Description: David Boeri reports that African American community leaders and city officials have proposed to build the new headquarters of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) in Roxbury. The MWRA headquarters would be the cornerstone in a project to develop Parcel 18, located near the Ruggles MBTA station. At a press conference with city officials and African American leaders, Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council), mayor Ray Flynn, Harold Hestnes (member of "The Vault"), and James Kelly (Boston City Council) all speak out in favor of Parcel 18. The Massachusetts State Legislature is also considering the city of Quincy for the MWRA site. African American leaders are asking state legislators to show their support for the African American community by choosing Parcel 18. State Sen. Paul Harold speaks to the media and says that Quincy is the right place for the MWRA headquarters. At a press conference Paul Levy of the MWRA says that the MWRA site does not have to be in Quincy.
1:00:08: V: Footage of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) at a press conference. Supporters stand behind him. Bolling says that "this project won on the merits." Footage of Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) saying that the project is very important to the community; that the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) must locate its headquarters on Parcel 18. Shots of the vacant land of Parcel 18 in Roxbury. Shot of the Ruggles MBTA station and the Boston skyline visible from Parcel 18. Shots of traffic on the street near Parcel 18. David Boeri reports that the development of Parcel 18 is part of a plan to bring jobs and development to Roxbury. Boeri notes that the development of Parcel 18 is a $200 million public/private venture; that the venture includes minority developers. V: Shots of two people entering the Ruggles MBTA station. Boeri reports that the MWRA would be the major tenant in the development. V: Shot of Parcel 18. Shot through a chain-link fence of the Boston skyline looming above Parcel 18. Boeri reports that the Massachusetts state legislators are considering other sites for the MWRA headquarters; that supporters of Parcel 18 development are lobbying for the MWRA to be located on Parcel 18. V: Footage of Bolling saying that people of color are told that they will be treated fairly in this country. Bolling says that the process should not be manipulated to prevent people of color from receiving their due. Shots of members of the media and the audience at the press conference. Boeri reports that African American leaders consider the MWRA vote to be a crucial litmus test for state legislators on the issue of race. V: Footage of Stith saying that many "progressive politicians" seem to lack the courage to stand up for their principles. Shots of Bolling; of other Parcel 18 supporters at the press conference. Boeri reports that the coalition at the press conference was assembled by Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston); that the coalition includes members of "The Vault" (Boston's powerful financial leaders). V: Footage of Harold Hestnes (member of "The Vault") speaking at the press conference. Hestnes says that the development of Parcel 18 would create a "climate of financial responsibility." Maura Hennigan (Boston City Council) is visible behind Hestnes. Shots of Richard Voke (State Representative) and David Scondras (Boston City Council) at the press conference. Boeri notes that the coalition is broad enough to include James Kelly (Boston City Council). V: Footage of Kelly turning around to look at the coalition standing behind him. Stith puts his hand on Kelly's shoulder and says, "You're with your own." The Parcel 18 supporters laugh along with Kelly. Shot of a reporter at the press conference. Boeri reports that Flynn believes that the development should proceed because it represents social justice and good business sense. V: Footage of Flynn at the press conference. Flynn says that this is a good opportunity for state legislators to prove their commitment to social and economic justice. Flynn says that the people of Roxbury have been disenfranchised and "left behind" in the past. Shot of a coalition member at the press conference. Boeri reports that the city of Quincy is competing with Parcel 18 for the MWRA headquarters. Boeri notes that Quincy will be the repository of the sludge from the Boston Harbor Cleanup project. V: Footage of Paul Harold (State Senator from Quincy) speaking to the media in a park. Harold says that the issue revolves around the survival of a sewage plant, a sludge plant and a landfill facility. Harold says that Parcel 18 has nothing to do with the real issue. Boeri reports that Paul Levy (Executive Director, MWRA) made a controversial decision today. V: Footage of Levy at an MWRA press conference. Levy says that Quincy must receive a premium from the MWRA; that the MWRA is open to discussing compensation for the city of Quincy. Levy says that compensation should not include locating the MWRA headquarters in the city. Footage of Harold saying that state officials have been ill advised on the issue. Harold says that the issue should have been decided days ago. Boeri stands in front of the Massachusetts State House. Boeri reports that the Parcel 18 coalition is trying to pressure a few state legislators to support Parcel 18. Boeri notes that the votes of those legislators will be necessary for Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) to sustain his veto of any vote which tries to move the MWRA headquarters from Roxbury to Quincy. Boeri notes with irony that the MWRA was created by state legislators to remove politics from the Harbor Cleanup Project.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/07/1989
Description: David Boeri reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and the Boston City Council will work together to create a public housing policy that ensures equal access while providing some element of choice. Boeri notes that the city must comply with the policy of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) if they wish to continue receiving federal funds. Boeri's report includes footage of Flynn, Charles Yancey (Boston City Council), and Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) at a press conference about fair housing policy. Boeri's report also features footage from an interview with James Kelly (Boston City Council). Kelly says that free choice is more important than racial diversity. Boeri reviews the current housing policy and the policy requirements of HUD. Boeri's report also includes footage of white and African American tenants of public housing and by footage of Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council). This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Sonia Sanchez
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) speaking to the press. Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) stands beside him. Flynn says that Boston's housing policy will guarantee equal access to housing for all. David Boeri reports that Flynn met with the Boston City Council about public housing issues; that Yancey said that the meeting was productive. Boeri reports that Flynn and the Council agreed that equal access to public housing must be guaranteed. V: Footage of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) saying that no families will be displaced from public housing in order to achieve integration. Boeri reports that Flynn and the Council agreed to work together constructively on the issue. Boeri notes that Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council) was not present at the meeting; that James Kelly (Boston City Council) did not join Flynn and the other councillors for the press conference after the meeting. V: Shot of O'Neil at a meeting in the City Council chambers. Footage of Kelly in his office. Kelly says that people should be able to choose where they want to live; that the new policy will create "forced housing" instead of "fair housing." Boeri notes that the current housing selection process allows each applicant to select choose three public housing projects where he or she would like to live. Boeri reports that South Boston residents usually list the three housing projects in South Boston; that the three housing projects are all white. V: Shots of Flynn and the councillors speaking to the press; of a white woman looking out of a window of an apartment in a project building; of a white woman and white children in front of a project building; of a sign for the Old Colony Housing Project in South Boston. Shot of a housing project in South Boston. Shots from a moving vehicle of a housing project in Mission Hill. Shot of an African American boy near a dumpster outside of a public housing project. Boeri notes that the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has called Boston's housing policy discriminatory; that the three-choice system has been rejected in other cities. Boeri reports that HUD has recommended a city-wide list, where applicants take the first available apartment. V: Shots of white residents outside of a public housing project in South Boston. Footage of Kelly saying that there is nothing wrong with giving tenants a choice about where they want to live. Kelly says that free choice may result in housing developments which are not racially diverse; that free choice is more important than racial diversity. Shot of Bolling. Boeri reports that Bolling would also like to protect the three-choice system. Boeri notes that HUD provides 70% of Boston's public housing funds; that Boston stands to lose $75 million if they do not comply with HUD policy. V: Shot from a moving vehicle of a manicured lawn in front of a public housing development; of a public housing project on Fidelis Way. Footage of Bolling saying that the city will try to negotiate with HUD to develop an application process with some degree of choice for tenants. Boeri notes that the HUD policy will make tenants choose between living in public housing and living in the neighborhood of choice. Boeri notes that there are 14,500 families on the waiting list for public housing in Boston. V: Shots of public housing projects in Boston; of a racially diverse group of children playing outside of a project building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/14/1988
Description: Christy George reports that a lawsuit has been filed against the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) to protest its discriminatory housing policies. It charges that the BHA has discouraged minorities from moving into all-white housing projects. The city is planning to voluntarily integrate its housing projects by next year. Interview with Tanya Boman and Annie Hailey, who are among the plaintiffs in the lawsuit. Boman and Hailey talk about their experience with the BHA. Both women were told that their families would be unsafe in white housing projects and that the BHA would not provide them with protection. Interview with Doris Bunte of the BHA, who denies any discriminatory practices on the part of BHA employees. Interview with City Councilor James Kelly, who defends the BHA and denounces public housing integration. Kelly has proposed an alternative public housing integration plan that eliminates preferences for minority families applying for apartments in white housing projects. Interview with Dianne Wilkerson of the NAACP. Wilkerson criticizes the city's record on public housing integration and the slow pace of change. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: David Boeri reports that midwives at Boston City Hospital have been locked out by the hospital administration in a dispute over hospital policy
1:00:19: Visual: Footage of Tanya Boman (plaintiff) sitting with her children. Boman says that people should have the right to live wherever they want to live. Christy George reports that Boman applied for public housing in 1985; that she was told to apply for an apartment in Charlestown or South Boston because the city would give preference to minorities requesting apartments in white housing projects. V: Shots of parochial school students walking toward a public housing project; of white residents in front of a housing project in South Boston. Footage of Boman saying that she asked the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) if they would provide protection for her family if they moved to a white housing project. Boman says that she was told that she would need to call the Boston Police Department if she ran into any problems. Boman says that she was told that she would be moved to the bottom of the waiting list if she moved out of the apartment for a "racial reason." George reports that a discrimination suit has been filed against the BHA on behalf of Boman, Annie Hailey (plaintiff), and unnamed parties. V: Footage of Hailey saying that she applied for an apartment in the McCormack Housing Development in 1987. Hailey says that the BHA told her that she would need to see the Civil Rights Board before she could move into the project. Hailey says that the BHA told her that the project would be unsafe for her teenage son. Footage of Doris Bunte (BHA) saying that the situation needs to be examined. Bunte says that she will not tolerate employees of the BHA who discourage minorities from living in white housing developments. George reports that the city is planning to voluntarily integrate its public housing projects. V: Shots of a broken-down wall near a housing project in South Boston; of parochial school students walking toward the housing project. George reports that African Americans may be the victims of harassment and violence when they move into white housing projects. V: Footage of Bunte saying that BHA employees can tell the truth; that BHA employees cannot use tactics designed to discourage African American families from moving to white housing projects. Footage of James Kelly (Boston City Council) in his office. Kelly says that people in private housing call the police for protection; that the BHA did not discriminate by telling an African American family to call the police for protection. George reports that Kelly has proposed a plan to integrate public housing in Boston very slowly; that Kelly's proposal eliminates minority preference. George says that Kelly believes that reverse discrimination causes racial hostility. V: Shots of a white woman looking out of a window of a project apartment; of a white woman and children in front of a project building in South Boston. Footage of Kelly being interviewed by George. Kelly says that there are South Boston residents who have been on the waiting list for years; that those residents are not being treated fairly. George reports that the suit suggests that many of Boston's housing projects are still segregated. George notes that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has been praised for his efforts to integrate the public housing projects in Charlestown. V: Footage of Dianne Wilkerson (NAACP) saying that there were 200 vacancies open in Charlestown; that over 600 African American families had requested apartments in Charlestown; that the BHA actively recruited white families to fill the vacancies in the Charlestown projects. Shot of housing project buildings in Charlestown. George reports that there are only six African American families in Charlestown; that Flynn has announced plans to integrate the housing projects in South Boston. V: Shots of signs for the Old Colony Housing Project and the Mary Ellen McCormack Housing Development. Shots of a white female resident standing at the entrance to a housing project in South Boston. Footage of Bunte saying that the mayor and the BHA want to move forward with integration. Bunte says that she hopes that the lawsuit does not hold back plans for integration.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Mayor Ray Flynn has promised to integrate public housing projects in South Boston and to put a stop to discriminatory practices by the Boston Housing Authority (BHA). African American families have been passed over on the waiting list for apartments in South Boston housing projects. Flynn's plans to integrate public housing have angered his constituents in South Boston, who refer to housing integration as "forced housing." Vaillancourt's report is accompanied by footage of white residents of a South Boston housing project and by footage of South Boston residents during the busing crisis in 1974. Vaillancourt reports that Flynn and Doris Bunte of the BHA attended a community meeting in South Boston to talk about housing integration with South Boston residents. Flynn defends himself against the hostile comments of South Boston residents. City Councilor James Kelly addresses the meeting, denouncing housing integration. Interview with Neil Sullivan, policy advisor to Flynn who talks about public housing integration and Flynn's relationship with South Boston residents.
1:00:02: Visual: Shot of a white woman standing at the entrance to a housing project building in South Boston. Audio of Neil Sullivan (Policy Advisor to Mayor Ray Flynn) saying that the people of South Boston understand discrimination. Meg Vaillancourt reports that residents of South Boston may understand discrimination; that some residents of South Boston also practice discrimination. Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) discriminates against African American families; that no African American families live in any of the three public housing projects in South Boston. V: Shots of a white woman looking out of a window of an apartment in a housing project; of the Old Colony Housing Project in South Boston; of a sign reading, "Old Colony Public Housing Development." Shots of white project residents outside of a project building. Vaillancourt reports that African American families were passed over on the waiting list for project apartments in South Boston; that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has promised to integrate the public housing projects in South Boston. Vaillancourt notes that Flynn met with angry South Boston residents at a community meeting yesterday evening. V: Footage of Flynn addressing the crowd at the community meeting. South Boston residents are crowded into the room, seated at long tables. Doris Bunte (BHA) is on stage with Flynn. Flynn says that the issue is fair and equal access to public housing. Shot of a bumper sticker reading, "Stop 'forced' housing." Vaillancourt reports that the slogan, "Stop forced housing" evokes memories of the anti-busing protests in South Boston in the 1970s. V: Footage of school buses pulling up to South Boston High School in September of 1973. Angry South Boston residents yell and jeer at the buses. Vaillancourt reports that South Boston residents are angry about the integration of the area's three public housing projects. V: Shot of a white woman in the audience making an angry remark. Footage of James Kelly (Boston City Council) addressing the crowd. Kelly says that South Boston residents are going to be denied the right to live in public housing in their own neighborhood. Members of the crowd stand and cheer. Meg Vaillancourt reports that the controversy surrounding the integration of public housing projects creates an identity crisis for Flynn; that Flynn is in disagreement with his South Boston neighbors. V: Shot of Flynn walking to the stage at the community meeting. The crowd yells and boos Flynn. Vaillancourt notes that an audience member asked Flynn when he was moving to Roxbury. V: Shots of white female audience member standing to address Flynn; of another audience member raising her hand. Footage of Flynn saying that he and his family were born and raised in South Boston. The audience jeers. Footage of Sullivan saying that Flynn was probably hurt by the attitude of South Boston residents last night; that Flynn has never ducked this sort of confrontation. Sullivan says that Flynn could have refused to go to the meeting. Vaillancourt reports that Sullivan said that the public housing projects in South Boston could begin to be integrated by April. Vaillancourt notes that no whites will be forced to move out of the projects in order to achieve integration. V: Shot of an African American man raking leaves outside of a project building; of a white female project resident speaking to a reporter. Shots of a public housing project in South Boston; of Flynn at the community meeting; of Bunte addressing the community meeting. Footage of Flynn saying that no person will be displaced to serve the purposes of integration. Footage of Sullivan being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Sullivan says that the average Boston housing development has a turnover rate of 10% each year; that 10% is a higher turnover rate than most neighborhoods. Sullivan says that the goal of the Flynn administration is to sustain a good quality of life in the public housing projects. Shots of a white woman and white children in front of a project building; of a young white boy running around outside of a project building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/13/1988
Description: South Boston residents pack St. Monica's Church to hear City Councilors James Kelly and Albert "Dapper" O'Neil and Rev. Earl W. Jackson, Sr. oppose mayor's public housing desegregation plan.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/12/1988
Description: Christy George reports that City Councilor James Kelly objects to an interfaith, interracial prayer service to be held in South Boston because he fears that the meeting could be seen as an endorsement of the city's plan to integrate South Boston housing projects. Kelly has called for the meeting to be moved to another location. Interview with Father Thomas McDonnell of St. Augustine's Church in South Boston and Reverend John Borders of the Morningstar Baptist Church. McDonnell and Borders say that South Boston is not a racist neighborhood. Interview with Jim Kelly. George quotes Kelly as saying that he opposes forced busing, racial quotas, and forced housing. Community leaders have met with Mayor Ray Flynn to discuss the peaceful integration of public housing projects, and hold a press conference. Doris Bunte of the Boston Housing Authority, Charles Stith of the Union United Methodist Church, John O'Bryant of the Boston School Committee, and Don Muhammad of the Nation of Islam, Roxbury speak at the press conference. George reports that Bernard Cardinal Law (Archdiocese of Boston) endorses the meeting. George notes that Flynn is pushing for housing integration over the objections of South Boston residents. Footage of Flynn at a community meeting in South Boston and footage of anti-busing activity in South Boston in 1977.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of Father Thomas McDonnell (St. Augustine's Church in South Boston) and Reverend John M. Borders, III (Morningstar Baptist Church in Mattapan) sitting together for an interview in South Boston. McDonnell says that both men believe in the power of prayer. Christy George reports that religious leaders want to hold an interfaith, interracial prayer meeting at St. Monica's Church in South Boston; that James Kelly (Boston City Council) has taken out a half-page advertisement in the South Boston Tribune; that the ad calls on the Catholic Church to move the prayer meeting to another location. George reports that Kelly fears that the prayer meeting could be seen as an endorsement of the city's plan to desegregate public housing projects in South Boston. V: Shot of the exterior of St. Monica's Church; of Kelly's advertisement in the South Boston Tribune; of a statue in front of the church. Footage of McDonnell saying that racism is a moral issue. Borders says that prayer is a means to change the people's hearts. Footage of police arresting two women on G Street in South Boston on May 12, 1977. Shots of police cruisers escorting school buses along a city street; of a housing project in South Boston. Shots of a sign for the Old Colony Housing Project; of a white woman and children in front of a housing project building. George notes that South Boston became a battleground during school desegregation. George reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has announced that the public housing projects in South Boston will be integrated; that Flynn alienated many South Boston voters by pushing for public housing integration. V: Shot of Flynn approaching the stage at a community meeting in South Boston on January 12, 1988. The crowd jeers and boos as Flynn walks on to the stage. Shot of audience members seated at long tables. Footage of Kelly at the community meeting. Kelly says that South Boston residents will serve time for civil rights violations if the public housing projects are integrated. The crowd applauds Kelly. George reports that community leaders met with Flynn today to talk about peaceful desegregation of the projects; that attendees at the meeting expressed thinly disguised scorn for Kelly. V: Shot of Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) speaking at a press conference. Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) and two other African American community leaders stand behind her. Footage of John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) at a press conference. A reporter asks him if Kelly's name was mentioned in the meeting with Flynn. O'Bryant replies, "Who's he?" George reports that Kelly believes that affirmative action is reverse racism. George quotes Kelly as saying that "assigning the needy to public housing based on race is morally and legally wrong." V: Shot of Kelly at his desk. A quote from Kelly is written out in text on-screen. Footage of Kelly saying that supporters of equal opportunity must oppose forced busing, racial quotas, and forced housing. Footage of Stith saying that there are some elected officials who insist on keeping the city divided; that religious leaders are making an effort to unite the city. Footage of Minister Don Muhammad (Nation of Islam, Roxbury) saying that not all Irish residents are racist; that African Americans in Roxbury are not all drug addicts. George reports that Bernard Cardinal Law (Archdiocese of Boston) endorsed the prayer meeting. George quotes Law as saying that publicity "could lead to the erroneous impression that racial discrimination is a problem of geography, which it is not. . . . Racial discrimination is a problem of the human heart." V: Shot of Law addressing an audience. A quote from Law is written out in text on-screen. George reports that one of the goals of the prayer meeting is to debunk the myth of South Boston as a racist neighborhood. V: Shot of a white family walking in front of St. Monica's Church. Footage of Borders saying that Kelly does not represent the views of all South Bostonians. Borders says that he had no problems in South Boston when he drove to today's interview at the church. George reports that religious leaders say that the prayer meeting is not about politics; that the controversy surrounding the meeting has become political despite the efforts of religious leaders.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/20/1988
Description: David Boeri reports that Boston City Councilor James Kelly along with City Councilor Dapper O'Neil, and white public housing tenants walks to the courthouse to file a suit against the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to stop the federal plan aimed at ending the city of Boston's discriminatory public housing policies. The federal plan mandates a citywide waiting list for public housing, on which the position of white tenants has now dropped. Boeri reports on the housing situations of Pamela Walsh (plaintiff) and William Katramados. Boeri notes that both are on the waiting list for public housing and their positions on the waiting list have dropped. Interview with Walsh and Katramados. Boeri's report is accompanied by footage of Walsh with her two children in temporary housing and by footage of the Katramados family's overcrowded apartment. Kelly, at a press conference, says that the federal plan gives minority applicants preference. He adds that white tenants are being denied housing on the basis of their race. Boeri reports that Kelly has been unable to find a law firm to take the case.
1:00:16: Visual: Footage of James Kelly (Boston City Council), Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council), and a small group of people exiting City Hall. Kelly, O'Neil and the group walk across City Hall Plaza. The group with Kelly and O'Neil includes white applicants for public housing. David Boeri reports that Kelly will file suit to stop the federal plan aimed at remedying discrimination in Boston's public housing policy. Boeri notes that Kelly's fellow plaintiffs are white housing applicants. Boeri adds that Kelly says that white housing applicants are the real victims of discrimination. Boeri reports that Pamela Walsh (plaintiff) is living with her parents in Cambridge while she is on the waiting list to get into public housing in South Boston. V: Shots of Walsh walking through a small park; of Walsh with her children in the basement of a house. Footage of Walsh pointing out where her children sleep. Shots of Walsh and her children in a kitchen. Boeri reports that Walsh had been sixth on the waiting list to get into the Old Colony Housing Project in South Boston; that Walsh is now 483rd on a city-wide waiting list under the new federal housing plan. V: Footage of Walsh saying that she had been on the waiting list for five years; that she will now have to wait another two or three years. Boeri reports that William Katramados (plaintiff) is married; that there is no room for him to live in his family's apartment. V: Shot of Katramados walking into a housing project building. Footage of Boeri in the Katramados' apartment with William Katramados and his family. A family member says that eight people live in the apartment. Shots of family members in the crowded apartment. Boeri reports that Katramados's wife lives with her mother, her brother, her sister and her children in the apartment. V: Footage of the family members indicating the bed where one of the children sleeps. Katramados' daughter says that she sleeps in her mother's room. Footage of Boeri being shown a bedroom by William Katramados and Sandra Katramados (wife of William). Shot of an infant in a cradle. Boeri reports that Sandra Katramados shares a room with her five-week-old babies and her daughter; that William Katramados lives in Brighton. Boeri notes that the Katramados family was third on a waiting list for a larger apartment until the federal housing plan took effect. V: Footage of William Katramados saying that the family is now around number 2,000 on the waiting list. Boeri walks outside of the Maverick Street Housing Project. A group of children cool off in a spray of water from a fire hydrant. Boeri reports that the Katramados requested another apartment in the Maverick Street Housing Project; that the Katramados were willing to wait for an apartment to open up in the project. Boeri reports that the new federal housing plan consoidates waiting lists for individual housing projects into a city-wide waiting list. V: Footage of Kelly and O'Neil walking down a street with Katramados and other plaintiffs. Shot of Katramados. Boeri reports that Kelly accuses the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) of victimizing the plaintiffs; that Kelly wants HUD to target the metropolitan area for public housing integration. V: Footage of Kelly speaking from a podium. The plaintiffs are seated behind him. Kelly says that the federal plan gives minority applicants preference on the city-wide waiting list; that other applicants are denied housing on the basis of race under the federal plan. Boeri reports that Kelly was unable to find a law firm to take the case; that Kelly may have to argue the case himself in court.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/03/1988
Description: Jan von Mehren reports that City Councilor James Kelly denies that Boston's public housing policy is discriminatory and plans to ask the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for proof of discrimination. He has proposed an alternative housing policy which allows tenants to choose where they want to live. Mayor Ray Flynn has agreed to present Kelly's plan to HUD for discussion. Kelly and Flynn attend a South Boston community meeting, where Kelly speaks out against housing integration. The crowd jeers at Flynn as he approaches the stage. Von Mehren's report is accompanied by footage of white and African American residents of housing projects in Boston.
1:00:06: Visual: Shot of James Kelly (Boston City Council) at a community meeting in South Boston. Shots of audience members at the meeting applauding; of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) at the meeting. Audio of audience members booing Flynn. Jan von Mehren reports that Kelly called a community meeting in South Boston to discuss public housing; that Flynn attended the meeting; that Flynn was booed by the crowd. V: Footage of Kelly at the meeting. Kelly dismisses the findings of discrimination in Boston public housing. Shot of a sign for the Mary Ellen McCormack Housing Development; of white women and children of a park bench; of a white boy scrambling under a fence near a housing project in South Boston. Von Mehren reports that there are approximately 2,000 housing units in South Boston; that no African American families have been placed in South Boston since Flynn entered office. Von Mehren reports that Kelly will ask the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for proof of discrimination; that Kelly has come up with an alternative housing plan. V: Footage of Kelly speaking at the meeting. Audience members are crowded into the room. Kelly talks about his "freedom of choice" housing plan, in which no family would be placed in a neighborhood without their consent. Von Mehren notes that Kelly's plan would permit African American families to move into white housing projects; that Kelly's plan would not force white families to move into primarily African American housing projects. V: Shots of a racially diverse group of children outside of a housing project. Von Mehren stands at the entrance to the community meeting in South Boston. Von Mehren reports that Flynn has promised to discuss Kelly's plan to HUD; that he will not submit the plan if it is deemed discriminatory. V: Footage of Flynn at the meeting. Flynn says that he will try to achieve as much choice as is possible in the new plan; that the new plan will not discriminate. Von Mehren reports that Flynn made clear that he has an obligation to work with HUD. Von Mehren notes that Kelly was clear about his intention to fight for South Boston residents. V: Shots of Flynn at the meeting; of Kelly at the meeting; of audience members.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/01/1988
Description: David Boeri reports that E.W. Jackson is the manager of WLVG radio station in Cambridge and the pastor of the New Corner Baptist Church in Roxbury. Jackson addressed a community meeting in South Boston last night about the city's public housing desegregation plan. He attacked atheism, school busing, and seat belt laws in his speech, and called the city's housing desegregation plan a form of "social engineering." Interview with Jackson in the studios of WLVG. He discusses public housing integration and says that "freedom of choice" is more important than integrated developments. Boeri reports that Boston City Councilors James Kelly and Dapper O'Neil are leading the fight against the desegregation plan, but that interest in the issue is waning among South Boston residents. Interview with Neil Sullivan, policy advisor to mayor Ray Flynn, who helped develop the housing desegregation plan. Sullivan says that elements of choice have been preserved in the city's new public housing policy.
1:00:13: Visual: Shots of a light outside of the studio door at WLVG radio station; of a record by Amy Grant spinning on a turntable inside of the studio. Music plays on the soundtrack. David Boeri reports that E.W. Jackson is the manager of WLVG, a gospel radio station in Cambridge. V: Shots of Jackson in the offices of WLVG. Shots of a record spinning on a turntable; of the WLVG logo on a piece of paper. Audio of Jackson talking to a disc jockey about the playlist. Shot of Jackson in the studio. Boeri reports that Jackson is also the pastor of the New Corner Baptist Church in Roxbury; that Jackson visited a community meeting in South Boston last night; that 350 white residents attended the meeting. V: Shot of Jackson addressing a community meeting in South Boston on July 12, 1988. Members of the audience stand to applaud for him. Footage of Jackson ad dressing the meeting. Jackson says that South Boston residents have been "dumped on" by city leaders. Footage of Jackson sitting behind a desk, being interviewed by Boeri. Jackson chuckles when Boeri asks him if he had ever imagined bringing an audience of South Boston residents to their feet. Shots of Jackson addressing the community meeting. Boeri reports that Jackson attacked atheism, school busing, and seat belt laws in his speech at the meeting in South Boston. Boeri says that Jackson called the city's plan to desegregate public housing is an example of "social engineering." V: Shots of audience members at the community meeting. Footage of Jackson addressing the meeting. Jackson says that he can understand why the people of South Boston do not want bureaucrats telling them how to live their lives. The audience applauds. Boeri reports that James Kelly (Boston City Council) and Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council) are leading the fight against the city's desegregation plan for public housing; that interest in the struggle may be waning among South Boston residents. V: Shot of Jackson addressing the meeting. O'Neil sits beside the podium. Kelly is visible behind Jackson. Shot of empty seats at the back of the room. Footage of Boeri asking Jackson if he thinks he might have been "used" by Kelly and O'Neil. Jackson quotes the Bible as saying that it is good to be used for a good cause. Footage of Neil Sullivan (Policy Advisor to Mayor Ray Flynn) being interviewed by Boeri. Sullivan says that the attending the community meeting is a good way to get on television. Boeri reports that Sullivan says that Jackson has confused the issues. V: Footage of Jackson saying that tenants must be able to choose where they want to live; that freedom of choice is more important than integrated developments. Footage of Sullivan saying that the city's plan tries to preserve elements of choice in the new housing plan. Footage of Jackson saying that affordable and adequate housing is needed in every neighborhood. Footage of Sullivan saying that the city of Boston is working harder than any other major city on the issue of affordable housing. Footage of Jackson leaving the stage at the community meeting. Jackson shakes hands with several attendees of the meeting. Boeri reports that Jackson may have forged a new alliance with South Boston residents.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/13/1988
Description: Christopher Lydon reports that Mayor Ray Flynn attended a community meeting in South Boston to discuss public housing integration. Lydon notes that the audience was hostile in their opposition to the issue. Lydon's report includes footage from the meeting. City Councilor James Kelly speaks out against public housing integration. The crowd cheers. The crowd jeers at Flynn as he makes the case for a fair and equitable housing policy. Lydon notes that Kelly linked the housing integration issue to memories of school desegregation in the 1970s.
1:00:15: Visual: Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) approaching the stage at a community meeting in South Boston. A noisy crowd yells and boos. The audience is seated at long tables. Footage of Leo Tierney (South Boston resident) saying that apartments in Roxbury should go to Roxbury residents. Tierney says, "Leave us the hell alone. Leave the blacks alone. Leave us to live in peace." The crowd cheers. Members of the crowd rise to their feet to cheer. Christopher Lydon reports that James Kelly (Boston City Council) addressed the crowd of South Boston residents at a community meeting; that Kelly stirred the emotions of the crowd by linking public housing integration to the memories of school desegregation in the 1970s. V: Footage of Kelly saying that "misguided" youth and adults will engage in violence if the public housing projects are integrated; that some South Boston residents will serve time for civil rights violations. Kelly says that Flynn and Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) should be "hauled into court" if the city has refused to grant African American families access to their choice of housing projects; that Flynn and Bunte are more guilty of discrimination than South Boston residents. The crowd cheers for Kelly. Footage of Flynn addressing the crowd. Flynn says that he is here to tell the truth, not to campaign for votes. Flynn says that the city of Boston must provide fair and equitable housing for all.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/12/1988