Description: Bernadette Devlin McAliskey (Irish Republican activist) holds a press conference in Boston as part of a 13-city tour of the United States. Devlin speaks about her recent candidacy for the European parliament and says that her speaking tour is intended to help defray debts incurred during her campaign. Devlin's campaign was organized around a human rights platform. Devlin notes that international organizations have condemned the human rights abuses in Northern Ireland but that the United Nations and western countries will not speak out against Great Britain. Devlin expresses cynicism towards politicians and doubts about an American political response to the situation in Northern Ireland. She equates the oppression in Northern Ireland to the inequalities that exist in the United States and notes that Irish Americans engage in oppression of African Americans in Boston. Devlin compares the dearth of Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland to the lack of white working class support for busing in Boston; recounts the history of the Irish conflict from the Irish elections in 1918; and discusses changes that must be made by Great Britain in Northern Ireland. Devlin discusses her activities in the years since she left parliament; the use of violence by Catholics in Northern Ireland; the death of Lord Louis Mountbatten (British official). She accuses the international press of hypocrisy; answers questions about her speaking schedule and her life in Ireland.
0:58:09: Visual: Bernadette Devlin McAliskey (Irish Republican activist) prepares for a press conference as part of a 13-city tour of the United States. She sits at a small table in front of a microphone and takes questions from reporters. The press conference takes place in an informally furnished room; the walls are covered with handmade political posters. A reporter asks Devlin if she is doing the speaking tour to pay off debt accumulated during her recent campaign for a seat in the European parliament. Devlin says that her candidacy focused on human rights issues; that her candidacy was announced only three weeks before the election; that she ran on behalf of the H-Block political prisoners. Devlin says that her political party still has a debt of $10,000 after the elections; that she has come to the US to raise money through speaking engagements and from contributions. Devlin says that she has raised about $3,000 so far. A reporter asks Devlin's opinion on US involvement in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that Amnesty International, the International Red Cross and the European Court of Human Rights have all condemned the human rights abuses in Northern Ireland; that Jimmy Carter (US President) condemns human rights abuses all over the world, but ignores the deprivation of human rights in Northern Ireland. Devlin questions Carter's sincerity on human rights issues. Devlin says that the United Nations and western countries will not speak out against Great Britain; that she is trying to raise awareness of the situation among the white population of the US. The reporter asks Devlin if she expects a response from Irish Americans and Irish American politicians. Devlin says that she has a cynical view of politicians; that Edward Kennedy (US Senator) and Carter might speak out against the situation in Northern Ireland if they thought it would win them some votes; that she is not sure if Irish American politicians will take any action. Devlin says that the Irish American community has been made to feel guilty about giving money to Ireland; that they are made to feel like they are supporting violence. Devlin says that US politicians do not want Irish Americans to take interest in the situation in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that there are enough Irish Americans in the US to pressure the US government to take some firm action about Northern Ireland; that Irish Americans might become aware of the inequalities in US society if they started to think about the oppression in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that it saddens her to see Irish Americans involved in the oppression of African Americans in Boston. Devlin says that Irish Americans would get themselves on the "right side" of the civil rights struggle in the US if they understood the situation in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that Catholics in Northern Ireland were inspired by the civil rights movement in the US; that they identify with the struggles of African Americans. Devlin says that Irish Americans appear to be actively involved in the oppression of African Americans. Devlin says that she could probably raise money more easily if she avoided discussing the role of Irish Americans in the oppression of African Americans; that she is not willing to keep silent for money. Devlin says that she hopes Irish Americans will become more aware of their contradictory behavior; that many fled oppression in Ireland only to become oppressors in the US. 1:07:11: V: Devlin says that there is little Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland. She compares the amount of Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland to the amount of white working class support for busing in Boston. Devlin says that Great Britain needs to withdraw the undemocratic veto given to Protestants in Northern Ireland in 1921; that Great Britain needs to support change in Northern Ireland. Devlin reviews the history of the Irish conflict from the Irish elections in 1918 to the partition of the country by Great Britain. Devlin accuses Great Britain of partitioning the country in order to create a Protestant majority where there was none before. A reporter asks Devlin what she did during the years before the most recent election. The reporter comments that Devlin had not been visible on the political scene. Devlin responds that she has never stopped working for her cause; that the media ignored her activities because she was no longer a member of the British Parliament. Devlin says that the world took no notice of the violence used by Great Britain to oppress Catholics in Northern Ireland before 1969; that the oppressed Catholics are adopting the methods of violence used by Great Britain. Devlin questions why the Catholics are condemned for using violence, when they are only reacting to the violence used to oppress them. Devlin says that the international media have portrayed Lord Louis Mountbatten (British official) as a brave soldier and an aristocrat; that the oppressed peoples of the British Empire see Lord Mountbatten as a symbol of oppression. Devlin adds that public figures who represent the oppression of the British Empire will inevitably become targets of the oppressed. Devlin questions why the life of Mountbatten is worth more than the lives of all the Irish people who have died at the hands of the British; that the Irish victims fought for their country as Mountbatten did; that they were portrayed as terrorists by the international press. Devlin accuses the international press of hypocrisy. She says that the Irish people will not be "chastened" by the press coverage of Mountbatten's death. Devlin adds that if Great Britain was not occupying Northern Ireland, Mountbatten would be alive today. A reporter asks Devlin about Princess Margaret of England's comment that the Irish are "pigs." Devlin responds with a translation of an old Irish saying that "a pig thinks the whole world is pigs." Devlin answers questions about her speaking schedule and her life in Ireland. Devlin says that she has three children; that she does not have a regular job; that she works in the resistance movement. Devlin adds that she works with Catholics whose welfare benefits have been taken away by the British government. Devlin says that the money she raises will pay off her party's campaign debt. She adds that if the debt is paid, the rest of the money will go to a fund to benefit Irish prisoners.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/19/1979
Description: Boston Garden seating plan showing ticket prices from $4 to $10 for Celtics games. Team photos from 1956-1957, 1964-1965, 1972-1973. Empty seats and concession stand. Interview with Celtics vice president Jeff Cohen.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/26/1979
Description: Start of Boston marathon. Bill Rodgers crosses finish line with police escort. Shots of runners and moving feet clad in running shoes.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/17/1978
Description: Senator Edward Brooke concedes the Senate race to Paul Tsongas in the ballroom of the Copley Plaza Hotel. With him on the stage are supporters including State Sen. William Owens, his mother Helen Brooke, community leader Elma Lewis, and campaign field director Thomas Trimarco. Sharon Stevens reports from behind the cheering crowd, anticipating Brooke's speech; Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) is on the stage, waiting to interview Brooke after the speech. Brooke thanks the crowd, his family, and his campaign staff. Brooke congratulates Tsongas for waging an honorable campaign. Brooke says that he will do his best to assure the smooth transition of the Senate seat and that he continues to support full equality and justice for all. Brooke thanks voters for giving him the opportunity to have served as both State Attorney General and US Senator and assures those who did not vote for him that he has no bitterness toward them. Brooke shakes hands and answers questions from the press as he slowly makes his way off stage surrounded by an entourage. B-roll of Brooke supporters in ballroom after the speech.
0:58:17: Visual: Shot of Edward Brooke (US Senator) at a podium, waving to a cheering crowd in the ballroom of the Copley Plaza Hotel. A large campaign banner behind him reads, "Brooke - United States Senator." William Owens (State Senator), Helen Brooke (Edward Brooke's mother), Elma Lewis (African American community leader), Thomas Trimarco (field director for Brooke's campaign) and other supporters are all on stage with Brooke. Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) stands behind the cheering crowd, anticipating Brooke's speech. 0:59:15: V: Brooke thanks the crowd, which continues to cheer for him. Brooke says that preliminary results show Paul Tsongas (candidate for US Senator) to be the victor. Brooke congratulates Tsongas for waging an honorable campaign. Brooke says that he will do his best to assure the smooth transition of the Senate seat. Brooke thanks his campaign workers and contributors for their support. Brooke notes that there are US Senators who will continue to fight for senior citizens, minorities, the poor, and the handicapped. Brooke says that he continues to support full equality for women and equal justice for all. Brooke thanks voters for giving him the opportunity to have served as both State Attorney General and US Senator. Brooke assures those who did not vote for him that he has no bitterness toward them. Brooke says that he leaves the Senate with the feeling that there is much left to be accomplished; that he remains committed to the causes he has supported. Brooke paraphrases Lillian Hellman, saying that "I could never cut my consciensce to fit the fashion of any year." Brooke commends his supporters for their hard work, faith and courage. Brooke thanks his family, his campaign manager, John Volpe (chairman of Brooke's campaign committee), and Trimarco. Brooke says that he regrets not having spent enough time with the voters of Massachusetts during the campaign. He notes that his Senate responsibilities kept him in Washington D.C. during much of the campaign. Brooke says that he wishes Tsongas well; that he is sorry he did not deliver a victory for his campaign workers and supporters. Brooke says that he is very happy that a woman has been elected to the US Senate. He jokes about going out to look for a job and wishes his supporters well. 1:09:35: V: Brooke shakes hands with members of the crowd. Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) is on the stage with a microphone, waiting to interview Brooke. The crowd continues to clap for Brooke. Stevens recaps Brooke's speech. Brooke is still on the stage, talking to members of the media. The crowd remains on the floor. 1:11:11: V: Brooke remains on the stage. He waves to supporters. Members of the media surround him. He answers questions about the race and his future plans. A jazz band plays and the noise of the crowd is audible. Brooke attempts to move off of the stage. The media continue to surround him. Brooke waves at the crowd as he moves slowly off the stage. Flashbulbs go off as the media take his photograph. 1:15:51: V: Shot of a sign reading, "We still love you Ed. You're the best.". Shots of campaign supporters on the floor; of members of the crowd. Shots of the media and their equipment in the corner of the room. Members of the crowd mill about in the ballroom. Shot of the jazz band playing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1978
Description: Boston Celtics vs Houston Rockets at Boston Garden. Red Auerbach sits with Celtics owner Harry Mangurian. Quarterly statistics hoisted on cord to announcer's booth above court. Interview with Houston owner George Maloof.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/12/1979
Description: Father Michael Groden (Advisor to Humberto Cardinal Medeiros) introduces a press conference with Cardinal Medeiros (Archbishop of Boston), Bishop Edward Carroll (United Methodist Church) and Donald Luster (President, Ministerial Alliance). Medeiros denounces incidents of violence and hatred and encourages citizens to celebrate the diversity of the urban community. Medeiros says that the clergy has prepared a Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony to be signed by the citizens of Boston. Medeiros urges the clergy and every city institution to dedicate itself to working towards peace in the city. Medeiros announces a gathering of religious leaders on the Boston Common on November 19 that will initiate a movement to help the city heal its wounds. Bishop Edward Carroll (United Methodist Church) reads a letter inviting the city's clergy to gather at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross the following Friday. Carroll speaks about the clergy's responsibility to cooperate in promoting peace, justice and harmony in the city; denounces recent acts of violence and hatred; and encourages all citizens to unite. Donald Luster (President, Ministerial Alliance) reads the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony. Groden reviews the series of events planned by the clergy to promote peace in the city. Groden and Luster respond to questions from the media about the movement for peace and the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony.
0:22:45: Visual: Father Michael Groden (Advisor to Cardinal Medeiros) welcomes the press to a press conference. He introduces Humberto Cardinal Medeiros (Archbishop of Boston). Medeiros approaches the podium and addresses the press. Medeiros says that Boston's religious leaders are calling on citizens of all races and religions to examine the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony." Medeiros says that incidents of violence and hatred in the city cannot be tolerated; that citizens must act together to celebrate the diversity of the urban community. Medeiros says that a spirit of religious and pastoral solidarity is growing; that all of the clergy in the city are invited to a meeting on Friday at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross. Shot of the front of the podium. A branch with different colored leaves is pictured on a matted print hanging from the podium. Shots of the press in the audience. Medeiros urges the clergy to join together in an effort to improve the atmosphere in the city. Medeiros says that every institution and business in the city must dedicate itself to working toward a peaceful atmosphere in the city. Medeiros says that the city's religious leader will gather on the Boston Common on November 19; that the clergy will initiate a movement to help the city heal its wounds. Shots of Donald Luster (President, Ministerial Alliance), Bishop Edward Carroll (United Methodist Church) and Groden sitting at a table beside the podium. Medeiros says that the ecumenical movement will encourage citizens to act peacefully toward one another. Medeiros quotes Pope John Paul as saying that a city needs to have a soul; that the citizens are the soul of a city. Medeiros quotes Pope John Paul as saying that Boston has always been a community in which diverse people live and work together peacefully. Medeiros says that every citizen of Boston will be asked to sign the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony; that citizens will be expected to uphold their pledge to work toward a better atmosphere in the city. Medeiros thanks the media and retreats from the podium. 0:29:10: V: Groden introduces Bishop Carroll. Carroll reads a letter inviting the city's clergy to gather at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross on Friday. The letter reads that the clergy must work together to foster an atmosphere of peace, justice and harmony in the city. Shot of the matted print hanging from the podium. The letter mentions a growing spirit of pastoral and religious solidarity. The letter denounces the recent acts of violence and hatred in the city. The letter encourages all citizens to unite in a spirit of solidarity. Shots of Luster, Medeiros and Groden , sitting at the table beside the podium. The letter urges the clergy to participate in the meeting. The letter reads that the clergy have an obligation to encourage its citizens to love one another; that the clergy must join together to renew their Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony. Shots of the members of the media at the press conference. The letter is signed by Medeiros and Carroll. 0:31:59: V: Groden introduces Luster. Luster reads the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony. The covenant celebrates freedom and call for the pursuit of equal rights and justice for all. The covenant calls for citizens to celebrate the diversity of the city's communities. The covenant calls for a mood of healing and forgiveness. The covenant denounces conflict and violence. The covenant denounces the atmosphere of hatred and fear in the city. The covenant rejects "special interest groups" which divide the community. Luster finishes reading and sits down at the table beside Medeiros. 0:35:16: V: Groden thanks Luster. Groden reviews the events organized by the city's religious leaders in the coming weeks. Groden mentions the meeting at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross on Friday. Groden says that religious leaders are working on a pastoral letter which will be read at religious services on the weekend of November 17 and 18. Shot of a nun taking a photo. Groden talks about the ecumenical gathering on the Boston Common on November 19. Groden says that civic, political, and religious leaders will be invited to the gathering on the Common; that leaders will be encouraged to examine and sign the covenant; that leaders will be encouraged to take the covenant to their constituents. Shots of the members of the press. Groden says that another ecumenical event will take place in December; that the event will celebrate the signing of the covenant. 0:38:10: V: Groden and Luster respond to questions from the audience. A reporter asks how the leaders will get signatures for the covenant. Luster says that city leaders will sign the covenant on November 19; that these leaders will take the covenant to their constituents, who may sign it. Luster notes that these leaders will be given pins to wear; that the pins will signify peace. A reporter asks which religious leaders will be involved in the movement. Luster says that clergy from all denominations and faiths will gather together on November 19; that business and political leaders will be invited as well. A reporter asks what this series of ecumenical meeting and events will accomplish. Luster says that the events will try to capitalize on the atmosphere of goodwill created by the covenant; that the religious leaders will work to strengthen this atmosphere by preaching the scripture. A reporter asks if these efforts will improve the racially charged atmosphere in the city's schools. Luster says that the religious leaders have a responsibility to set a good example for young people; that the religious leaders need to sound a warning to those who are promoting the negative atmosphere. A reporter asks how the religious leaders will reach out to those who do not attend church. Groden says that religious leaders know that they cannot reach out to all citizens through religious services; that religious leaders will reach out to schools and to the neighborhoods. A reporter asks if the efforts by religious leaders are connected to a recent neighborhood summit. Luster says that their movement has been put together by religious leaders; that religious leaders have a "higher mandate" which propels them to preach the gospel of peace. A reporter asks if the religious leaders expect political leaders to speak out on these issues. Groden says that political leaders have accused religious leaders of not doing enough; that the religious leaders are fulfilling their responsibilities with this movement; that he hopes other leaders will join in. A reporter asks a question about the reference to "special interest groups" in the covenant. Groden says that religious leaders encourage membership in and support of "positive" community groups; that religious leaders are asking people to disassociate themselves from groups whose behavior is not constructive. Groden says that they will not single out any groups.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/29/1979
Description: Structural details and signage on combat zone architecture. E.M. Loew's Publix Theater ('vaudeville, burlesque' words on brick side). Marquees of: The Scene: Adult Movies, Center Theater, featuring Chinese martial arts movies. Paramount and State Theater signs. Pussycat Cinema next to New England Medical Center. Interiors of a theater building, in the theater district. Sign for "Modern Theatre Restoration Circus." Interview with theater manager about reopening the theater, the shows they will feature, the restoration they will do on the building, including work with the Boston Redevelopment Authority, and neighborhood development.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1979
Description: 'Ann Corio' on Charles Playhouse marquee. Pilgrim, Paramount, State, Savoy, E.M. Loews, Center, Star, Modern, Lyric Stage and Next Move Theater exteriors. Hotel Avery sign. Boylston building. Parking lot. “Adult films, Chinese movies, martial arts,” Combat zone, theater district.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/10/1979
Description: Interview with Albert "Dapper" O'Neil during his run for Suffolk County sheriff. He accuses his oppenent of corruption and complains that no Boston newspapers will report the negative allegations he has made against his opponent. He discusses his plan to make the sheriff's department more visible and says "I'm a law and order man." He discusses his plan for the Charles St. Jail. He defends the office of the sheriff in the face of claims that the state should take over its responsibilities. He accuses the current sheriff of patronage and speaks against it in his campaign. He expresses his conservatism against the liberalism of the current sheriff., which includes his position against furloughs and halfway houses. He explains how he got the nickname "Dapper." He explains why he thinks former mayor and governor James Curley is the greatest man that ever lived. Video dropout in the middle of the video.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1978
Description: Michael Dukakis speaks at State House after upset defeat by Edward King in gubernatorial primary. Kitty, Frank Keefe, Barbara Ackermann, Evelyn Murphy.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/20/1978
Description: Edward F. King (not to be confused with Edward J. King) holds a press conference to announce his Republican gubernatorial candidacy at Park Plaza Hotel. Otto Walrab, former Chairman of the Republican State Committee, introduces King. King talks about his past experience and Massachusetts economic policy. He talks about cutting across traditional party lines, especially in Massachusetts, a heavily Democratic state. He criticizes Michael Dukakis for tax plan and for his judicial appointments, including Robert Bonin and Margaret Burnham. King takes questions from the press. Several takes of reporter standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/04/1978
Description: Edward King gives victory speech at Park Plaza Hotel after winning gubernatorial election. He thanks the community and introduces his family.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1978
Description: Several takes of reporter standup in empty Boston Garden. Bruins banners hang over ice rink. Long circular pan of unoccupied seats.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/18/1978
Description: Boston mayoral candidate David Finnegan speaks outside Faneuil Hall in opposition to low property taxes paid by developer of Quincy Market pursuant to deal made with city. He compares the tax rates paid by Faneuil Hall and Milton Street in Dorchester.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/23/1979
Description: Boston waterfront. Dock scenes. Just caught fish in barrels on dock. Lumpers with rubber gloves and overalls. Boston Fish Market Corporation building. Press conference led by Massport director David Davis, who announces renovation of Fish Pier. Rep. Joseph Moakley speaks. He goes over the history of the fishing industry in Boston, Massachusetts, and the United States. He provides details on the redevelopment of the pier, and mentions the effects of the 200 mile limit enacted by Congress. Helen Keyes of the U.S. Dept. of Commerce speaks. George Kariotis, transportation secretary Barry Locke, Lt. Gov. Tom O'Neill are present.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/15/1979
Description: George McGovern visits Boston to raise funds among liberals for his 1980 Senate reelection campaign in South Dakota. He doubts that there will ever be a senate race run purely on funds contributed within the border of the state. He thinks that campaigns should be financed publicly. Speaks about his nomination for presidency in 1972. Additional footage includes McGovern meeting and speaking with liberal Massachusetts politicians at a gathering.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/20/1979
Description: Governors Conference in Boston. Sen. Edward Kennedy and Rep. John Anderson meet with the National Governors Association, including Govs. Jerry Brown, Ella Grasso, Reubin Askew, Dixie Lee Ray, Ed Herschler, James Longley, Harvey Wollman, Richard Lamm, Meldrim Thomson, Mike O'Callaghan, and Richard Snelling. End of the discussion on health care and insurance policy. Governor Dukakis speaks and Senator Kennedy responds. Many closeups on Kennedy, Dukakis, and audience pans. Governor Snelling introduces John Anderson and the panel on government regulations. Cuts of Anderson's speech about the problem of over-regulation by Congress and the legislative veto, with shots of governors around the table. The Director of the US Office of Management and Budget, James T. McIntyre, speaks to the same issues. Rep. Anderson takes questions.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/28/1978
Description: Green line T pulling into and out of Kenmore station underground during rush hour. Old style PCC trolley and newer LRV cars. Driver's point of view, looking down tracks into dark subway tunnel. Passengers get on and off.Passenger reading Benjamin Disraeli. Passenger complains about MBTA service.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/15/1979
Description: Jane Fonda and Tom Hayden hold press conference at State House to give their progressive stances on social justice issues, and to discuss their work with grass roots organizations. They hope to influence the 1980 presidential election.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1979
Description: Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) holds a press conference to discuss his victory the previous day in the mayoral election. White discusses his potential role as a national spokesman on urban issues. White says that he has no plans to assume a national role. White predicts great success in his next term; rejects Boston's reputation as a racist city; guarantees the safety of all citizens in the city; discusses the city's affirmative action program as it relates to his administration; and says his administration will not tolerate racial violence. White notes the community's responsibility to speak out against racial violence; discusses the recent shooting of Darryl Williams (African American Jamaica Plain student). White talks about former city employee James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) and the need to be sensitive in making appointments to city jobs. White discusses the city's poor racial climate, and assesses the extent to which he is responsible for it, and his belief that other cities are more racist than Boston. White talks about his support base in the mayoral election and about his opponent, Joseph Timilty. He discusses the US Senate race and notes that he has not been asked to endorse Edward Kennedy (US Senator) or any other candidates. White expresses confidence in the vitality of the city and talks about his priorities for the next term, including tax reform and the development of the North Station area. White is very relaxed and has a good rapport with the media.
0:00:11: Visual: Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) walks into a small room where a press conference will be held. He greets the members of the media informally, saying "Hi everybody." He jokes with the media about having forgotten his tie. White sits down on a couch. Microphones are set up on the coffee table in front of him. White says that he is pleased about his victory. A reporter asks White if he and Henry Maier (Mayor of Milwaukee) will join Dick Hatcher (Mayor of Gary, Indiana) as national spokesmen for urban issues. White says that he will speak out on urban issues as he always has; that he has no plans to assume a national role. White adds that there are mayors in other cities who will become influential and make themselves heard. He mentions Bill Green (Mayor of Philadelphia) and Don Frasier (Mayor of Minneapolis). Another reporter asks White if he will be eclipsed by these new urban mayors. White makes a joke, "the old gray mare, he is what he used to be." White says that he will speak out on national issues which affect Boston. A reporter asks what the next four years will bring to Boston. White says that the next term will be the greatest of his terms as mayor. He mentions that Bob Ryan (Director, Boston Redevelopment Authority) is optimistic about new building projects. A reporter comments on Boston's reputation as the most racist city in the nation. White says that Boston's reputation as a racist city is not correct. He notes that he cannot rid the city of racism and hypocrisy. White guarantees that people of all colors and nationalities will be able to walk the streets safely by the end of his term. A reporter asks White if he will hire more African Americans to key positions in the city administration. White says that there is a good affirmative action program in place; that the African American community supported him in the election. White says that racial violence will not be tolerated in the city. He says that the residents of Charlestown helped to apprehend the youth involved in the shooting of Darryl Williams (Jamaica Plain student); that the residents of Charlestown did not want to be seen as harboring racist criminals. White says that his administration will not tolerate racial violence. 0:06:24: V: White notes that the Charlestown Business Association held a press conference within hours of the Williams shooting; that they condemned racial violence in the press conference; that people in the community need to speak out against racist violence. White says that he will enlist his supporters in the neighborhoods to speak out. A reporter asks White if he will be more sensitive about whom he puts on the city payroll after the "Jimmy Kelly affair." White says that he is always sensitive about whom he puts on the city payroll; that the media will always disagree with his hiring decisions. White notes that James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) resigned from his city job; that he was not fired. The reporter asks if it is a good idea to have Kelly representing the city by holding a city job. White says that he was not willing to fire Kelly in order to court African American voters during the campaign. White says that he wanted to be elected on his record, not for his ability to play upon the emotions of voters. White adds that Kelly was qualified to do the job for which he was hired; that hiring Kelly was not a mistake. White says that he does not want to fire city workers because of their beliefs, even if their beliefs are unpalatable. 0:09:32: V: A reporter asks White if he feels responsible for the poor racial climate in the city. White says that he cannot change it all by himself; that he has never ducked a crisis. White adds that the city will not come together until more people become active; that the voters need to elect good people to the Boston School Committee and the Boston City Council. A reporter asks White how Boston got its reputation as a racist city. White says that racism is a national problem; that problems in Boston get more media coverage than problems in other cities. White mentions that there are severe racial problems in Detroit and other cities; that many affluent communities are very racist. White says that Boston has lived through busing and has learned from it; that there are racial problems in Boston; that he does not think of Boston as the most racist city in the US. A reporter asks White about low voter turnout in the election. Jump cut on videotape. 0:13:14: V: White says that he expanded his political base in this election; that he did not lose support in areas where he has always been popular. He expresses confidence in the vitality of the city. White says that he has not been approached for an endorsement of Edward Kennedy (US Senator) or any other candidates for US Senate. White jokes with reporters about not needing to talk to the media now that he has been reelected. A reporter asks White about his priorities for the next term. White talks about tax reform and the development of the area around North Station. A reporter asks White why he did not attend Kennedy's announcement at Faneuil Hall this morning. Jump cut on videotape. 0:15:16: V: White talks further about the race for the US Senate. A reporter asks White to analyze the campaign strategy of Joseph Timilty (former mayoral candidate). White says that he does not like to pick apart the strategy of an opponent. White says that both he and Timilty knew that Timilty had a good chance to win the election. A photographer focuses on White and takes his photo. A reporter asks if he will lay off workers from the city payroll. White deflects the question with a joke. He has a good rapport with the reporters. White closes the press conference. He commends the reporters on their professionalism, saying that they treated both him and Timilty fairly. White and the reporters prepare to leave the room. White speaks informally to Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) and others.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1979