks Flynn and the city of Boston for receiving their visit. Yancey delivers closing remarks at the ceremony. He thanks the ambassadors. The diplomats and city officials socialize at a reception at City Hall. Flynn circulates among the members of the delegation. Flynn and one of the diplomats raise their glasses in an informal toast. Members of the delegation speak to one another.
1:00:00: Visual: Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) addresses a delegation of African diplomats at City Hall. Flynn speaks into a microphone about the historic heritage of Boston. The African delegation stands and listens. Flynn talks about John F. Kennedy (former US President) and other political leaders from Boston. Shots of the members of the African delegation. Flynn welcomes the delegation to Boston. Shot of Flynn from the back of the room. Shots of the members of the delegation. Flynn presents books to the members of the delegation. Irene Smalls (Director of Public Information for Flynn) reads out the names of the delegation members. Flynn hands gifts of the book "A Book for Boston," to ambassadors and representatives from Benin, Burundi, the Central African Republic, Guinea, the Ivory Coast, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Togo, Uganda, Cameroon, Lesotho, Swaziland, Mali, the Congo, Sierra Leone, Kenya, and Gambia. Smalls has trouble pronoucing some of the ambassadors' names. Flynn shakes hands with each ambassador as he hands him the book. The ambassadors from Chad and Gabon are absent. Shots of the books on a table. Shots of the members of the delegation. 1:06:54: V: Smalls introduces Charles Yancey (Boston City Council). Yancey addresses the delegation. Yancey reads a proclamation from the Boston City Council. The proclamation notes that the delegation has come to visit Boston as part of the African Diplomats' Project, sponsored by the United States Information Agency and the African American Institute of Washington DC. The proclamation talks about the mission of the African Diplomats' Project. The proclamation welcomes the diplomats to Boston. Shots of the members of the delegation; of the proclamation in Yancey's hands. Yancey compliments Flynn on his sensitivity to the interests of all people. Yancey says that he has a copy of the proclamation for each ambassador. The delegation applauds Yancey's speech. 1:09:10: V: Flynn invites City Councillors David Scondras, Bruce Bolling and Maura Hennigan to the front of the room. Scondras, Bolling and Hennigan walk to the front of the room. Bolling shakes hands with the members of the delegation. Chris Ianella (Boston City Council) is announced. The ambassador from Gambia addresses the group. The ambassador thanks Flynn and extends greetings from the people of Africa to the people of Boston. The ambassador says that the group has come to Boston to learn from the city; that the group will return to their countries more able to meet the needs of modern Africa. The ambassador thanks Flynn and the city for giving the delegation a warm welcome. He wishes continued success to the city. The ambassador shakes hands with the councillors. Small invites Yancey to give closing remarks. Yancey notes that the city of Boston is honored to receive the delegation. He says that there are strong ties between Boston and the countries and Africa. Yancey thanks the delegation. The delegation applauds. 1:13:25: The delegation enters a room where refreshments have been set up. The diplomats sip champagne and punch while they socialize. Shot of the ambassador from the Central African Republic talking with another ambassador. An official directs the diplomats to the food table. V: Shots of glasses of champagne arranged on a table. An African American catering worker gives a glasses of punch to the ambassador from Madagascar and another diplomat. Flynn circulates among the members of the delegation. Shots of Flynn and various members of the delegation. Flynn and one of the diplomats raise their glasses in an informal toast. Members of the delegation stand near the food table. Shots of hors d'oevres in warming pans. A member of the media approaches one of the diplomats. A few of the diplomats serve themselves from the food table. Two diplomats confer with one another.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/10/1985
Description: Carmen Fields reports on the restoration of the African Meeting House on Beacon Hill. The Meeting House is the oldest African American church in the nation and it was gutted by fire in 1973. Interview with Philip Hart (Board of Directors, African Meeting House) and Ruth Batson (Director, African Meeting House). Hart talks about the significance of the Meeting House. Batson talks about plans for music, scholarly debate, and religious services at the Meeting House. Fields notes that a series of rededication programs will begin soon. Footage of construction workers and staff at the Meeting House and photographs documenting the history of African Americans in Boston.
1:00:01: Visual: Footage of woodworkers and construction workers doing restoration work at the African Meeting House on Beacon Hill. Carmen Fields reports that the African Meeting House is being restored; that the African Meeting House is the oldest African American church in the nation. V: Shots of the exterior of the Meeting House; of a commemorative stone reading, "A gift to Cato Gardner. First promoter of this building, 1806." Footage of Fields interviewing Philip Hart (Board of Directors, African Meeting House). Hart says that Frederick Douglass (abolitionist) spoke at the Meeting House; that the Meeting House was important to the Underground Railroad. Hart talks about the history of the Meeting House. Hart says that the Meeting House hosted notable figures and the average citizens. Shots black and white images of Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison (abolitionist). Fields reports that the Meeting House was gutted by fire in 1973; that a series of rededication programs begin on Sunday. V: Shots of the interior of the Meeting House with scaffolding; of white and African American workers involved in the rededication programs. Shots of Ruth Batson (Director, African Meeting House); of a black and white image of the Meeting House; of a 19th century photograph of a group of African Americans. Footage of Batson saying that she would like to have music, scholarly debate, and special religious services in the Meeting House. Batson says that the building will serve multiple purposes; that she hopes it will unite the people of Boston. Shots of photographs by Hamilton Smith, documenting the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century African American community. Fields notes that photographs by Hamilton Smith will be part of a permanent exhibit at the Meeting House. Field adds that the nineteenth-century African American community was centered on the north slope of Beacon Hill. V: Shot of a black and white photo of three African American women; of a black and white image of the Meeting House. Footage of Batson saying that the African American community began on Beacon Hill; that the African American community must celebrate their heritage. Footage of Hart saying that the building is a reminder of the role of the African American community in the history of Boston. Shots of black and white images of African Americans in the nineteenth century. Shot of the exterior of the Meeting House. Footage of Batson saying that she can hear the voices of past generations when she stands in the building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/09/1987
Description: Hope Kelly reports on a dispute between the tenants and the landlords of a building in Allston on Parkvale St. Kelly notes that the tenants have brought suit against the landlords for discriminatory practices. Kelly reports that a fire damaged the building in February. She notes that the landlords have aided white tenants with temporary relocation and have assured them an eventual return to their apartments. Kelly reports that African American tenants have been ignored. Kelly reports that the tenants have been barred from the building altogether. Kelly's report includes footage of a protest outside the apartment building by tenants and city officials. Brian McLoughlin (Boston City Council), Mel King (community activist), Domenic Bozzotto (Hotel Workers Union), and David Scondras (Boston City Council) are among those present. Tenants and city officials condemn the owners of the building and demand the return of tenants to the building. Kelly reviews the status of the lawsuit and gives the names of the owners of the building. She attempts to interview David Spada (owner) when he arrives at the building. Spada refuses to be interviewed.
1:00:16: Visual: Footage of Thomas Gallagher (New England Equity Institute) addressing a group of protesters under the awning of an apartment building at 56 Parkvale Avenue in Allston. Gallagher says, "It's a sorry state of affairs." Shots of protesters standing under the awning to get out of the rain. Hope Kelly reports that workmen are working on the interior of the apartment building; that tenants cannot enter the building. V: Footage of Etta Anderson (tenant) addressing the gathered protesters. Anderson says that the building looks habitable; that the building is empty. Shot of a street sign for Parkvale Avenue in Allston. Shots of the exterior of the building on Parkvale Avenue. Kelly reports that a fire damaged parts of the sixteen-unit building on January 15. V: Footage of Brian McLoughlin (Boston City Council) addressing the gathered protesters. McLoughlin criticizes the property owners for not allowing the tenants to return to their homes. Shots of the protesters under the awning. Several protesters hold signs. One of the signs reads, "Evict racist landlords, not tenants of color." Shots of Mel King (community activist) and Domenic Bozzotto (President, Hotel Workers Union) standing among the protesters. Kelly reports that the tenants say that the landlords are racist; that the tenants say that the landlords do not want the tenants to return to the building. Kelly reports that Pat Roberts (tenant) said that the landlords told her that they didn't want "colored people" in their building. V: Footage of Roberts addressing the gathering. Roberts says that she is living with her sister and her three children in a one-room apartment. Kelly reports that white tenants have testified that the landlords have helped them find temporary housing; that white tenants say that the landlords have assured them of an eventual return to their apartments. V: Shots of the protesters under the awning. Shots of signs reading, "Burned out" and "Real people, not real estate." Kelly reports that the tenants have brought suit against the landlords. V: Footage of Marian Glaser (Greater Boston Legal Services) saying that the tenants were first in court in February. Glaser says that the landlords said in February that the tenants could return to the building. Glaser says that the landlords changed their story at a second hearing. Glaser says that the landlords told the tenants that they could return to the building only if they dropped their legal claims against the landlords. Shots of the protesters. Kelly reports that the tenants have brought suit against the landlords for racial discrimination, retaliation, code violations from before the fire, and property loss since the fire. V: Shot of a man addressing the protesters. Shots through a window of a construction worker inside of the building. A sign in the window of the building reads, "Private Property." Footage of David Scondras (Boston City Council) addressing the gathering. Scondras accuses the landlords of suspicious behavior. Scondras wonders if the landlords wanted the fire to happen. Footage of King addressing the protesters. King says that the issue is of larger importance to the city of Boston. On-screen text details specifics of the building's ownership. Kelly reports that the property is owned by the Lightfoot Realty Trust and Bay State Property Management; that the owners are identified as Robert Kingman, Roman Zar, Charles M. Bernstein, and David Spada. V: Footage of David Spada (owner) saying that he will not comment on the case. Shots of protesters standing beneath the awning; of Spada passing by the protesters as he enters the building. Kelly reports that the case returns to housing court on Monday morning.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/19/1988
Description: Deborah Wang reports that notes that Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) was the keynote speaker at a gathering of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund gathered in Boston this evening. Wang notes that many members of the Legal Defense Fund are skeptical of President George Bush's commitment to civil rights; she adds that civil rights advocates are worried about Bush making conservative appointments to the judiciary. Wang interviews Young about Bush's presidency and his possible judicial appointments. Young says that Bush did not exhibit fairness and decency during the presidential campaign. Wang interviews Tom Franklin and Rona Kiley of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Franklin and Kiley say that Bush is beholden to the conservative wing of the Republican Party. Wang reports that there will be several openings in lower courts and a possible opening on the Supreme Court during Bush's term in office. Wang's report is accompanied by footage of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund gathering, by footage of Bush giving a speech and by footage of Ronald Reagan standing by as a judge is sworn in.
1:00:09: Visual: Shots of a gathering of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Attendees of the gathering are socializing in a large room. Footage of Tom Franklin (NAACP Legal Defense Fund) saying that his colleagues do not have a high regard for George Bush (US President-elect). Franklin says that he hopes that Bush will show more character and leadership than he has shown so far. Franklin says that he does not have high expectations for the Bush presidency. Footage of Bush addressing the Coalition of Black Republicans on August 11, 1988. Bush announces the formation of the Black Americans for Bush Committee. Wang reports that many members of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund are skeptical of Bush's commitment to civil rights. Wang notes that Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) was the keynote speaker at tonight's gathering of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. V: Footage of Young being interviewed by Wang. Young says that he wants to believe that Bush is not as bad as his campaign was. Young says that Bush could be counted on for decency and fairness in the past; that Bush did not exhibit decency and fairness during the presidential campaign. Footage of Franklin saying that Bush is beholden to the conservative wing of the Republican Party. Franklin says that Bush will talk about civil rights; that he will not take any action on civil rights issues. Wang reports that civil rights advocates are worried about Bush making conservative appointments to the judiciary. V: Shots of the exterior of the Supreme Court Building; of Reagan standing by as a federal judge is sworn in. Shot of Reagan standing behind an official at a press conference. Wang notes that there may be openings on the Supreme Court; that there will be numerous openings in lower courts. V: Footage of Young being interviewed by Wang. Young says that Bush needs to decide which wing of the Republican Party to represent. Young says that the "Eastern establishment" wing of the Republican Party has generally made wise judicial appointments. Footage of Rona Kiley (NAACP Legal Defense Fund) being interviewed by Wang. Kiley says that Bush has been playing to the conservative wing of the Republican Party. Kiley says that she hopes that Bush will not adopt Ronald Reagan's "litmus test" for making judicial appointments. Shots of the members of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund as they socialize.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/15/1988
Description: Fritz Wetherbee reports that Annie Johnson, a Boston resident, will receive the Living Legacy Award in Washington DC. Johnson grew up in Boston and organized domestic workers through the Women's Service Clubs of Boston in the 1960s. She led the workers on a campaign for benefits. Interview with Johnson in her home. She talks about the importance of helping others. Johnson discusses her aunt, Eleanor Graves Chandler, who was an early community activist. Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen and visiting a senior citizen meal program at the Grace Baptist Church.
1:00:12: Visual: Footage of Annie Johnson (Living Legacy Award winner) saying that a person can be poor and "colored" and still help everybody. Fritz Wetherbee reports that Johnson is 83 years old; that Johnson will fly to Washington DC to receive her Living Legacy Award. V: Footage of Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen at home. Wetherbee reports that Johnson is preparing the food for Project Soup; that Project Soup is a senior citizen meal program at Grace Baptist Church. V: Footage of Johnson saying that people have called her for help when she is sick in bed; that she will get up to try to help them, before going back to bed to lie down. Wetherbee reports that Johnson grew up in Boston; that she has lived in the same house on Elmwood Street for 46 years; that she raised seven children in the house. V: Shots of Elmwood Street in Boston; of the exterior of Johnson's house on Elmwood Street. Footage of Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen. Wetherbee reports that Johnson organized domestic workers in the 1960s, through the Women's Service Clubs of Boston. Wetherbee notes that Johnson succeeded in winning minimum wage, worker's compensation, social security, and regular days off for the workers. Wetherbee adds that Johnson organized a job training program for the workers. V: Shot of the prepared chicken in a foil dish. Wetherbee reports that Johnson is the niece of Eleanor Graves Chandler. V: Shot of an African American woman serving chicken to elderly women at Project Soup. Footage of Johnson saying that Chandler was a politician; that Chandler believed that African American women should be active in politics and civic life. Johnson says that she can remember taking people to register to vote when she was younger. Johnson talks about another one of her relatives who was "an advocate for her race." Shot of Johnson leaving the Grace Baptist Church, carrying some flowers. Wetherbee reports that Martin Luther King Sr., Jesse Owens, Rosa Parks, A. Philip Randolph, and Roy Wilkins have all been awarded the Living Legacy Award; that Johnson will receive the award this evening. V: Footage of Johnson saying that many other racial groups have followed the lead of African Americans in their struggle for civil rights.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/20/1987
Description: Callie Crossley interviews several students about the student occupation of Ballou Hall at Tufts University. One female student says that the demonstrators have demanded that the university divest completely from South Africa and that the university increase financial aid for low-income and minority students. She criticizes the administration's decision to bar food from Ballou Hall during the student occupation. She remarks that the demonstrations across the nation prove that college students are not apathetic. Members of this protest have been circulating petitions, recently issued a report on institutional racism at Tufts, and received over 2,000 signatures (more than half the student body) on their petitions. A male student, the editor of the school paper, is interviewed as well who argues that while divestment is a complicated issues, this protest is counterproductive and the students are making things confrontational with the administration. He suggests holding a committee forum to discuss the issue further. He is skeptical that the students' demands will be met immediately. He further discusses Tufts' current image and history in social/political activism. A second female student is interviewed about her thoughts on the issue. An administrator is interviewed and asked about the administration's position on the demonstration. He states that they will let the demonstration run it's course and is working on informing the student body of what the university is doing. He also states that Tufts currently has agreed to selective divestment, not total divestment. Reporter compares this protest to activism seen in the 1960s and 1970s.
1:00:09: Visual: Callie Crossley interviews Alysa Rose (Tufts student) on the quadrangle at Tufts University. Crossley asks Rose about the previous evening's events in Ballou Hall. Rose says that 150 to 180 entered Ballou Hall yesterday evening; that the students refused to leave until their demands were met. Rose says that the protesters demanded total divestment from South Africa and increased financial aid for low-income and minority students. Rose says that there is a great feeling of unity inside the building; that students on the outside are trying to spread the protesters' message. The interview is interrupted by a commotion from Ballou Hall. Shots of security guards trying to keep students from throwing food to the protesters. One security guard catches a box of crackers. Crossley continues the interview. Rose says that she left the building in order to circulate a letter to Tufts' professors, encouraging them to show their support for the protesters. Rose talks about the protests which are being held across the nation. Crossley asks if the administration has met with the protesters. Rose says that the deans of the university met last night; that they decided to close down Ballou Hall, which houses the administrative offices of the university. Rose says that the deans are not allowing students or food into the building. Rose condemns Jean Mayer (President of Tufts University) for not allowing food into the building. Rose says that there are some seniors in the building who say they will not come out of the building, even for graduation. Crossley comments that college students today have a reputation of being apathetic. Rose says that these protests prove that today's students are not apathetic. Rose notes that Jesse Jackson (African American leader) is touring campuses; that Jackson tells students not to be materialistic or to become "yuppies"; that she is not sure if she completely agrees with Jackson. Rose says that she hopes that people in South Africa hear about the protests in the US. Rose says that she feels a kinship with protesting students at other colleges. Rose names other universities where protests are being held. The crew takes cutaway shots of Crossley and Rose. Crossley asks Rose if she knew what apartheid was before she came to Tufts. Rose says that she only recently became aware of apartheid. 1:04:51: V: Crossley sets up an interview with Michael Mayo (student, Tufts University). Crossley asks for the Mayo's opinion on the protests. Mayo says that he does not agree with the protesters' confrontational approach to the issue; that divestment is a complicated issue. Mayo says that he supports efforts to draw attention to the issue of apartheid. Mayo says that confrontation is counterproductive and has led to a stalemate between the protesters and the administration. Mayo says that the Tufts administration opted for a policy of selective divestment in 1979; that the university does not invest in companies which refuse to sign the Sullivan Principles. Mayo suggests that a committee of students, faculties and administrators discuss the issue of complete divestment. Mayo says that the student demonstration is disruptive. Mayo says that the students will probably leave the building over the weekend; that finals are coming up for most students. Mayo says that he has heard that the mood inside the building is becoming less enthusiastic. Mayo notes that the protesters begin to chant when the media show up. Mayo says that the protesters have drawn attention to the issue; that he is not sure if the administration will decide to divest as a response to student demonstrations. Crossley asks about student attitudes toward the demonstration. Mayo says that some students disagree with the protesters' methods; that some students view the demonstrators as "leftovers" from the 1960s. Mayo comments that the demonstrators had been circulating petitions protesting "institutional racism" at Tufts; that over 2,000 people signed the petitions. Mayo says that he is not sure if all of the 2,000 signees understood the issues brought up in the petition; that some signees wanted to be part of the 1960s "resurgence." Crossley comments that college students today have a reputation of being apathetic. Mayo says that there is a history of protest demonstrations at Tufts. He talks about specific protests in the 1960s and 1970s. Mayo says that the renewal of activism on campus is "refreshing." The crew takes a cutaway shot of Crossley and Mayo. Mayo talks about his experiences as editor of the campus newspaper. 1:09:16: V: Crossley sets up an interview with Tiffany Wheeler (Tufts student). Crossley asks for Wheeler's opinion on the protests. Wheeler says that the protests are a good thing; that she wishes she could help out more; that she signed petitions and attended the rallies. Wheeler says that she thinks the protest might help change the administration's policy. Crossley comments that college students today have a reputation of being apathetic. Wheeler says that she hopes that these protests signal a renewal of campus activism. Crossley thanks the student. 1:10:10: V: Shot of a protest sign reading, "Invest in students, not in apartheid." The protesters are heard chanting, "We need your support" and "The people united will never be defeated." Shot of a white female protester. Tufts University police officers stand in front of the Ballou Hall. Student protesters sit and stand in the entrance and foyer of the building. Crossley asks a police officer why the administration is not allowing food into the building. The officer tells Crossley to ask the chief of the Tufts police force. The officer directs Crossley to the chief. 1:10:58: V: Thomas Foster (Chief, Tufts University Police Department) stands with another man near the side of Ballou Hall. Crossley asks Foster why food is not being allowed into the building. Foster tells Crossley to speak to Curtis Barnes (Tufts University Communications Department). Crossley asks Foster when the administration decided to keep food out of the building. Foster says that the administration decided at the beginning of the protest to keep food from the building. Foster tells Crossley to ask Curtis Barnes about the university's policy toward the demonstrators. 1:12:03: V: Shot of a typed sheet reading, "What's going on at Ballou?" The typed sheet explains the background of the student demonstration at Ballou Hall. The chants of the demonstrators are audible in the background. 1:12:33: V: Crossley sets up an interview with Barnes. Crossley asks about the administration's position. Barnes says that the administration will let the demonstration continue; that student protests are part of the educational process. Barnes says that the administration's policy at this time is to abide by the Sullivan Principles. Barnes says that he hopes the demonstration will end soon. Crossley asks if it is true that the university has agreed to selective divestment. Barnes talks about the Sullivan Principles. Barnes says that the university has sold its stock in companies which refuse to abide by the Sullivan Principles. Barnes notes that the university holds stock in a company which is currently deciding whether or not to abide by the Sullivan Principles; that the university will sell the stock of that company if the company does not choose to follow the Sullivan Principles. Barnes adds that some people think that total divestment is a bad idea. The official says that stockholders are the people who can influence the policies of major corporations; that stockholders can change the policies of corporations doing business in South Africa. Crossley asks the official if the administration will change it position in response to the demonstration. Barnes says that he is preparing a fact sheet to inform all Tufts students about adminstrative action to combat racism. Barnes notes that the administration has strengthened financial aid packages for incoming minority students. Crossley asks if the administration plans to meet with the students protesters. Barnes notes that the protesters and the administration agree on divestment; that they only disagree on the extent of divestment. Barnes says that the administration will not negotiate with the students under any circumstances; that the administration will provide access to information about its policies; that the administration will not negotiate because they are already in agreement with the students. Crossley asks if the administration is feeling pressure to divest completely from South Africa. Barnes says that the administration and faculty have carefully considered the issue. Barnes notes that student protesters have demanded the addition of a course to the curriculum; that the faculty makes curriculum decisions. Barnes says that he hopes the demonstrations will lead to more discussion. Crossley asks why food has not been allowed into Ballou Hall. Barnes says that a student demonstration is not a "picnic." Barnes says that the students are welcome to eat in the dining hall; that the administration will not bring "food caravans" to the students. Barnes says that the demonstrators have put a stop to the proper functioning of the university; that the administration will not allow the demonstrators to cycle in and out; that the administration would like to focus on the issues and return to normal. Crossley asks if participation in the demonstration will keep hurt students academically or keep seniors from graduating. Barnes says that there is time to bring the protest to an end before commencement; that the protesters need to realize that sitting on the steps of Ballou Hall is not the most productive way to focus on the issue. Barnes says that he hopes to resolve the issue in the next few days. The crew takes cutaway shots of Crossley and the Barnes. Crossley asks why the administration is not allowing the students to take crackers or snacks from other students. Barnes says that the students have the option to leave the building if they are hungry. 1:19:29: V: Crossley stands near Ballou Hall. Crossley reports that the current student demonstrations against apartheid are reminiscent of student protests in the 1960s. Crossley notes that the student demonstrations are part of a national movement against apartheid. Crossley reports that students say that they will not back down from an administration which refuses to hear their demands.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/25/1985
Description: David Boeri reports that African American community leaders and city officials have proposed to build the new headquarters of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) in Roxbury. The MWRA headquarters would be the cornerstone in a project to develop Parcel 18, located near the Ruggles MBTA station. At a press conference with city officials and African American leaders, Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council), mayor Ray Flynn, Harold Hestnes (member of "The Vault"), and James Kelly (Boston City Council) all speak out in favor of Parcel 18. The Massachusetts State Legislature is also considering the city of Quincy for the MWRA site. African American leaders are asking state legislators to show their support for the African American community by choosing Parcel 18. State Sen. Paul Harold speaks to the media and says that Quincy is the right place for the MWRA headquarters. At a press conference Paul Levy of the MWRA says that the MWRA site does not have to be in Quincy.
1:00:08: V: Footage of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) at a press conference. Supporters stand behind him. Bolling says that "this project won on the merits." Footage of Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) saying that the project is very important to the community; that the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) must locate its headquarters on Parcel 18. Shots of the vacant land of Parcel 18 in Roxbury. Shot of the Ruggles MBTA station and the Boston skyline visible from Parcel 18. Shots of traffic on the street near Parcel 18. David Boeri reports that the development of Parcel 18 is part of a plan to bring jobs and development to Roxbury. Boeri notes that the development of Parcel 18 is a $200 million public/private venture; that the venture includes minority developers. V: Shots of two people entering the Ruggles MBTA station. Boeri reports that the MWRA would be the major tenant in the development. V: Shot of Parcel 18. Shot through a chain-link fence of the Boston skyline looming above Parcel 18. Boeri reports that the Massachusetts state legislators are considering other sites for the MWRA headquarters; that supporters of Parcel 18 development are lobbying for the MWRA to be located on Parcel 18. V: Footage of Bolling saying that people of color are told that they will be treated fairly in this country. Bolling says that the process should not be manipulated to prevent people of color from receiving their due. Shots of members of the media and the audience at the press conference. Boeri reports that African American leaders consider the MWRA vote to be a crucial litmus test for state legislators on the issue of race. V: Footage of Stith saying that many "progressive politicians" seem to lack the courage to stand up for their principles. Shots of Bolling; of other Parcel 18 supporters at the press conference. Boeri reports that the coalition at the press conference was assembled by Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston); that the coalition includes members of "The Vault" (Boston's powerful financial leaders). V: Footage of Harold Hestnes (member of "The Vault") speaking at the press conference. Hestnes says that the development of Parcel 18 would create a "climate of financial responsibility." Maura Hennigan (Boston City Council) is visible behind Hestnes. Shots of Richard Voke (State Representative) and David Scondras (Boston City Council) at the press conference. Boeri notes that the coalition is broad enough to include James Kelly (Boston City Council). V: Footage of Kelly turning around to look at the coalition standing behind him. Stith puts his hand on Kelly's shoulder and says, "You're with your own." The Parcel 18 supporters laugh along with Kelly. Shot of a reporter at the press conference. Boeri reports that Flynn believes that the development should proceed because it represents social justice and good business sense. V: Footage of Flynn at the press conference. Flynn says that this is a good opportunity for state legislators to prove their commitment to social and economic justice. Flynn says that the people of Roxbury have been disenfranchised and "left behind" in the past. Shot of a coalition member at the press conference. Boeri reports that the city of Quincy is competing with Parcel 18 for the MWRA headquarters. Boeri notes that Quincy will be the repository of the sludge from the Boston Harbor Cleanup project. V: Footage of Paul Harold (State Senator from Quincy) speaking to the media in a park. Harold says that the issue revolves around the survival of a sewage plant, a sludge plant and a landfill facility. Harold says that Parcel 18 has nothing to do with the real issue. Boeri reports that Paul Levy (Executive Director, MWRA) made a controversial decision today. V: Footage of Levy at an MWRA press conference. Levy says that Quincy must receive a premium from the MWRA; that the MWRA is open to discussing compensation for the city of Quincy. Levy says that compensation should not include locating the MWRA headquarters in the city. Footage of Harold saying that state officials have been ill advised on the issue. Harold says that the issue should have been decided days ago. Boeri stands in front of the Massachusetts State House. Boeri reports that the Parcel 18 coalition is trying to pressure a few state legislators to support Parcel 18. Boeri notes that the votes of those legislators will be necessary for Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) to sustain his veto of any vote which tries to move the MWRA headquarters from Roxbury to Quincy. Boeri notes with irony that the MWRA was created by state legislators to remove politics from the Harbor Cleanup Project.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/07/1989
Description: Reporter David Boeri walks with Sam Cook, age 24, retired auto thief and part seller. Cook explains his specialties being Chevrolet Camaro IROC-Z, Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, Chevrolet Monte Carlo Super Sport, and customized vans. MDC officer Robert Springer and State Trooper Richard Connolly of Governor's Auto Theft Strike force comment on Cook's theft and similar theft in other cities. 50,000 cars were stolen in Boston in 1987: most in the country. Cook explains that auto thieves look for parts of cars rather than reselling whole cars. Cook now works for City of Boston as a parking enforcement officer.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/09/1988
Description: Deborah Wang reports that Boston City Hospital offers a weekly Failure to Thrive Clinic for malnourished children. A team of doctors, nurses and psychologists treat the children and talk to their families. Wang reviews the symptoms and effects of malnourishment. Health care workers treating patients at the Failure to Thrive Clinic. Interview with Dr. Deborah Frank of Boston City Hospital about malnourishment and its effect on children. Frank talks about the importance of the clinic to the lives of children. Frank examines children at the clinic. Wang reports that malnourished children are often victims of poverty and that some are neglected or abused. 80% of children attending the clinic have stabilized or improved their condition. Staff meeting of clinic employees. A health care worker talks about the improved condition of one of his patients. Wang reports that there are six Failure to Thrive Clinics, but that the clinics are underfunded. She adds that some families in Boston are not yet receiving the necessary care for malnourishment. Following the edited story is additional footage of health care workers and patients at the Failure to Thrive Clinic.
1:00:05: Visual: Shots of young children playing with toys and magic markers in the waiting room of a health clinic. Shot of an African American infant on an examination table in a health clinic. Deborah Wang reports that some children in Boston show signs of malnourishment. V: Footage of Dr. Deborah Frank (Boston City Hospital) saying that undernourished children become lethargic and apathetic. Frank notes that the children in the waiting room are very quiet. Shots of an African American health care worker weighing an African American infant on a scale. Wang notes that undernourished children are small for their age; that undernourished children are often ill. V: Footage of Frank saying that malnutrition impairs the body's ability to fight infection. Frank says that undernourished children become sick more often; that each infection contributes to the malnourishment. Shots of health care workers measuring an infant's height. The infant lies on an examining table. Shots of the infant; of the health care workers. Shot of a health care worker putting a diaper on an infant. Wang reports that some malnourished infants are neglected or abused; that most malnourished children are victims of poverty. V: Footage of Frank being interviewed by Wang. Frank talks about a malnourished boy who was admitted with a case of pneumonia. Frank talks about the poor conditions under which many poor families live. Wang reports that the Boston City Hospital offers a weekly Failure to Thrive Clinic for malnourished children; that a team of doctors, nurses, psychologists, social workers treat the children and talk to their families. V: Footage of a white female doctor in an examining room with an African American woman and a young African American girl. The doctor talks to the woman while filling out paperwork. The girl plays quietly in her chair. The doctor talks to the woman about meal times for the child. Footage of a meeting of employees at the Failure to Thrive Clinic. A white male health care worker talks about an infant who has gained weight after attending the clinic. Wang reports that the program has been a success; that 80% of the children attending the clinic have stabilized or improved their conditions. V: Shot of a Latina woman and young boy in an examining room. The woman wipes the boy's face. The boy draws with magic markers. Footage of Frank saying that the hospitals resources are stretched thin. Frank notes that there are families in Boston who are not receiving services. Wang reports that the Failure to Thrive Clinic has a $500,000 budget; that there are six Failure to Thrive Clinics. V: Shot of an African American health care worker taking the temperature of a young white boy. The boy sits on his mother's lap. Shots of an African American girl at the clinic; of a Latino boy drawing with a magic marker; of an African American infant on an examing table; of an African American child holding a stuffed doll. Audio of Frank saying that society needs to reassess its priorities; that these children are the next generation of US citizens. Frank says that society will pay a higher price in the future if these children are not treated now.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/30/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on the slow pace of public housing integration in South Boston. Footage of Doris Bunte, the director of the BHA talking about housing integration in 1986. The waiting list for public housing is 80% minority, but that there are no African American families living in the three public housing projects in South Boston. One resident talks about her opposition to housing integration. The Boston Housing Authority (BHA) says that white families were first on the waiting lists for South Boston Projects. Interview with William Wright of the BHA, who denies any discriminatory practices on the part of the BHA. Vaillancourt notes that the BHA says that the safety of African American families in all-white housing projects cannot be assured. Interview with with Alex Rodriguez of the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination. Rodriguez accuses the BHA of practicing segregation in their housing policies. Kathy Gannett a former employee of the Department of Housing and Urban Development has also accused the BHA of practicing discrimination. Interview with Gannett. Vaillancourt reports that neither Bunte nor Mayor Ray Flynn will comment on the slow pace of desegregation.
1:00:02: Visual: Footage of Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) from 1986. Bunte says that separate facilities are unequal facilities. Meg Vaillancourt reports that little has been done to desegregate public housing in Boston. V: Shot of a white woman and white children standing outside of a housing project building in South Boston. Footage of a white woman talking to a reporter from the window of her project apartment. The woman says that she would like the neighborhood to remain white. Shots of white project residents standing at the entrance to a project building; of white girl reading on the stoop of an apartment; of a white boy scrambling under a fence near a housing projects; of white children in the area surrounding the project buildings. Vaillancourt reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) hired Doris Bunte to run the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) four years ago; that Bunte is a former project resident. Vaillancourt notes that there are still no African American families living in the three public housing projects in South Boston. Vaillancourt adds that African American families are on the waiting list for public housing. V: Shots of white residents sitting on park benches outside of a project; of parochial school students walking home from school. Vaillancourt reports that the BHA says that families are placed on a first come, first served basis; that the BHA says that white families were first on the waiting list for the South Boston projects. V: Shot of an African American girl looking out of the window of a project apartment. Footage of William Wright (BHA) saying that African American families have not been passed over on the waiting list for the South Boston projects. Vaillancourt notes that non-whites comprise 80% of the BHA waiting list. V: Shots of African American children and adults outside of a housing project building. Footage of Kathy Gannett (former employee, Department of Housing and Urban Development) saying that African American families were passed over on the waiting list for apartments in South Boston public housing projects; that the BHA is denying access to public housing projects on the basis of skin color. Vaillancourt reports that Gannett has been fired from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD); that Gannett says that Bunte complained about her aggressive investigation of the BHA's desegregation efforts. V: Footage of Bunte from 1986. Shot of Wright sitting behind a desk. Vaillancourt notes that the BHA has denied Gannett's accusations. V: Shots of a child being held by a woman standing in the window of a project apartment; of a woman feeding a child dinner in an apartment; of the exterior of project buildings in South Boston; of a sign reading, "Old Colony Public Housing Development." Vaillancourt reports that the BHA has an emergency list; that families on the emergency list must be placed in the first available apartment. V: Footage of Wright being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks if an African American family on the emergency list would be placed in an available South Boston apartment. Wright says that the BHA is not housing people from the emergency lists in South Boston projects at this time. Wright adds that the families did not request apartments in South Boston; that the BHA is not discriminating against those families. Wright says that the turnover rate in South Boston public housing projects is very low. Wright says that he does not know if African American families on the emergency list were turned away from South Boston apartments. Vaillancourt reports that the BHA says that the safety of African American families in the all-white South Boston projects cannot be assured. V: Shot of white residents outside of a project building. Footage of Alex Rodriguez (Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination) saying that families are being denied access to public housing on the basis of race; that the housing authority has engaged in "social engineering" by continuing segregation in public housing projects. Rodriguez says that the BHA must abide by the law. Vaillancourt says that neither Bunte nor Flynn will comment on the situation. V: Shot of Bunte speaking to someone at a social function; of Flynn; of a white woman and white children sitting on the steps of a housing project; of a white child running around in front of a South Boston project building; of an African American man raking leaves in front of a project building. Vaillancourt notes that Flynn has said that the South Boston public housing projects will be desegregated by 1988; that Flynn will not comment on why desegregation has taken so long.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/05/1987
Description: David Boeri reports from a press conference with Mayor Ray Flynn, Doris Bunte, of the Boston Housing Authority, Neil Sullivan, the Policy Advisor to Flynn, and Robert Laplante, from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The officials attempt to explain the new rules for the Boston Housing Authority's revised public housing tenant selection policy. The policy is intended to end discrimination in the selection process, but will not result in the removal of current tenants from their apartments. Boeri reports that the explanation of the policy is very confusing, but two tenants in attendance are able to do understand the policy. Interviews with public housing tenants Jean Deaver and Marcia Langford. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Reporter Meg Vaillancourt at the Old Colony housing project
1:00:15: Visual: Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) entering a press conference. Flynn approaches the podium and addresses the audience. Shots of the audience. Flynn says that he is asking for the goodwill and help of city residents. Shot of Bunte. David Boeri reports that Flynn has alienated some city residents on the issue of integration of public housing; that some white residents oppose integration; that some African American residents have been the victims of discrimination. V: Footage of Flynn addressing the audience. Flynn says that tenants will not be asked to vacate apartments in order to achieve housing integration. Shot of an African American woman in the audience. Boeri notes that Bunte and Flynn has some problems explaining the rules of the new public housing policy. V: Footage of Flynn at the press conference. Flynn shuffles through papers at the podium. Neil Sullivan (Policy Advisor to Flynn) approaches the podium to help Flynn. Sullivan addresses the audience. Sullivan tries to explain how tenants will be placed under the new policy. Shots of Flynn; of reporters at the press conference. Boeri notes that Sullivan's explanation was not very clear; that reporters at the press conference looked bored. V: Footage of Robert LaPlante (Department of Housing and Urban Development) addressing the audience. Laplante talks about the fine points of the new housing agreement. Shots of Flynn slipping out of the press conference; of Bunte. Sullivan looks for the mayor. Footage of Boeri at the press conference looking at a video monitor showing a speech by Flynn. Boeri looks at the camera and says, "I still don't understand this." Shots of audience members at the press conference. Boeri reports that several housing project tenants were at the conference; that the tenants were able to make sense of the rules of the new policy. V: Footage of Jean Deaver (tenant) saying that potential tenants will be put on one waiting list; that potential tenants will now be given equal treatment. Footage of Marcia Langford (tenant) saying that the rules are being put in place to assure South Boston white residents that they will not be moved out of their apartments for the purposes of integration.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/16/1988
Description: Mayor Ray Flynn proposes million-dollar cut in Boston Public Library funds. Flynn cites funding used for new positions, fringe benefits, and unnecessary accouterments instead of library services. Library representative speaks in BPL courtyard about the effect of cutbacks. Footage of employees working at circulation and card catalog. Brief clip of Congressman William Bulger in court. Various Library representatives explain job functions and loss at BPL. Flynn explains that library fund must be focused on branch services instead of fringe benefits.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/27/1989
Description: Conviction of Scott Arsenault for manslaughter of Bun Vong -- Retrial. Court scenes including jury delivering verdict, reaction shots of Arsenault and his fiancee. Interviews with Scott Harshbarger and defense attorney Ralph Champ. Discussion of whether the attack was racially motivated. Interview with Elaine Song from Asians for Justice.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/19/1986
Description: Immigrants from Baltic states of Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia march on City Hall plaza to demonstrate nationalistic pride and support independence movement in Soviet Union. Interviews with participants. Edited story is followed by b-roll of the demonstration. Participants act out the "blood pact" between Hitler and Stalin. They sing the American National Anthem.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/22/1989
Description: Marcus Jones reports on the affirmative action program at the Bank of Boston. Twenty percent of the employees at the bank are minorities. Interview with Charles Gifford from the Bank of Boston, who says that a diverse workforce makes sense. Gifford says that the bank will hire any qualified candidate, regardless of race. Gifford adds that he would like to hire more minorities in top bank positions. Jones reports that bank managers have set affirmative action goals that exceed federal requirements because they believe that an integrated workforce is good for business. Interview with Rosa Hunter, the Director of Affirmative Action Planning for the Bank of Boston. Hunter talks about the bank's commitment to diversity. Jones reviews statistics concerning minority professionals and minority managers at the Bank of Boston. He notes that most minority employees are hired for entry-level and mid-level positions. The edited story is followed by additional b-roll footage of Bank of Boston employees in the offices and cafeteria. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Meg Vaillancourt reports on affirmative action in the Boston Fire Department
1:00:10: Visual: Shots of Bank of Boston employees riding on an escalator in a Bank of Boston building; of a sign for the Bank of Boston. Shots of tellers helping customers in a Bank of Boston office. Marcus Jones reports that the Bank of Boston employs almost 20,000 people; that 20 percent of the employees are minorities. Shots of an African American bank teller; of employees eating lunch in a cafeteria. Jones reports that the bank has doubled its number of minority employees in the past ten years; that bank executives see room for more minorities among their employees. V: Footage of Charles Gifford (Bank of Boston) being interviewed by Jones in his office. Gifford says that a diverse work force makes sense regardless of affirmative action guidelines. Shots of the interior of the Bank of Boston; of customers and tellers inside of the bank. Jones reports that the Bank of Boston receives federal funding; that the Bank of Boston is obligated to comply with federal affirmative action guidelines. Jones notes that the bank management has often set goals which exceed federal requirements. Jones reports that the bank managers believe that an integrated workforce is good for business. V: Shots of employees in a Bank of Boston office. Footage of Gifford saying that the Bank of Boston is growing; that they need more employees. Gifford says that the bank will be at an advantage if it is known as an employer who is open to all. Gifford says that he wants the bank to hire people according to qualifications and performance. Jones reports that Rosa Hunter (Director of Affirmative Action Planning for the Bank of Boston) has worked at the Bank of Boston for 21 years; that Hunter has directed the Bank of Boston's affirmative action effort for two years. V: Footage of Hunter being interviewed by Jones. Hunter says that the Bank of Boston is committed to diversity; that the Bank of Boston will continue its diversity efforts regardless of court rulings against affirmative action programs. Shot of an African American employee at the Bank of Boston. Jones reports that the number of minority managers at the Bank of Boston increased from 4.3% to 9.7% between 1978 and 1988. Jones notes that the number of minority professionals at the Bank of Boston increased from 6.6% to 12.4% from 1978 to 1988. V: On-screen text and visuals detail statistics on the percentage of minority managers and the percentage of minority professionals at the Bank of Boston. Shots of employees eating at a cafeteria. Jones reports that minority employees are being hired for entry-level and mid-level postions; that few minority employees are being appointed to top-level management positions. V: Footage of Gifford saying that the bank is not satisfied with the low number of minority and female employees among its top positions. Gifford says that he expects those numbers to improve because the bank is open to promoting qualified employees to top positions regardless of race or gender. Shot of an African American female bank employee in a Bank of Boston office.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/15/1989
Description: Hope Kelly reports that Barbara Arnwine, the Executive Director of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights, is filing a lawsuit against the city of Boston, the Boston Housing Authority (BHA), and the department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) on behalf of public housing tenants in Boston. Mayor Ray Flynn has announced an agreement aimed at eradicating discriminatory housing practices, but Arnwine considers the agreement inadequate because it does not acknowledge that African American families were "victims" of discrimination. Arnwine says that the city of Boston and the BHA lied to African American families and that the BHA worked to keep housing projects segregated. Press conference held by Flynn, Doris Bunte (BHA), and Robert LaPlante (HUD). Interview with Arnwine in her office at the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights. She says that the city of Boston, the BHA, and HUD do not want to accept responsibility for the harm done to African American tenants and that, despite the difficulty of the struggle, racial equality is worth fighting for. Kelly reviews Arnwine's career as an activist and lawyer. Kelly's report also features footage of African American and white children playing outside of public housing projects and footage of African American students entering a Boston high school. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Carmen Fields reports on nomination papers for Bill Owens and Royal Bolling, Sr.
1:00:16: Visual: Shot of the exterior of the offices of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights. An African American woman sits at a desk at the front of the offices. The woman answers the phone. Footage of Barbara Arnwine (Executive Director, Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights) being interviewed by Hope Kelly. Arnwine says that the city of Boston, the Boston Housing Authority (BHA), and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) do not want to face up to the harm they have caused to African American residents of public housing in Boston. Shot of Arnwine signing a business letter. Kelly reports that Arnwine is bringing a lawsuit against the city of Boston, the BHA, and HUD on behalf of tenants of public housing in Boston. Kelly reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has announced an agreement aimed at correcting the discriminatory housing practices of the past; that Arnwine believes the agreement to be inadequate. V: Shot of Flynn, Doris Bunte (BHA), and Robert LaPlante (HUD) entering a press conference in June of 1988. Footage of Arnwine in her office, being interviewed by Kelly. Arnwine says that the agreement does not acknowledge that African American families were the "victims" of discrimination; that the agreement calls the families "disadvantaged." Arnwine says that the African American families were injured by the discriminatory housing policy. Arnwine says that African American families were misled and lied to by the city and the BHA. Arnwine says that African American families were not placed in white housing projects because of their race. Shots of African American children outside of a housing project building; of white children playing with a garden hose outside of a housing project building in South Boston. Footage of Arnwine saying that some white families were also victims of discrimination; that white families were discouraged from living in primarily African American housing projects. Arnwine says that the BHA was engaged in an effort to keep public housing projects segregated. Shot of the name plaque on the door of Arnwine's office. Shots of Arnwine working in her office. Kelly reports that Arnwine grew up in a segregated housing project in Detroit. Kelly reports that the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights was involved in the struggles to desegregate the fire department, the police department, and the schools in Boston. V: Shots of a poster in the Lawyers' Committee offices. The poster has a caption reading, "I have a dream. . . ." Shots of Arnwine talking on the telephone in her office. Kelly notes that the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights filed the original school desegregation suit against the Boston School Committee in 1972. V: Shots of African American students entering a high school in Boston. Footage of Arnwine being interviewed by Kelly. Kelly asks if the housing discrimination suit can be compared to the school desegregation suit. Arnwine says that housing integration means that people of different races become neighbors. Arnwine says that housing integration represents change; that change is often met by resistance; that some people might get hurt in the resulting struggle. Arnwine says that it was difficult for the African Americans who first integrated the police department and the schools; that integration has a price. Arnwine says that racial equality is worth fighting for. Shots of Boston police officer taking an oath; of African American students entering Charlestown High School.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/21/1988
Description: Interview with Representative Barney Frank regarding the Steve Gobie prostitution scandal. Frank denies knowledge of Gobie's escorting activities while in residence at Frank's home. Discusses pressures of being a closeted gay man that led to Frank hiring prostitutes. Following edited story is b-roll of interview between reporter David Boeri and Frank. Frank frequently expresses displeasure with Boeri's questioning. Discussion of Frank's moral views of prostitution; interactions with House Committee on Ethics; nature of relationship with Gobie. Footage of Boeri posing for cutaways.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/29/1989
Description: Rep. Barney Frank press conference where he admits to hiring male prostitute and taking him on as personal aide, but denies knowing an escort service was conducted from his apartment. Republicans respond.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/25/1989
Description: Callie Crossley reports on the documentary film Street Cop, set in Roxbury. Interview with Roxbury community activists Georgette Watson and Ben Haith about the documentary's portrayal of crime and drug traffic in the community. Watson complains about the negative images of Roxbury in the media and about the negative attitude of many police officers toward African Americans. Crossley's report includes footage from Street Cop and footage of Crossley, Watson, and Haith walking in Dudley Square. Interview with Larry Brown of the Boston Minority Police Association, who says that the documentary gave a realistic and effective portrayal of law enforcement. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: David Boeri reports that William Celester has been accused of sexual assault by a female employee of the Police Department
1:00:00: Visual: Footage from Street Cop, a documentary film produced for Frontline. The footage shows a police plainclothes police officer entering a family's apartment. Women and children in the apartment are screaming and crying. Callie Crossley reports that Street Cop is a gritty documentary set in Roxbury; that the documentary profiles police officers from Area B headquarters in Roxbury; that the documentary examines crime and drug traffic. Crossley reports that some Roxbury activists say that the film shows the disrepectful attitude of the police toward citizens in the community. V: Footage of Crossley interviewing Georgette Watson (Roxbury community activist) and Ben Haith (Roxbury community activist). Watson says that police show less respect and restraint in Roxbury than they do in other communities. Watson wonders if the police are helping the community or destroying it. Crossley reports that Watson and Haith are concerned about the portrayal the Roxbury community in the documentary. V: Footage from Street Cop of a police officer breaking down an apartment door with a sledgehammer. Footage of Watson saying that drug problems exist all over the city, not just in Roxbury. Footage of Haith saying that the documentary showed the police attacking the neighborhood as if they were engaged in warfare. Footage from Street Cop of police officers searching for drugs in an apartment. Footage of Crossley, Watson, and Haith walking across the street in Dudley Square in Roxbury. Watson says that there are massive drug deals taking place across from the police station; that police are more concerned with forcefully entering homes to search for nickel bags of marijuana. Footage from Street Cop. Stanley Philbin (Boston Police Department) drives by a depressed housing project in Roxbury, saying that if he were young, black and living in that housing project, he would probably sell drugs; that "being black is no bargain." Crossley reports that Roxbury activists say that comments by police officers in the documentary reflect racist attitudes. V: Footage from Street Cop of a white police officer grabbing an African American girl as he tries to chase some African American kids away from a residential home. Footage of Watson saying that Roxbury needs police officers who understand the community; that police officers from South Boston do not understand the culture of African Americans. Watson says that Roxbury needs police officers who do not have a negative attitude toward African Americans. Footage of Larry Brown (Boston Minority Police Association) saying that the documentary was realistic and effective portrayal of law enforcement. Footage from Street Cop of a police officer reaching down the shirt of an old woman to pull out drugs. Footage of Brown saying that drugs and guns are a huge problem in communities; that police officers need to protect themselves from violence. Footage from Street Cop of police officers making an arrest. Footage of Brown saying that the community needs to support the police officers in the fight against the drug problem; that tough tactics are necessary to eradicate the drug problem. Footage from Street Cop of a uniformed African American police officer in a cruiser.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/31/1987
Description: Bill Baird press conference on concerns over abortion clinic bombings and fighting back against them. He describes the types of demonstrations by antiabortion groups and the effects they have on the women who use those clinics. He proposes a "demilitarized zone" between the protesters and the women using the clinics, so that they can continue to receive treatment without being physically abused. He describes interstate efforts of pro-choice groups to analyze the attacks. He expresses anger with the FBI's lack of attention, refusal to classify the attacks as terrorism, and the institutionalized sexism of law enforcement agencies. He says that many abortion clinics are now armed and have increased defenses.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/11/1985
Description: Marcus Jones reports on the ordination of Reverend Barbara Harris as Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts, which has been the focus of international attention and controversy. Press conference held by Harris and David Johnson. Harris says that she will seek understanding with opponents of her ordination. Interviews with James Solheim of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts and Greer Gordon of the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston. Solheim talks about about opposition to Harris's nomination and his support of her nomination. Gordon talks about the reasons for the Roman Catholic Church's opposition to the ordination of women.
1:00:01: Visual: Footage of Reverend Barbara Harris (Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts) at a press conference. Bishop David Johnson (Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts) sits next to her. Harris says that she is pleased that the consent process is nearing completion. Shots of the media at the press conference. Marcus Jones reports that it has taken four months for Harris to convince Episcopal Church leaders of her qualifications to be Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts. V: Footage of Johnson saying that some Episcopal leaders are afraid of women taking over the Episcopal Church. Johnson says that he disagrees with those leaders; that it is important to share the ministry. Footage of Harris saying that her ordination as bishop presents theological and emotional problems for some. Harris talks about the need to seek understanding and reconciliation with opponents of her ordination. Jones reports that the ordination of women into the priesthood has long been controversial among Christian religions. Jones reports that Harris's ordination has been the focus of international attention. V: Footage of the Reverend James Solheim (Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts) saying that Harris' election has polarized the Episcopal Church. Solheim says that Harris' election to bishop is a first in the history of the Church. Solheim says that some religions leaders do not believe that a woman should stand in apostolic succession. Footage of Greer Gordon (Catholic Archdiocese of Boston) saying that there is no evidence of women having been admitted into the realm of the apostles. Gordon talks about the principle of apostolic succession. Gordon says that the apostles are seen as a direct line from Jesus. Shot of Pope John Paul II. Jones reports that the Episcopal Church was born out of a separation from Roman Catholicism; that the Roman Catholic Church still bans the ordination of women. V: Footage of Gordon being interviewed by Jones. Gordon talks about and quotes from the Scriptures. Gordon talks about the beginnings of the Roman Catholic Church as represented in the Scriptures. Footage of Solheim saying that the Scriptures should not be read "legalistically." Solheim says that there are many laws in the Scriptures which are not followed today. Jones reports that Harris will be installed as bishop on February 11, 1989. Jones notes that it will be a time of celebration for some; that it will be a time of soul-searching for others.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/25/1989
Description: Marcus Jones reports on the Ninth Annual Black-Jewish Seder held in Roxbury. Jones reports that the audience at the Seder honored civil rights workers Andrew Goodman, James Chaney, and Michael Schwerner. Jones notes that the three civil rights workers were murdered in Mississippi during the civil rights movement. Jones notes that family members were present at the Seder to talk about the men on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the murders. Jones' report includes footage from the Seder supper. Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) talks about the sacrifices made by the three men. Family members Ben Chaney, Carolyn Goodman and Cassie Schwerner talk about the three men. Ben Chaney announces a freedom ride from Mississippi to New York planned for the summer. Chaney, Carolyn Goodman and Cassie Schwerner talk about the need to continue the struggle for civil rights. Jones reviews the events leading up to the murder of the three men. Jones' report also features clips from Eyes on the Prize and Mississippi Burning. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Christy George reports that the Boston School Committee held an executive session to make a decision on the renewal of the contract of Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools)
1:00:17: Visual: Footage from a trailer for the 1988 film, Mississippi Burning. Shots of official FBI posters with head shots of three missing men. Marcus Jones reports that the film Mississippi Burning is based on the murders of civil rights workers Andrew Goodman, James Chaney, and Michael Schwerner in Mississippi during the civil rights movement. V: Shot of a newspaper article with a headline reading, "Three men reported missing in Mississippi rights campaign." Jones reports that African Americans and Jews gathered in Roxbury last night to honor the three men and their family members. V: Shot of a flyer for the Ninth Annual Black-Jewish Seder. Footage of Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) speaking at the Ninth Annual Black-Jewish Seder. Stith talks about the sacrifice made by Goodman, Chaney, and Schwerner. Shots of audience members, including Leonard Zakim (Director, Anti-Defamation League of B'Nai B'rith) Jones reports that the twenty-fifth anniversary of the murders will be marked in June. Jones notes that relatives of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner are traveling across the country to enlist people in a major demonstration planned for the summer. V: Shots of black and white photos of the three men which are displayed at the Seder gathering. Footage of Ben Chaney (brother of James Chaney) saying that racism and anti-semitism are not a regional problem. Chaney says that a group of demonstrators will depart from Mississippi on June 21; that the demonstrators will travel to New York. Chaney says that the demonstrators want to send a message about the national importance of civil rights. The audience stands to applaud Ben Chaney. Jones reports that Ben Chaney was eleven years old in 1964; that Ben Chaney began to work with James Chaney and Michael Schwerner to register African Americans in Mississippi to vote in 1964. V: Shots of black and white photos of James Chaney and Michael Schwermer. Black and white footage of a white man approaching the home of an African American man; of a body being put onto a stretcher. Footage of Ben Chaney saying that he used to attend demonstrations with James Chaney and Schwermer; that Chaney and Schwermer would bail him out of jail when he got arrested. Ben Chaney says that he did not believe that any of the demonstrators would die as a result of their actions until his brother was found dead. Footage from Eyes on the Prize of the Chaney family at the burial of James Chaney. Black and white footage of Mr. and Mrs. Goodman (parents of Andrew Goodman) speaking to the media in 1964. Mr. Goodman says that he is proud of his son's commitment and the commitment of Chaney and Schwarmer. Shots of an audience listening to Goodman. Jones reports that the anniversary of the murders brings back disturbing memories for Dr. Carolyn Goodman (mother of Andrew Goodman). V: Footage of Goodman at the Seder gathering. Goodman says that there are civil rights issues which still need to be addressed. Footage of Goodman being interviewed by Jones. Goodman says that the families of the victims wish to perpetuate the work performed by the three men. Goodman says that young people need to be made aware of the events of the civil rights era. Footage of Cassie Schwermer (niece of Michael Schwermer) at the Seder gathering. Schwermer says that the murders of the three men were meant to discourage northern volunteers from participating in the Mississippi Freedom Summer. Jones reports that Cassie Schwermer never knew her uncle; that she has come to understand his beliefs. Jones reports that Cassie Schwermer is a social activist. V: Shot of a black and white photo of Michael Schwerner. Shot of a newspaper article with a headline reading, "Three in rights drive reported missing." Footage of Schwermer being interviewed by Jones. Schwermer says that she would like to see a renewed commitment to activism by young people today. Black and white footage of Fannie Chaney (mother of James Chaney) speaking in 1964. Fannie Chaney says that the three men died to help African Americans achieve equal rights. Footage of the Chaney family at the funeral of James Chaney. Footage of Carolyn Goodman saying that the work of civil rights activists is never finished. Goodman says that there will always be threats to our freedoms. Black and white shot from 1964 of James Chaney's coffin.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/11/1989
Description: Christy George reports from Atlanta on African American residents' views of the Democratic presidential ticket and the Democratic National Convention. George notes that Michael Dukakis needs to show African American voters that he wants their support. Interviews with employees and customers at the Auburn Rib Shack. The interviewees support Jesse Jackson and hope that Jackson will be named as Dukakis's running mate. George notes that both Dukakis and Lloyd Bentsen have good records on civil rights and that Jackson's supporters may be waiting for Jackson to throw his support behind Dukakis. Interviews with African Americans in Atlanta about Jackson and Dukakis. Many interviewees are skeptical about Dukakis. George's report also features footage of Jackson speaking to an audience and footage of Dukakis addressing the Democratic National Convention.
1:00:21: Visual: Footage of James Wyatt (Atlanta resident) driving his cab in Atlanta. Wyatt talks about how life has changed in Atlanta since the civil rights movement. Christy George reports that Wyatt is 84 years old; that he has been driving a cab for 52 years. V: Footage of Wyatt talking about how is mother used to work in the cafeteria of a white school. Wyatt says that she would bring the leftovers home to him. Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American leader) addressing an audience. Jackson talks about how his mother could not prepare a Thanksgiving meal for his family. Jackson say that his mother was busy serving another family's meal. Footage of Wyatt saying that he would have liked to have seen Jackson as the Democratic nominee or as the running mate of Michael Dukakis (Democratic nominee for US President). Christy George stands in front of the Auburn Rib Shack in Atlanta. George reports that Dukakis needs to ask African American voters what they want. V: Footage of an African American female working behind a counter in a restaurant. The woman says that some voters may vote for the Republican ticket if they are disappointed in the Democratic ticket. Footage of an African American male saying that many voters will be upset if Jackson is left off of the Democratic ticket. Shot of an African American man working in the kitchen of the Auburn Rib Shack. George reports that workers and customers at the Auburn Rib Shack are hoping that Jackson will named to the Democratic ticket. V: Footage of an African American man saying that many African Americans registered to vote in order to vote for Jackson. Footage of Dukakis speaking from a podium at the Democratic National Convention. Jackson and Lloyd Bentsen (US Senator) stand on each side of Dukakis. Dukakis says that he wants Jackson and his supporters to play a major role in the presidential campaign. George reports that Dukakis and Bentsen both have good civil rights records. George notes that African American voters may be waiting for Jackson to throw his support behind Dukakis. V: Footage of an African American woman in the driver's seat of a car. The woman says that Jackson deserves a chance. Footage of an African American woman saying that it is time for a change; that the US is ready for an African American candidate. Footage of two women wearing T-shirts which read, "Jesse Walk Out." The women say that Dukakis should go back to Massachusetts. Footage of Wyatt talking about Dukakis. Wyatt says that he has not heard much about Dukakis; that the Democratic Party needs a good leader. Shot of Wyatt's cab turning a corner.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/18/1988
Description: Christy George reports from the Democratic National Convention in Atlanta. George reports that Atlanta is the heart of the new South; she adds that the region is becoming more diverse, and has been energized by an influx of industry and culture. George reports that the Mississippi Delegation to the Democratic National Convention is said to lead the region on issues of race relations. George notes that the Mississippi delegates are representative of the new South. Interviews with Mississippi delegates Jesse Banks, Ed Cole, Isaiah Frederides, Sherry Fisher, Deborah Dunn and Joe Gaitlin. Each delegate expresses pride in the political process and talks about the changes in the state of Mississippi. George reviews the struggle by African Americans for inclusion in the Democratic Party. George discusses the history of African Americans at the Democratic National Convention from 1948 to 1968. George's report includes footage of civil rights protesters in the 1960s and footage of the Democratic National Convention in the 1960s. George's report is also accompanied by footage of Jesse Jackson at the 1988 Democratic National Convention. George notes that Jackson has led a new group of people into the Democratic Party.
1:00:16: Visual: Black and white footage from Eyes on the Prize of Fannie Lou Hamer (Mississippi Freedom Delegation) at the Democratic National Convention in 1964. Black and white footage from "Eyes on the Prize" of African Americans exiting a bus; of white political officials. Shots of a uniformed man taking American flags from the hands of African American demonstrators; of African American demonstrators marching with American flags. Shots of a Democratic National Convention from the 1960s. Christy George reports that African Americans have been fighting for inclusion in the Democratic Party since 1948; that white delegates from Mississippi and Alabama walked out of the convention in 1948 to protest a civil rights plank in the party platform. George notes that the Mississippi Freedom Delegation was seated at the Democratic National Convention in 1968. V: Footage of Jessie Banks (resident of Tchula, Mississippi) talking about the seating of the Mississippi Freedom Delegation at the 1968 convention. George reports that Banks is now a Mississippi delegate to the Democratic National Convention; that the Mississippi delegation is said to lead the South on the issue of race relations. V: Shot of the Mississippi delegation on the floor of the 1988 Democratic National Convention. Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) addressing the convention on July 19, 1988. Jackson announces that Ed Cole (Mississippi delegate) is the leader of the Mississippi delegation; that Cole is African American. Shots of Jackson exiting a building. He waves to voters. A bus awaits Jackson. A banner on the bus reads, "Rainbow voter registration campaign." Jackson stands in the entrance to the bus, waving to supporters. George reports that Jackson has a led a new group of people into the Democratic Party. V: Footage of State Representative Isaiah Frederides (resident of Gulfport, Mississippi) says that his mother was a domestic servant; that his mother was fired from her job when he tried to register to vote; that his father-in-law's job was threatened. Frederides says that he and his wife were the first two African Americans to register to vote in his county. Footage of Sherry Fisher (resident of Vicksburg, Mississippi) saying that she is attending a convention for the first time; that she wants to be a part of the US democracy. She says that it feels good to be a part of the changes in Mississippi and the US. Shot of delegates on the floor of the 1988 convention. George says that the "new South" is focused on sharing power between those of common backgrounds. V: Footage of Deborah Dunn (resident of Bruce, Mississippi) being interviewed by George. Dunn says that she is a white woman who has picked cotton and worked hard for what she has. Dun says that all southerners are proud of what they have achieved. Footage of Jackson addressing the 1988 Democratic National Convention. Jackson calls Atlanta the "crucible of the new South." V: Shots of the Atlanta skyline; of construction workers working on a new building in Atlanta. George reports that Atlanta is becoming a major urban center. V: Footage from WNEV-TV of an Atlanta Hawks basketball game. Footage of Joe Gatlin (resident of Laurel, Mississippi) saying that industry has come to Atlanta from the north; that industry has brought culture and diversity. Gatlin says that the South is diversifying while keeping some of its old values. Shots of the Atlanta skyline. George reports that diversity and new people may energize the Democratic Party as it is energizing the South. V: Footage of Banks saying that she has great hope for the nation; that the Democratic Party has great African American and white leaders. Christy George stands in downtown Atlanta. George reports that African Americans and whites live in harmony and prosperity in Atlanta; that the Democratic Party will begin to understand the "new South" after holding its convention in Atlanta.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/20/1988
Description: Coverage of the annual performance of Black Nativity by Langston Hughes. The performance takes place in the Opera House in Boston. Interview with Music Director John Ross, who talks about the play. He says that the story of the nativity is told in a "black context," using traditional music. Excerpts from the performance.
1:00:08: Visual: Shots of schoolchildren entering an auditorium. V: Footage from the Black Nativity performed at the Opera House in Boston. V: Footage of John A. Ross (Music Director) saying that Langston Hughes used the Bible as a source for Black Nativity; that the story is told in a "black context." Ross says that the play relies on traditional gospel music. V: Footage from the performance of Black Nativity. V: Footage of a female African American student saying that some of her friends and former teachers were in the performance. Footage of a female African American student saying that the play shows us "how God began his life." Footage of a female white students saying that the acting is good; that the play is "pretty." Footage of a group of African American students in the lobby. One student says that he likes the music. Another student says that she likes everything. V: Footage from the performance of Black Nativity.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/08/1989
Description: Marcus Jones reports that the Black Political Task Force has announced its candidate endorsements for the upcoming elections. Footage from a press conference at which the Task Force announces its slate of candidates. Salvatore DiMasi (candidate for State Representative) addresses the audience. The Task Force has generated controversy by endorsing some white candidates over African American candidates. Footage of Georgette Watson and Robert Rufo talking about Black Political Task Force endorsement. Jones interviews Peter Hardie (President, Black Political Task Force) about the endorsements. Clips of Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP), Baroness Williams-Martin (political activist), and Regina Placid (candidate for State Representative) commenting on the endorsements. Clips of Mel King (political activist) and Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) campaigning.
1:00:21: Visual: Footage of Peter Hardie (President, Black Political Task Force) addressing a crowd at a press conference in front of the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial on Boston Common. Hardie talks about the mission of the Black Political Task Force. Marcus Jones reports that the Black Political Task Force was started in 1979; that the Task Force is comprised of 60 minority activists who collect dues, hold forums, and endorse candidates. V: Shots of a male Task Force member wearing a Bob Rufo campaign pin; of a female Task Force member; of Mel King (political acitivist) campaigning in Roxbury; of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts). Jones reports that the Task Force endorsed Mel King in the 1983 mayoral race; that they endorsed Michael Dukakis in the 1982 governor's race. V: Shots of African American campaign workers holding campaign signs for Georgette Watson (candidate for Suffolk County Sheriff); of Bob Rufo (candidate for Suffolk County Sheriff) shaking hands with Hardie. Jones reports that the Task Force has endorsed Bob Rufo over Georgette Watson in the race for Suffolk County Sheriff. V: Footage of Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP) saying that the Task Force does not always have to endorse African American candidates; that Watson deserves the endorsement of the Task Force because she is a good leader. Footage of Baroness Williams-Martin (political activist) saying that the Task Force's endorsement of Rufo was unfair; that the endorsement was "a political slap in the face to Watson." Jones says that Watson was shaken by the Task Force's endorsement of Rufo. V: Footage of Watson with supporters at a press conference. Watson has tears in her eyes. Watson says that the Task Force's decision has been an "emotional experience"; that she is going to wage a winning campaign. Footage of Hardie at the Task Force press conference. Hardie says that Rufo is a better candidate for the position than Watson. Footage of Rufo saying that the race is important to him; that the voters need to decide which candidate is most qualified for the position. Rufo says that he hopes that the endorsement does not become an issue between him and Watson. Jones says that the Task Force announced its full slate of candidates at the press conference today. Jones reports that the Task Force has endorsed Rufo for Suffolk County Sheriff, Gerry D'Amico for lieutenant governor, Jo Ann Shotwell for attorney general, Byron Rushing for state representative for the ninth Suffolk District. Jones notes that the Task Force endorsed Salvatore DiMasi over Regina Placid for state representative of the third Suffolk District. V: Shots of Rufo at the Task Force press conference; of Gerry D'Amico (candidate for lieutenant governor) at the press conference; of Jo Ann Shotwell (candidate for state attorney general) at the press conference; of Byron Rushing (candidate for state representative) at the press conference. Footage of Salvatore DiMasi (candidate for state representative) at the Task Force press conference. DiMasi says that this endorsement shows that people from different communities and ethnic backgrounds are working together. DiMasi says that he is proud to receive the Task Force's endorsement. Footage of Regina Placid (candidate for State Representative) saying that the Task Force's endorsement does not represent the true voice of the African American community. Footage of Hardie at the press conference. Hardie says that the Task Force is accustomed to the controversy which often accompanies their endorsements. Jones stands on the Boston Common. Jones reports that no one can predict if the Task Force's endorsements will make a difference in the upcoming elections. Jones notes that critics of the Task Force say that their endorsements may backfire. Jones says that some critics predict that the African American community may back the African American candidates not backed by the Task Force.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/25/1986
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that many African American legislators are opposed to the adoption of the latest version of the state budget proposed by the Ways and Means Committee of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Vaillancourt reviews the proposed budget, which includes cuts in rental assistance and welfare assistance. The budget also includes cuts to the Department of Social Services and the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination. Interview with State Rep. Shirley Owens Hicks, State Rep. Byron Rushing, and Louis Elisa of the Boston chapter of the NAACP at a breakfast meeting of the Massachusetts Legislative Black Caucus. Owens Hicks and Elisa talk about the need for funding of human services. Rushing says that many voters are not opposed to new taxes to fund human services. Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee Richard Volk talks about the proposed budget in the chambers of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Maureen Hart Hennessey of the Norman Rockwell Museum and African Americans in the paintings of Norman Rockwell
1:00:11: Visual: Shots of a breakfast meeting of the Black Caucus. Shots of attendees at the breakfast including Byron Rushing (State Representative). Meg Vaillancourt reports that African American legislators are concerned about the adoption of the budget proposed by the Ways and Means Committee of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Vaillancourt notes that African American legislators are concerned about cuts to specific areas of the budget. V: Footage of Shirley Owens Hicks (State Representative) saying that cuts to the budget will affect the poor; that many people depend on the services provided by state agencies. Vaillancourt reports that Richard Volk (Chairman, House Ways and Means Committee) unveiled a budget which cuts $582 million from the budget proposed by Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts); that the budget includes no new taxes. V: Shot of Volk in the House chambers. Volk stands at a podium to explain the proposed budget. On-screen text details some of the cuts included in the budget proposed by the House Ways and Means Committee. Vaillancourt reports that the House Ways and Means budget includes an $8.5 million decrease in rental assistance and a $12 million decrease in emergency welfare assistance. Vaillancourt notes that the budget cuts $6 million from the Department of Social Services; that the budget cuts $20,000 from the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD). Vaillancourt reports that the House Ways and Means budget increases spending on AIDS prevention, elder services, and drug treatment. V: Footage of Rushing saying that the House Ways and Means budget did not cut some areas; that the budget increased spending in other areas. Rushing says that the House Ways and Means Committee proposed spending more money on drug treatment than Dukakis did. Shot of the Massachusetts State House. Vaillancourt reports that legislators are aware of the popular revolt against new taxes; that the minority community may be more receptive to the governor's call for new taxes. V: Footage of Rushing being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Rushing says that his constituents favor new taxes; that many voters all over the state probably favor new taxes. Rushing says that many state representatives are not listening to their constituents. Footage of Owens-Hicks being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks Owens-Hicks if she will vote for new taxes. Owens-Hicks says that she is not opposed to some elements of the new tax package; that she supports a capital gains tax; that she is not opposed to cigarette or alcohol taxes. Owens-Hicks says that she will not endorse a gasoline tax. Footage of Louis Elisa (Boston chapter of the NAACP) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Elisa says that every citizen of the Commonwealth needs to reaffirm their commitment to human services and to their neighbors. Elisa says that the state legislators cannot play politics when there are lives at stake.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/24/1989
Description: Harold Washington (Mayor of Chicago) and W. Wilson Goode (Mayor of Philadelphia). The city of Hartford, Connecticut has elected Carrie Perry, an African American woman, as mayor of the city. Marcus Jones notes that Hartford is the only major city in New England with an African American mayor. Jones' report includes footage of Perry at a polling station and at a press conference. Jones reports that Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) is seen as having the best chance at becoming Boston's first African American mayor. Interview with Bolling, who says that he might run for mayor someday, but that he is concentrating on his agenda in the City Council. Jones notes that Bolling differed with Mel King (candidate for Mayor of Boston in 1983) and other African American community leaders over the issue of Roxbury's secession from Boston. Footage of Bolling, King, Andrew Young (Greater Roxbury Incorporation Project) and Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) on the Phil Donahue Show in 1986. Jones notes that the minority community in Boston is becoming impatient for an African American mayor. Interviews with Charles Weeks (Black Political Task Force) about the chances of Boston electing an African American mayor.
1:00:09: Visual: Shots of Harold Washington (Mayor of Chicago) celebrating his victory at the polls; of W. Wilson Goode (Mayor of Philadelphia); of an African American man official from the campaign of Carrie Perry in Hartford. Shot of Carrie Perry (Mayor of Hartford) entering a polling booth. Marcus Jones reports that Carrie Perry is the first African American to be mayor of Hartford; that Hartford is the only major city in New England with an African American mayor. V: Footage of Perry at a press conference. Footage of Bruce Bolling (President, Boston City Council) being interviewed by Jones. Bolling says that the city of Hartford deserves a lot of credit; that Hartford voters have looked beyond race in electing city officials. Jones reports that Bolling is seen as having the best chance of becoming Boston's first African American mayor. V: Footage of Bolling saying that he is not preoccupied with the thought of running for mayor. Bolling says that he is pursuing his agenda in the City Council. Jones notes that Bolling was once seen as a successor to Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston in 1983); that King and Bolling differed publicly on the issue of Roxbury's proposed secession from Boston. V: Shot of King campaigning in Roxbury in 1983. Footage of Bolling, King, Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) and Andrew Jones (Greater Roxbury Incorporation Project) on the Phil Donahue show on October 30, 1986. Bolling says that African Americans and voters from other races supported King's candidacy in 1983 because they wanted a change in the city. Footage of Charles Weeks (Black Political Task Force) saying that there will be an African American mayor in Boston; that the African American mayor will need to be the mayor for all residents, not just African Americans. Jones notes that the Black Political Task Force endorsed Bolling's last bid for re-election to the City Council. V: Footage of Weeks saying that whites are becoming more accustomed to seeing African Americans in positions of authority; that an African American will eventually become mayor of Boston. Footage of Bolling saying that it is possible that he might become mayor someday. Bolling adds that an African American will become mayor of Boston in the future. Footage of African American audience members debating on the Donahue show. Marcus Jones notes that the minority community in Boston is becoming impatient for an African American mayor.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/04/1987
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on issues of race in the presidential campaign. While the African American community has traditionally voted Democratic, Michael Dukakis is not receiving unanimous support from the African American community. Younger African Americans seem open to voting Republican. At a meeting of the Black Republican Leadership Council, Reverend Earl Jackson criticizes the Dukakis campaign and Ed Reed speaks out in favor of George Bush. Interviews with African American voters about which candidate they support. Many of the interviewees support Bush. Vaillancourt reports that some African American voters support Bush because they want to support the eventual winner. She notes that some African American voters are disillusioned with Dukakis for not choosing Jesse Jackson as his running mate. The African American community is still a Democratic stronghold, but that Dukakis may be alienating some African American voters in his effort to appeal to more conservative Democratic voters. Interview with Janice Thurmond of the Dukakis campaign about the campaign and his appeal to African American voters. Vaillancourt's report is accompanied by footage of Dukakis and Jackson at the 1988 Democratic National Convention. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Curtis Davis of the Greater Roxbury Incorporation Project (GRIP)
1:00:22: Visual: Footage from CBS of Lloyd Bentsen (Democratic US vice-presidential candidate) being interviewed on October 26, 1988. Bentsen says that there are elements of racism in the campaign. Meg Vaillancourt reports that race has become an issue in the presidential election; that Democrats claim that Republican campaign advertisements are racist. Vaillancourt notes that Republican accuse Democrats of racially divisive tactics. V: Footage of the Reverend Earl Jackson (Black Republican Council) addressing a meeting of the Black Republican Leadership Council in Roxbury. Shots of the audience. Jackson accuses Michael Dukakis (Democratic US presidential candidate) of hypocrisy. Jackson remarks that Dukakis has kept his distance from the African American community during the campaign; that Dukakis is now accusing George Bush of racism (Republican US presidential candidate). Shots of an African American neighborhood; of African American female shopper. Vaillancourt reports that the African American community has traditionally voted Democratic; that younger African Americans have doubts about Dukakis. V: Footage of an African American female saying that she will vote Republican this year because Dukakis is not a good candidate for president. Footage of another African American female saying that she would vote for Bush because he seems like an honest man. Footage from CNN of Dukakis, Kitty Dukakis (wife of Dukakis), Jesse Jackson (African American political leader), and Jaqueline Jackson (wife of Jackson) with other Democratic Party leaders at the 1988 Democratic National Convention; of delegates at the convention. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis is not running as strongly with African American voters as previous Democratic candidates. Vaillancourt reports that a poll has found younger African American voters to be more open to Republican overtures. V: Shots of the meeting of the Black Republican Leadership Council; of the attendees. Footage of Ed Reed (Black Republican Council) saying that Bush will make an effort to increase minority participation if elected. Vaillancourt reports that some African Americans are supporting Bush because they want to support the winner. V: Shots of African Americans residents on the streets of Roxbury. Footage of an African American man saying that Dukakis doesn't have what it takes to win. Vaillancourt reports that African American voters may not be convinced by the Republican Party's position on economic issues. V: Footage of an African American woman saying that she will vote for Dukakis because she is a poor, African American woman. Shots of a voter registration table in Dorchester. African American workers register African American residents to vote. Vaillancourt notes that many African American voters seem angry at Dukakis. V: Footage of an African American male saying that he is angry at Dukakis for not choosing Jackson as his vice-president. Footage of an elderly African American woman saying that she remembers when the candidates were nice to poor people. Footage from CNN of Michael Dukakis, Kitty Dukakis, and Euterpe Dukakis (mother of Michael Dukakis) at the Democratic Convention. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis may be alienating traditional Democratic voters by trying to appeal to a wider spectrum of voters. Vaillancourt notes that the African American community is still a Democratic stronghold. V: Shots of African American residents on the streets of Roxbury. Footage of Janice Thurmond (Dukakis campaign) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Thurmond says that young African Americans take civil rights for granted. Thurmond says that Dukakis represents justice and a sense of fair play.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/27/1988
Description: Hope Kelly reports on a celebration at the Museum of Afro-American History marking the arrival of the first African Americans in Massachusetts. Kelly notes that the first African Americans arrived as immigrants, not as slaves. Kelly's report features footage of Henry Hampton (Chairman, Museum of Afro-American History) addressing the gathering. Kelly reviews the history of African Americans in Massachusetts. Kelly's report is accompanied by historical photos and drawings related to African American history in Massachusetts.
1:00:09: Visual: Footage of a group of African American singers performing a song. Hope Kelly reports that a gathering at the Museum of Afro-American History celebrated the anniversary of the arrival of black immigrants in Massachusetts; that the first black immigrants arrived in Massachusetts on February 26, 1638. V: Shot of a black and white image of black immigrants and early white settlers; of a ship in a harbor; of a black man addressing a crowd. Footage of Henry Hampton (Chairman of the Board, Museum of Afro-American History) saying that the most important history is found in the lives of individual people; that people form the families and cultures which are important to history. Kelly reports that the first black immigrants arrived in a boat from the West Indies; that the first black immigrants were not slaves; that many worked as servants and laborers and in factories; that skilled professions were off limits to the first black immigrants. V: Shots of a black and white image of early black immigrants in the hold of a boat; of a poster for a slave auction. Shots of black and white images of the early black immigrants working as servants. Shot of a color image of black men working as dock laborers. Shots of a black and white image of black immigrant women working in a factory. Shot of a black and white image of black men and women waiting at a dock as sailing ships approach. Shot of a black and white image of a slave auction. Kelly reports that the experience of black immigrants in the north was different from that of black slaves in the South. V: Shot of a black and white image of two black children and a white school master. Shots of black and white photos of African Americans in Boston in the nineteenth century. Footage of Henry Hampton addressing an audience. Hampton says that the study of history must include the stories of all people. Footage of a group of African American singers singing "Amazing Grace."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/26/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on controversy over the affirmative action program in the Boston Fire Department. A 1976 court ruling required the Boston Fire Department to offer equal opportunities to minorities. Interview with Kathleen Allen, of the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination, about the affirmative action program in the Fire Department. Vaillancourt reports on the percentages of non-white firefighters in the department. Vaillancourt notes that some white firefighters consider the affirmative action program to be unfair, while many non-white firefighters support the program. Interview with David Coritella from the Mayor's Policy Office about the affirmative action program and the civil service exam. Cortiella says that the highest-scoring applicants in each racial group are hired. Vaillancourt reviews statistics concerning the rank and salaries of non-white firefighters. There are few minorities in positions of authority within the department. White firefighters Philip Malone and Paul Malone were recently fired for having claimed to be African American on their job applications. City and state officials fully support the affirmative action program. Vaillancourt's report is accompanied by footage of white and minority firefighters on the job and in a fire station. Vaillancourt's report also features clips from Nova. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Marcus Jones reports on the affirmative action program at the Bank of Boston
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of an African American firefighter and a white firefighter sitting in a fire station. Shots of the two firefighters sliding down a pole and putting on gear. Shot of a fire truck pulling out of a station with its siren blaring. Footage from Nova of flames and burning buildings. Shots of firefighters fighting fires. Meg Vaillancourt reports that a 1976 court ruling found discriminatory practices in the Boston Fire Department; that a consent order required the Boston Fire Department to offer equal opportunities to minorites. V: Shot of a siren; of a white firefighter putting on gear and climbing into a fire truck. Footage of Kathleen Allen (Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination) saying that firefighters used to be hired only if they knew someone on the force; that firefighters were not hired according to their qualifications before 1976. Shot of an African American firefighter and a white firefighter working with equipment in the fire station. On-screen visuals and text detail the racial breakdown of employees in the Boston Fire Department. Vaillancourt reports that there were nineteen non-white firefighters in 1976; that minority firefighters made up less than one percent of the department in 1976. Vaillancourt reports that there are 373 non-white firefighters in 1989; that minority firefighters make up 23% of the department in 1989. V: Vaillancourt stands in a fire station. Vaillancourt reports that Boston firefighters did not want to talk about affirmative action on camera because it is a touchy subject. Vaillancourt notes that some white firefighters said that the consent decree was unfair. Vaillancourt reports that some white firefighters say that the consent decree allows minorities to be hired before whites who scored higher on the civil service exam. Vaillancourt reports that some African American firefighters said that the consent decree allowed them an equal opportunity to be hired. Vaillancourt notes that David Cortiella (Mayor's Policy Office) is the former director of the city of Boston's affirmative action program. V: Footage of Cortiella being interviewed by Vaillancourt at a fire station. Cortiella says that the consent decree does not force the Fire Department to hire minorities. Vaillancourt asks if the consent decree would allow a white applicant to be passed over in favor of a minority applicant who scored lower on the civil service exam. Cortiella says that such a scenario is possible. Cortiella adds that the highest-scoring applicants in each racial group will be hired. Vaillancourt reports that white firefighters in Alabama have won the right to sue for reverse discrimination. Vaillancourt notes that the white Alabama firefighters have not yet proven their case. V: Shots of a white firefighter; of an African American firefighter; of a firefighting ladder extended toward a tall building. Shots of an African American firefighter in uniform; of a white firefighter standing on a firefighting ladder. Vaillancourt reports that it is hard to argue that affirmative action has decreased opportunities for white firefighters. Vaillancourt notes that few minorities are in positions of authority within the Boston Fire Department. V: On-screen text and visuals details statistics about the rank and salaries of minority firefighters. Vaillancourt reports that there was one African American lieutenant in the Fire Department in 1976; that there are seven African American lieutenants or captains in 1989. Vaillancourt notes that 158 firefighters earn salaries of $43,000 or more; that only one of those 158 firefighters is a minority. Vaillancourt reports that some white firefighters in Boston believe that affirmative action puts them at a disadvantage. Vaillancourt notes that two white firefighters were recently fired for having claimed to be African American on their job applications. Vaillancourt adds that the two firefighters are fighting their dismissal; that the two firefighters claim that their grandmother was African American. V: Shot of a white firefighter climbing into the driver's seat of a fire truck. Shots of black and white photos from WNEV of Philip Malone (former firefighter) and Paul Malone (former firefighter). Vaillancourt reports that two other firefighters are under review for having claimed to be Latino. V: Shots of firefighters fighting fires. Footage of Cortiello saying that he will not comment on the cases of the two firefighters who claimed to be Latino. Shots of firefighters sliding down a pole in a fire station. The firefighters climb onto a fire truck. Shot of a fire truck pulling out of a fire station. Vaillancourt reports that city and state officials say that they will not retreat from their affirmative action program.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/15/1989
Description: Runners at starting line and on course of Boston Marathon. Press conferences on John Hancock as new sponsor. Laurel wreath, Bill Rodgers.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/19/1985
Description: Hotel workers union Local 26 is not being permitted to protest against Boston Marathon sponsor and Back Bay Hilton owner, John Hancock, during the race. Start of the Boston Marathon. Interview with union leader Domenic Bozzotto. Hearing on the protesting. Several union protests. Footage from a John Hancock Boston Marathon commercial.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/16/1987
Description: Three-part series updating the state of the Boston Public Schools since court ordered desegregation. First part on changes in racial and socioeconomic composition of student body. White enrollment has declined and more children come from poor and single-parent households. Second part on the dilapidated conditions of school buildings and the difficult decision of which schools should be closed. Exteriors of closed schools, some boarded up. Third part on the evolution of curriculum planning to enhance flexibility and keep up with standards. Interviews with John Coakley, School Department; Robert Dentler, expert on court order; Ellen Guiney, Citywide Education Coalition; Leon Nelson, Freedom House. Superintendent Robert Spillane attends School Committee meeting.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/20/1985
Description: U.S. Commerce Secretary Malcolm Baldridge opens the new Boston World Trade Center. Discussion of Massachusetts as an export state, and local industry's competition with imported goods. Michael Dukakis and Baldridge speak at the opening ceremony, and mention new trade legislation on the floor in Congress. Interview with Dukakis on his differing opinions on the legislation. Exteriors of the Trade Center and scenes of the Boston Harbor and waterfront. Following the edited story is b-roll of the ceremony, a helicopter taking off, the world trade center building from multiple angles, and photographs and aerials of the surrounding area.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/28/1986
Description: Marcus Jones reports that the Dorchester Youth Collaborative (DYC) provides a safe haven from street violence for young people in the area. Jones reports that some young people at the DYC have formed their own music groups and write their own songs. Jones interviews Robert Bostic (15-year old Roxbury resident) and his friends. Bostic says that he is using rap music to send a positive message. Jones also interviews Al McClain (DYC counselor), who talks about the impact of the DYC on the lives of the neighborhood teenagers. Jones reports that the DYC-member group One Nation has released an album. Jones interviews DeMaul Golson (DYC member) and other members of the group One Nation. Jones also interviews Todd Maxell (16-year old Roxbury resident), who says that teenagers will listen to anti-violence messages from their peers. The report includes footage of Natalie Jacobson (WCVB-TV) and R.D. Sahl (WNEV-TV) reporting on crime in Roxbury. The report also features footage of teenagers at the DYC, footage of the members of One Nation performing on stage and footage from a video produced by teenagers at the Roxbury Boys and Girls Club. This tape includes additional footage of DYC members and a music video called "Stand Back From Crack" filmed inside Back Bay Station.
1:00:29: Visual: Footage of the members of the group One Nation dancing and performing on stage. Footage from WNEV of R.D. Sahl (WNEV reporter) reporting on gang violence in Roxbury. Footage from WCVB of Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) reporting on shootings in Roxbury. Shots of paramedics wheeling an injured African American woman out of a building; of police vehicles and an ambulance on a street in Roxbury; of paramedics tending to an injured African American patient inside of an ambulance. Marcus Jones reports that a group of Roxbury youngsters are not surrenduring to the violence in Roxbury. V: Footage of Robert Bostic (15-year old Roxbury resident) sitting with a group of his friends. Bostic says that he wants to set a good example for young people; that young people should avoid violence. Bostic says that he and his friends are using rap to send a positive message. Jones reports that Bostic and his friends are members of the Dorchester Youth Collaborative (DYC). V: Shots of Bostic and other members of the Youth Collaborative; of a sign for the Youth Collaborative. Shots of African American youth entering the Youth Collaborative building. Footage of Al McClain (Counselor, Dorchester Youth Collaborative) saying that the Youth Collaborative has had a great impact; that some of the members of the Youth Collaborative used to be in gangs. Shots of members of the youth collaborative dancing to rap music; of Jones sitting with the members of the youth collaborative. Jones reports that some of the members of the Dorchester Youth Collaborative have formed groups to make music. Jones notes that some of the youth write their own music; that the DYC member group One Nation has released an album about AIDS. V: Shot of the cover of an album by the group One Nation. Footage of One Nation members performing a rap song about street violence. Footage of Jones interviewing DeMaul Golson (DYC member) and two other African American male DYC members. Jones asks the boys if they are scared by the street violence. The boys say yes. Golson says that his cousin was shot in the back; that his cousin is dead. Footage of One Nation members performing on stage. Jones reports that the DYC members are determined to rise above the violence. Jones notes that members of the Roxbury Boys and Girls Club are also doing their best to fight the violence. V: Footage of a video produced by members of the Roxbury Boys and Girls Club. Footage of Bostic saying that most kids are not going to listen to their parents' advice; that kids are influenced by the people on the streets who are making money from drugs. Footage of Todd Maxwell (16-year old Roxbury resident) saying that kids might listen to their peers if their peers tell them not to do drugs. Shots of an African American man being led into a police station by police officers; of police standing near a cordoned-off crime scene.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/01/1989
Description: Story on the thriving Boston rock scene. Interviews with musicians who came from Boston. Footage of Boston Music Awards. Up and coming bands mentioned include Down Avenue, The Liars, and New Man. Aimee Mann thanks crowd. Marcus Jones focuses on one up and coming band, The Regulars. Interview with lead singer on why he's based in Boston. Interview with Debbie Gilberg, manager of The Regulars. Jones says that Boston is a good place to develop a local base following because it has venues and radio that feature local artists. Interview with radio DJ on finding good local bands to play on the air. Footage from Tracy Chapman's Fast Car music video. Interview with Jeff Marshall, founder of Monolith Records, on signing bands to smaller labels. following the edited story is b-roll of Newbury Comics interiors with closeups on album covers. Exterior of Newbury Comics.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/16/1988
Description: Hope Kelly reports that Superintendent Laval Wilson proposed a set of reforms to improve the Boston Public Schools in the beginning of his tenure as superintendent. Kelly reviews Wilson's proposals for school reforms and notes that the programs were backed by the Boston School Committee. Kelly's report includes footage of Wilson in 1985 and footage of Wilson announcing his school reform package. The Boston School Committee has recently cut Wilson's budget by $8.5 million. Kelly reviews the budget cuts. Interviews with John Nucci (Boston School Committee), Sam Tyler (Boston Municipal Research Bureau), and Ellen Guiney (Educational Advisor to Mayor Flynn) about the budget cuts. Kelly reviews the budget figures for municipal spending on education from 1984 to 1989 and budget figures for overall city spending from 1986 to 1988. Kelly notes that the city's spending on education has greatly increased from 1984. She notes that critics believe that the School Department is not spending its money wisely. Kelly reports that the city will need to curb its spending in the next few years due to the absence of budget surpluses. Kelly's report is accompanied by footage of students in the Boston Public Schools.
1:00:19: Visual: Footage of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) being interviewed by the Boston School Committee for the position of superintendent of schools on July 19, 1985. Wilson says that his goal is to convince the members of the Boston School Committee that he is the best candidate for the position. Hope Kelly reports that Wilson took over the Boston Public School System at a time when the average graduating senior reads at a seventh-grade level. Kelly notes that the average drop-out rate is 43%. V: Shots of high school students outside of a high school; of students descending a stairs in a school building. Kelly notes that Wilson approached the job with determination. V: Footage of Wilson saying that his goal is to lift the educational level of the students coming out of the Boston public school system. On-screen text and visuals detail the specifics of Wilson's proposed educational programs. Kelly reports that Wilson proposed a set of reforms called the Boston Education Plan. Kelly notes that Wilson proposed a $3.1 million dollar program for after-school remedial reading; that Wilson proposed a $1.3 million program to standardize remedial reading programs city-wide. Kelly notes that the School Committee backed Wilson's programs when he arrived. Kelly reports that the School Committee cut Wilson's budget by $8.5 million on Wednesday. V: On-screen text detail the specifics of the budget cuts. Kelly reports that Wilson proposed a budget of $364.6 million; that the School Committee cut his budget to $355.9 million; that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has refused to spend more than $350.0 million on the school budget. V: Shot of Flynn talking to reporters. Footage of John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) saying that the city administration does not understand the impact of its cuts to the school budget. Kelly reports that Sam Tyler (Boston Municipal Research Bureau) runs an agency which monitors city spending. V: Footage of Tyler being interviewed by Kelly. Tyler says that city officials were thinking about the future when they asked the School Department to keep its spending to within $350 million. Tyler says that the superintendent cannot introduce new programs and expect them all to be funded. Footage of Ellen Guiney (Flynn's Education Advisor) being interviewed by Kelly. Guiney says that $350 million is what the city can afford to spend on education. On-screen text and visuals detail the city of Boston's spending on education from 1984 to 1989. Kelly reports that the city has increased its spending on schools from $245 million in 1984 to $341.1 million in 1989. V: Footage of Guiney says that some city officials in other departments think that the School Department already receives too much money. Kelly reports that some critics wonder if the School Department is spending its money wisely. V: Shot of two elementary-school students in front of a computer terminal. Footage of Tyler saying that the school system has improved. Kelly reports that Nucci points to a 1% decrease in the drop-out rate. Kelly notes that Guiney points to improved teacher salaries and more teachers; that Guiney admits that there have been few actual performance gains by students. V: Shot of Nucci; of Guiney; of a white male teacher in a classroom. Footage of Guiney saying that she would have liked to have seen greater improvements in the last five years. Shot of an African American girl coloring a picture in a classroom. Kelly reports that spending by the city has risen overall in the past five years. V: On-screen text compares the rise in city spending to the rise in school spending from 1986 to 1988. Kelly reports that city spending has risen 34% since 1986; that school spending has risen 23% since 1986. Kelly stands in front of the offices of the Boston School Committee. Kelly reports that the city had surpluses from 1986 to 1988; that it is less certain that surpluses will exist in future city budgets. V: Footage of Tyler saying that the city needs to put a brake on its spending. Shot of elementary school students entering a classroom.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/06/1988
Description: Reviewing opinions on the dangers of boxing and risk of brain damage. Scenes of bowers training and sparring in the ring at Connolly's Gym. Interview with doctor Francis Rocket on the danger of brain damage. Interview with Boxing Commissioner James McCarin, using Muhammad Ali as an example of a boxer affected by brain damage from the sport. Footage of Ali, he slurs his speech. Boxing can also cause blindness. Interview with eye doctor Edward Ryan. Gym owner Jim Connolly defends boxing in comparison to other more dangerous sports like hockey and football.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/31/1986
Description: Christy George reports on the end of a two-week fast by chaplains at Brandeis University. George notes that the chaplains fasted to protest the university's investments in South Africa. George's report includes footage from a gathering of apartheid protesters on the Brandeis campus. Father Maurice Loiselle, Rabbi Albert Axelrad and Reverend Diane Moore discuss their fast and the university's policy regarding South Africa. The protesters sing and hold hands at the gathering. George reports that the chaplains' fast serves as the last phase of a community protest against apartheid. George notes that Brandeis trustees will review their investment policy at an upcoming meeting. George reviews the apartheid protest at Brandeis University since last year. George's report includes footage of Brandeis students at a shantytown on campus from the previous year.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/13/1987