Description: Boston landmarks: swan boats at Public Garden, Bunker Hill Monument, Old Ironsides, State House, Paul Revere statue, Hancock tower, Faneuil Hall / Quincy Market, Gardner Museum, Museum of Fine Arts, rowers on Charles River, two views of skyline, City Hall plaza, Harvard Yard and Widener Library, Hatch Shell on Esplanade, New England Aquarium.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Description: John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson at Democratic National Convention 1960. JFK's "New Frontier" speech.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 1960
Description: Swearing in and inaugural address of John F. Kennedy.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/20/1961
Description: Last two minutes of Harvard Yale football game in which Harvard ties score at 29-29 in final seconds. Fans mob team on field. Scoreboard, pandemonium.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/15/1968
Description: Originally broadcast as a WGBH news special, this tape was later used as source material for Ten O'Clock News stories. Roger Fisher moderates discussion among students, administrators, faculty about student strike at Harvard over ROTC, Afro-American studies, expansion into Boston and Cambridge. Louis Lyons starts by reading the news from Harvard. Participants include Jim Kiernan, a WGBH consultant; Brey O'Connell, a member of the Committee for Radical Structural Reform; Richard Rubinowitz, a representative of Harvard New College; Hugh Calkins, a member of the Harvard Corporation; and Norman Daniels, a member of the Strike Committee and of the Student for a Democratic Society. First segment of the program provides some radical Harvard students the opportunity to speak to a member of the Harvard Corporation. Another students, King Collins, starts using explicit language, and the audio was cut during the original broadcast. Much argument over who has right to speak. reel 1 of 2.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/17/1969
Description: Part of this tape is a repeat of the end of Part 1. Originally broadcast as a WGBH news special, this tape was later used as source material for Ten O'Clock News stories. Roger Fisher moderates discussion among students, administrators, faculty about student strike at Harvard over ROTC, Afro-American studies, expansion into Boston and Cambridge. Participants include Jim Kiernan, a WGBH consultant; Brey O'Connell, a member of the Committee for Radical Structural Reform; Richard Rubinowitz, a representative of Harvard New College; Hugh Calkins, a member of the Harvard Corporation; and Norman Daniels, a member of the Strike Committee and of the Student for a Democratic Society. Several other students join in the conversation. Much argument over who has right to speak. Professors James Ackerman and Jerome Bruner join the table. Fisher tries to define points of contention. reel 2 of 2.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/17/1969
Description: Bruins vs St. Louis Blues. Bobby Orr scores winning goal in sudden death overtime to gain Stanley Cup. Replay of the goal. Team celebrating. Blues and Bruins congratulating each other after game. Some dropout at the end of the tape.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/15/1970
Description: AFSCME state workers on strike, marching with placards outside Saltonstall building. Reporter interviews employees, Teresa Cincotta, Tom Knightly, Pamela Knights, and Shirley Lumpkins, about short-term and long-term expectations of the strike. Prison guards on strike outside MCI Concord. Prison workers gather around tree. Guard tower seen through chain link fence.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/21/1976
Description: Exteriors of the Massachusetts State House. AFSCME (American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees) state workers on strike, picketing outside State House with placards. Closeup on Beacon St. street sign.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/21/1976
Description: Interviews with Dorchester residents on Dorchester Fair Share's effort to get HUD or city of Boston to sell vacant properties to people who would rehabilitate them and pay taxes. B-roll of abandoned house on Bowdoin Street, Dorchester. Trashed interior. Other houses with boarded up windows.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/19/1976
Description: Electric power station in Allston. Grid of insulators, transformers and cables. Danger High Voltage sign. Line of utility poles and railroad tracks along Massachusetts Turnpike (Interstate 90) looking toward TV38 (WSBK) transmission tower.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/30/1976
Description: Nantucket shore sunset. Several takes of reporter standup. Reporter interviews John Clay, engineering officer who was working on the Argo Merchant oil spill. Clay points out the effects of the oil spill on the major fishing areas off the coast of Massachusetts, including the Georges Bank. Nantucket shore with ice and snow, seagulls.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/22/1976
Description: Low quality sound at the beginning of the video. Judge Arthur Garrity speaks at a community meeting, calling for better communication among organizations involved in the school desegregation process. He takes questions about the role of the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC) and the organization of community forums to invite feedback on schools. Garrity talks about setting up hearings about the school desegregation plan for the 1976-77 school year. Audience members express confusion at the roles of the CCC and the Citywide Parents Advisory Council (CPAC). Garrity explains the role of the Racial Ethnic Parents Councils, set up through the CPAC. Garrity reads a letter about problems which need to be resolved at the Blackstone Elementary School. Hubie Jones (African American community activist) sits beside Garrity at the meeting
1:00:00: Audio on tape is muffled. Visual: Arthur Garrity (federal judge) speaks before a biracial community meeting about Boston schools and court-ordered desegregation. Garrity speaks about the importance of good communication between the organizations involved in the schools. He says that the parents on the Citywide Parents Advisory Council (CPAC) are interested in working with the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC) in organizing meetings about the schools. Garrity closes his talk by saying that he is offering suggestions, not directives. Hubert Jones (African American community activist) informally thanks Garrity. Garrity sits down in a chair next to Jones. 1:02:43: V: Garrity takes questions from audience members. Garrity responds to a question, saying that he will consult with all of the lawyers involved in the school desegregation case before putting anything into the court order; that he will schedule a series of hearings for the 1976-77 school year. Garrity says that the hearings might be held in late February or early March. A meeting member asks Garrity to comment on the group's idea to hold community forums in the neighborhoods, so that parents can give suggestions and air their grievances. Garrity agrees that the community hearings are a good idea. He suggests that a few members of the CCC and the CPAC should be present at the forums; that these members should be well informed in order to combat inaccurate information and false rumors; that members should feel free to ask him for the statistics and facts before going to the hearings. A meeting member asks Garrity if the CCC should have an attorney present for the court hearings. Garrity says that the CCC is not a party to the lawsuit; that the CCC might be seen as a distraction in the court. The member asks how the CCC can get feedback from the court. Garrity says that he is looking for constructive proposals for changes in the desegregation plan; that he hopes the community forums will provide these constructive proposals for change. Garrity adds that he receives other reports which do not call for action. A meeting member asks how Garrity would define the role of the CCC. Garrity says that he appreciates the efforts of CCC mediators in diffusing the tense situation in South Boston; that the most important function of the CCC is to monitor how the desegregation plan is carried out across the city. 1:13:41: V: A meeting member tells Garrity that members of the community see the CCC as a council which can take action and solve problems. Garrity responds that the CCC can publicize information and draw attention to problems. Garrity reads a letter that he received about problems at the Blackstone School. Garrity says that he hopes the CCC can delegate members to investigate problems at the schools in order to get them resolved. Garrity says that he would like the CCC to help solve these problems; that he would rather not try to resolve problems at individual schools through the court order. An audience member says that there is some confusion regarding the roles of the CCC and the CPAC. Garrity says that the Racial Ethnic Parents Councils under the CPAC exist to promote communication on racial issues in the schools; that the councils have also taken action on educational issues in the schools. Garrity notes that the CPAC has no staff or resources; that the CCC can support the CPAC and the Racial Ethnic Parents Councils. Garrity refers to a decision by the US Court of Appeals regarding the schools.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/14/1976
Description: Damaged remains of bombed prop jet outside Eastern Airlines hangar at Logan Airport. Yellow Massport fire truck. Fire fighters spraying wreckage. Group of men examine ruined fuselage and wing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/02/1976
Description: Boston City Hospital patient admitting desk with English and Spanish signs in corridor. Ambulance bay and emergency entrance sign. One ambulance departs with flashing lights and siren. Several takes of reporter standup on an investigation involving the hospital.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/03/1976
Description: Footage of the Bunker Hill Monument against a blue sky. Children play on the surrounding grass slope. Pans to adjacent columned building with US and Massachusetts State flags. Footage of the USS Constitution ("Old Ironsides") in Charlestown Navy Yard. “Welcome aboard” sign; masts without sails; shipmates with striped shirts. Early US flag with 15 stars hangs from bowsprit. Visitors ascend gangplank. National Park Service booth with attendant. Boston Naval Shipyard plaque. Aft view of ship.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/02/1976
Description: Campaign brochures for candidates opposing Rep. Tip O'Neill in eighth congressional district. Barnstead, Florenzo DiDonato, Leo Kahian. Interview with Tip O'Neill about his campaign and the U.S. economy. O'Neill shakes hands and talks with constituents.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/22/1976
Description: Presidential candidate Jimmy Carter enters North End Post 144, Veterans of Foreign Wars hall, shakes hands. A man introduces Carter; he also points out local politicians in attendance. Carter addresses a small crowd. He calls himself a 'Washington outsider' and appeals to them as same. Carter takes questions from the audience. He lays out his plans for national defense. He talks about the nuclear positions of the United States and the Soviet Union. Exteriors of the VFW.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/17/1976
Description: Charlestown environs. Charlestown High School and Monument Square, Bartletts Street, Bunker Hill Street and St. Francis de Sales Church. Children ride bicycles in Monument Square. People are gathered in the park beside St. Francis de Sales Church. Shot from the park of the port. Racist, white supremacist and antibusing graffiti is visible on buildings on Medford and Main Streets. Shots of Medford and Main Streets. Pedestrians walking along streets. Children play at a playground. Audio goes in and out.
0:00:23: Visual: Shot across Monument Square of Charlestown High School. Shot of the top of the building, including school name carved into the stone. A broken window at the school has been patched up. The streets around Monument Square are quiet. A child rides his bike along the street. Shots of Bartlett Street, beside the school; of the Bunker Hill Monument. 0:05:35: V: Children ride their bikes in Monument Square. Shots of Bartlett Street; of racist graffiti on a building on Concord Street; of Concord Street. 0:09:24: V: Shot of Bartlett Street. Traveling shot up Bartlett Street. Traveling shot continues on to Elm Street and on to Bunker Hill Street. Traveling shot continues up Bunker Hill Street. Shot of St. Francis de Sales church. Cars are parked along both sides of Bunker Hill Street. An older man walks slowly along the sidewalk and stops in front of one of the houses. Two young men walk down the sidewalk of Bunker Hill Street. 0:14:26: V: Teenagers are gathered in the park beside St. Francis de Sales church. A group of people sit on steps in the park, looking at the view of the port. Gas tanks and industrial ships are visible in the port. Long shot of park and the port. Children play in the playground at the park. Shot of two children on swings with wrought iron fence in foreground. Shot of older man on a park bench with wrought iron fence in foreground. A girl takes a drink from a water fountain. 0:17:43: V: Traveling shot of Medford Street. Shot of a garage on Medford Street with white supremacist and antibusing graffiti. Traveling shot of Main Street. Mishawum Park apartments are visible. An older man sits with another person on the stoop of a dilapidated building. Shot of white supremacist and antibusing graffiti on a building at the corner of Essex and Main Streets. Video is distorted at end of tape.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/18/1976
Description: No audio at very beginning. Police officers and US Marshals are stationed outside of Charlestown High School. African American and white students exit the school. White students walk away from the school. African American students board buses and depart. Members of the media record the event from across the street, under Bunker Hill Monument. Gary Griffith does several takes of reporter standup from the South End. He gives an update on the senatorial race in the second Suffolk district. Elevated train tracks are visible on Washington Street. South End environs Shot of the Prudential Center. Washington St. street sign.
0:00:00: Visual: School buses pull up to the front of Charlestown High School. Graffiti on the front of the school has been painted over. A Boston Police Department cruiser pulls up behind the buses. A police officer on a motorcycle waits behind the buses. A US Marshal surveys the school from across the street. A group of officials and another US Marshal stand at the entrance of the school. Members of the media observe the scene from behind the fence at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. 0:01:49: V: An African American police officer is stationed at the corner of Monument Square and Concord Street. Shot of Concord Street. A group of white youth observe events at the school from across Monument Square. A girl sits on the fence watching the school. Three young men stand on the steps of a brownstone house on Monument Square. A group of police officers are stationed on Monument Square where the youth have gathered. Some members of the media stand at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. Shot of the Bunker Hill Monument. School buses and police motorcycle escorts remain parked in front of the school. Police radios are audible. Shots of Charlestown High School through the fence at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. 0:06:37: V: A police officer talks to school officials at the entrance of the school. Two white US Marshals and one African American US Marshal are gathered in front of the school. Police officials and a US Marshal confer at the corner of Monument Square and Bartlett Street. Police officers are stationed along Concord Street. Shot of the Bunker Hill Monument and the gathered media. 0:08:25: V: African American and white students exit the school together. Some white students walk away from the school. African American students and some white students head toward the buses. Shot of the exterior of Charlestown High School. A student makes a gesture of peace to the media. The video is overly bright during this scene. 0:12:02: V: Buses pull away from the school, followed by a police motorcycle and a police cruiser. White students are gathered at the corner of Concord and Bartlett Streets. Police officials leave the scene. Another group of white students is gathered on the corner of Bartlett Street and Monument Square. One girl makes a peace sign for the camera. Two police officers with riot helmets walk up the street. 0:14:24: V: Gary Griffith reports on the senatorial race in the second Suffolk district. He stands on a street corner. The Prudential Tower is visible in the distance. Griffith says that the election will be determined in the Democratic primary because there are no Republican or independent candidates; that the Democratic primary will take place in four days. Griffith makes a mistake in his delivery and does two more takes. The camera pans to Washington Street. Elevated train tracks run down the center of the street. Shot of the fire escape of a building on the corner of Washington Street. The windows of the building are boarded up. Shots of rowhouses and buildings along the street perpendicular to Washington Street. Shots of a garden behind a chain link fence. A colorful sign on the fence reads "Community Garden". Shot of the street and the Prudential Tower. Clothes are hanging out to dry on the fire escape of a building on the street. Shots of Washington Street and elevated train tracks. Shot of street sign for Washington Street. Shots of overgrown lot on the corner of Washington Street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/09/1976
Description: Police officers and US Marshals are present outside of Charlestown High School on the first day of school during the third year of court-ordered busing in Boston. The media is gathered across the street from the school, at the foot of the Bunker Hill Monument. Robert DiGrazia (Boston Police Commissioner) confers with police and surveys the scene outside of the school. A group of buses with a police motorcycle escort pulls up to the school. African American students exit the buses and enter the school. A crowd of white youth gathers near the school. Dennis Kearney (State Representative) and Robert Murphy (Headmaster, Charlestown High School) talk to the crowd of youths. DiGrazia and Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) confer near the crowd
0:00:05: Visual: Members of the media pass two police officers as they enter the enclosure surrounding the Bunker Hill Monument in Monument Square. Shot of three US Marshals walking toward Charlestown High School. An MDC Police officer exits a police vehicle parked near the high school. Shot of the exterior of Charlestown High School. A few police officers stand in front of the high school. Two US Marshals confer near the high school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: Police, including Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) disperse a crowd in Monument Square in Charlestown after an anti-busing demonstration. A crowd is gathered in front of Bunker Hill Housing Project. Police and US Marshals are stationed across the street from the crowd. The police maneuver in the street. The crowd jeers at police and at least one bottle is thrown. The crowd retreats into the housing project. Police move up Bunker Hill Street. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) is present.
0:58:19: Visual: A large crowd of mostly students is gathered along a street in Monument Square. Police are stationed in the street, monitoring the crowd. Captain Bill MacDonald (Boston Police Department) addresses the crowd through a bullhorn, telling them to go home. Crowd begins to disperse, chanting periodically. An MDC Police vehicle is visible. 1:01:02: V: A Boston Police truck with officers seated in back drives past Charlestown High School and stops. MacDonald issues instructions to them through a bullhorn. Police officers exit from the back of the truck and gather in front of the high school. MacDonald issues more instructions through a bullhorn. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) confers with an officer across from the school. 1:02:37: V: The crowd disperses, moving along Bunker Hill Street. Shot of Concord Street and the intersection of Concord and Bunker Hill Streets. DiGrazia walks down Concord Street. Residents watch the action on the street from their windows. Graffiti on Concord Street marks a boundary of 100 yards from the high school: "100 yds. - Freedom Ends Here." Shot up Concord Street to High School. 1:03:45: V: Police are assembled at the intersection of Concord and Bunker Hill Streets. A crowd is gathered outside of the Bunker Hill Housing Project on Bunker Hill Street. Shots of crowd outside housing project; of police assembled in street. 1:05:25: V: The crowd cheers as police march back up Concord Street toward the high school. Members of the press, including Gary Griffith (reporter), follow the police up Concord Street. The crowd in front of the housing project moves into the street. A voice yells into a bullhorn, "Ok kids, it's your neighborhood." The crowd mills about in front of housing project. 1:07:08: V: A few police officers walk down Concord Street toward the housing project. A large crowd is still gathered in front of the housing project. A group of US Marshals walk down Concord Street. DiGrazia surveys the scene from the top of Concord Street. Voices can be heard taunting the police. DiGrazia walks down Concord Street toward the housing project. A woman walks her father back to his house, so that he won't get hurt "when the bottles start." 1:09:06: V: The large crowd in front of the housing project cheers loudly. Shot of a US Marshal walking away from the crowd. Noise of a bottle breaking against the pavement. Police on Concord Street watch the crowd in front of the housing project. The noise of a helicopter is audible. MacDonald shouts instructions through a bullhorn to police. Two US Marshals in riot helmets walk down Concord Street. A group of police march in formation from Monument Square down Concord Street. DiGrazia stands with a group of officers at the end of Concord Street, across from the housing project. A helicopter circles overhead. The crowd thins as people move into the housing project. MacDonald advances toward a crowd of youth, turning the corner onto Bunker Hill Street. DiGrazia and a group of officers and US Marshals follow MacDonald. MacDonald shouts into the bullhorn. A group of police officers exit the housing project and take a right as they continue to walk up Bunker Hill Street. Cars pass slowly on Bunker Hill Street. Small groups of people are gathered on the sidewalks. Police officers and the media walk in the street. 1:13:49: V: Three US Marshals in riot helmets confer on Bunker Hill Street. Police officers walk up the street. The media are gathered on a street corner. Two officers stand at the side of the street. One officer adjusts his riot helmet.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: Tape dropout in beginning. Combat Zone environs. Thriving pornography district. XXX rated movies, peep shows, Naked i, Pussy Cat Cinema, adult book store, State and Pilgrim Theaters, Intermission Lounge. Garish marquees with flashing lights. MBTA and Boston police cars.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/15/1976
Description: Press conference after Suffolk County Courthouse bombing; decision to close building for safety. Talk of increased security at entrances. Also, press conference with Michael Dukakis, Frank Bellotti, Kevin White, Tom McGee, and Kevin Harrington pledging to commit all necessary resources to investigate and prosecute violent crime.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/22/1976
Description: Reporters set up microphones at podium. Archibald Cox chairs a press conference on judicial reform and court reorganization. He describes the effects and causes of delays in the Massachusetts courts and the budgets associated with the courts. He is flanked by Alan Sisitsky, Michael Dukakis, Kevin Harrington, Michael Flaherty, and Francis Bellotti. He thanks committee that did the study. Attorney General Francis Bellotti expresses his support of the committee, which he hopes will be able to bring about the necessary judicial reform.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/08/1976
Description: Boston Police Department press conference with Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, Captain Morris Allen, and Captain Fred Conley. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) is the moderator. The speakers are seated at a table featuring an array of street weapons used against police in a riot in South Boston on the previous day. Press conference includes police department videotapes of a riot in South Boston on the previous day and of an unruly crowd at a Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC) meeting at English High School. DiGrazia announces that violence and disruptions of public order will no longer be tolerated by police.
0:00:16: Visual: Shot of bottles, baseball bats, pipes, bricks and other weapons lying on table. Some have exhibit tags attached to them. Microphones are also set up on the table for a press conference. Shot of a police map of the city of Boston. 0:03:31: V: Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) and others sit down at the table displaying the weapons. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) introduces the police officials on the panel: Captain Morris Allen, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, DiGrazia, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, Captain Fred Conley. Dunleavy announces that a short videotape will be shown. 0:05:02: V: A videotape plays on a television screen. The videotape shows a large crowd on a city street. Police officers in riot gear are stationed on the street. Dunleavy points out the weapons used by the crowd, and that the crowd has thrown tear gas at the police. The videotape shows a cloud of tear gas in the police ranks. Rioting crowd charges police, throwing bricks and other objects. Dunleavy says that the street on the videotape is East 6th Street in South Boston. V: The videotape shows crowd throwing rocks and other objects. The crowd retreats, still throwing objects, as police advance. Dunleavy announces that the next videotape was shot at English High School last Thursday at a meeting of the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC). V: The videotape shows a noisy crowd seated in an auditorium. Members of the CCC are seated on stage. The crowd chants and claps its hands, disrupting the meeting. Arthur Gartland (CCC) threatens to call in the police to establish order. Shot of members of press watching videotape on the television. 0:14:03: V: Shot of DiGrazia. Dunleavy shows photos of the aftermath of violence yesterday in South Boston, including photo of a police cruiser with rear window missing. He says that the weapons on the table were used against police in South Boston yesterday. DiGrazia says that a demonstration in South Boston turned violent yesterday; that citizens of Boston have a legitimate right to stage demonstrations against busing; that the actions of some are denying the rights of others; that the governor's wife was denied her right to speak at Faneuil Hall; that a US Senator has been harassed and threatened; that a presidential candidate was denied the right to speak out last week; that parents are prevented from holding meetings. DiGrazia says that there is a conspiracy against public order in Boston; that the police will no longer be tolerant of those disrupting the rights of others. DiGrazia says that the police will protect the rights of anti-busers and pro-busers alike; that arrests will be made and violators of the law will be prosecuted. 0:18:44: V: Reporters ask questions to DiGrazia and other police officers. DiGrazia says that a small number of people in the city are using the busing issue as an excuse to pursue vandalism and mayhem. DiGrazia says that the police department took a low visibility approach to busing in 1974; that they acted more forcefully in 1975; that they have been attempting to let people demonstrate against the law; that they will be more forceful from now on. A reporter asks if there is evidence of a conspiracy against the police. DiGrazia replies that the weapons on the table are evidence of a conspiracy; that police were letting the demonstration proceed until they were attacked by the crowd.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/16/1976
Description: Boston Police Department press conference with Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, Captain Morris Allen, and Captain Fred Conley. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) is the moderator. The speakers are seated at a table featuring an array of street weapons used against police in a riot in South Boston on the previous day. DiGrazia says that violence and disruptions of public order will no longer be tolerated. He says that the police department is actively investigating participants in the violence at the previous day's demonstration in South Boston. DiGrazia says that the police are gathering evidence against the South Boston Marshals and others for engaging in violent actions. DiGrazia notes that the demonstrators in South Boston knowingly violated the restrictions of their parade permit. Some drop out in the middle of the video. Reel 2 of 2.
1:00:03: Visual: Press conference with Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston), Captain Morris Allen, Superintendent Joseph Jordan, Deputy Superintendent Lawrence Quinlan, and Captain Fred Conley. Steve Dunleavy (spokesperson for DiGrazia) is the moderator. DiGrazia and the police officers sit at a table displaying bottles, rocks, pipes and bricks which were used against police in a demonstration in South Boston the day before. DiGrazia takes questions from reporters. A reporter comments that one anti-busing organization has decided to take to the streets. DiGrazia replied that statements like that will be considered conspiratorial and could be used against the organization in court. DiGrazia says that the police will use whatever force is necessary to keep order. DiGrazia says that the police department has been working with the state police and the MDC police since 1974; that the Boston police will continue to rely on those police forces for support. DiGrazia says that he is compiling facts and evidence to be presented before a grand jury; that the police will arrest those who participate in violence or who violate the civil rights of others. DiGrazia says that a parade permit was granted to demonstrators in South Boston yesterday; that the demonstrators knowingly violated the permit when they marched up to the high school to confront police. 1:02:52: V: A reporter asks DiGrazia if the police department has the support of the mayor. DiGrazia says that the mayor supports police efforts to enforce the law and protect the community. DiGrazia says that he is concerned with the lack of prosecutions of those violating the court order; that he was pleased when the US Justice Department began investigating cases in 1975; that he is particularly dismayed at the lack of prosecutions in the South Boston District Court. DiGrazia says that he does not know where the demonstrators in South Boston procured tear gas. DiGrazia says that the police is now taking a more forceful approach against disruptors of public order. A reporter asks if past policies of tolerance were a mistake. DiGrazia says that they began with a low visibility policy in September of 1974; that the policy worked in all areas of the city except South Boston; that in 1975, they changed tactics and were more forceful; that the police have been tolerant of demonstrations up until now; that they will no longer tolerate violence during demonstrations. DiGrazia says that expenses are not an issue when city residents are injured and property is damaged; that the money will be made available to the police to deal with these problems. 1:06:02: V: A reporter asks DiGrazia about how the police handled demonstrators at the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC) meeting. Shot of weapons on table. DiGrazia says that police tried to take their cues from Arthur Gartland (CCC), who ran the meeting; that from now on, police will act when they think it is necessary. DiGrazia says that he has not been in contact with Judge Garrity about the change in police deparment tactics. Dunleavy adds that a list will be made available of the 80 police officers injured in yesterday's demonstration in South Boston; that 13 arrests were made at the demonstration. DiGrazia says that the police department's new policy on demonstrations will not affect the way police handle their duties in and around the schools. DiGrazia says that he will not station more police in South Boston permanently; that he will send more officers there if it is necessary. A reporter comments that demonstrators were using radios to monitor police activity. A reporter asks if police department will change radio frequencies to avoid being monitored. DiGrazia says that police department may explore other means of communications in order to avoid radios altogether. 1:09:24: V: DiGrazia invites the reporters to question the other officers who were all present at the demonstration in South Boston on the previous day. A reporter asks if it is a small group of people who are actively participating in violence. DiGrazia replies that he has seen demonstrations with as few as 150 people; that 1,000 people were present at yesterday's demonstration; that there is a group of 300-400 "hoods" who are leading the violence; that the police department is gathering evidence on the participation of the South Boston Marshals in violent acts. DiGrazia says that the police department is actively investigating actions connected to yesterday's demonstration; that he will not put a time limit on the investigation. DiGrazia thanks the media and leaves. 1:10:41: V: DiGrazia exits. Members of the media talk among themselves. Jordan talks to members of the press informally. 1:12:07: V: Judy Stoia stands next to map of South Boston. Allen refers to the map as he charts out the course of the previous day's demonstration. Allen says that one group of marchers began at the Broadway MBTA station and proceeded up West Broadway to Perkins square; that the other group of marchers began at the Andrews MBTA station and marched up Dorchester Avenue to Perkins Square;that the marchers were supposed to proceed to the Dorchester Heights Monument. Allen says that the marchers chose to march up East Broadway to G Street, heading toward the front of the high school; that there were over 2,000 marchers gathered in Perkins Square. Stoia and crew prepare to leave.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/16/1976
Description: Robert DiGrazia resigns as Boston police commissioner to become police chief in Montgomery County, Maryland. Gives press conference on strengths and weaknesses in his department.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/04/1976
Description: Bars in Dudley Square. Noise of the elevated train in background (not seen). Patio Lounge, Giant Liquors, other package stores on Washington Street. Street signs at the corner of Zeigler and Washington. Highland Tap. Men loiter on corner. Pedestrians and cars.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/27/1976
Description: Governor Michael Dukakis press conference on the high costs of health care delivery and the Medicaid budget. He discusses the tight budget for the next fiscal year.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/18/1976
Description: Sound dropout in the beginning of the video. Boston City Council meeting on the Boston School budget. City Councilor reads communications from Mayor White to the City Council. Boston schools superintendent Marion Fahey testifies to City Council about school budget deficit. Accompanying Fahey are Paul Kennedy, Associate Superintendant in charge of personnel and John McGran, member of the superintendent's office on budgetary matters. Councilors Louise Day Hicks, Albert "Dapper" O'Neil, Larry DiCara are among those on the panel questioning Fahey. Mayor White and Superintendent Fahey both address the effect of Judge Arthur Garrity's 1975 court order on the Boston School Department budget. Video goes black in the middle for a few second, but audio continues.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/20/1976
Description: Press conference held by Attorney General Francis X. Bellotti and Paula Gold, chief of consumer protection division, on criminal prosecution of fraud to combat white collar economic crime. She talks about technology to facilitate communication between law enforcement agencies. A man talks about fraud in the nursing home industry. High rises in Boston financial district. Several takes of reporter standup. He curses when he messes up.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/22/1976
Description: Steve Nevas interviews George Wallace about his campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination. Nevas asks Wallace if he expects to do well with anti-busing voters in Massachusetts. Wallace comments on his chances in the Massachusetts primary, his relationship with the Democratic Party establishment and his role at the Democratic convention. He describes his feelings towards other Democratic perspective candidates Hubert Humphrey and Edward Kennedy. Wallace says that he has never campaigned much in Massachusetts; that he is happy to have the opportunity to present his ideas to the Massachusetts voters. Wallace denounces the "expansion" of the federal government, and calls busing a social experiment. Wallace gives his opinions on the political positions of Ralph Nader (consumer advocate) and Ronald Reagan (Governor of California). He talks about his previous campaigns for the presidential nomination.
15:33:22: Visual: Steve Nevas sets up an interview with George Wallace (Governor, State of Alabama) on his campaign for the presidency of the United States. Wallace is seated in a wheelchair. Nevas asks Wallace to comment on predictions that he will win the Massachusetts primary; that voters who are against busing will vote for him. Wallace says that he would be surprised if he won the Massachusetts primary. He says that too much time and money has been spent on busing in Boston; that busing is a "social experiment"; that the government needs to focus on unemployment and inflation. Wallace says that he did not campaign in Massachusetts in 1972; that he has not had a lot of contact with Massachusetts voters. Nevas again brings up the predictions that Wallace will win the state. Wallace says that his ideas have been distorted through propoganda; that many voters in Massachusetts have misunderstood his ideas. Wallace says that winning the Massachusetts primary would be a great victory for him. Nevas asks Wallace about the candidacy of Ronald Reagan (Governor, State of California). Wallace says that he is not familiar with the details of Reagan's plan to cut $90 billion from the federal budget; that he agrees with Reagan on increased state control over government spending; that the people of Massachusetts should have more control over how school money is spent. Nevas asks Wallace about Ralph Nader (consumer advocate) and his proposal that large corporations be chartered by the federal government. Wallace says that he does not support any idea giving the federal government more authority; that he believes in the enforcement of anti-trust laws. Wallace adds that the federal government already has too much authority; that the people of Massachusetts had no recourse when federal judges ordered forced busing; that state governments should have more authority in most matters. 15:38:25: V: Nevas remarks that a poll showed Wallace in second place after Sargent Shriver (presidential candidate) in Massachusetts. Wallace says again that he does not expect to do well in Massachusetts. Wallace adds that government attention has been focused on busing; that busing is a "social experiment"; that the voters of Massachusetts are concerned about other issues. Wallace says that he is campaigning in Massachusetts because it has an early primary election; that voters in the northeast have been unfamiliar with his ideas until now. Nevas asks Wallace if he would support Hubert Humphrey (US Senator) or Edward Kennedy (US Senator) as the Democratic nominee for president. Wallace says that Kennedy has never declared his candidacy; that Humphrey is not campaigning. Wallace notes that the national Democratic Party does not support his candidacy for president; that the Democratic Party is organizing a strategy to defeat his candidacy; that the Democratic Party is out of touch with working people. Wallace adds that there is a conspiracy against him in the Democratic Party. Nevas asks about the possibility of Wallace running for president as a third party candidate. Wallace says that many Democratic nominees are adopting his positions against busing and big government; that his positions are compatible with the platform of the national Democratic Party. Wallace says that he will work to ensure that his positions are represented at the Democratic convention in New York City over the summer. Wallace notes that many leaders are paying attention to his positions; that his ideas represent those of the working people of the nation. Wallace says that he is not at all interested in the vice-presidency. He adds that the other candidates have already stated that they will not offer him the vice-presidential nomination. 15:45:25: V: Nevas asks him if he would disclose his full medical report if the other candidates did so. Wallace responds that a medical writer for the New York Times has examined his medical report and given him a clean bill of health; that his confinement to a wheelchair does not affect his ability to be president. Nevas asks Wallace to comment on the movement for an uncommitted slate of delegates within the Democratic Party. Wallace says that some of the uncommitted delegates could pledge their votes to him. Nevas asks Wallace if he is in favor of streamlining the presidential campaign process. Wallace says that the state primaries could be consolidated into regional primaries. Nevas states that Wallace has run for president more than once. Wallace responds that he ran for president once in 1968; that he ran in three primaries in 1964 in order to make a statement against the left-wing politics of the other Democratic candidates; that he was shot in 1972 and did not finish the campaign. Nevas asks Wallace why he is seeking the presidency. Wallace says that he wants the working people of the nation to be represented in the government. Wallace notes that he has been warning people about the expanding reach of the federal government; that the people of Massachusetts experienced this kind of intrusive governmental intervention during the busing crisis. Nevas says that many people see him as a segregationist. Wallace says that he is not against people of color; that African Americans in Alabama have voted for him overwhelmingly; that he is against big government, not people. Wallace says that he grew up during a time when the segregation of races was accepted as the best solution; that segregation was sanctioned by the courts back then. Wallace adds that segregation is illegal now and it is no longer an issue. Nevas closes the interview. The camera crew takes cutaway shots of Nevas questioning Wallace. Wallace asks Nevas if he would be surprised if Wallace did well in the Massachusetts primary election. Nevas says that he would not be surprised if Wallace did well. Wallace says that he has not conducted any polls of Massachusetts voters. Wallace says that he expects to do well in Michigan and Pennsylvania; that it is hard to predict how voters will react to him. Wallace notes that people in Massachusetts made fun of his ideas years ago; that now Massachusetts voters take him seriously.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/27/1976
Description: Dedication ceremony of John Hancock glass tower, in lobby. General James M. Gavin is introduced and addresses the audience. Gavin and other speakers talk about the history of the building project. Thomas O'Neill and Kevin White are also on stage. Unveiling of massive reproduction of Declaration of Independence on wall of lobby. English High School chorus sings patriotic songs. Hundreds of guests crowded in lobby.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/15/1976
Description: Exteriors of Harvard Medical School, Longwood Campus. Main building with ionic columns on Shattuck Street. A few students in front of the building. Countway library next door. Audio goes in and out throughout.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1976
Description: High, wide, long shots of Boston environs from observation deck of Hancock Tower. Nearly aerial views of South End, Charles River, Boston Harbor, State House, and orange line T moving along elevated tracks.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/10/1976
Description: Audio goes in and out. Hyde Park environs. Uniformed police are stationed outside of Hyde Park High School, including horse mounted officers. Students exit the school. African American students board buses. Buses depart with police motorcycle escort. Pam Bullard interviews Hyde Park High School teachers Terry Gaskill and Hugh Mullen discuss racial tension inside the school. The students have returned to school after a recent racial disturbance. Mullen says that the school was quiet; that the students segregated themselves along racial lines. Mullen says that a small group of students is responsible for the trouble at the school. Both teachers agree that the students do not act up when the police are present in the school. Tape 1 of 2.
0:58:01: Visual: Shots of a black dog on the porch of a house on Westminster Street, near Hyde Park High School; of a police horse standing on the grass while a police officer talks to a resident; of the exterior of Hyde Park High School. Police are stationed outside of Hyde Park High School. A police bus is parked in front of the school. Three police officers stand on the steps of the school, while one police officer directs traffic on the street. A police officer pulls up on a motorcycle. 1:00:44: V: A line of school buses pulls up Central Street and stops beside Hyde Park High School. Two mounted police officers survey the scene from the intersection. Several officers are stationed on the steps of the school. Cars pass by slowly. Another police officer arrives on a motorcycle. 1:05:19: V: Shot of the exterior of Hyde Park High School. African American and white students exit the school. African American students walk toward the school buses and board them. Police and the media survey the scene. 1:09:56: V: Groups of police officers appear in the front entrances of the school. Three of the buses pull away, escorted by police on motorcycles. The buses travel up Metropolitan Avenue. Three more buses follow, accompanied by a police officer on a motorcycle. Groups of students, school officials, and police remain on the steps of the school. The last bus pulls away, with a police motorcycle escort. Police officers exit the school and walk down the steps. Groups of people remain on the steps. Close up shot of a white woman police officer on a horse. A few police officers walk away from the school. 1:13:27: V: Pam Bullard sets up an interview with two Hyde Park teachers in front of the school. Terry Gaskill is African American and Hugh Mullen is white. Vehicle noise makes their voices inaudible at beginning of interview. Gaskill advocates an after school program or gathering place for both white and African American youth in Boston. He notes that African American and white students gather on the streets after school; that a group of angry white youth kicked his car last year as he drove to Hyde Park High School. Mullen says that the day went smoothly; that the school staff had to break up groups of students in order to get them into homeroom in the morning; that the strong police presence made a difference; that the police did not interfere with school activities. Gaskill says that the students were tense at the beginning of the day; that the atmosphere was quiet. Bullard asks about racial tension among the students. Mullen says that the students segregated themselves along racial lines today; that students of different races had been mixing somewhat before Friday's racial disturbance. Gaskill says that the first day of school was calm; that racial tension began to build up among the students as the week progressed. Mullen agrees that the first few days of school were quiet. He says that there is a small group of students who make trouble; that the situation at the school will not get better unless they can get rid of the small group of troublemakers. Mullen adds that the school has a large freshman class this year; that he had thought the presence of the younger students would help to ease the tensions of the previous year; that teachers will not be able to assess the situation until the police pull out of the school; that the students do not dare act out while the police are present. Gaskill agrees that students will not act out while police are in the building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/15/1976
Description: Pam Bullard interviews teachers Hugh Mullen and Terry Gaskill about racial tension and disturbances at Hyde Park High School. The teachers say that incidents occur in the hallways, bathrooms and cafeteria, but not in the classrooms. They discuss requests made by Hyde Park High School faculty to the school administration upon the reopening of the school after a racial disturbance. Mullen says that the school faculty has requested that outside community groups stay out of the schools until the situation is under control. Tape 2 of 2.
0:00:14: Visual: Pam Bullard interviews a white teacher, Hugh Mullen, and an African American teacher, Terry Gaskill, about racial tension at Hyde Park High School. Gaskill says that every student has grown up with racial prejudice; that most students do not want to get into trouble; that emotions run high when trouble begins and students are drawn in to the situation. Mullen says that most of the trouble happens in the hallways and bathrooms; that the atmosphere is calm in the classrooms and the gym. Gaskill adds that two fights have occurred this year in the gym; that neither stemmed from racial tensions. Mullen says that the Hyde Park High School Faculty Senate has asked for a stronger police presence and for more aides in the school building; that the school administration has granted their requests; that he hopes the school can be peaceful without police officers on duty. Pam Bullard talks informally to the teachers while the crew takes cutaway shots. Mullen says that there has been little interference from parents; that African American parents have had meetings since last week's racial disturbance; that he does not know what has come out of the school administration's meetings with parents. Mullen says that the faculty has requested outside community groups to stay out of the school until the situation is under control.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/13/1976
Description: South Boston High School exterior. Background comments of pedestrians talking to camera operator and reporter. Pam Bullard interviews headmaster Jerome Wynegar on what programs his school will offer, including core curriculum and vocational education. Wynegar says racial problems have been aggravated by outside agitators. He adds that the school is enrolled to capacity, and cannot accommodate students who wish to return after dropping out. He says that the school should make sure to listen to the suggestions of the students, and those students who dropped out, to try to improve the school. He commends the faculty. Additional comments from Wynegar as they shoot cutaways. Shots of graffiti painted on pavement, which reads “Stop Forced Busing.” Several takes of reporter voice over and standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/17/1976
Description: Pam Bullard interviews Kathleen Sullivan (Boston School Committee) about the quality of education in Boston. Sullivan says that she is frustrated because Boston schools have not improved since court-ordered desegregation began in 1974. Sullivan calls Arthur Garrity (federal judge) a "crazy judge." Sullivan says that the desegregation plans since 1974 have been disruptive. She says that neither African American nor white students have benefitted from school desegregation; that students should not be assigned to different schools each year. Sullivan and her assistant discuss Judge Garrity's latest order concerning the Boston schools. Bullard explains to Sullivan that she is putting together a piece which contrasts Sullivan's views on schools and court-ordered desegregation with the views of African American leader Melnea Cass
0:59:44: V: Pam Bullard interviews Kathleen Sullivan in her office. Bullard comments that Sullivan was elected to the School Committee because voters were impressed with her commitment to quality education and better schools. Bullard asks Sullivan how she would have fared if voters were less concerned with the state of the schools and more concerned with politics as usual. Sullivan says that she could have been re-elected. Sullivan says that parents are concerned about education; that a difficult economy coupled with the costs of school desegregation has made school improvement difficult. Sullivan says that the quality of education has not improved in the city since she was elected to the School Committee; that she feels frustrated in her efforts to improve the schools. 1:03:48: V: Bullard asks if it would damage Sullivan politically to admit that desegregation has improved Boston schools. Sullivan says that voters in Boston are beginning to accept desegregation as a fact; that the anti-busing movement has lost steam because people are tired; that voters would be happy to hear that schools have improved, even if the improvement was a direct result of desegregation and a "crazy judge on the scene." Sullivan says that there has been little improvement except in a few schools. Sullivan mentions that Roxbury High School, the Lewenberg School and the Curley School have seen improvement. Bullard asks why Sullivan never mentions the positive impact that desegregation has had on African American students, who now have access to an equal education. Sullivan says that she has been preoccupied with the budget this year; that she visited last year with African American students who had been assigned to three different schools in three years, and had not benefitted from the experience. Sullivan says that the school situation has begun to stabilize this year; that one can begin to talk about better education for African American students this year; that police presence in schools and community hostility to busing prevented a healthy school situation for African American students in 1974 and 1975; that she understands why African American parents might disagree with her because they wanted access to better schools for their children. Sullivan says that she hopes schools can be improved for all students; that she is worried because only 51,000 children attended Boston Public Schools last year, out of a school-age population of 117,000. Sullivan says that she taught African American students in Dorchester; that she thinks desegregation has been disruptive for those students; that the desegregation of Boston schools could have been beneficial for African American students and white students in 1974 and 1975 if it had been implemented differently. 1:10:34: V: An administrative assistant enters Sullivan's office to go over some papers with her. The assistant points out that Judge Garrity has ordered the School Committee to appoint a new Transitional Director of Program Development at South Boston High School. Sullivan and the assistant discuss Garrity's instructions. Sullivan and her assistant tell Bullard that Judge Garrity has approved 160 transfers out of 1,782 requests. Sullivan alludes to Garrity's heavy involvement in managing the Boston schools. 1:12:57: V: Bullard explains to Sullivan how she will edit the final piece. Shots of Sullivan's office. Bullard explains that she has also interviewed Melnea Cass (African American community leader) and wants the final piece to reflect the positions of the two women. Bullard says that both women are leaders, but that their positions on school desegregation reflect their ethnic heritage; that their positions are as far apart as the communities they represent. Sullivan points out that she has done a lot of work with African American students. Bullard says that Sullivan and Cass have a good working relationship because neither harbors strong racial prejudices; that both have friends of other races and backgrounds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1976
Description: Press conference at City Hall. Boston Mayor Kevin White and Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia read prepared statements about the following day's school opening in the third year of court-ordered busing. White expresses confidence in a peaceful opening of schools. DiGrazia says that police have been instructed to use minimum force, but to act decisively against any disruptions of public order. Both men hope that police can be removed from schools as soon as possible. White notes that the atmosphere seems calmer this year than during the previous two years. White says that he would like to remove police from the schools as soon as possible because their presence hinders the development of a healthy learning environment. Reporters question them on the school opening. Shots of Pam Bullard listening to the press conference.
2:09:33: Visual: Members of the press are assembled for a press conference at City Hall with Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) and Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston). White begins reading a statement, then stops because there is a problem with sound. 2:11:53: V: White reads a prepared statement. He says that school opens tomorrow; that fewer students face assignments to new schools this year; that more students are attending the schools of their choice; that many schools are benefitting from programs linked with universities and businesses; that three new schools are opening; that he is confident that the school year will be productive. White says that the city is prepared to guarantee the safety of all schoolchildren; that he hopes to reduce the police presence at the schools this year; that police will restore order if disruptions occur. White urges citizens to share in the responsibility for a peaceful school opening; that the city will focus on improving schools this year. 2:14:32: V: DiGrazia reads a prepared statement. He expresses confidence in a peaceful school opening. He reports that police have received instructions to allow peaceful demonstrations, but to maintain public order; that police officers have been instructed to use minimum force and to treat those arrested with respect and courtesy. DiGrazia says that police will not tolerate any acts of violence or disruption; that these acts are often committed by only a few citizens. 2:15:56: V: White invites questions from the reporters. A reporter asks DiGrazia what kind of preparations have been made for additional police support. DiGrazia says that Massachusetts State Police will be assigned to South Boston; that MDC Police will be assigned to Charlestown; that US Marshals will be present for the opening of schools. DiGrazia says that the atmosphere on the streets seems calm; that a few citizens are engaging in disruptive behavior; that the atmosphere seems calmer than in the previous two years; that police presence will be less visible than last year; that additional police will stand by for support. DiGrazia says that the police have not received any indication that there will be outside agitators at the schools. DiGrazia says that he hopes there will be little overtime for police officers this year. DiGrazia says that uniformed State Police officers will be assigned to South Boston High School; that community service officers and juvenile officers will be assigned to monitor the other schools. 2:18:52: V: A reporter asks about cooperative efforts between the School Department, the city of Boston, and the Police Department. White says that the three entities have been working together on school desegregaton for three years; that differences about the school budget have not affected efforts to achieve a successful school opening. DiGrazia says that police will continue to enforce ordinances forbidding the assembly of more than three people along a bus route, or assemblies within 100 yards of schools. Shot of Pam Bullard. White says that he would like to remove police from schools as soon as possible; that police presence hinders a healthy learning atmospheres; that police can be removed if citizens refrain from disrupting the schools. A reporter asks DiGrazia to clarify the term "minimum force" in police conduct. DiGrazia says that he hopes police can dissuade citizens from engaging in disruptive behavior; that he would like to see the police removed from the schools as soon as possible. DiGrazia refuses to elaborate on minimum tolerance policy guidelines, but says that warnings will be given to disruptors before action is taken. DiGrazia says that the school department instituted the use of metal detectors at the schools; that they will be used again this year. DiGrazia refuses to give out information on the number of police officers assigned to the schools
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1976
Description: Stanley Forman's Herald American photographs of Theodore Landsmark being attacked on City Hall plaza by Joseph Rakes and teenage boys from South Boston. Sen. Bill Owens addresses crowd, withdrawing vote of confidence for Kevin White's ability to ease Boston's racial tension and saying that Boston is not a safe city for people of color. Report of the reactions of Robert DiGrazia (police commissioner), Mayor Kevin White, and James Kelly (head of Home and School Association of South Boston).
1:00:17: Steve Nevas reads the news the set of The Ten O'Clock News. Behind Nevas is a photo of Ted Landsmark, after he was attacked at City Hall Plaza. Nevas reports that Boston police have identified four of the men who attacked Landsmark; that one of the youths from South Boston has been arrested for assault and battery; that police have issued a warrant for Joseph Rakes and two others involved in the attack yesterday. Nevas reports that the Massachusetts House of Representatives has passed a resolution condemning the attack; that Governor Michael Dukakis has issued a similar statement. 1:00:57: Pam Bullard reports that a group of white youths attacked Theodore Landsmark (attorney) as he passed through City Hall Plaza on his way to a meeting at City Hall yesterday. Bullard reports that the youths were at City Hall Plaza to protest busing with a group of 250 South Boston and Charlestown students. Visual: Still photographs of the attack on Landsmark at City Hall Plaza by Stanley Forman of the Boston Herald American. Bullard reports that the students involved in the protest were demanding an end to school desegregation; that several people were harassed by the youths at City Hall Plaza; that Landsmark suffered a broken nose and facial lacerations. Bullard reports that the African American community gathered today at City Hall Plaza; that African American leaders condemned police for failing to respond effectively to the attack; that leaders condemned the city's leadership for encouraging the growing violence. V: Footage of a crowd of African Americans and whites gathered at City Hall Plaza. State Senator William Owens addresses the crowd, saying that people of color are not safe in Boston; that people of color from other parts of the nation should stay away from Boston; that people of color must unite against the climate of racism in the city; that people of color in Boston should ask for federal protection because the city has failed to protect them. Bullard reports that African American leaders have accused Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) of encouraging violence by tolerating disruptions in the schools; that African American leaders have condemned the use of City Hall for anti-busing rallies. V: Footage of Owens saying that he is withdrawing his support of White. Bullard reports that African American leaders appear united in the belief that White and Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) have broke their promises to the African American community. V: Footage of White on September 3, 1975, saying that no breach of public safety will be tolerated by the city. Footage of DiGrazia on February 16, 1976, saying that violent behavior will not be tolerated; that those participating in violent behavior will be arrested and prosecuted. Bullard reports that White and DiGrazia say that they have not broken any promises; that DiGrazia is confident that Landsmark's attackers will be apprehended; that White had no comment on calls for his resignation by the African American community. Bullard reports that James Kelly (South Boston Home and School Association) blamed the violence on the liberal press. Bullard comments that the racial tension in Boston is worse than it has been in several months; that little effort is being made to ease the tension in the city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/06/1976
Description: Theodore Landsmark (attorney) speaks to the media at a press conference. His face is in bandages. Landsmark gives an account of the attack he sustained on City Hall Plaza, perpetrated by white teenagers attending an anti-busing rally. He commends the actions of Clarence Jones (Deputy Mayor, City of Boston), who came to his aid after the attack. Landsmark talks about the media's coverage of his attack. Landsmark says that he will seek full prosecution of his attackers, and adds that he will bring suit against members of the Boston School Committee and the Boston City Council. He condemns white city leaders who "incite and encourage" racist violence. Landsmark calls for an end to racism and race discrimination in the city. He accuses the white power structure of ignoring the problems of minority citizens.
1:00:04: Visual: A group of African American men greet each other at the entrance of the room where Theodore Landsmark (attorney) will hold a press conference. Landsmark enters the room. His nose and face are bandaged with white tape. An African American woman hands him a note as he enters. Landsmark sits down behind a table with microphones. An African American man sits beside him. A group of African American men and women, and a few white people, stand behind him as he speaks. Reporters sit at the other side of the table and stand around the room. The reporters take notes as Landsmark speaks. 1:02:00: V: Landsmark notes that there has been conflict among the media over coverage of the press conference; that he wants both union and non-union members of the media to cover the press conference; that the media needs to work out the union issues outside of the press conference. Landsmark greets the media and reads a statement. He says that the press conference will be brief because he needs to get some rest; that he lost a lot of blood in the attack. Landsmark says that he is concerned that the publicity generated by the attack may distort some of the crucial issues which need to be discussed. Landsmark runs through the sequence of events on the day of the attack. Landsmark says that he was on his way to an affirmative action committee meeting with the Boston Redevelopment Authority; that he was beaten and kicked by a crowd of young people coming from an anti-busing rally at City Hall. Landsmark refutes rumors that Clarence Jones (Deputy Mayor, City of Boston) had been with him and ran away from the scene. Landsmark says that he regrets the circulation of the false reports regarding Jones; that Jones was the only person who left City Hall to aid him after the attack. Landsmark says that he will seek full prosecution of the youth involved in the attack; that he will take action in civil and criminal court against members of the Boston City Council and the Boston School Committee; that he would like to see an end to the use of City Hall as "a sanctuary for racism and a resource center for those who would incite and encourage racist violence." Landsmark says that some city officials perpetuate discrimination against people of color in Boston on a daily basis. Landsmark expresses gratitude to members of the African American and white communities for the many acts of kindness and courage shown to him after the attack. Landsmark adds that meaningful gestures by the white community before the attack could have prevented the violence. Landsmark says that he is grateful for the support of the Black Caucus, the Board of Directors of the Contractors Association of Boston, and the Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association. Landsmark thanks the newspaper and TV cameramen for capturing the attack on film. He says that he wishes that somebody had come to his aid, but is grateful for the record of the attack provided by the journalists. Landsmark says that without the photos, the attack would have been recorded "as just another scuffle on the street." Landsmark says that racism is to blame for the attack; that racism in the city of Boston has been fueled by selfish politicians; that politicians continue to ignore the social and economic problems of the city. Landsmark says that he will work to solve these problems in the African American community; that solving these problems will benefit all citizens. Landsmark says that the attack lays bare the problems of the city; that the problems go beyond issues of safety in the street or busing. Landsmark notes that the attack has been called "an isolated incident" by J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant US Attorney General). Landsmark says that he does not agree; that people of color must be allowed to participate on an equal basis in all areas and levels of business and city government. Landsmark says that the issue of racism must not be subordinated; that the white power structure is indifferent to people of color in the city; that businesses and government must work together to improve the economic situation of people of color in Boston. 1:15:29: V: Reporters ask Landsmark questions after his statement. A reporter asks him to specify city officials against whom he will bring suit. Landsmark says that he will not name the officials because he does not want to jeopardize any of the lawsuits. A reporter asks him if he will bring suit against Louise Day Hicks (Boston City Council). Landsmark says that he will not comment except that his attackers were violating truancy laws; that his attackers were marching on City Hall Plaza without a parade permit. Landsmark notes that Hicks invited the protestors into her office to escape from the cold; that police officers were on duty near City Hall Plaza, but did not arrive on the scene until after the attack. Landsmark says that he cannot comment on how the police department should have deployed its personnel to control the unlicensed protest on City Hall Plaza by the students. A reporter asks Landsmark if he agrees with the Black Caucus' decision to call for the resignation of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston). Landsmark says that the Black Caucus is looking for better leadership from White on issues of affirmative action, busing, and unemployment. Landsmark says that he has received calls from around the country; that many are appalled by the incident on City Hall Plaza; that the city can take action to prevent more violent incidents.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/07/1976
Description: Longshoremen's hiring hall. Men crowd around window for work assignments. Interview with union worker, who says job shortage due to progress and automation. He has not been paid under contract guaranty because of loopholes. He predicts October 1 strike against Boston Shipping Association. Containerization calls for fewer workers, from about 1,200 men to about 400 men, though tonnage of port has remained stable. Man hours have decreased, some men have left the industry, others try to collect their guaranty. A man being interviewed says that the men are very angry.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/24/1976
Description: Steve Curwood interviews Louise Day Hicks about her vote in favor of a curfew proposal for the city of Boston. Hicks thinks that the curfew could reduce unrest on the streets in the evenings. She says that she will vote to rescind the curfew if police are shown to use it as a means to harass residents. Hicks notes that the senior citizens and fire fighters support the curfew proposal. They shoot cutaways.
0:58:32: Visual: Steve Curwood interviews Louis Day Hicks in her office. Curwood asks Hicks why she is in favor of a curfew proposal for Boston. Hicks says that senior citizens and fire fighters have requested the curfew; that a curfew could mean greater safety in the evening. Curwood comments that police have called the curfew proposal unenforceable. Hicks says that the city should try the curfew to test its effectiveness; that she voted for it to show solidarity with the senior citizens and fire fighters. Curwood points out the expense involved in a curfew ordinance; that the county may have to pay for private lawyers to defend violators because of the heavy workload of the public defenders. Hicks says that the curfew does not place undue burden on minors, who can move about with a note from their parents; that the curfew can be rescinded if it proves to be unworkable. Hicks says that the curfew could be enforced arbitrarily as a means of harassment; that she will vote to rescind the curfew if this proves to be true. Hicks says that the law could be used to bolster parental authority; that she hopes most parents have authority over their children even without the curfew. Hicks says that she does not know if the mayor will veto the curfew. Curwood thanks Hicks. The crew takes cutaway shots of Curwood and Hicks. Curwood and Hicks speak informally. Hicks talks about her constituents' support for the curfew.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/06/1976
Description: Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) holds a press conference on the closing of Hyde Park High after a disturbance. She says that the her staff is investigating the situation and will respond to a list of complaints drawn up by the faculty of the high school. Fahey says that the school faculty is concerned about disruptive students and renovations to the building. She will not comment on whether the disturbance was caused by racial tension. Fahey says that Elvira "Pixie" Palladino (Boston School Committee) had a right to visit the school. Fahey will not comment on the effect of Palladino's presence on the disturbance. Ann Foley (administrative assistant to Fahey) and Associate Superintendents Charles Leftwich and Paul Kennedy are also present at the press conference.
0:00:45: Visual: Media are gathered at Boston Schools Information Center as Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), Ann Foley (administrative assistant to Fahey), and Paul Kennedy (Associate Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) seat themselves. Foley says that Fahey will speak about the situation at Hyde Park High School. She requests the media to confine their questions to that situation. 0:01:26: V: Fahey announces that classes at Hyde Park High School will be suspended on the following day; that a group of officials and administrators will be convened to plan for the reopening of the school. Reporters ask questions about the school closing. Fahey says that Kennedy and Leftwich visited Hyde Park High School to confer with faculty, administrators, members of the biracial counsel and members of the Home and School Association. Fahey says that she made the decision to close the school based on information from that visit. Fahey says that Hyde Park faculty is preparing a list of concerns and problems which need to be addressed. Fahey says that the following day will be spent planning and addressing concerns about the school. Fahey says that she has not decided whether to request a larger police presence at Hyde Park High School. 0:03:32: V: Fahey says that she will not comment on the situation at the school until she has all of the information. Fahey says that she will determine tomorrow evening if the school will reopen on Friday. Fahey says that the school will reopen when the safety of the students can be guaranteed. Fahey says that damage to the building will be repaired before the school reopens. Fahey says that the incidents at Hyde Park were deplorable and that the situation at the school will be addressed. Fahey says that she does not know how many arrests were made; that her staff is investigating the situation in order to make a full report to her. 0:05:52: V: A reporter asks Fahey to comment on overcrowded classes and the closing of the top floor of the school. Leftwich says that some classrooms on the top floor are being refurbished; that the superintendent's staff is investigating the situation; that these complaints may have contributed to the situation at Hyde Park. Fahey says that she will not speculate on whether racial issues were the cause of the disturbance; that she will investigate the causes of the disturbance. Fahey says that her staff will assess the situation tomorrow and make plans to prevent such incidents in the future. Fahey says that she had not known about the concerns about Hyde Park faculty members before today; that faculty are concerned about disruptive students and renovations to the school building. Fahey says that students had been dismissed from school when she arrived there. Fahey says that she would address the students by saying that the faculty at Hyde Park is concerned about their well-being and education; that the biracial counsel will work hard to resolve problems at the school; that her administration is dedicated to resolving the situation at the school. 0:10:18: V: A reporter asks Fahey if Elvira "Pixie" Palladino played a destructive role in the situation at Hyde Park. Fahey says that Palladino had a right to be at the school as a member of the school committee; that she has not spoken to Palladino about the situation. A reporter asks Fahey if she is concerned that the concerns of Hyde Park faculty have not been addressed. Fahey says that she will investigate the situation. Fahey declines to answer a question unrelated to the situation at Hyde Park. She thanks the media and leaves the room with Leftwich, Kennedy, and Foley. Reporters talk among themselves as they clear the room. Shot of Fahey heading down a hallway toward the exit.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/21/1976
Description: Exteriors of Maverick housing project in East Boston. White children play outside. Lone black girl sits on fence. Black Power and racist graffiti. Boarded up windows. East Boston environs shot from moving car.Sign for Police Station 7. Interview with a Maverick resident, Mrs. Baker, about vandalism and threats from youth, and destruction of her apartment and possessions and death of three dogs due to a fire of suspicious origin. Interview with a priest, Father Corrigan, who says 12 African American families moved out of project because of intimidation and harassment. Shot of Maverick St. sign. Interview with Maverick resident, Mrs. Porter, about the families who moved out, many of whom she knew, and why she's going to stay. They shoot cutaways.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/24/1976
Description: Ornate and intricate architectural details of Victorian house on Melville Avenue in Dorchester. Interior and exterior. Dorchester environs. Ornately furnished rooms, stained glass windows, carved woodwork, chandelier, grand fireplace. People's conversation about the neighborhood and property values overheard in the background. Shot of the Channel 2 news van through the stained glass front door. Several takes of reporter standup on the property values of the Melville Avenue area of Dorchester.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/06/1976
Description: Footage of Massachusetts Port Authority Mystic container terminal in Charlestown. Hundreds of large shipping containers packed together in rows and stacks; vehicles moving and arranging containers. High shot of cranes and fork lifts moving and lowering containers by waterfront.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/20/1976
Description: Some deteriorated sound quality and some video corruption. Staff meeting on the revitalization of Massport. Meeting leader briefly mentions an accident of a cargo ship approaching Boston. He provides an update on the current business and port operations. Multiple other speakers. Massport Mystic container terminal in Charlestown. Rows of shipping containers stacked upon each other.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/30/1976