Description: Marcus Jones reports that Mayor Ray Flynn and a group of community activists have suggested replacing Boston's elected school committee with an appointed school board. Interview with Charles Stith of the Union United Methodist Church at Logan Airport. Stith talks about his upcoming trip to Philadelphia to learn about the appointed school board in that city. Flynn wants to remove politics from the government of the Boston Public School System. Press conference with Flynn and supporters. Flynn urges the citizens of Boston to join the movement to change the School Committee. Elnavia Green (parent), Bill Owens (State Senator), Reverend McCall Thomas (Charles Street African Methodist Episcopal Church) and Tony Molina (President, Bilingual Master Parents' Advisory Council) voice their support for Flynn's proposal at the press conference. Interview with John Nucci of the Boston School Committee, who says that it is not a good idea to ask voters to give up their right to vote. Jones notes that the controversy is drawing attention away from the immediate needs of the schools. Footage of a Boston School Committee meeting.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of the members of the Boston School Committee seated at the front of the School Committee chambers during a meeting. Shots of Daniel Burke (Boston School Committee); of School Committee members Abigail Browne and Kitty Bowman. Marcus Jones reports that a group of community activists has suggested replacing Boston's elected school committee with an appointed school board. V: Shot of a video screen at Logan Airport listing departing flights on Delta Airlines. Shots of Charles Stith (President, Organization for a New Equality) and a small group in a waiting area at Logan Airport. Stith and another man walk toward their gate. Jones reports that a small group of community activists traveled to Philadelphia today; that the activists will examine the Philadelphia School System. Jones notes that the Philadelphia School System is led by an appointed school board. Jones adds that the group will report its findings later this week. V: Footage of Stith being interviewed by Jones at Logan Airport. Stith says that he is interested in how the Philadelphia School System works. Stith says that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has been talking about implementing a similar kind of system. Jones reports that Flynn has been consulting with advisors about how to remove politics from the government of the Boston Public School System. V: Shot of Flynn at a press conference at School Department headquarters. Flynn stands in front of a group of city officials including Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council) and David Scondras (Boston City Council). Jones reports that Flynn has proposed a new school board with seven mayoral appointees. V: Shots of the members of the School Committee seated at the front of the School Committee chambers; of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), Peggy Davis-Mullen (Boston School Committee) and Thomas O'Reilly (President, Boston School Committee). Footage of Flynn at the press conference. Flynn urges the citizens of Boston to join the movement to change the School Committee. Flynn says that the present system is not working. Shots of the members of the media at the press conference. Jones reports that Flynn was joined at the press conference by parents and community leaders; that many endorse Flynn's call for a non-binding referendum on an appointed school committee. V: Shots of community leaders and parents at the press conference. Footage of Elnavia Green (parent) speaking at the press conference. Green says that parents have been waiting for better schools; that parents are "getting the runaround." Footage of Bill Owens (State Senator) saying that the present system is not effective. Footage of Reverend McCall Thomas (Charles Street African Methodist Episcopal Church) at the press conference. Thomas says that the present system is not effective. Footage of Tony Molina (President, Bilingual Master Parents' Advisory Council) at the press conference. Molina says that parents have been "abused" by the School Committee. Molina says that parents want change. The crowd applauds. Jones reports that not everyone is pleased with Flynn's proposal. V: Footage of John Nucci (Boston School Committee) being interviewed by Jones. Nucci says that the referendum will ask the voters to choose between two evils; that the voters will have to choose between the status quo and their right to vote. Jones stands outside of the headquarters of the Boston School Department. Jones reports that the debate has distracted school officials from concentrating their energies on the schools. Jones notes that the debate could continue beyond November.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/08/1989
Description: Marcus Jones reports that the Boston School Committee voted eight to five in favor of renewing the contract of superintendent Dr. Laval Wilson. Some members are opposed to renewing Wilson's contract and made an effort to postpone the vote on his contract renewal. Footage from a Boston School Committee meeting. Committee member Peggy Davis-Mullen proposes to postpone the vote on Wilson's contract. Committee member John O'Bryant says that he supports the renewal of Wilson's contract. Committee member Daniel Burke questions Wilson about the high drop-out rate in the Boston Public Schools. Wilson responds. Jones reports that Wilson has acknowledged the complaints of some critics by pledging to increase parental involvement in the schools and by pledging to improve the School Department's relations with unions.
1:00:09: Visual: Footage of Daniel Burke (Boston School Committee) at a meeting of the Boston School Committee. Burke remarks that a certain motion is out of order. Shots of the School Committee members seated at the meeting; of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) seated at the meeting. Marcus Jones reports that some members of the School Committee are opposed to the renewal of Wilson's contract; that those members made an effort to take the matter of Wilson's contract off of the agenda. V: Footage of Peggy Davis-Mullen (Boston School Committee) at the meeting. Davis-Mullen says that the decision is being forced; that the decision should wait until January. Davis-Mullen says that she does not like the way in which the decision is being made. Shot of Jones in the audience of the meeting. Jones reports that Wilson's supporters on the School Committee were able to keep the debate open. V: Footage of John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) saying that he is prepared to support the renegotiation of Wilson's contract. Footage of Wilson saying that he has a good understanding of the school system; that he has made progress in improving the school system. Footage of Burke asking Wilson about the student drop-out rate. Wilson responds to Burke. Wilson says that reading and math scores have gone up and the drop-out rate has declined. Shots of the audience at the meeting. Jones reports that Wilson admits that he has not done enough to involve parents in the educational process. Jones notes that Wilson says that he will try to increase parental involvement and to improve the school department's relations with unions. V: Footage of O'Bryant saying that Wilson has made a lot of progress in improving the system. Shots of the members as they vote on a motion. Jones reports that the School Committee voted eight to five in favor of renewing Wilson's contract; that the details of the contract remain to be discussed.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/11/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports that Jack E. Robinson (President, National Association of Black Americans) is trying to get a voluntary school uniform program started in the Boston Public Schools. Jones notes that some schools have found that voluntary dress codes have led to better grades and behavior. He adds that opponents of school uniforms believe that they stifle creativity. Jones interviews Robinson about school uniforms. Jones reports that Robinson believes that students are more concerned about their clothes and possessions than they are about their studies. Jones quotes from a Boston Herald newspaper article about a nine-year old drug runner who impresses his friends with his clothes. Jones also interviews John Grady (Boston School Committee), Elizabeth Foley (Boston parent), and a Boston school child about school uniforms. Jones reviews some of the benefits to school uniforms.
1:00:02: Visual: Footage of white elementary students in school uniforms rising to greet their teacher at the St. Columbkille School in Brighton. Shots of students in the classroom. Marcus Jones reports that uniforms are a long-standing tradition in private and parochial schools. Jones notes that supporters of school uniforms believe that uniforms help inspire discipline. Jones notes that opponents of school uniforms believe that they stifle creativity. V: Shots of white uniformed students in classrooms. Shots of African American uniformed students in an elementary school in Washigton DC. Jones reports that an elementary school in Washington DC and five elementary schools in Baltimore have instituted a voluntary dress code; that the schools have found that the dress code has led to better grades and behavior. V: Footage of Jack E. Robinson (President, National Association of Black Americans) being interviewed by Jones. Robinson says that school uniforms lead to a decrease in disciplinary problems. Jones notes that Robinson is trying to get a voluntary uniform program started in the Boston Public Schools. V: Footage of Robinson saying that adults wear uniforms; that business people wear suits; that people in all professions wear uniforms all over the world. Shot of a Boston Herald newspaper article with a headline reading, "He's the littlest pusher." Jones reports that Robinson says that children are more concerned about clothes and stylish possessions than they are about their studies. Jones quotes from the Boston Herald newspaper article; the newspaper article says that a nine-year-old drug runner impresses his friends with his clothes. V: On-screen text quotes from the Boston Herald newspaper article. Footage of John Grady (Boston School Committee) saying that he will support uniforms if they contribute to a good learning environment in the schools. Footage of Jennifer Foley (Boston public school student) saying that she would not want to wear the same colors all year long. Footage of Elizabeth Foley (parent) saying that students are entitled to their own identities. Jones reports that there are some good reasons to institute a school uniform program. Jones notes that parents can save money on clothing bills; that students have one less peer pressure to worry them; that teachers have one less distraction in the classroom. Johnson adds that Robinson has suggested that the community can profit by having the uniforms manufactured in the neighborhoods.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/09/1988
Description: Jan von Mehren reports that the Massachusetts Civil Liberties Union has filed a class-action lawsuit against the Boston Police Department on behalf of minority youth in Mattapan, Roxbury, and Dorchester. Von Mehren notes that the lawsuit accuses the Police Department of engaging in unreasonable search and seizure practices. Von Mehren's reports includes footage from a press conference with John Roberts (Massachusetts Civil Liberties Union), Bill Owens (State Senator), Caroline Marshall (mother of plaintiff), and Margaret Burnham (attorney). Roberts says that statements by the Boston Police Department provoked the lawsuit. Marshall and Burnham speak out against unreasonable police practices. Von Mehren quotes Paul Evans (Commissioner, Boston Police Department) as saying that the police are not violating anyone's Constitutional rights. Von Mehren reports that many students at English High School support the lawsuit. Von Mehren interviews English High School students about their experiences with police officers.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of a group of English High School students walking on a street after school. Jan von Mehren reports that many students from English High School have stories to tell about police officers who have overstepped their boundaries. V: Footage of Tony Moss (Roxbury resident, 16 years old) saying that he was walking home from school one day when police officers stopped, threw him against the wall and proceeded to search him. Footage of Hector Pinto (Dorchester resident) talking about being searched by police. Footage of a high school gym. A group of girls in the gym play with a volleyball. Another group of students stands on the bleachers. Footage of Reginald Verdieu (Mattapan resident) saying that he has never been searched; that his friends have been searched. Verdieu says that a friend was forced by police officers to pull down his pants and take off his shoes. Footage of Alexia Baez (18 years old) being interviewed by von Mehren. Baez says that a group of her friends were searched by police; that one member of the group was forced to pull down his pants. Von Mehren reports that Baez believes that the police are humiliating teenagers. Von Mehren reports that the Massachusetts Civil Liberties Union has filed a class-action lawsuit against the Boston Police Department; that the suit is being filed on behalf of African American and Latino young people from Mattapan, Roxbury, and Dorchester. V: Footage of John Roberts (Massachusetts Civil Liberties Union) speaking at a press conference. Roberts says that statements by the Boston Police Department provoked the lawsuit. Roberts sits at a table four others including Bill Owens (State Senator) Caroline Marshall (mother of plaintiff), and Margaret Burnham (attorney). Shots of the media at the press conference; of von Mehren at the press conference. Von Mehren reports that the lawsuit accuses the Police Department of engaging in unreasonable search and seizure practices; of violating the fourth amendment rights of those who are searched. V: Footage of Marshall saying that she wants the police to operate within the law; that people need to realize what is going on in their community. Shots of attendees at the press conference. Footage of Burnham saying that police are only allowed to search those who are suspected of committing a crime. Von Mehren quotes Paul Evans (Commissioner, Boston Police Department) as saying that police do sometimes make mistakes; that police are not violating anyone's Constitutional rights. V: Shot of two white police officers stopping to search a young African American male. Evans' quote appears written in text on-screen. Von Mehren reports that many English High School students applaud the lawsuit. Von Mehren notes that the students are quick to point out the problems in their neighborhood. Von Mehren says that the students do not want the police to leave the neighborhood; that the students want police to stop searching the wrong people. V: Shots of English High School students walking on the sidewalks. Footage of Verdieu saying that innocent people should not be stopped by police; that police do need to stop some people.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/21/1989
Description: David Boeri reports on expansion plans by the State Street Bank. The bank's activities are focused on mutual funds, pension funds, and informational services, and it has a presence on the international scene. The bank needs approval from the State Banking Commission before opening an office in Tokyo. Critics accuse the bank of abandoning its local responsibilities. State Banking Commission Hearing. State Senator Bill Owens says that the bank does not provide credit to low- and moderate-income neighborhoods. William Edgerly, Chairman of the State Street Bank and Trust says that the bank does not provide a full range of consumer services. Interview with Edgerly, who says that the bank needs to go global in order to be an industry leader. He adds that the bank is committed to the local community. Interview with Diane Strother from the Massachusetts Affordable Housing Alliance, who says that the bank does not do enough for the community. Boeri reports that affordable-housing advocates want the bank to renew its commitment to low-income neighborhoods.
1:00:13: Visual: Shots of the exterior of the State Street Bank building on Franklin Street. David Boeri reports that the State Street Bank has been in operation in Boston since 1792; that the bank has been expanding in the 1980s. V: Footage of William Edgerly (Chairman, State Street Bank and Trust) saying that the bank needs to go global in order to be a leader in the industry. Shots of the exterior of the bank; of the entrance to the bank. Boeri reports that loans are a small part of the bank's business; that the bank's focus is on mutual funds, pension funds, and informational services. V: Shots of the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on October 13, 1989; of a NYSE official banging a gavel. Footage of Edgerly saying that the bank is no longer a regional bank; that the bank is now a national and international bank. Shots of the floor of the stock exchange in Tokyo; of business workers on a busy street. Shots of Japanese workers at the Tokyo stock exchange; of a screen listing stocks at the Tokyo stock exchange. Boeri reports that State Street Bank has a presence on the international scene in London, Luxemborg, and Hong Kong; that the bank is planning an office in Tokyo. Boeri reports that advocates of affordable housing have challenged the bank's plans. V: Footage of William Owens (State Senator) at a hearing of the state banking commission. Owens says that poor urban neighborhoods remain in the "backyards" of the multinational banks. Shots of attendees and audience members at the hearing of the banking commission. Boeri reports that State Street Bank needs approval from the banking commission before it opens an office in Tokyo; that the bank remains a state bank. Boeri reports that critics say that the bank has abandoned its local responsibilities. Boeri notes that critics say that the bank has shut down branch offices in Dorchester, Roxbury, and other neighborhoods. V: Shots of audience members at the hearing. Footage of Owens addressing the banking commission. Owens says that the State Street Bank is responsible for a decrease in access to banking services in minority neighborhoods. Boeri stands in front of the State Street Bank building. Boeri reports that the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) requires banks to provide credit to their local communities. Boeri notes that a bank can have its applications denied if it does not provide credit to low- and moderate-income neighborhoods. Boeri adds that critics want the State Street Bank to take care of business in Boston before opening up a Tokyo office. V: Footage of Edgerly addressing the banking commission. Edgerly says that the State Street Bank is a wholesale bank; that the bank does not provide a full range of consumer services. Shots of audience members at the hearing. Boeri notes that State Street Bank officials say that the bank does not do home mortgages. V: Footage of Edgerly being interviewed by Boeri. Edgerly says that the State Street Bank is devoted to helping the local community become successful. Shot of Edgerly at the bank commission hearing. Boeri reports that Edgerly helped to form the Boston Housing Partnership and the Boston Compact. V: Footage of Diane Strother (Massachusetts Affordable Housing Alliance) saying that the bank does not do enough for the community. Shots of the exterior of the State Street Bank building. Boeri reports that housing advocates want the approval of the bank's Tokyo office to be linked to a renewed effort by the bank to provide banking services and loans to low-income neighborhoods.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/13/1989
Description: Sam Fleming reports on voter registration in Massachusetts. Fleming notes that many eligible voters in Massachusetts are not registered to vote. He notes that the percentages of unregistered voters are highest in minority communities. Fleming interviews Yvonne Footman (Dorchester resident) and other city residents about voter registration. Fleming's report includes footage of Footman registering to vote. Fleming interviews Charles Weeks (Office of the Massachusetts Secretary of State) and David Sullivan (Office of the Massachusetts Secretary of State) about voter registration. Sullivan and Weeks say that the State of Massachusetts is not doing enough to make voter registration easy and accessible. Fleming reports on voter registration initiatives at the state and national level. Fleming notes that Jesse Jackson (Democratic candidate for US President) has made increased access to voter registration part of his campaign platform. Following the edited story is b-roll of Jesse Jackson at the Democratic Convention,voter registration tables, polling booths, and city residents near City Hall Plaza.
1:00:00: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) speaking at the 1988 Democratic National Convention. Michael Dukakis (Democratic US presidential nominee) and Lloyd Bentsen (Democratic US vice-presidential nominee) stand on either side of him. Jackson talks about the importance of on-site voter registration. Sam Fleming reports that Jackson's platform slate has not been embraced by Dukakis; that Dukakis has agreed to work on voter registration. V: Footage of Yvonne Footman (Dorchester resident) registering to vote at a voter registration table in Dorchester. Registration workers examine her license and fill out a form. Fleming reports that many eligible voters in Massachusetts have never voted before. V: Footage of Fleming standing on a street in Boston. Fleming asks an African American man if he is registered to vote. The man says that he is not. Fleming reports that 27% of eligible voters in Massachusetts are not registered to vote; that the percentage of unregistered voters is highest in minority communities. V: Shots of residents walking near City Hall Plaza; of residents on the street in an African American neighborhood of Boston. Footage of Fleming asking an African American woman if she would vote if Jackson were on the ticket. The woman says no. Footage of Charles Weeks (Office of the Massachusetts Secretary of State) being interviewed by Fleming. Weeks says that some people do not think that their voices count. Fleming notes that Weeks is a former president of the Black Political Task Force. Fleming reports that Weeks says that voter registration is difficult in Massachusetts. Fleming reports that voters need to register at City Hall in Boston. Fleming notes that the Boston Election Commission is trying to set up portable voter registration centers. V: Shots of people walking near City Hall Plaza; of a voter registration table in Dorchester. Footage of Footman saying that she is not sure if she would have traveled to City Hall in order to register to vote. Shots of workers registering voters at the portable registration center in Dorchester. Fleming reports that State Election Officials say that Massachusetts is not doing enough to make voter registration accessible and easy for all. V: Shot of a bulletin board with voter registration information. Footage of David Sullivan (Office of the Massachusetts Secretary of State) saying that many voters in many states can register by mail; that four states have voter registration on election day; that some states allow voters to register at various state agencies. Sullivan says that Massachusetts has done none of these things. Fleming reports that a number of initiatives are under way on the state and national level; that an on-site, same-day voter registration initiative is under way. V: Shots of a poll worker sitting with a list of voters; of a voter entering a polling booth; of poll workers checking a voters name against the voter lists. Fleming reports that Massachusetts voters rejected an effort to allow registration by mail two years ago; that Massachusetts voters may resist other voter registration initiatives. V: Shot of Jackson at the Democratic Convention, flanked by Dukakis and Bentsen. Footage of Sullivan saying that a new law allows voter registration in high schools; that more needs to be done to improve access to voter registration.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/19/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that the Boston School Committee is deeply divided over whether to renew the contract of superintendent Laval Wilson. Committee members discuss Wilson's contract renewal at a School Committee meeting. Committee member John O'Bryant says that he refuses to watch Wilson be lynched by members of the Committee who do not respect his professionalism. Vaillancourt reviews Wilson's record as superintendent. She speculates on how each member of the Committee will vote and quotes Committee member John Nucci as saying that Wilson's prospects look "gloomy." Vaillancourt reports accusations that Mayor Ray Flynn has been lobbying against Wilson. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Marcus Jones reports on the debate over the terms "black" and "African American"
1:00:18: Visual: Footage of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) addressing members of the Boston School Committee at a meeting of the School Committee. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Wilson is fighting for his job. Vaillancourt reports that Wilson told the School Committee at last night's meeting that the debate over his contract should be postponed. Vaillancourt notes that Wilson said that he did not have proper legal counsel with him at last night's meeting. Vaillancourt adds that there are deep divisions among School Committee members over the renewal of Wilson's contract. V: Footage from Say Brother of School Committee members John O'Bryant, Juanita Wade and Rita Walsh Tomasini at a School Committee meeting. Footage of Abigail Browne (Boston School Committee) saying that the School Committee must decide whether it will negotiate a new contract with Wilson. Browne says that Wilson does not need legal counsel if the School Committee decides not to negotiate a contract. Footage of Peggy Davis-Mullen (Boston School Committee) saying that she would like the School Committee to decide if it should renew Wilson's contract. Footage of John Nucci (Boston School Committee) saying that Wilson has made a respectful request not to negotiate this evening. Nucci says that he would not blame Wilson if he got up and left the meeting. Vaillancourt reports that Wilson and his supporters were prepared to walk out of the meeting; that they did not walk out of the meeting. V: Footage of O'Bryant speaking to a few School Committee members during a break in the meeting. O'Bryant says that he refuses to watch Wilson "be lynched" by Committee members who have no respect for his professionalism. Vaillancourt reports that the meeting was postponed until next week. V: Shots of audience members at the School Committee meeting; of Wilson standing alone at the meeting as he sips a beverage. Vaillancourt reports that some School Committee members are angry about Wilson's handling of a new student assignment plan; that some members fault Wilson for stalled contract talks with the teachers' union. Vaillancourt notes that Wilson is credited with an increase in student test scores; that Wilson is blamed for the School Department's $3 milllion deficit. V: Shots of a group of School Committee members conferring, including Davis-Mullen, Daniel Burke, Robert Cappucci, and Walsh-Tomasini; of Wilson conferring with another group of School Committee members, including Nucci, O'Bryant, and John Grady. Vaillancourt reports that Wilson asked for a raise and a housing allowance; that the School Committee voted in the fall to begin negotiations with Wilson. Vaillancourt notes that some members do not want to renew his contract. V: Shots of Davis-Mullen, Wilson and Thomas O'Reilly (President, Boston School Committee) at a School Committee Meeting. Footage of Robert Cappucci saying that he will give no support to Wilson. Vaillancourt reports that Wilson needs seven votes in order to extend his contract. Vaillancourt notes that Committee members Walsh Tomasini, Cappucci, Davis-Mullen, Burke, Kitty Bowman, and Browne are opposed to renewing Wilson's contract; that Committee members O'Bryant, Jean McGuire, Wade, Gerald Anderson and Grady support Wilson; that Committee members Nucci and O'Reilly are undecided. V: On-screen text details the breakdown of the potential votes of School Committee members. Vaillancourt reports that O'Reilly has said that he is open to negotiating with Wilson; that O'Reilly has not said how he will vote. Vaillancourt reports that Nucci wants to discuss Wilson's plans to deal with the School Department deficit before casting his vote. Vaillancourt notes that Nucci has characterized Wilson's chances as "gloomy." V: Shots of O'Reilly; of Nucci. Vaillancourt reports that O'Bryant has accused Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) of lobbying against Wilson. Vaillancourt reports that a spokesman for Flynn said that "there is no basis for that charge. The mayor has worked cooperatively with the Superintendent and the School Committee." V: Shots of O'Bryant; of Flynn. A quote from a Flynn spokesman appears written on the screen. Vaillancourt reports that Flynn would like to have more influence over the school system; that Flynn has suggested doing away with the Boston School Committee. Vaillancourt wonders if Flynn would also like to choose a superintendent more to his liking.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/15/1989
Description: Marcus Jones reports that teachers and parents are frustrated over new starting times for the Boston Public Schools for the coming school year. The Boston School Committee voted in favor of the new starting times in May as part of an effort to cut costs. Parents have not yet received notification of the new starting times. Many parents blame the Dr. Laval Wilson, the Superintendent of Boston Public Schools. Footage from a Boston School Committee meeting. Parents and teachers address their complaints about the new starting times to the Committee members. Interview with Dede Calhoun, a Dorchester parent, about her dissatisfaction with the new starting times. Calhoun talks about the difficulty of finding after school care on short notice because school hours have been altered. Support for Wilson among School Committee members may be slipping, and discussions on the renewal of Wilson's contract will begin soon. Interview with Peggy Davis-Mullen of the Boston School Committee, who says that Wilson is not able to deliver the school-based management policies that are necessary to improve the schools. Wilson will begin his third year on the job under intense scrutiny by School Committee members. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Meg Vaillancourt interviews Elma Lewis about the Roxbury neighborhood and Charles Laquidara organizes a boycott against Shell Oil Company
1:00:15: Visual: Footage from a Boston School Committee meeting from August 23, 1988. A white man addresses the committee members. Shots of the members as they listen, including Jean McGuire (Boston School Committee). Marcus Jones reports that every meeting of the Boston School Committee opens with a period of public comment. Jones reports that questioners at tonight's meeting focused on the same problems as in previous sessions. Jones notes that these questions never seem to get solved. V: Footage of a woman addressing the Boston School Committee. The woman says that she has been waiting for four years for an answer to a specific problem. The woman asks what the committee does. Calhoun asks for answers. Jones reports that many questioners focused on the altered starting times for schools next year. Jones reports that teachers and parents told School Committee members that staggered starting times for schools are difficult for them. V: Shots of the School Committee members seated at the front of the School Committee chambers; of a woman addressing the School Committee members. Shot of Peggy Davis-Mullen (Boston School Committee), Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), and John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee). Shot of audience members. Footage of a female teacher addressing the members of the School Committee. The teacher says that her school was set up as a school to facilitate mainstreaming. The teacher says that she has one group of students starting at 7:30am and another group of students starting at 9:30am. The teacher says that she cannot wait until 10:00 to begin mainstreaming. Jones reports that the School Committee members voted in favor of the new starting times in May; that the new starting times are part of an effort to cut costs. Jones reports that parents have not yet received official notification of the new start times; that many parents blame the superintendent. V: Shots of Wilson; of Davis-Mullen. Footage of Dede Calhoun (Dorchester parent) being interviewed outside of the meeting. Calhoun says that her kids are lucky enough to be in an after-school program; that they may not be eligible for an after-school program now. Calhoun says that it will be difficult to find an after-school program because the start of school is two weeks away. Calhoun says that waiting lists for specific time slots are very long. Calhoun says that many students are "latch-key kids"; that the new school times put these kids out on the street for an extra hour in the afternoon. Footage of Wilson speaking at the School Committee Meeting. Wilson says that there are four options. Jones notes that Wilson's contract finishes at the end of the upcoming school year; that the Committee members must discuss Wilson's contract in the coming weeks. Jones reports that Wilson's support may be slipping; that there is growing frustration with his leadership. V: Shots of audience members at the meeting; of Nucci speaking at the meeting; of Wilson. Footage of Davis-Mullen being interviewed outside of the School Committee chambers. Davis-Mullen says that the school system needs more school-based management. Davis-Mullen says that she does not think that Wilson is willing or able to deliver a policy of school-based management. Jones stands outside of the School Committee chambers. Jones reports that Wilson will start his third year on the job under intense scrutiny; that Wilson may be in for another rocky year. Jones notes that Wilson may be running out of chances to prove that he can improve the Boston Public Schools.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/23/1988
Description: Christy George reports that the Boston School Committee held an executive session to make a decision on the renewal of the contract of superintendent Laval Wilson Several audience members addressed the Boston School Committee about Wilson's performance before they made their decision. Jim Hobby (South Boston resident), Minister Don Muhammad (Roxbury community leader), and Pedro Posado (Latino activist) address the members of the School Committee at a meeting. The School Committee has offered Wilson a two-year contract with constant performance reviews and no perquisites. George adds that the contract does not allow Wilson much freedom to operate. School Committee president Thomas O'Reilly and Committee member Robert Cappucci announce the contract at a School Committee meeting. O'Reilly talks about the details of the contract. Cappucci expresses his non-support of Wilson. Wilson speaks to reporters about his new contract. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Marcus Jones reports on the Ninth Annual Black-Jewish Seder held in Roxbury
1:00:18: Visual: Footage of a Boston School Committee meeting. Shots audience members crowded into the chambers of the Boston School Committee. Shots of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) standing at the front of the School Committee chambers. Christy George reports that audience members had 30 seconds each to address the School Committee on the subject of Wilson's contract. V: Footage of Jim Hobby (South Boston resident) saying that there is a high drop-out rate in South Boston. He accuses Wilson of not doing his job. Shots of School Committee members John Grady, Jean McGuire, and John Nucci at the front of the School Committee Chambers. Footage of Don Muhammad (Roxbury community leader) saying that Wilson's contract should be renewed; that Wilson has begun to turn the school system around. Shots of audience members. Footage of Pedro Posado (Latino activist) saying that the School Committee needs to address the concerns of the Latino community. Shots of the School Committee members at the front of the chambers. George notes that the Committee members made their decision in an executive session; that the members of the School Committee ended up with a compromise. V: Footage of Thomas O'Reilly (President, Boston School Committee) standing at the front of the chambers with Wilson and Robert Cappucci (Boston School Committee). O'Reilly announces that the School Committee decided to offer Wilson a two-year contract. O'Reilly notes that the contract includes provisions relating to on-going performance relationships. Footage of Cappucci saying that the School Committee vote was seven-to-six; that there are six School Committee members who do not think Wilson should continue as superintendent. Cappucci says that the six members will do everything they can to see that Boston gets a new superintendent. Shots of School Committee members speaking to the press; of Gerald Anderson (Boston School Committee) speaking to the media. George reports that Wilson had wanted a three- or four-year contract. George notes that the first year of the contract is guaranteed; that the second year of the contract depends on good performance reviews. V: Footage of Wilson speaking to the media. Wilson says that he has served for six years in Boston; that six years is the longest tenure of any superintendent in the recent past. George reports that Wilson's contract is a two-year contract with constant performance reviews and no perquisites. George notes that Wilson will have another chance to prove himself; that he will not have a lot of room to maneuver.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/11/1989
Description: Deborah Wang reports that a delegation of forty residents from Yonkers, New York, visited Boston to learn about the city's approach to public housing. The delegation toured Boston's model housing projects, which contain a mix of low-, middle- and upper-income units. Wang reports that the city of Yonkers is divided over the issue of mixed-income public housing and affordable housing. She reviews the public housing situation in Yonkers. Wang's report includes footage of the city of Yonkers and footage of the Yonkers delegation discussing housing at a meeting with Amy Anthony (Secretary of Communities and Development for the City of Boston). Charles Cola (Yonkers City Council), Anthony DiPopallo and JoAnne Gardner (Yonkers resident) talk about public housing in Yonkers and in Boston. Boston Mayor Ray Flynn addressed the delegation about Boston's efforts to provide affordable housing for city residents. Members of the delegation, including Peter Chema and Mel Ellen, talk about their impressions of the visit.
1:00:08: Visual: Footage of Yonkers residents exiting a bus in a Boston neighborhood. Deborah Wang reports that a delegation of forty residents from Yonkers, NY, arrived in Boston to see how Boston has solved its public housing dilemma. V: Footage of Yonkers from "We the People." Shots of a school bus traveling on a street in Yonkers; of a residential street in Yonkers; of housing projects in Yonkers. Wang reports that the city of Yonkers has agreed to build 800 units of affordable housing in the city's predominantly white East End; that the city's affordable housing had all been built in the less affluent West End. Wang reports that the city of Yonkers is divided over the issue of affordable housing. V: Footage of Charles Cola (Yonkers City Council) saying that he wanted to see how public housing works in Boston; that he hopes to accomplish the same thing in Yonkers. Footage of Anthony DiPopallo (Yonkers resident) talking about the integration of public housing in Yonkers. Footage of JoAnne Gardner (Yonkers resident) saying that the city of Yonkers needs to need to build affordable housing according to the wishes of neighborhood residents. Gardner says that she does not want to be bused across town to live. Amy Anthony (Secretary of Communities and Development) responds to Gardner. Anthony says that the Yonkers residents need to look at what was done in Boston and then apply it to their own neighborhoods. Wang reports that delegation from Yonkers toured the city of Boston's model housing projects; that the housing projects contain a mix of low-income, middle-income and upper-income units. Wang reports that the city of Boston has been ordered to build 800 units of mixed-income housing; that the city of Boston has been building mixed-income housing for years. V: Shots of construction site; of the exterior of a housing development in Mission Hill. Wang reports that the city helped to build 165 units of mixed-income housing in Mission Hill; that half of the units will go to low- and moderate-income residents. V: Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) addressing the delegation from Yonkers. Flynn talks about one of the housing developments. Flynn talks about the efforts of the city and the community to turn a vacant lot into a housing development. Shots of the delegation from Yonkers as they tour a housing development. Wang reports that the politicians in the Yonkers delegation were impressed. V: Shot of Flynn speaking to members of the delegation. Footage of Peter Chema (Yonkers City Council) saying that it is helpful to see successful mixed-income housing developments. Chema says that the visit to Boston has allayed some of the fears of opponents of mixed-income units in Yonkers. Footage of Mel Ellen (Yonkers resident), DiPopallo and other members of the delegation standing near their bus. Ellen says that a Boston housing development would be a "slum" in East Yonkers. Footage of Ellen talking to a reporter. Ellen says that the government is using Yonkers to experiment with new forms of public housing; that the residents of Yonkers have no recourse if the "experiment" does not work. Footage of Anthony saying that the Boston tour has given the Yonkers delegation an idea of what is possible. Shot of a drawing of a drawing of an urban cityscape.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/23/1988