Description: Christopher Lydon reports that Mayor Ray Flynn is requesting the creation of a Boston Employment Commission in order to boost the number of Boston residents working in Boston jobs. The Flynn administration would like the Boston work force to be 10% female, 25% minority and 50% Boston residents. Interview with Flynn about employment in Boston. Interview with City Councilor James Kelly, who says that sanctions will be imposed unfairly on the construction industry. Interviews with Mel King and City Councilor Thomas Menino. Lydon notes that critics believe that compliance with the ordinance would cost jobs. Brief interviews with construction workers and white-collar workers about the proposed ordinance. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Minister Don Mohammad speaks out against drug traffic in Roxbury
1:00:02: Visual: Footage of a white male construction worker being interviewed on the street. The man says that he is from Boston. Hope Kelly (WGBH reporter) asks him which neighborhood he is from. The man says that he is actually from Billerica. The man says that he avoids telling people that he is not from Boston. Christopher Lydon reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) is requesting the creation of the Boston Employment Commission; that the Commission's goal would be to boost the number of Boston residents working on Boston jobs. V: Footage of Flynn being interviewed. Flynn says that Boston is experiencing a significant growth period; that there are plenty of opportunities for everyone. Flynn says that people are not fighting over crumbs. Footage of a white male construction worker being interviewed on the street. The man says that Flynn wants to put the "outsiders" out of work; that the "outsiders" are the true professionals who have been in the union for over ten years. Footage of another white male construction worker being interviewed. The man asks where he is supposed to go to work. The man says that the work is in the city of Boston; that he should be allowed to work there. Lydon reports that many construction workers fear displacement by the goals set by the Flynn administration. Lydon reports that the Flynn administration would like the Boston work force to be 10% female, 25% minority and 50% Boston residents. V: Shot of Boston City Hall. Lydon says that the present work force does not resemble Flynn's proposed work force. V: Footage of Hope Kelly interviewing construction workers at International Place. Two white male construction workers say that they are from North Attleborough. Another white male construction worker says that he is from Canton; that ninety percent of the workers on his job are not living in the city. Footage of Hope Kelly interviewing white-collar workers in Post Office Square. A white male says that he is a commuter. Another white male says that he is from Walpole. A white female says that she is from Newton. Another white female says that she is from Brookline. A third white female says that she is from Quincy. Lydon reports that Flynn's proposed ordinance would change the demographics of the work force in the public and private sectors. Lydon says that the greatest opposition so far comes from the unions; that the construction unions say that their field is being singled out. V: Shots of corporate workers crossing the street near Government Center; of a man carrying a brief case as he crosses the street. Shot of two white corporate workers conversing on the sidewalk. Shot of an African American construction worker talking to white colleagues. Shot of the State Street Bank building. Lydon reports that the unions have a political ally in James Kelly (Boston City Council and Sheet Metalworkers Union). V: Footage of James Kelly being interviewed. Kelly says that Flynn's ordinance talks about good faith efforts and voluntary agreements between the city and major corporations. Kelly says that sanctions will be imposed on construction companies. Lydon reports that the sanctions include potential fines against developers whose hiring practices do not meet the standards of the ordinance. Lydon notes that the mayor has issues two previous ordinances with similar goals. V: Shot of a backhoe excavating dirt at a construction site. Footage of Mel King (candidate for US Representative) being interviewed outside of his campaign offices. King says that the mayor has been unable to put "teeth" in the ordinance. Lydon reports that Flynn supporters point to progress. V: Footage of Thomas Menino (Boston City Council) being interviewed. Menino says that some trades are up to 20% and higher. Menino says that progress is being made. Menino says that the city has not yet imposed any sanctions on the construction trades. Lydon reports that King believes that sanctions are necessary. V: Footage of King being interviewed. King says that the ordinance needs "teeth." King says that there is no real monitoring process. Lydon reports that critics believe that compliance with the ordinance could cost jobs. Flynn disagrees with critics. Flynn says that at least six major public works projects are imminent. V: Shot of Flynn. Lydon reports that many workers do not believe Flynn. V: Footage of a white male construction worker being interviewed by Hope Kelly. The construction worker says that he does not believe Flynn. He asks Hope Kelly if she believes Flynn.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/24/1986
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on the failure of Ward 7 to elect any minority delegates to the Massachusetts State Democratic Party convention. Minority voters accuse party bosses of discouraging minorities from running as delegates. Ward 7 residents Dianne Wilkerson and Bernard Sneed both ran for delegate in Ward 7 last year. Sneed calls for a change in the election process. Interviews with Wilkerson and Sneed. Wilkerson accuses City Councilor James Kelly of setting up the election to be restrictive and hostile to minority delegates. Vaillancourt quotes Kelly as saying that he set up a fair election and that Wilkerson and Sneed lost. Wilkerson and Sneed were named as delegates on an appeal to the State Democratic Party.
1:00:00: Visual: Footage of Dianne Wilkerson (Ward 7 resident) saying that minority voters have been consistently loyal to the Democratic Party. Wilkerson questions the commitment of the Democratic Party to minority participation. Shots of residents on the streets of Ward 7 in Boston; of minority residents on a busy street corner; of a commercial street in South Boston; of two African American women entering a shoe store; of pedestrians walking by the shoe store. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Boston's Ward 7 has always been a stronghold of the Democratic Party; that Ward 7 stretches from Upham's Corner in Dorchester to South Boston. Vaillancourt notes that Ward 7 has ten precincts; that eight of the precincts are almost totally white; that two of the precincts have large Hispanic and African American populations; that Ward 7 has never elected any minorities as delegates to the state party convention. Vaillancourt reports that minority voters accuse party bosses of discouraging minorities from running as delegates. V: Footage of Wilkerson being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Wilkerson says that party leaders publish notices about party caucuses in the South Boston Tribune newspaper; that minority voters do not read the South Boston Tribune because they do not live in South Boston. Vaillancourt notes that Wilkerson and Bernard Sneed (Ward 7 resident) both ran for delegate in Ward 7 last year; that neither was elected to the position. Vaillancourt reports that Wilkerson and Sneed say that the election for delegates was selectively advertised; that Wilkerson and Sneed say that the election was held in an area of South Boston which was outside of the ward. V: Shot of Vaillancourt interviewing Sneed; of a streetcorner in a minority neighborhood. Footage of Vaillancourt interviewing Wilkerson. Vaillancourt asks if the election was set up to put Wilkerson and Sneed at a disadvantage. Wilkerson says that the election was set up to be "uncomfortable, prohibitive, restrictive, harassing and hostile." Wilkerson notes that James Kelly (Boston City Council) set up the election. Vaillancourt reports that Kelly is Chairman of the Ward 7 Democratic Committee; that Kelly is a vocal opponent of affirmative action. V: Shot of Kelly working behind a desk in an office. On-screen graphics show a quote from Kelly which reads, "We held a full and fair election. And they lost." Vaillancourt reports that Wilkerson accuses Kelly of making her candidacy difficult. V: Footage of Wilkerson saying that the Democratic Party needs to monitor the elections in Ward 7. Footage of Sneed saying that minorities will not be elected as delegates until the process is changed. Shot of residents on a streetcorner in a minority neighborhood. Vaillancourt stands on a streetcorner. Vaillancourt reports that Sneed and Wilkerson have won their appeal to the State Democratic Party Committee; that the Committee has forced Ward 7 to accept Wilkerson, Sneed and three other minority delegates as add-on delegates to the state convention. Vaillancourt notes that much of the work by the other Ward 7 delegates has already been finished.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/21/1987
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that the Boston City Council has delayed voting on the school reform package proposed by Mayor Ray Flynn, which includes a home rule petition that transfers decision-making power from the Boston School Committee to the superintendent of schools. Reverend Bruce Wall of the Twelfth Baptist Church delivers an invocation before a City Council meeting, presided over by President Bruce Bolling. Some councilors, including Dapper O'Neil, are opposed to the plan. O'Neil criticizes the plan because it gives too much power to the superintendent. Jim Kelly and Joseph Tierney also speak at the meeting. Critics accuse the Boston City Council of delaying their vote on the proposal in order to garner media attention. Interview with Boston School Committee member John Nucci. Vaillancourt notes that school reform is an important issue for voters. Shots of a newspaper article criticizing the City Council. Interview with City Councilor Christopher Ianella, who says that the councilors are practicing "the art of politics" and that they will eventually vote in favor of the proposal. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Callie Crossley reports on a proposal to allow for AIDS testing by insurance companies
1:00:01: Visual: Footage of Reverend Bruce Wall (Twelfth Baptist Church) delivering an invocation before a meeting of the Boston City Council in the City Council Chambers. City Councillors Charles Yancey and Bruce Bolling stand behind him. Shots of the City Councillors in the Chambers. Bruce Bolling presides over the meeting. The other councillors sit behind desks. Meg Vaillancourt reports that the Boston City Council met to consider the school reform package proposed by Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston). Vaillancourt notes that the package includes the home rule petition, which is the "cornerstone" of school reform in Boston. V: Footage of Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council) saying that the Boston School Commitee is "crucifying the teachers"; that the School Committee is giving too much power to the superintendent. O'Neill compares Wilson's power to that of Adolph Hitler. O'Neil says that he will never vote for the school reform package. Vaillancourt reports that O'Neil was the only City Councillor to say that he would vote against the package; that consensus is never easy in an election year. V: Shot of the stenographer in the center of the Chambers. Footage of James Kelly (Boston City Council) saying that there is no rush to vote on the home rule petition; that the state legislature will not meet to approve the petition until September. Vaillancourt reports that most City Councillors agree with the petition; that the petition transfers power from the School Committee to the superintendent. V: Shots of a School Committee meeting in session. Vaillancourt reports that the School Committee has agreed to share power; that the proposal to allow Wilson to make personnel decisions has strong backing in the business community. Vaillancourt notes that Flynn's proposal includes changes suggested by councillors; that Boston newspapers called the councillors' suggested changes "absurd." V: Shots of the City Council meeting; of a newspaper editorial with a headline reading, "Games Councillors Play." Vaillancourt reports from outside of the City Council Chambers. Vaillancourt reports that the City Council delayed voting on the package; that the Council referred the school reform package to its Education Committee for review. Vaillancourt notes that the Council objected to the package last week. Vaillancourt speculates that the Council did not want to appear to back down from their objections by approving the package; that the Council did not want to open themselves up to criticism by rejecting the package. V: Footage of Bolling preciding over a vote in the Coucil Chambers. Shot of Joseph Tierney (Boston City Council) addressing the Council. Vaillancourt reports that politics may be behind the City Council's delay. Vaillancourt adds that school reform is the focus of Tierney's mayoral campaign. V: Footage of Tierney saying that he will not vote in favor of the package until he has the opportunity to make an "intelligent, informed vote." Footage of John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) saying that the City Council is delaying on the issue in order to garner attention from the media. Vaillancourt speculates that Nucci is correct; that school reform is a major issue for voters; that most City Councillors will probably endorse the plan. V: Shot of students playing ring-around-the rosey at the Jackson Mann Elementary School. Footage of Christopher Ianella (Boston City Council) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Ianella says that Councillors are practicing the "art of politics"; that the vote will eventually come out in favor of the package.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/03/1987