Description: Longshoremen's hiring hall. Men crowd around window for work assignments. Interview with union worker, who says job shortage due to progress and automation. He has not been paid under contract guaranty because of loopholes. He predicts October 1 strike against Boston Shipping Association. Containerization calls for fewer workers, from about 1,200 men to about 400 men, though tonnage of port has remained stable. Man hours have decreased, some men have left the industry, others try to collect their guaranty. A man being interviewed says that the men are very angry.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/24/1976
Description: E. Edward Clark, a ninety-two-year-old African American man, speaks to a racially integrated class at the Hennigan Elementary School. The son of slaves, Clark tells vivid stories about his family's experiences in the south following emancipation and about growing up in Cambridge. He stresses the importance of a good education and respect for people of all races. The students ask Mr. Clark questions. Tape 1 of 2.
1:00:00: Visual: E. Edward Clark speaks to a racially integrated class at the Hennigan school. Clark describes the lives of his parents, who were slaves. Clark's father bought his freedom eight years before emancipation. His father bought the freedom of his mother, then the two were married. Clark's parents had 13 children. Clark describes the schools he attended as a boy, and the good education he received from New England missionaries who traveled south to teach former slaves. Clark describes race relations in the south after the Civil War. Clark says that his family moved to a cold-water flat at 143 Erie Street in Cambridge in 1898. Clark talks to the students about the importance of a good education and respect for others; about his impressions of how the world has changed. Clark warns the students that an education will prepare them to make a living later on. He reminds the students that the teachers are there to help them. Clark describes growing up in Cambridge in the early part of the century. He describes how the city has changed and how little things cost back then. 1:18:32: V: Clark invites the students to ask him questions. One student asks him about the secret to long life. Clark says that his parents were healthy; that he does not drink or smoke; that he does not believe in hate or violence. Clark stresses again that an education is necessary for success in life. Another student asks Clark if he was ever married.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/27/1977
Description: Grand lobby, interior of Music Hall. Ornate chandelier, marble columns, heavenly mural. Gilded architectural details — carved moldings, capitals, medallions, angels. Interview with Harry Lodge, who gives history of Music Hall (formerly Metropolitan Theater), originally designed in 1920s by Clarence Blackhall for Vaudeville and movies. Describes the proposed restoration program to be completed in fall 1980 if lease secured and funds raised. In order to bring the Metropolitan Opera to Boston, the theater needs deeper stage for performing arts, updated communication systems, ventilation systems, and a renovated auditorium (seats 4,300). The theater is used for ballet, concerts, movies. Lodge states that this renovation with revitalize Boston as a major center for the performing arts. Lodge shows a drawing of the proposed plan.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/21/1977
Description: Grand facade of Boston's Old City Hall (now housing Maison Robert restaurant). Marker for Freedom Trail and information booth on edge of Boston Common. People walk through the park, gather around information booth. Sign for Freedom Trail. Boston Common environs. People getting off Peter Pan bus.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/05/1976
Description: High shots of Park Square during snowstorm. Hillbilly Ranch, Continental Trailways bus terminal, Playboy Club, billboards. Man digging out a car. Buses and cars driving on snow covered roads. Pedestrians walking through snow.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/29/1976
Description: B-roll of parking tickets, parking meters, and parking enforcement officer near Government Center. Man argues ticket with officer. "No Parking" and "Tow Zone" signs.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/11/1977
Description: Press conference on the court-ordered plan for Phase III desegregation of the Boston Public Schools. Elvira "Pixie" Palladino (Boston School Committee), Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) and John Nucci (East Boston community activist) are among the interested parties and reporters in attendance. Attendees read over the court order. Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) and Marvin Scott (Associate Dean of Education, Boston University) review the court order. They discuss efforts to desegregate Boston kindergartens. They announce the opening of the Mattahunt Elementary School and Madison Park High School. Smith and Dentler discuss the decision to close the McKinley School, the Storrow School and the Higginson Elementary School, because they remain segregated despite all efforts to integrate the student population.
0:00:13: Visual: People are seating themselves in a lecture hall before a press conference about the court-ordered plan for Phase III desegregation of Boston Public Schools. Elvira "Pixie" Palladino sits with several white women at a table at the front of the room. Walt Sanders (WBZ reporter) reads the paper at his seat, also near the front of the room. Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) greets people as they enter the room. The media set up cameras to record the press conference. 0:03:20: V: Marvin Scott (Associate Dean of Education, Boston University) and Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) seat themselves at the front of the room. The moderator announces that copies of the court-ordered Phase III desegregation plan will be passed out. Audience members approach him for copies of the report. Scott and Dentler wait as the moderator passes out the report. 0:05:51: V: The moderator introduces Dentler and Scott, and says that they will answer questions about the report. Dentler and Scott are seated at a table with microphones. They quietly confer with one another and check their watches. The press conference attendees quietly read over the report. John Nucci (East Boston community activist) quietly studies it. Leftwich flips through the report. An attendee asks Dentler how the plan will affect East Boston. Dentler says that he will answer questions after the attendees have had a chance to read over the report. 0:09:49: V: Smith says that the court order for Phase III desegregation focuses on stability and continuity. He says that he and Dentler will review the order and then take questions. Smith says that a third theme of the court order is the disengagement of the court from the schools. Smith refers to the court order and explains some statistics. He points out how some school assignments have changed from last year to this year. He makes reference to the assignment of students to examination schools. Dentler notes that kindergarten classrooms in Boston have never been desegregated; that neighborhood kindergarten classrooms remain more accessible to white students than to African American students; that fewer minority students enter kindergarten. Dentler adds that the Phase III desegregation plan aims to increase accessibility to neighborhood kindergarten for all; that some students will be assigned to citywide magnet kindergartens for desegregation purposes; that magnet kindergarten assignments are made with the idea that children will stay in the same building for the elementary school grades. Dentler says that the goal of kindergarten desegregation was first stated in the original court order. Smith mentions some of the details of student assignments to District 9 schools. Dentler says that the court aims to stabilize the high student turnover rate. He names the deadlines for initial assignments and corrective assignments of students. Dentler notes the statistic that one in three students transfers from one school to another under the current plan; that there will be limitations on student transfers. Dentler says that a high turnover rate is detrimental to classroom learning. Smith announces the opening of the Mattahunt Elementary School and Madison Park High School. Dentler announces the closings of four schools. He says that the McKinley School, the Storrow School, and the Higginson Elementary School will be closed because they have remained segregated despite all efforts to integrate the student population. Dentler notes that alternative plans to desegregate these schools are infeasible or unconstitutional; that the student populations in these schools are small. Dentler notes that there are 60 students enrolled in the McKinley School; that there are less than 100 students enrolled in the Storrow School; that there are less than 150 students at the Higginson School, not including kindergarten students.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/06/1977
Description: B-roll of the site of a proposed multilevel garage for Quincy Market, which is currently a parking lot between Haymarket and the Expressway. Close-ups on cars in the parking lot. Several takes of reporter standup on the Boston Redevelopment Authority's plans. Exteriors of Faneuil Hall before North Market was developed. Several takes of another portion of reporter standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/24/1977
Description: Railroad terminal yard in Allston adjacent to Mass. Turnpike. Freight containers and container beds parked on train tracks. Sole engine moving slowly into yard. Traffic on elevated section of pike in background. Hancock Towers and Prudential in hazy distance.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/19/1976
Description: Mayor Kevin White releases report on racial violence in Boston. He does not comment on the findings because he has not yet reviewed them. The report was written by a committee consisting of 13 diverse members, chaired by Speaker Thomas McGee and Judge David Nelson. They met ten times over two months to interview 17 community leaders, both supporters and opponents of busing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/24/1976