Description: State Senator Jack Backman opens a press conference in support of Mel King (Boston mayoral candidate) in front of the State House. Other participants include Byron Rushing (State Representative from the South End), Mary Jane Gibson (State Representative from Belmont), Susan Schur (State Representative from Newton), Mary Goode (former State Representative from Roxbury), and Barney Frank (US Congressman). Frank voices his support for King's candidacy and discusses the reasons for his endorsement, specifically, Frank talks about King's views on economic development and about his leadership abilities. Frank says that King is a creative leader who will bring "enlightened policy" to the city. Various reporters point out that Frank endorsed Dennis Kearney (candidate for mayor of Boston) in the primary elections. King arrives, shakes hands with Frank, thanks endorsers, and asserts that his administration will focus on employment, education, and the youth of the city.
1:00:10: Visual: Shot of a Mel King campaign sign. Jack Backman (State Senator) opens a press conference in front of the State House. He notes that Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) has not yet arrived. He voices his support for King. He introduces Byron Rushing (State Representative from the South End), Mary Jane Gibson (State Representative from Belmont), Susan Schur (State Representative from Newton), Mary Goode (former State Representative from Roxbury). Bachman lists off some state representatives who are due to arrive shortly at the press conference. Shots of Schur; of Rushing. Bachman introduces Barney Frank (US Congressman). 1:02:33: V: Frank says that he will support King for mayor of Boston; that he served with King for eight years in the legislature. Frank says that King is an advocate for enlightened policy for the city of Boston. Frank talks about King's ideas for economic development programs; about the Community Development Corporation. Frank says that King's ideas for development are in tune with the needs of city residents; that King is sensitive to the problems of displacement and the needs of area residents. Frank says that King can speak effectively on behalf of a diverse group of people; that King was an effective and respected legislator. Frank says that King will make an excellent mayor. A reporter asks Frank about his previous endorsements for mayor. Frank says that he is not always good at picking the winning candidate; that he speaks out on behalf of candidates who have good ideas and programs. A reporter notes that Frank endorsed Dennis Kearney (State Representative) in the primary election. He asks Frank how Kearney would have been a better mayor than King. Frank says that he endorsed Kearney in the primary because he thought Kearney was a good candidate with a good chance of winning. Frank says that Kearney and King take similar positions on the issues. Shot of King supporters standing behind Frank. Shot of Christy George (WGBH reporter). Audio is muffled. 1:07:45: V: Frank says that the many of the candidates in the race had similar positions on the issues; that King has helped shape the debate on the issues; that King was one of the first people to talk about the adverse effects of development on the elderly and the poor. Frank says that King is responsible for focusing the attention of the city on the management of economic development in a compassionate and effective manner. Frank says that he respects Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston); that King is more creative, thoughtful and consistent candidate; that King has proven himself to be an effective leader. Frank refuses to speculate on who he would have endorsed if King were not in the race. Frank says that he is endorsing a candidate because he is an elected official with an opinion; that he does not know what effect his endorsement has on a candidate's chances. A reporter asks Frank about the differences between King and Flynn. Frank says that the differences between the candidates stem from their past records; that King has proven himself to be a consistent and effective leader on economic issues for many years; that King has the capacity to stay with these issues. Frank notes that he does not agree with King on a mayor's role in foreign policy. A reporter asks Frank if King needs to highlight the issues on which he differs from Flynn. Frank says that King has stuck with the same issues for ten years; that his leadership has brought attention to these issues. Frank says that this has been a good mayoral campaign; that it has focused on issues. 1:13:15: V: Frank jokes with the reporters about his endorsement bringing in the voters from Brookline and Newton. A reporter asks Frank how King can get white liberal voters to support him instead of Flynn. Frank says that King can win voter support by focusing on the issues; that his positions on economic development may win over voters from traditionally "conservative" neighborhoods. A reporter asks Frank about his campaign advice for King. Frank says that King is doing the right thing by focusing on the issues; that King has proven his ability to be a leader on the issues. 1:16:32: V: King's supporters clap as he arrives at the State House. King and Frank shake hands. King thanks Frank and the assembled state representatives for their endorsements and support. King says that his administration will make the city open and accessible; that his administration will focus on employment, education, and the youth of the city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/21/1983
Description: Greek dancers in traditional folk costumes do circle dances in Massachusetts State House rotunda to celebrate Greek independence day. Crowd of spectators. Greek music, and crowd sings Greek songs. Michael Dukakis, Kitty Dukakis, William Bulger, and Paul Tsongas join in. Buzzing sounds over audio at the end of video.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/15/1983
Description: Barney Frank (US Representative) and Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) shake hands in front of the Massachusetts State House. Frank has endorsed King for mayor of Boston. Christy George interviews King in front of the State House. King talks about the current policies of the White administration and White's recent appointments to the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA). King says that his administration would eliminate the BRA in order to consolidate city development under a community development office. King criticizes White for making mayoral appointments without regard for his successor. King adds that the current police commissioner must be forced to resign. King says that the Boston City Council should not approve White's new housing proposal. He adds that the City Council should wait until the next mayor is elected before making new policy.
1:00:05: Visual: Mel King stands in front of the State House with his supporters and talks to the media about his candidacy for mayor. He talks about the "politics of inclusion." A reporter asks King how he feels about being "Barney Frank's second choice." King says that Barney Frank (US Representative) makes good choices; that he is glad to be one of Frank's choices. Mel King thanks the media. He shakes hands with Frank. Frank and King speak to one another. 1:01:12: V: Christy George sets up an interview with King. George asks King if Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) is consolidating power. She also asks him about mayoral appointments to city jobs. King says that political patronage is unfortunate; that White has not considered his appointments from the viewpoint of his successor. King says that the police commissioner must be asked to resign; that the new administration must work around the commissioner if he refuses to resign. George comments that the business community is wary of King and Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston). She asks if White is making appointments to the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) before the mayoral elections in order to satisfy the business community. King says that the new administration must take a balanced approach to development; that the needs of the whole city must be considered. King says that his administration would consolidate the development functions of the city; that his administration would work to eliminate the BRA board as it is now; that a community development office would oversee development in the neighborhoods and in the downtown area. George notes that White's appointments to the BRA are not unusual for a mayor leaving office. King says that these candidates will be "holdovers"; that "holdover" appointments should only be allowed for a minimum period of time; that these appointments undermine public confidence in government. George asks King about White's plans to create a Neighborhood Housing Trust. King says that he hopes that the Boston City Council will not approve the program until a new mayor has been elected. King says that he will lobby the council not to approve the program. George ends the interview.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/21/1983
Description: Several takes of reporter standup. Report on the "domino effect" created by the swearing in of ex-auditor Thaddues Buczko as a judge. John Finnegan will most likely replace him, and then someone else will have to replace Finnegan. B-roll of Speaker of the House Thomas McGee, President of the Senate William Bulger, and other state legislators in the State House Chambers. Buczko's swearing in ceremony. Bulger, McGee, and Governor King preside over the ceremony. McGee makes a heartfelt speech about his admiration for Buczko. King swears in Buczko. Buczko addresses the audience. A judge also addresses the audience.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/11/1981