Description: Stanley Forman's Herald American photographs of Theodore Landsmark being attacked on City Hall plaza by Joseph Rakes and teenage boys from South Boston. Sen. Bill Owens addresses crowd, withdrawing vote of confidence for Kevin White's ability to ease Boston's racial tension and saying that Boston is not a safe city for people of color. Report of the reactions of Robert DiGrazia (police commissioner), Mayor Kevin White, and James Kelly (head of Home and School Association of South Boston).
1:00:17: Steve Nevas reads the news the set of The Ten O'Clock News. Behind Nevas is a photo of Ted Landsmark, after he was attacked at City Hall Plaza. Nevas reports that Boston police have identified four of the men who attacked Landsmark; that one of the youths from South Boston has been arrested for assault and battery; that police have issued a warrant for Joseph Rakes and two others involved in the attack yesterday. Nevas reports that the Massachusetts House of Representatives has passed a resolution condemning the attack; that Governor Michael Dukakis has issued a similar statement. 1:00:57: Pam Bullard reports that a group of white youths attacked Theodore Landsmark (attorney) as he passed through City Hall Plaza on his way to a meeting at City Hall yesterday. Bullard reports that the youths were at City Hall Plaza to protest busing with a group of 250 South Boston and Charlestown students. Visual: Still photographs of the attack on Landsmark at City Hall Plaza by Stanley Forman of the Boston Herald American. Bullard reports that the students involved in the protest were demanding an end to school desegregation; that several people were harassed by the youths at City Hall Plaza; that Landsmark suffered a broken nose and facial lacerations. Bullard reports that the African American community gathered today at City Hall Plaza; that African American leaders condemned police for failing to respond effectively to the attack; that leaders condemned the city's leadership for encouraging the growing violence. V: Footage of a crowd of African Americans and whites gathered at City Hall Plaza. State Senator William Owens addresses the crowd, saying that people of color are not safe in Boston; that people of color from other parts of the nation should stay away from Boston; that people of color must unite against the climate of racism in the city; that people of color in Boston should ask for federal protection because the city has failed to protect them. Bullard reports that African American leaders have accused Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) of encouraging violence by tolerating disruptions in the schools; that African American leaders have condemned the use of City Hall for anti-busing rallies. V: Footage of Owens saying that he is withdrawing his support of White. Bullard reports that African American leaders appear united in the belief that White and Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) have broke their promises to the African American community. V: Footage of White on September 3, 1975, saying that no breach of public safety will be tolerated by the city. Footage of DiGrazia on February 16, 1976, saying that violent behavior will not be tolerated; that those participating in violent behavior will be arrested and prosecuted. Bullard reports that White and DiGrazia say that they have not broken any promises; that DiGrazia is confident that Landsmark's attackers will be apprehended; that White had no comment on calls for his resignation by the African American community. Bullard reports that James Kelly (South Boston Home and School Association) blamed the violence on the liberal press. Bullard comments that the racial tension in Boston is worse than it has been in several months; that little effort is being made to ease the tension in the city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/06/1976
Description: Judy Stoia interviews James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) about resistance to busing and his decision not to attend the Procession Against Violence. Kelly says that he has appealed to African American parents to put pressure on the NAACP to stop busing. Kelly says that many African American parents agree that "forced busing is the problem." Following interview is silent footage of helicopter and security detail among rooftops of City Hall Plaza. A WGBH camera crew overlooks City Hall Plaza and records the Procession Against Violence. Thomas O'Neill, Jr. (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Kitty Dukakis, Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Kathryn White, Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), Charles Barry (State Secretary of Public Safety), Dr. Charles Glenn (Massachusetts State Department of Education), Ann Landers (advice columnist), Joseph Kennedy, Edward Kennedy (US Senator), and Edward Brooke (US Senator) are among those at the front of the procession. Footage includes overhead shots of the crowd and audio of hecklers jeering at White and Kennedy. Reverend Robert Golledge and John Colburn address the crowd. Tape 1 of 3.
1:00:15: Visual: Judy Stoia sets up an interview with James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) near City Hall Plaza. Stoia asks Kelly about a message he delivered to African American parents. Kelly says that he urged African American parents to use their influence with the NAACP to stop forced busing; that both white and African Americans know that "forced busing is the problem"; that African American parents have encouraged the South Boston Information Center to continue the fight against busing. Kelly says that he made the plea to African American parents in order to help restore sanity to the city. Kelly says that he will not participate in today's Procession Against Violence because it will do nothing to remedy forced busing; that the mayor, state officials and "the liberals" need to take a stand against forced busing. Stoia probes Kelly's motives in boycotting the march. Kelly says that his statement to African American parents will be more effective than a march around the city by "the liberal establishment." Kelly says that white parents want a good education for their children in neighborhood schools; that the "liberal establishment" and the media need to realize that "good education for all kids" is more important than "quality integrated education." Kelly says that he hopes white parents and African American parents can work together to solve some of the problems in the city. Stoia thanks Kelly. The crew takes some cutaway shots of Stoia asking questions. 1:05:09: V: A small crowd begins to gather for the procession against violence at City Hall Plaza. A few people look down on the plaza from rooftops. Helicopters circle above City Hall Plaza. A crowd mills about on the plaza. A small crowd is gathered around some seating. A marching band plays. 1:07:44: V: Groups of people walk toward City Hall Plaza. Police officers are visible. One officer directs traffic. The music of a marching band is audible, then it stops. Marchers begin to fill the street, moving toward the plaza. Four men in uniform lead the march, carrying an American flag and a Massachusetts state flag. A crowd of people stream into the plaza. A woman yells, "Kevin, stop forced busing." A man yells, "Hey, you hypocrite." Thomas O'Neill (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Kitty Dukakis, Kathryn White, Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), Charles Barry (State Secretary of Public Safety), Dr. Charles Glenn (Massachusetts State Department of Education) and Ann Landers (advice columnist) are among those visible at the front of the marchers. Some of the crowd jeers. A man yells, "Kennedy, you faker." The officials at the front of the march greet Elma Lewis and others informally as they proceed to the front of the plaza. A woman yells, "Stop forced busing. A large crowd continues to stream into the plaza. Shots of the assembled crowd. The WGBH crew tries to locate and identify public figures. A helicopter circles overhead. 1:15:25: V: A marching band begins to play. The stream of marchers continues into the plaza. Shots of assembled crowd. A woman yells, "Stop forced busing. A voice is heard addressing the crowd, calling for "a peaceful community in Boston." Shot of the crowd. O'Neill, Joseph Kennedy, Edward Kennedy (US Senator) and Edward Brooke (US Senator) are visible. Audio is difficult to hear. Reverend Robert Golledge (Vicar, Old North Church) addresses the crowd from the podium. Golledge introduces the band from the St. William's School in Dorchester. Assembled in front of the podium, the band strikes up the national anthem. Shots of the media photographing the event; of the crowd filling the plaza; of officials at the front of the crowd. John Colburn (Episcopal Archdiocese) leads the crowd in prayer.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/23/1976
Description: Mostly b-roll footage of a demonstration by R.O.A.R. (Restore Our Alienated Rights), an anti-busing organization. People gathered in the Boston Common as a man speaks over a load speaker. Silent footage of a man speaking and people in the crowd watching. Signs and flags. An interview with James M. Kelly about the demonstration. Shots of the crowd sitting and standing in the park. Mix of sound and silent.
Collection: WCVB Collection
Date Created: 09/12/1976
Description: Police officers and members of the media are gathered on G Street in front of South Boston High School. Graffiti written in large white letters on the pavement of G Street reads, "Go home, Jerome. You failed." (Graffiti refers to South Boston High School headmaster Jerome Wynegar.) Police are stationed along G Street. A small crowd on the steps of a house jeers at police. News crews with ENG cameras and microphones approach. The crowd refuses to disperse. Police officers in riot helmets assemble in front of the house. Four women and two men are put into police vans. Two of the women struggle with the police, and one man is dragged into the van. The crowd retreats into the house on G Street. James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) talks to a woman about the conflict between the crowd and police. Joseph Jordan (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) confers with police officials outside of South Boston High School.
0:00:24: Visual: Exterior of South Boston High School. Shots of the front of the building; of the school name carved into the stone at the top of the building. Police officers and media are gathered on the sidewalk in front of the school. A fading green shamrock is painted on the pavement of the school yard. Police officers confer about logistics. Boston Police Department vehicles are parked in the school yard. A Boston Police Department truck pulls in front of the of the high school. 0:02:23: V: Police officers are stationed along G Street. Close-up shot of the Boston Police Department insignia on a police officer's uniform. A crowd of white residents is gathered on the on the steps of a house on G Street, not far from the school. White teenagers are gathered outside of the Hill Stop Delicatessen on G Street, near the school. A police officer directs traffic along G Street. A group of police officers are gathered on G Street, near the crowd on the steps of the house. A police officer exits a car parked in the school yard of the high school. A Boston Police Department truck passes by the high school with its lights flashing. The truck pulls to the side of G Street, near the house where the crowd has gathered. Members of the media follow the truck down the street. A police officer gestures to the truck to pull up closer. A woman sits on the hood of a car, surrounded by police officers. 0:05:15: V: The crowd gathered on the steps of the house yells and makes gestures at the police officers. The woman sitting on the car speaks angrily to the police officers. She refuses to move from the car and says that she is not creating a scene. Police officers try to disperse the crowd of media gathered on the street. The crowd on the steps of the house is heard jeering at police. Graffiti written in large white letters on the pavement in the middle of G Street reads, "Go home Jerome. You failed." (Graffiti refers to South Boston High School Headmaster, Jerome Wynegar.) A crowd of onlookers gathers outside of the delicatessen, across the street from the crowd. Police and the media remain in the street. The crowd on the steps of the house begins to sing. 0:06:48: V: A second Boston Police Department truck exits the school yard of South Boston High School and pulls up behind the first truck on G Street. A group of helmeted police officers walks down G Street from the school. The police officers spread out across the street as they walk toward the house where the crowd has gathered. The police instruct onlookers to move down the street, away from the scene. Police officers and officials watch as the helmeted officers disperse the crowd of onlookers. Police officers stand in front of the small crowd assembled on the steps of the house. The police put the woman who had been sitting on the hood of the car into the police truck. The crowd cheers for the woman. One man yells, "Where is the civil rights commission?" A woman runs from the crowd to stop police from putting a second woman into the police truck. Police force both women into the truck, and hold the doors closed. The women inside the truck beat on the doors from the inside. The crowd jeers at police. A young man yells, "Three girls!" 0:10:11: V: A police officer walks down G Street from the high school. Other police officers remain in front of the crowd on the steps of the house. The crowd and the police exchange remarks. The crowd refuses to go indoors. A man is led by police into the second police truck. Police drag a second man from the crowd into the police truck. A police officer pushes the crowd from the steps into the house as another woman is led to the truck by police officers. The woman says, "This is a violation of civil rights." 0:12:11: V: Most of the crowd on the steps has disappeared into the house on G Street. Members of the crowd look out of the window at the action on the street. James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) stands on the steps of the house, listening to a woman describe the conflict between the crowd and the police. The police truck drives slowly down G Street. Police line the sides of the street. A group of police officers confers in the middle of G Street. The media observes the police and the dwindling crowd from the sidewalks. There are still a few people gathered on the steps of the house on G Street. Shot of a quiet side street. Residents sit outside of their houses, enjoying the sun. 0:14:19: V: Joseph Jordan (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) confers with officers outside of South Boston High School. Shot of the exterior of South Boston High School. A few youth are gathered on the steps.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/12/1977
Description: Interview with James Kelly, director of South Boston Information Center, about a demonstration at Carson Beach. He describes it as a visit by armed black militants from Columbia Point. Then he expounds on his strident views on busing and affirmative action. SBIC storefront and sign “Welcome to Boston. The city is occupied. A boycott exists. A tyrant reigns. Law is by decree. People are oppressed. The spirit of freedom still lives.” Kelly on the street, talking to a pedestrian. Kelly sitting at desk in back room answering phone.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/02/1977