Description: Apartheid protesters gather in front of the South African Consulate at 100 Charles River Plaza in Boston, surrounded by press. Mel King (community activist), Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) and Willard Johnson (Head, TransAfrica) demand to see Richard Blankstein (honorary consul to South Africa). Police officers bar entry to the building. Johnson announces to the media that the protesters will ask for Blankstein's resignation from his post. He adds that they will ask Blankstein's law firm to sever ties with South Africa. Johnson and the others are eventually allowed to enter the building. Several takes of reporter standup. Police, protesters and the media wait outside of the building. Themba Vilakazi (member of African National Congress) is interviewed by the media, announcing the resignation of Blankstein, and noting that Blackstein doesn't want to talk to the media. Johnson, King and Yancey exit the building. Johnson reads a statement of resignation from Blankstein, which says he is not a supporter of apartheid. Johnson announces a victory for the protesters. Johnson, King and Yancey walk over to a group of protesters on the street. Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) leads the protesters in a chant. Johnson announces the resignation of Blankstein. The crowd cheers.
1:04:34: V: Johnson tells the media that the protestors have asked for the right to meet with Blankstein; that they would like to ask Blankstein to resign from his post as honorary consul. Johnson says that the protestors are acting in the best interest of the public. Johnson says that the protestors are willing to meet with Blankstein outside of the building. Johnson says that Blankenstein must resign publicly; that his law firm must sever ties with South Africa. Johnson says that the police officer has gone inside to ask Blankstein to meet with the protestors. Johnson says that the protestors' goal is to force the resignation of Blankstein; that the protestors will focus next on other corporations with ties to South Africa. 1:06:30: V: Four protestors, including Yancey and Johnson, are let into the building. They are accompanied by Themba Vilakazi (member, African National Congress). Police officers stand guard at the entrance to the building. Protestors and the media wait on the sidewalk outside of the entrance. Tug Yourgrau reports from the sidewalk in front of the entrance. The chants of protestors are audible. Yourgrau reports that Blankstein has been honorary counsel to South Africa in Boston for two years; that Blankstein has refused to be interviewed on camera. Yourgrau reports that the protestors have promised to picket Blankstein's offices again of Friday; that a candlelight vigil has been planned on Sunday at the Boston Public Library. Yourgrau does several takes of his comments for the news story. 1:09:13: V: Police officers are lined up in front of the entrance to the building. The sidewalk is crowded with members of the media, protestors and bystanders. 1:10:13: V: Vilakazi talks to the media. Vilakazi reports that Blankenstein has signed a letter of resignation, which he will hand to the protestors. Vilakazi reports that Blankenstein has said that the actions of the protestors influenced his decision to resign. Vilakazi notes that Blankenstein has said that he does not support apartheid. 1:11:20: V: The media and protestors peer curiously into the lobby of the building. Johnson exits the building, accompanied by King and Yancey. Johnson reads a statement of resignation from Blankstein. Blankstein's statement describes his post as honorary consul. The statement denies that Blankstein is a supporter of apartheid. The statement reads that Blankstein does not wish to be made an apologist for the South African government. Johnson shows the letter to the media. Johnson says that Blankenstein's resignation is a victory for the protestors. Johnson says that the protestors will target other corporations with ties to the South African government. 1:14:02: V: Johnson, King and Yancey walk away from the building. The three men walk toward a group of protestors on the street. A large group of protestors is picketing on the sidewalk. The protestors chant, "Blankstein, resign." Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) stands on the bed of a pick-up truck, leading the chant through a bullhorn. Johnson takes the bullhorn from the man and addresses the crowd. Stith starts to cheer. King and Yancey stand on the bed of the pick-up truck with Johnson. Johnson announces Blankstein's resignation and holds up the letter. Johnson reads a portion of the statement from Blankstein. The crowd cheers as Johnson reads the statement. Shots of the crowd of protestors. The crowd chants, "Freedom, yes. Apartheid, no."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/04/1984
Description: A group of apartheid protesters picket the South African Consulate at 100 Charles River Plaza in Boston. Police officers stand at the door to the consulate. Willard Johnson (Head of TransAfrica) speaks to the crowd of picketers through a bullhorn. Themba Vilakazi (member of the African National Congress) addresses the crowd, condemning the South African government and criticizing Ronald Reagan for engaging in a policy of "constructive engagement" with the South African government. City Councilor Charles Yancey addresses the crowd, praising Bishop Desmond Tutu and urging the protesters to engage in acts of civil disobedience to protest apartheid. Community activist Mel King addresses the crowd, calling for the resignation of Richard Blankstein (honorary consul to South Africa). King criticizes the Reagan administration's policies in South Africa and talks about the need for large companies to divest from South Africa. Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) stands beside the speakers. Johnson expresses his support for Nelson Mandela and all those fighting apartheid in South Africa.
1:00:00: Visual: The WGBH camera crew sets up its equipment. A diverse group of anti-apartheid protestors picket the South African Consulate at 100 Charles River Plaza. More than 100 protestors carry signs and chant, "1, 2, 3, 4, let's close the consulate door." Shot of a white protest leader leading the chant with a bullhorn. 1:02:48: V: A police officer stands in front of the entrance to the building. He carries a two-way radio. Another officer stands with him. 1:03:20: V: The protestors continue to picket, chanting "Hey, hey, ho, ho, this consulate has got to go." Willard Johnson (head of TransAfrica) speaks to the crowd of picketers through a bullhorn. He urges them to keep the picket line moving. 1:04:19: V: Themba Vilakazi (member, African National Congress) speaks to the crowd about the struggle of black South Africans. Vilakazi criticizes the policies of the ruling government in South Africa. He says that the South African government in engaged in a brutal repression of the residents of black townships. Vilakazi says that the African National Congress (ANC) welcomes worldwide condemnation of the white regime. Vilakazi criticizes the policy of Ronald Reagan (US President) toward South Africa. Vilakazi condemns the Reagan administration's policy of "constructive engagement" with the ruling government. Vilakazi praises the actions of three US political leaders who encouraged an anti-apartheid sit-in at the South African embassy in Washington DC. Vilakazi encourages anti-apartheid protestors across the world. Shots of the picketers. Vilakazi talks about the ANC struggle for freedom in South Africa. Vilakazi closes his speech by saying, "We will win." The protestors chant, "We will win." 1:07:10: V: Johnson introduces Charles Yancey (Boston City Council). Johnson says that Yancey introduced legislation in the City Council for the divestment of city funds from South Africa. Yancey talks about his "unceasing opposition" to the policies of apartheid. Yancey criticizes the repression of blacks in South Africa. Other protest leaders help Yancey to adjust the bullhorn. Yancey says that the international community cannot tolerate the apartheid policies of the South African government. Yancey talks about the previous day's visit to Boston by Bishop Desmond Tutu (South African anti-apartheid leader). Yancey notes that Tutu has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Yancey calls on all people to join the protest against apartheid. Yancey criticizes the federal government's policy toward South Africa. Yancey talks about the importance of acts of civil disobedience in opposing apartheid in South Africa. The crowd applauds. 1:10:15: V: The crowd applauds as Mel King (political activist) takes the bullhorn. King thanks the protestors for coming out to protest. Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) stands next to King. King challenges Richard Blankstein (honorary consul to South Africa) to come down from the consulate and speak to the protestors. King challenges Blankstein to resign in protest of the South African government's apartheid policies. King accuses the Reagan administration of engaging in racist policies in South Africa. King says that protestors will picket multi-national corporations who do business in South Africa; that large corporations need to divest from South Africa. King accuses these corporations of supporting apartheid. King talks about a South African trade union leader who has been jailed by the South African government. King says that the trade union leader has encouraged US protestors to push for corporate divestiture from South Africa. King calls for an end to Reagan's policies and an end to apartheid. 1:14:16: V: Johnson puts on a hat with a sign pinned to it. The sign reads, "For shame." Johnson addresses the crowd. Johnson quotes Nelson Mandela (ANC leader) as saying that he is prepared to die for a free South Africa. Johnson expresses support for Mandela and the black South Africans who are fighting apartheid.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/04/1984
Description: Thomas Saltonstall (Area Director, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) speaks at a press conference to mark the opening of a Boston office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Saltonstall introduces Robert Williams (regional attorney for the EEOC). Saltonstall discusses the EEOC's commitment to the elimination of race discrimination in employment and to equal opportunities for women, older workers and minorities; he announces the initiatives planned by the EEOC to enforce federal anti-discrimination laws. Saltonstall says that the EEOC will focus on voluntary compliance. Saltonstall discusses statistics illustrating the underrepresentation, or "opportunity gap," in the employment of women in management and of minorities in the city's overall work force. Saltonstall presents statistics illustrating the "opportunity gap" for minorities in the printing/publishing industry, the communications industry, investment companies, brokerage firms, and retail stores. Saltonstall talks about the concentration of Boston's minority workers in lower-paying jobs. Tape 1 of 2
1:00:05: Visual: A federal official from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the US Department of Labor stands at a podium speaking to the media at a press conference on the opening of a Boston office of the EEOC. The official commends Thomas Saltonstall (Regional Director, EEOC) and the General Services Administration (GSA) for the design and effective use of space in the new EEOC office. Shot of the EEOC seal on the front of the podium. The official says that the EEOC is committed to equal treatment and access for all citizens; that minorities and women must be given an equal opportunity to advance themselves in the workplace. The official talks about the need for society to renew its commitment to civil rights. The official thanks the audience. Shot of audience members. 1:05:16: V: Saltonstall introduces Robert Williams (regional attorney for the EEOC). Saltonstall talks about the need to redress the employment opportunity gaps which exist for minorities in Boston. Saltonstall says that he will focus on race discrimination in employment; that the EEOC is also committed to equal opportunities for women, older workers and other minorities. Saltonstall announces the initiatives which will be taken by the EEOC to enforce federal anti-discrimination laws. Saltonstall says that the EEOC will promote a program of voluntary compliance with the statutes; that the EEOC will expand its services to the public; that the EEOC will focus on eliminating broad patterns and practices of employment discrimination; that the EEOC will focus on improving the quality and impact of the lawsuits filed. Saltonstall notes that he does not want to preach or embarass anyone. 1:08:23: V: Saltonstall defines the term "opportunity gap." Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the opportunity gap existing in 1980 for women as officials and managers in the Boston area. Saltonstall says that Boston rates among the lowest of six cities in a survey measuring the percentage of women in managerial positions. Saltonstall notes that minorities make up 29% of the labor force in the city of Boston; that minorities make up only 8% of the work force in the metropolitan area; that this disparity is greater in Boston than in any other major city. Saltonstall explains that the metropolitan figure of 8% has been used to calculate opportunity gaps; that the metropolitan figure is low when applied to businesses in the city. Saltonstall defines minorities. Saltonstall explains how the statistics were compiled. 1:13:58: V: Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the opportunity gap for minorities in the business of security/commodity brokerage. Saltonstall explains that individual companies will have performances which are better or worse than the average. Saltonstall notes that an unnamed private company in the Boston area has been targeted for enforcement action by the EEOC; that the unnamed company employs between 500 and 1000 employees; that all of the employees are white and only 3 employees are women. 1:15:28: Visual: Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the underrepresentation in the printing/publishing industry. Saltonstall notes that minorities are underrepresented as office workers and sales workers. Close-up shot of chart indicating statistical representation of minorities in jobs in the printing/publishing industry. Saltonstall says that many employers have claimed that they cannot find qualified minority employees to hire. Saltonstall says that there is not a shortage of qualified minority employees for low-paying clerical and sales positions. Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap widened for minority workers in the communications industry and other industries between 1970 and 1982. Close-up shot of the chart illustrating statistical representation of minority workers in the communications industry. Saltonstall notes that minorities are underrepresented in all white collar job categories in the communications industry except for office/clerical jobs. Saltonstall adds that many major companies in the communications industry failed to report statistics to the EEOC; that private employers are required by law to report statistics to the EEOC. 1:17:13: Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap widened for minority workers in food stores between 1970 and 1982. Saltonstall says that the statistics are "appalling"; that minority workers are underrepresented in all positions except as laborors and sales workers. Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating representation of minority workers in investment companies. Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap for minorities in investment companies widened between 1970 and 1982; that hiring for managerial positions tripled, while the number of minority workers in those positions decreased. Saltonstall notes that minority workers are underrepresented in all white collar jobs except for clerical positions; that all of the laborors working for investment companies are white; that all of the companies represented by the statistics are located within the city of Boston. Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating minority worker representation in general merchandise stores. Saltonstall says that the retail industry should be hiring more minority workers because a significant share of their income comes from minority shoppers. Saltonstall notes that the opportunity gap for minority workers in general merchandise stores widened between 1970 and 1982; that the minority participation rate in the industry has declined since 1970. Saltonstall talks about the concentration of minorities in lower-paying jobs.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/19/1984
Description: The Commerce and Labor Committee of the Massachusetts State Legislature holds a hearing on proposed legislation barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Royal Bolling Sr. (State Senator) testifies in favor of the legislation. Bolling says that legislators must guarantee protection and equal rights for all citizens. Suzanne Bumps (State Representative) testifies in favor of legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps defines sexual harassment and talks about the its effect on women in the workplace. John Olver (State Senator) and Thomas Vallely (State Representative) testify in favor of the legislation. Vallely says that legislators must fight one of the last remaining civil rights battles by banning discrimination on the grounds of sexual preference. Vallely talks about a proposed amendment barring religious organizations from some aspects of civil rights law; he says that such an amendment is unnecessary. Peter Morin (State Representative) asks Vallely a question about language used in the legislation. Vallely talks about other exceptions granted under the proposed legislation. John Businger (State Representative) testifies in favor of the legislation. Businger talks about the need to make citizens aware of their civil rights by posting anti-discrimination policy and legislation. George Bachrach (State Senator) testifies in favor of the legislation.
1:00:00: Visual: The Commerce and Labor Committee of the Massachusetts State Legislature sits at the front of a room. The committee prepares to hear testimony on proposed legislation barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. The room is crowded with audience members and members of the press. Audience members stand and seat themselves on the floor. The committee chairman invites Royal Bolling Sr. (State Senator) to testify. 1:00:28: V: Bolling thanks the committee members. Bolling notes that the Senate could not vote on this legislation during the previous year; that the vote was held up until the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled on the constitutionality of the legislation. Bolling talks about discrimination against gays and lesbians. Bolling says that opponents of legislation barring discrimnation on the grounds of sexual orientation have ignored ugly incidents involving discrimination against gays and lesbians. Bolling makes reference to a television show which depicted the absurdity of society's prejudices against gays and lesbians. Bolling notes that gay and lesbians make up 10% of the population. Bolling says that many citizens will be positively affected by the passage of legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Bolling says that gays and lesbians will be denied equal protection under the law unless this legislation is passed; that there cannot be exceptions to the government's guarantee of equal access to all citizens. Bolling says that the legislators must guarantee protection for all citizens, even if legislators disagree with those citizens' way of life. Bolling says that Massachusetts must be a safe haven from discrimination. Bolling says that this legislation reaffirms the dignity and integrity of our democracy; that legislators must be willing to take risks to assure civil rights for all citizens. Bolling says that legislators must speak out against discrimination in all forms. Bolling reaffirms the right of citizens to live free from fear. Bolling says that he hopes the law will be passed this year. 1:11:11: V: The committee chairman thanks Bolling and calls the next speaker. Suzanne Bump (State Representative from Braintree) speaks on behalf of the Massachusetts Caucus of Women Legislators. She notes that the caucus strongly supports legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps defines sexual harassment and talks about the ill effects of sexual harassment on students and female employees. Bump adds that surveys show that 75% to 95% of women have been harassed at some point in their working lives. Bumps says that sexual harassment is a form of sexual discrimination; that sexual harassment is degrading and humiliating to women. Bumps notes that women who quit their jobs because of sexual harassment are unable to collect unemployment benefits. Bumps says that grievance procedures for victims of sexual harassment are non-existant; that victims who complain about sexual harassment often receive little support. Bumps says that sexual harassment is often perpetrated by men in positions of power who go unpunished; that the perpetrators are often the bosses or professors of these women. Bumps notes that federal courts have upheld the use of Title VII of the civil rights act in some sexual harassment cases; that Title VII bars discrimination in the work place; that there are limits to the application of Title VII in sexual harassment cases. Bumps talks about the importance of the current legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps notes that the legislation defines sexual harassment, puts cases of sexual harassment under the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination and establishes a uniform grievance procedure for cases of sexual harassment within state government. Bumps notes that the legislation allows for the prompt resolution of complaints. She urges legislators to support the bill. 1:15:05: V: The committee chairman thanks Bumps and calls the next speaker. John Olver (State Senator) says that he is testifying as a Democratic state senator and on behalf of the Massachusetts State Democratic Party. Olver urges the Massachusetts state legislature to ban discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Olver says that discrimination against gays and lesbians must be ended in housing, employment, public accomodation, and in the consumer marketplace. Olver thanks the Congressional committee. 1:17:06: V: Tom Vallely (State Representative) speaks to the committee about his support for legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Vallely notes that he has been one of the principal sponsors of this legislation in the Massasachusetts House of Representatives. Vallely reviews the history of the legislation. Vallely notes that the legislation allows for the protection of gays and lesbians under the state civil rights law. Vallely says that legislators are not condoning homosexuality by offering protection for gays and lesbians under the civil rights law; that legislators need to allow citizens a form of redress against widespread discrimination. Vallely notes that this legislation has been debated by the legislature for more than a decade. Vallely says that the debate about the "gay lifestyle" is inappropriate; that the lifestyles of gays and lesbians is the same as the lifestyle of straight people. Vallely says that gays and lesbians are looking for equal protection, not "special treatment." Vallely refers to the controversy about Mark Twain's book, Huckleberry Finn. Vallely says that the book is a moving exploration of discrimination in American society; that the book is not racist. Vallely says that discrimination on the grounds of race or sexual preference is not acceptable in our society; that discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation is one of the "last civil rights battles" to be fought. Vallely says that opponents to the legislation will try to add an amendment exempting religious organizations from some aspects of the civil rights law. Vallely says that this amendment is unnecessary because the separation of church and state already exists. Vallely says that religious groups do not need to be exempted from legislation about the ERA (Equal Rights Amendement) or from legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Vallely offers to speak to the members of the committee individually about why special legislation exempting religious groups from the civil rights law would be a "grave error." Vallely says that the legislation is important and worth the fight to get it passed. 1:25:44: V: Peter Morin (State Representative) asks a question about the language used in the legislation. Morin points out that there is an exemption to the discrimination law in the case of "bona fide occupational qualifications." Vallely says that the exemption grants authority to the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD) to consider the qualifications necessary for a certain occupation before deciding a discrimination case. Vallely says that it is important to give the MCAD some leeway in its decisions; that he cannot name a list of these "occupational qualifications." Vallely thanks the Congressional committee. 1:28:11: V: John Businger (State Representative from Brookline) notes that he has co-sponsored legislation in the Massachusetts House of Representatives barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Businger says that government has a role in protecting its citizens from discrimination and harassment. Businger says that sexual harassment and discrimination against gays and lesbians are "unreasonable" and "arbitrary" forms of harassment. Businger talks about the need to make citizens aware of this legislation; that he has sponsored a bill to increase the posting requirements for anti-discrimination legislation; that the people affected by the legislation must be well informed in order to take advantage of it. Businger says that anti-discrimination policy and legislation must be posted on applications for credit, for employment, for services and for membership in organizations. Businger urges the legislators to pass this bill so that people can be made aware of their civil rights. Businger urges the legislators to pass the bills barring sexual harassment and discrimination of the basis of sexual orientation. 1:31:29: V: George Bachrach (State Senator) makes a lighthearted joke. The members of the panel laugh. Bachrach says that he is testifying in support of the Senate bill which bars discrimination against gays and lesbians in housing, employment, and credit. Bachrach says that he is sorry that this legislation has not already been passed into law.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/28/1985
Description: W. Arthur Garrity (federal judge) speaks at a meeting of the Citywide Educational Coalition (CWEC). Jane Margulis (CWEC) introduces Garrity. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), Sidney Smith (Headmaster, English High School), and Ellen Guiney (CWEC) sit on stage. Garrity talks about his efforts to wrap up the school desegregation case. He says that there are a few lingering matters to be handled before he withdraws. Garrity thanks the CWEC for providing factual and reliable information about school desegregation. Garrity talks about a "sea of misinformation" surrounding school desegregation. He refutes rumors that he was involved in hiring teachers and buying supplies. Garrity compliments John Coakley (Boston School Department) on his career in the Boston School Department; he mentions Coakley's integrity and dedication to his job. Garrity sums up the challenges facing the Boston Public Schools; he says that school integration is an ongoing process. Reel 1
0:59:59: Visual: Arthur Garrity (federal judge) speaks at English High School at the annual meeting of the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC). Garrity is at the end of his involvement in the Boston school desegregation case. Jane Margulis (CWEC) introduces Garrity. Garrity sits on stage, with a group of officials including Laval Wilson (Superintendent of Boston Public Schools), Sidney Smith (Headmaster, English High School), and Ellen Guiney (CWEC). Margulis tells a few anecdotes as she introduces Garrity. Garrity shakes her hand and kisses her on the cheek as he approaches the podium. 1:02:17: V: Garrity thanks Margulis. Garrity tells a story about how he and Margulis spoke at a seminar about school desegregation in Virginia. Garrity says that members of the audience were so impressed with Margulis that she received a job offer on the spot from a school system in Texas. Garrity says that he has not come to talk about the final court orders that he handed down on September 3. Garrity reads from the canon of judicial conduct, which instructs a judge not to comment publicly on court proceedings. Garrity reminds the audience that the court case is not entirely over; that the Boston Teacher's Union has filed an appeal of the court orders issued on September 3. Garrity says that he has extended the time period in which other appeals may be filed. Garrity adds that there is another court hearing on Friday to discuss support services for the Boston Latin School. Garrity talks about a motion filed by the city of Boston to modify one of the court orders dealing with emergency school repairs. 1:07:57: V: Garrity says that he has come to thank the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC). Garrity commends the CWEC for gathering and disseminating factual information since the beginning of desegregation. Garrity says that there was "a sea of misinformation" during that time period. Garrity cites an article from The New York Times written on September 6. The article says that Garrity was involved in hiring teachers and buying supplies. Garrity says that it is "laughable" to think that he was involved in those areas of the school system. Garrity notes that he was only involved in the hiring of one person; that he helped to hire Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School). Garrity says that he wanted to acknowledge the debt owed to the CWEC by the court. Garrity adds that he wanted to meet Laval Wilson; that Wilson has a good reputation as a school administrator. Garrity says that he wanted to be present to honor John Coakley (Boston School Department). Garrity says that the Boston school desegregation case "is nothing else if not a hundred stories." Garrity talks about referring to one of the school desegregation plans filed in court as "the Coakley plan," because it was written by Coakley. He adds that a friend counseled him to stop calling it the "Coakley plan" so as not to ruin Coakley's future in the Boston School Department. Garrity says that he had recently written a a memo connected to one of the court orders, in which he commended Coakley's conscientious job performance. Garrity talks about Coakley's integrity and dedication to his job. Garrity says that there never would have been a student assignment system without Coakley. 1:12:56: V: Garrity says that school desegregation is an ongoing process. Garrity talks about the many tasks facing the Boston Public School System. Garrity talks about differences between the city of Boston and the state over the budget for facilities and school repair. Garrity talks about the need to determine which schools will get money to improve facilities. Garrity talks about the question of the Latin Schools. Garrity notes that the Boston Globe recently printed a letter from Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) on the subject of the Latin Schools. Garrity denies charges printed in the newspapers that he vetoed a plan to improve the Latin Schools. Garrity adds that no plan has been filed to improve the Latin Schools. Garrity says that critics have misread the court orders; that planning must be undertaken for the Latin Schools. Garrity talks about the challenges involved in plans to improve vocational and occupational education. Garrity notes that the Boston School Committee faces some deadlines in its plans to improve vocational education. Garrity stresses that there is much work remaining to be done in the schools; that "the challenges of the future are greater than the challenges of the past." Garrity commends Rita Walsh-Tomasini (Boston School Committee) for advocating the formation of a committee to work with parents' organizations in the schools.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/23/1985
Description: Digital Corporation sponsors a demonstration of the evolution of voice technology at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. A moderator and a group of speakers answer questions from the audience about voice technology and computing technology. The speakers and audience discuss the importance of access to this technology by the blind and disabled. The moderator introduces musician Stevie Wonder. A short clip of Saturday Night Live is played, featuring Stevie Wonder as a news reporter. Wonder speaks to the audience about the opportunities provided to him through technology. He explains the transition from acoustic technology to a more visual technology in terms of music. Wonder discusses his experiences with technology and explains how he works with a Kurzweil reading machine, a DECtalk computer and a synthesizer to compose music. He explains how technology helps further opportunity. Wonder thanks the creators of this technology. Tape 1 of 2
0:59:59: Visual: A man stands at a podium, talking about the evolution of voice technology at a demonstration of the Kurzweil voice recognition machine at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. The man talks about the applications of voice technology in computer-assisted instruction. He talks about speech synthesis and speech recognition as two components of computer-assisted instruction devices. The man says that computer-assisted instruction devices can help young children learn. 1:01:36: V: The audience applauds. The moderator invites the audience to ask questions of the speakers. The speakers are gathered beside the podium, in front of a large banner for the Digital Corporation. The moderator talks about Digital's commitment to promoting and furthering technology in the interests of the company and the greater community. An audience member asks about the sales of the voice recognition machine. The moderator says that the product is successful; that sales figures are not the focus of this conference. 1:03:26: V: The man who spoke answers a question at the podium. The man talks about silicon technology. He says that the price of silicon chips will continue to decline. He says that his company has an active research and development team; that they are working hard to incorporate the latest technology into their products. The man predicts that the future will bring more powerful devices at lower costs; that companies in the field would like to provide computing devices which are affordable for individuals. Another man says that blind people can benefit from voice recognition machines which are available at their workplaces or through community organizations. He notes that blind people can access the machines in these ways, even if they cannot afford to buy one. The first man quotes a statistic indicating that two-thirds of all blind college students have access to a Kurzweil reading machine through their college campuses. The man notes that the Xerox Corporation donated reading machines to many college campuses. A third man approaches the podium. He says that many corporations are interested in donating machines to appropriate organizations; that corporations want to provide access to the machines. 1:05:33: V: The moderator tells the audience that there will be a question and answer period after the presentation of Stevie Wonder (pop singer). A fourth man talks about Wonder's Kurzweil music synthesizer. The man talks about Wonder's involvement with technology. The man talks about Wonder's accomplishments and his efforts to establish a holiday in honor of Martin Luther King (African American civil rights leader). The man talks about recent awards given to Wonder. 1:07:00: V: The audience applauds as Wonder enters the room. A man guides Wonder to the podium. Wonder introduces a video presentation, which begins to play. The video presentation shows Wonder doing a parody of a music critic on Saturday Night Live (late night TV show). 1:09:09: V: Wonder talks about the opportunities provided to him through technology. Wonder talks about the contributions made to the technology which allows him to communicate more fully. Wonder says that technology is his "little sister, big brother, mother and father. I get inspired by it." He talks about learning and developing along with technology. Wonder says that he was first introduced to technology through learning the Braille language; that the Braille language provided him with a fundamental understanding of technology; that he applies that lesson to the machines he encounters today. Wonder says that technology has become more visual; that blind people need to be able to read or hear visual displays on machines. Wonder thanks the technological community for allowing him to access to technology through voice recognition. Wonder says that he used a Teleprompter for the blind during his appearance on Saturday Night Live. Wonder talks about his portable Braille machine, which allows him to access information on a cassette tape. Wonder talks about the pleasure of reading a book through the Kurzweil reading machine. Wonder talks about the DECtalk machine. Wonder says that the DECtalk machine can read Braille input in English. Wonder talks about the usefulness of the DECtalk machine. Wonder says that he will show the audience how the DECtalk machine can read the visual output of a Kurzweil machine, which allows him to use synthesizers without relying on visuals. Wonder says that he is frustrated that these machines are not more accessible to the blind. Wonder says that this technology must be made available to the handicapped and non-handicapped alike; that demand for the product will lead to greater access. Wonder urges the technology community to apply its skill to create greater access for all people. Wonder thanks the creators of the technology and the audience. The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/29/1985
Description: Stevie Wonder demonstrates a Kurweil Reading Machine with text-to-speech capability, which enables blind people to read printed text. He uses the machine to help him read instructions for his synthesizer, so he can compose a song. He jokes around with the audience. He sings part of "I Just Called to Say I Love You." A Boston politician presents Wonder with a commemorative award of his visit to Boston. Wonder addresses the crowd and talks about how the Reading Machine is making a more "harmonious world." Several takes of reporter stand up. A man demonstrates a computer with a touchscreen and Deck Talk features.
1:00:00: Visual: An audience from the technology industry is gathered in the ballroom of the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. Stevie Wonder (pop singer) is at the front of the room, preparing to demonstrate the Kurzweil reading machine and DECtalk machine, which allow him to fully operate a synthesizer. Wonder stands before the keyboard. Wonder explains that the computer keyboard interfaces with the synthesizer; that he cannot operate the machine because he cannot see the controls. Wonder pushes a knob and a computerized voice says what the button does. Wonder begins to program the keyboard. Wonder program the keyboard to play like a piano. Wonder programs the synthesizer to lay down a drumbeat. Wonder stops the drumbeat. Wonder plays and records the tune to the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." The audience applauds when he finishes. 1:05:57: V: Wonder says that the synthesizer allows him to create the sound of a band. He jokes that he cannot afford a band of his own. Wonder programs the synthesizer to sound like drums. Wonder plays the drum track over the recorded tune to the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." Shots of the audience. The audience applauds when he finishes. Wonder programs the synthesizer to play bass and strings. Wonder has to try a few times before successfully programming the machine. Wonder adds a track with strings to the other tracks of the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." 1:13:48: V: The audience applauds. Wonder sings along to the recorded tracks of the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." He adds a line to the song, singing "What it is, is something true, that technology like this makes it possible for me to do." The audience sings and claps along with Wonder. Wonder sings a line, thanking DEC (Digital Equipment Corporation) and Raymond Kurzweiler (inventor of the reading machine). The audience gives Wonder a standing ovation. Wonder is guided to the podium. 1:17:16: V: Shots of the audience. A speaker presents Wonder with a silver Revere Bowl from Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) commemorating his visit to Boston. The audience applauds. 1:18:15: V: Shot of Wonder from the back of the room. Wonder stands at the podium. He talks about how technology makes communication easier. Shots of audience applauding. Meg Vaillancourt stands at the back of the room. Vaillancourt reports on Wonder's demonstration of new technology. 1:20:08: V: Shots of a computer on display at a vendor's table. Vaillancourt interviews the computer vendor. The computer vendor demonstrates the touch-sensitive screen on his computer. A computerized voice identifies which icon has been pushed. The computer vendor explains that the screen can show either text icons or picture icons. The computer vendor talks about the different voice options on the computer. The computer vendor programs the computer voices to repeat stock phrases for the camera.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/29/1985
Description: Laval Wilson (candidate for Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) prepares for his interview with the Boston School Committee. He arranges several large posterboards around and in front of a table in the School Committee chambers. Eileen Jones interviews Wilson about his upcoming interview with the School Committee. Wilson says that he will try to show the School Committee that he is the best candidate for the job. He adds that posters and visual aids help him to communicate. Wilson says that he hopes to have the support of a broad spectrum of community groups and not just the African American community. Wilson declines to identify himself as "conservative." Wilson begins his interview with the School Committee. Wilson talks about his previous experience and his thorough understanding of school desegregation issues and school curricula. Wilson answers questions about remedial education. A member of the School Committee asks Wilson why two African American members of the School Committee do not support his candidacy. Wilson says that he is not familiar with the politics of individual committee members; he adds that he is an educator who happens to be black. Wilson says that he would like to be superintendent for all students and members of the community. Wilson notes that educational programs are more important than ethnicity. Jones reports on the interview and the School Committee's process in selecting a new superintendent.
1:00:00: Visual: Dr. Laval Wilson (candidate for Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) prepares for his interview with the Boston School Committee for the post of superintendent. He arranges several large posterboards around and in front of a table in the School Committee chambers. The boards display papers, advertisements and articles representing his achievements. Members of the press are gathered in front of the table. Several members of the press take photographs. Eileen Jones (WGBH reporter) comments that Wilson does not look nervous. Wilson says that he is a professional; that he has confidence in his abilities; that he hopes to convince the Boston School Committee to hire him. Crowd noise muffles the audio. Jones asks Wilson about his chances of being hired. Wilson says that he is one of three candidates; that he does not know how the School Committee will respond to his candidacy; that he plans to demonstrate his abilities and to answer the School Committee's questions. Wilson mentions that he will use visual aids in his presentation to the School Committee; that the visual aids document his career; that he plans to discuss ideas. Jones comments that the visual aids seem "showy." Wilson says that visual aids help him to learn and communicate better; that the visual aids document his abilities in several areas including planning, budget development, and partnerships. Jones asks how Wilson feels about African Americans in Boston coming out to support his candidacy. Wilson says that he does not know anything about it; that he is concentrating on his interview with the School Committee; that he hopes the entire community will support his candidacy. Wilson says that he is delighted to have support from the African American community; that he hopes to have support of the entire school system and a broad spectrum of community groups. Jones asks Wilson about his reputation as a tough administrator. Wilson says that descriptions are subjective; that he considers himself a "professional educator." Jones asks Wilson if he considers himself "conservative." Wilson says that he considers himself as a school superintendent, not as a liberal or a conservative. 1:06:10: V: Wilson sits down at the table, which faces the members of the Committee. John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) warns the audience to be silent during the interview and presentation, so as not to distract Wilson. Nucci asks Wilson why he would like to be Superintendent of Boston Public Schools. Wilson arranges the microphones on the table. Wilson describes his previous experiences including his positions as a superintendent in Rochester NY, Berkeley CA, and on Long Island. Wilson says that he has a thorough understanding of school desegregation policies and school curricula. He describes his experiences in working with government agencies and lobbying for school funding. Wilson describes his planning abilities and his commitment to working with parent groups. Shot of the members of the school committee. Kevin McCluskey (Boston School Committee) asks Wilson a question about remedial education. Shot of Wilson. Wilson talks about his experience in and views on remedial education programs. Shots of African American audience members. Wilson talks about the possibility of extending the school day. Committee members ask Wilson questions about a specific remedial education program. Wilson talks about the need to close the gap between low-achievement scores and high-achievement scores. Shots of the audience; of individual audience members. 1:13:03: V: Wilson says that he is not the type of person to brag about his achievements; that he must highlight his achievements in order to be considered for this post; that he considers himself to be one of the most qualified superintendents in the nation. Wilson notes that he was selected as one of the top 100 executive educators in the nation; that he has a strong reputation across the nation. A member of the Committee asks Wilson why African American School Committee members John O'Bryant and Jean McGuire do not support his candidacy. The member says, "What do they know about you that we don't know about you?" Wilson says that he does not know why O'Bryant and McGuire do not support him; that a superintendent needs to make decisions for students of all races; that he is a school educator who happens to be black. Wilson says that he has not read the newspapers; that he is not familiar with the politics of individual Committee members. The same committee member asks Wilson what it means to be an educator "who also happens to be black." The committee member asks Wilson if he will deal with minority students who are not getting an education, or if he will "keep playing a game." Wilson says that the superintendent needs to implement the best educational programs for the school population. Wilson says that he would not like his statements as superintendent to be seen as "the black statement"; that he would not be the superintendent for any particular group; that he would be the superintendent for the whole community. Wilson says that the superintendent cannot afford to be associated with one particular ethnic group; that the superintendent has to work together with all staff, students, parents, and community groups. Wilson says that it is important to consider issues, not skin color. Wilson says that ethnicity can be an issue; that every ethnic group has its own specific concerns; that educational programs are more important than ethnicity. 1:18:55: V: Jones reports that the interviews with candidates are not the end of the selection process; that School Committee members will make site visits to the school districts of each candidate. Jones notes that the School Committee will elect a new superintendent on July 31. Jones does two takes of her closing to the news story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/19/1985
Description: Dr. Laval Wilson and members of the Boston School Committee assemble themselves at a press conference in Wilson's office. The media sets up a shot of Wilson and Nucci signing copies of Wilson's contract. Wilson and Nucci shake hands. Wilson shakes hands with each member of the School Committee. Wilson takes questions from reporters. Wilson talks about his enthusiasm for his new post. He says that his biggest challenge will be to familiarize himself with the issues and problems within the school system. A reporter asks Wilson about the politics of the school system. Wilson says that politics are always involved in public education. Wilson says that he and his family are making themselves at home in the city. Wilson answers reporters' questions about Arthur Garrity (federal judge) and his supervisory role over the Boston Public Schools. Wilson says that the city of Boston owes Garrity a debt of gratitude for his wisdom and leadership in the school desegregation case. Wilson talks about his meeting with Garrity in the courtroom. Wilson says that he is committed to integrated schools. Wilson adds that today's hearing in Garrity's courtroom was the last. He says that Garrity will soon turn over stewardship of the schools to Wilson and the School Committee. Meg Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Grady. Grady talks about the importance of Garrity's final hearings. He says that today is a "historic" day. Grady is optimistic about Wilson's selection as superintendent. Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Nucci. Nucci talks about the significance of Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. He says that the School Committee is ready to take on the responsibility of running the schools. Nucci adds that the School Committee is looking forward to working with Wilson as superintendent.
1:00:01: V: Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) walks over to a desk and lays out two copies of his contract. Microphones are set up on the desk. Shot of papers laid out on the desk. Wilson confers with Boston School Committee members John Nucci, Rita Walsh-Tomasini, John Grady, and Joe Casper. The School Committee members stand to the side of the desk. Wilson examines the papers with Nucci and Walsh-Tomasini. Boston School Committee members Abigail Browne and Jean McGuire walk behind the group with Wilson. Close-up shots of Wilson, Nucci and Walsh-Tomasini. Casper stands on the opposite side of the desk from the group with Wilson. The media sets up a shot of Wilson sitting at the desk with the members of the School Committee, including Kevin McCluskey, standing around him. Wilson takes his suitcoat off and settles into the desk. Wilson and Nucci each sign both copies of the contract. Wilson shakes hands with Nucci and each of the School Committee members. 1:03:12: V: Wilson sits down and takes questions from reporters. The School Committee members remain standing around his desk. A reporter asks Wilson if he has any second thoughts about coming to Boston. Wilson says that he is delighted to be in Boston; that he wishes he could have had more time to prepare for the coming school year. Wilson says that he will work with school staff to get to know the school system; that he will do his best to work with the School Committee and the mayor to benefit the schools. A reporter asks Wilson to name the biggest problem he faces. Wilson says that his biggest problem will be to get to know the system. Wilson says that he must understand the issues and the problems before he can address them. A reporter asks Wilson about the politics involved in the Boston Public School System. Wilson says that politics come with the territory of public education. Shot of the members of the media recording the event. A reporter asks Wilson about the insights given to him by the transition team. Wilson says that he has not yet received a briefing from the transition team. Shot of Grady. Wilson says that he is happy to be in Boston; that his three children will be attending Boston Public Schools; that he is in the process of looking for a home in the city. Wilson again shakes hands with Nucci and the members of the School Committee. 1:07:20: V: Wilson is interviewed by the media. Wilson talks about a conversation he had with Arthur Garrity (federal judge). Wilson says that Garrity told him that the problems in the school system may be exaggerated by the media. Wilson notes that the city of Boston owes Garrity a debt of gratitude for his wisdom and leadership in the school desegregation case. Wilson says that Garrity will soon turn over supervision of the school system to Wilson and the School Committee. A reporter asks Wilson about the challenges he will face in improving the schools. Wilson says that the community must commit itself to integrated schools; that all children must have equal access to the schools. A reporter asks Wilson how he felt while meeting with Garrity. Wilson says that the meeting was, in fact, "historic." Wilson adds that he appreciated the opportunity to talk to Garrity in the courtroom. A reporter asks how Garrity responded to Wilson's requests to meet with him privately. Wilson says that Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) told him that Garrity had decided not to meet privately with any of the superintendents of the Boston Public Schools; that Dentler told Wilson not to feel slighted if Garrity does not meet with him. Wilson adds that he had a productive conversation with Dentler. A reporter asks Wilson if today's hearing was the last in the Boston school desegregation case (Morgan v. Hennigan). Wilson says that Garrity indicated that today's hearing was the last. Wilson says that he will do his best to provide equal access to integrated schools; that another hearing can be avoided if the schools remain integrated. 1:10:45: V: Meg Vaillancourt sets up a meeting with Grady. Vaillancourt asks him if today's hearing was the final hearing. Grady says that Garrity indicated that today's hearing was the last one. Grady notes that it is a "historic" day for the Boston Public School System; that the Boston School Committee and the Boston School Department have worked hard to arrive at this day. Vaillancourt asks Grady about the challenges facing Wilson and the School Committee. Grady says that Wilson will need to move ahead in the same direction; that the schools have "turned the corner." Grady says that there is "an air of optimism" throughout the school system; that Wilson will be a capable superintendent. Vaillancourt thanks Grady. 1:11:57: V: Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Nucci. Vaillancourt asks Nucci about the withdrawal of Garrity. She notes that Garrity told the Boston School Committee to pay heed to the parents and teachers. Nucci says that the School Committee recognizes the contributions of parents and teachers over the past ten years. Nucci says that he is optimistic; that Garrity is confident in the School Committee's commitment to integrated schools; that Garrity is optimistic about the selection of Wilson as superintendent. Nucci says that it is time to close "a chapter in Boston's history." Vaillancourt notes that Dr. Robert Spillane (former Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) left because the School Committee switched to district representation. She asks if Wilson will face a challenge in dealing with the School Committee. Nucci says that Garrity has cited the district-elected School Commitee's commitment to desegregated schools. Nucci adds that the new School Committee has led to Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. Another reporter asks Nucci if any potential problems could prevent Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. Nucci says that there are only minor differences to be resolved. The reporter asks about the significance of Garrity's withdrawal. Nucci says that the judge will set the parameters for desegregation in his final court orders; that the Boston School Committee will be responsible for running the schools. Vaillancourt asks Nucci if a larger School Committee could hinder Wilson's ability to get his programs approved. Nucci quotes Spillane as saying that the size of the committee is less important than the quality of the people who serve on the committee. Nucci says that the School Committee will help Wilson in his new role as superintendent.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/21/1985
Description: Reporter Christopher Lydon interviews attendees of the inauguration of Ray Flynn as Mayor of Boston, in the Wang Center. The crowd cheers as Flynn and former mayor Kevin White pass by. Lydon interviews attendees of the inauguration in the lobby of the Wang Center. Interviewees express concerns about unemployment, crime, the restoration of city services and the city budget. Cynthia Silveira (Dorchester resident) says that she appreciates Flynn's commitment to diversity and unity but is suspicious of his past voting record on racial issues. Lydon interviews people outside of the Wang Center. Harry Spence (Boston Housing Authority) says that Flynn delivered a "solid" speech, but will face difficulties in delivering city services and achieving racial harmony. George Keverian (State Representative) says that Flynn is the right person to unite the city. Louise Day Hicks (former member of the Boston City Council) says that Flynn must strike a balance between downtown concerns and neighborhood interests. Hicks says that South Boston is the "center of the city." Hicks speaks to Dapper O'Neil outside of the Wang Center. Felix Arroyo (Latino activist) hopes that Flynn will deliver on his promises; Arroyo believes that it will be difficult for Flynn to integrate the city's neighborhoods. Elma Lewis (African American activist) says that she and others will work with Flynn to improve the city. Lewis adds that she is "always looking for diversity." Claire Crawford (Boston resident) says that Flynn is a "people's mayor." Flynn exits the Wang Center and gets in his station wagon; crowd cheers. Lydon interviews James Kelly (South Boston Information Center). Kelly expresses reservations about Flynn's proposal for District Advisory Councils. Thomas Menino (Boston City Council) compliments Flynn's inaugural speech.
1:00:00: Visual: Christopher Lydon interviews a white male about the inaugural speech of Ray Flynn (Mayor, City of Boston) at the Wang Center for the Performing Arts. The man says that Flynn gave a strong speech; that he is optimistic about Flynn's administration. The man says that Flynn will face challenges in improving the schools. Lydon speaks informally to the man. 1:00:45: V: Uniformed officers march up the stairs in the lobby of the Wang Center. People are gathered in the lobby. The audience cheers as Flynn exits a room and proceeds up the stairs. Flynn's young daughter holds his hand as he walks up the stairs. Flynn stops to greet bystanders as he passes. Kevin White (former Mayor of Boston) and Kathryn White (wife of Kevin White) proceed up the stairs after Flynn. 1:02:12: V: Lydon interviews a white man who is a Dorchester resident. The man says that Flynn is the first mayor since Josiah Quincy to have a "sense of the city"; that Flynn is familiar with the neighborhoods and the downtown. Lydon interviews a white middle-aged man about Flynn's speech. The man says that Flynn's speech was very good; that Flynn understands that the government exists to serve the people. The man says that Flynn will face a challenge in restoring city services during an economic crisis. An older white woman says that Flynn's speech was "wonderful." The woman says that Flynn will face a challenge in reducing unemployment; that Flynn's emphasis on unity was important. Cynthia Silveira (Dorchester resident) says that Flynn's speech was good; that she hesitates to trust Flynn because of his past voting record on racial issues. Silveira says that it will be difficult for Flynn to give his full attention to Boston neighborhoods; that she appreciates his commitment to diversity and unity. An older Irish woman recognizes Lydon from television. Her companions explains that they are from the region of Ireland where Flynn's family is from. The second Irish woman says that the speech was "wonderful." An older white woman says that Flynn will be a good mayor if he delivers what he promised in the speech; that it will be difficult for Flynn to reduce the crime rate. An older white man says that Flynn has the right idea; that Flynn will "economize." 1:06:59: V: A crowd streams out of the doors of the Wang Center. Lydon interviews Harry Spence (Boston Housing Authority). Spence says that Flynn delivered a "solid" speech; that it will be difficult for Flynn to deliver services and to achieve racial harmony. Spence says that Flynn's speech expressed his decency and commitment to the people. The crowd continues to exit the building. Groups of people are gathered outside of the doors. Members of the crowd greet Lydon. George Keverian (Massachusetts House of Representatives) greets Lydon and his two daughters. Keverian says that Flynn delivered a good speech; that Flynn's humanity was in evidence. Keverian says that Flynn is the right person to unite the people of Boston. Keverian continues to speak informally to Lydon and his daughters. 1:12:07: V: Louise Day Hicks greets Lydon. Hicks says that Flynn's speech covered many "interesting" and important topics; that South Boston is the "center" of the city. Hicks says that Flynn will need to strike a balance between the neighborhoods and the downtown interests; that Flynn needs to concentrate on affordable housing and crime reduction. Hicks confers with Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council) on the street outside of the Wang Center. Lydon interviews Felix Arroyo (Latino activist). Arroyo says that the city will be a better place if Flynn can deliver on his promises. Arroyo says that Flynn will face challenges in integrating the neighborhoods; that he appreciates Flynn's commitment to education. Shot of a black car pulled up to the curb in front of the Wang Center. Lydon asks Elma Lewis (African American activist) about Flynn's speech. Lewis say that Flynn put on a good "show"; that inaugural speeches do not mean much; that she and others will work with Flynn to improve the city. Lewis says that she has attended inaugurals for many years; that she would like to have seen "more diversity"; that she is "always looking for more diversity." 1:17:04: V: Claire Crawford (Boston resident) says that Flynn is a "people's mayor." Crawford says that Flynn will face challenges in eliminating racial discrimination. Flynn exits the Wang Center. He greets several groups of bystanders. Photographers crowd around Flynn's station wagon. Flynn clears snow from his windshield. Flynn gets in the car and drives away. The crowd cheers briefly. 1:20:37: V: Lydon interviews Jim Kelly (South Boston Information Center). Kelly says that Flynn gave a good speech; that parts of the speech "concerned" him. Kelly expresses reservations about the District Advisory Councils. Kelly says that Flynn face difficulties in providing services to the city during an economic crisis. Kelly says that the people of South Boston are happy to "have a say" in how the city is run. Lydon begins to interview Thomas Menino (Boston City Council). Menino says that Flynn made an excellent speech.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/02/1984