Description: Boston School Committee meeting proceedings. Chair John McDonough, David Finnegan, and Kathleen Sullivan criticize Superintendent Marion Fahey for negative remarks she made about the school committee in a newspaper interview. Paul Tierney supports Fahey, and Pixie Palladino comes down in the middle of the issue. Fahey defends her right to speak out on the Hyde Park High incident.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/02/1976
Description: School committee meeting. Chairman John McDonough, Elvira Pixie Palladino, Paul Tierney, David Finnegan, Kathleen Sullivan. McDonough accuses Superintendent Marion Fahey of political expediency. She responds. Committee member Elvira Pixie Palladino comments on the situation and states her position on anti-bussing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/02/1976
Description: Boston School Committee meeting, with Mayor Kevin White in attendance, where he discusses school desegregation and states his support for the recently elected school committee. Says Judge Arthur Garrity should cede some control to that body.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/11/1976
Description: Pam Bullard reports on the Tobin Elementary School, which is located near the Mission Hill Housing Project.Bullard reports that 75 white children are bused into the Tobin school with no problems. Interviews with students and teachers talking about how much they like the school. Bullard reports that Charlie Gibbons, the principal, encourages teachers to develop innovative programs for students. During the report Principal Gibbons was in Puerto Rico learning about the schools there to better be able to serve the Latino students at his school. Bullard notes that the school has a good atmosphere and enjoys a good rapport with the community.
9:50:07: Visual: Shots of street sign for Tobin Ct.; of the Mission Hill Housing Project. Pam Bullard reports that the Mission Hill Housing Project is in one of Boston's toughest neighborhoods; that racial fighting occurred there two weeks before school opened; that the housing project is in the heart of a depressed neighborhood. Bullard reports that the Tobin Elementary School is located near the housing project. V: Footage of an African American male student (Derek) saying that he has attended the Tobin School for four years; that he knows all of the teachers and gets along with them; that the school is special because of the teachers, the kids, and the field trips. A white male student (Richard) says that Derek is his friend; that he likes the Tobin school; that he has fun taking the bus everyday; that he has met a lot of new people. Bullard reports that Charlie Gibbons (principal, Tobin School) and his assistant are in Puerto Rico; that they are learning about the Puerto Rican school system in order to understand the needs of Spanish-speaking students; that Gibbons and his assistant are paying for their own trips. V: Shots of Gibbons' office; of a button reading "I go to the best - Tobin School, Roxbury"; of a thank-you note written to Gibbons from the students. Bullard reports that the Tobin School has extensive reading and physical education programs set up with Boston University; that there is a program for dental care set up with the Harvard Dental school; that the Tobin School has one of the city's best bilingual programs; that the students receive a lot of individual attention. Bullard reports that Gibbons and the teachers at the Tobin set up most of these programs themselves. V: Footage of student reading Spanish; of a student writing on a chalkboard; of bilingual posters in a classroom. Footage of a teacher at a chalkboard; of students in classroom. A white female teacher says that the students respond well to the school's programs; that she tries to give the students individual attention; that she likes the students and the parents at the Tobin. Footage of children playing learning games. An African American female teacher says that she agrees with Gibbons that the Tobin is the best school in Boston; that the Tobin has a warm atmosphere, a good faculty and a lot of support from the community. An African American male student says that he likes the Tobin because he learns things. Bullard reports that the Tobin school is located in a predominantly African American neighborhood; that 75 white students have been bused in with no problems; that students and teachers like the school very much. V: Footage of children playing on a field outside of the school. The Church of Our Lady of Perpetual Help is visible.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/26/1976
Description: Grand facade of Boston's Old City Hall (now housing Maison Robert restaurant). Marker for Freedom Trail and information booth on edge of Boston Common. People walk through the park, gather around information booth. Sign for Freedom Trail. Boston Common environs. People getting off Peter Pan bus.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/05/1976
Description: Exteriors of Harvard Medical School, Longwood Campus. Main building with ionic columns on Shattuck Street. A few students in front of the building. Countway library next door. Audio goes in and out throughout.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1976
Description: Mayor Kevin White exchanges banter with journalist, and goes on to deliver statement on increasing Boston property tax (one-time levy at $16.40) to finance the $27.5 million deficit caused by court ordered desegregation, at Judge Arthur Garrity's request. City treasurer Jim Young elaborates on choosing assessment method over borrowing. Mayor White takes questions from reporters. White accuses school committee of mismanagement in busing effort. He also comments that the teachers will have to work knowing they are in a debt situation.
0:00:30: Visual: Members of the press wait for Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) to arrive at press conference at City Hall. Walt Sanders (WBZ) and Gary Griffith (WGBH) are among the reporters. White arrives, begins reading his statement and is interrupted by a knock on the door. He jokes lightheartedly about the interruption. 0:01:53: V: White reads a statement about the school deficit caused by desegregation and school mismanagement. He says that an additional $16.40 will be added to property taxes this year; that Boston's property tax is already the highest in the nation; that Judge Garrity has ordered the city to find new revenue sources to fund the court-ordered desegregation. White says that he is submitting three pieces of legislation to the city council: an appropriation order for $10 million to cover the costs of police overtime; an appropriation order for $17.5 million to keep the schools operating for the remainder of the term; legislation to raise new revenue through the property tax. White says that he is faced with an unpleasant task; that this tax levy is the most efficient way to raise funds; that the tax will be levied only once. White says that he hopes Garrity acts to overhaul the city's school system, personnel, and management; that mismanagement of the school system has caused the deficit. 0:06:50: V: James Young (Treasurer, City of Boston) explains that the taxpayers must pay for the expenditures of the city government; that a tax levy is the most prudent and cost-effective way to raise revenues. Young says that borrowing money to cover the deficit is not a financially sound course of action; that the appropriation orders will allow the city to continue paying for the police and schools; that the tax levy will cover the appropriations; that the tax levy is related to a home rule petition to be brought before the state legislature. 0:08:26: V: White takes questions from reporters. White says that he does not know how quickly the city council will respond; that the tax levy is the most responsible way to cover the deficit. A reporter asks if a lengthy review of the legislation by the city council will allow enough time for the money to be raised. White says that he does not know how long the city council will take to make a decision on the legislation; that he did his best to respond expeditiously to the request by Judge Garrity. A reporter brings up other suggestions of ways to fund the deficit. White says that there are only a few rational and responsible ways to raise the funds; that the tax levy is the easiest, fairest, and cheapest way to cover the deficit. White says that extra police overtime is directly related to the desegregation order and should be covered along with the school deficit; that the taxes will be levied only to cover expenses resulting from the court order; that the deficit does not reflect any of the busing costs from the previous year. 0:12:19: V: A reporter asks about a rumored $8 million surplus in the budget. Young refutes those numbers and says there is no surplus. White says that money needs to be allocated in order to cover the next School Department payroll on June 1; that presently there is no more money to cover School Department payroll; that payroll will be owed to employees if the hours are worked. Young admits that there will be short-term borrowing to cover the deficit until the tax is levied; that he does not know how much will be borrowed; that $5.5 million is needed to cover payroll in 2 weeks. White says that he will not comment on speculation that some city residents will not pay the tax. A reporter accuses White of waiting until the last possible moment to raise the funds. White says that he notified all parties of the shortfall six months ago; that Judge Garrity did not consider the shortfall to be an emergency situation; that he warned the School Committee to make cuts; that neither the court nor the School Committee responded to his warnings. White accuses the School Committee of "total mismanagement" of the desegregation process. White says that some people have profited from school desegregation; that the city absorbed the costs of desegregation without comment last year; that the school deficit must be brought to the attention of the taxpayers. 0:19:03: V: White says that he does not want to close the city schools; that he refuses to borrow money to cover the costs of mismanagement of the school system. White admits that school teachers are going to work with the knowledge that there is no money for payroll; that the management of the schools must be overhauled next year. White says that he is responding to a request from the court to cover the deficit.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1976
Description: Railroad terminal yard in Allston adjacent to Mass. Turnpike. Freight containers and container beds parked on train tracks. Sole engine moving slowly into yard. Traffic on elevated section of pike in background. Hancock Towers and Prudential in hazy distance.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/19/1976
Description: Sound dropout in the beginning of the video. Boston City Council meeting on the Boston School budget. City Councilor reads communications from Mayor White to the City Council. Boston schools superintendent Marion Fahey testifies to City Council about school budget deficit. Accompanying Fahey are Paul Kennedy, Associate Superintendant in charge of personnel and John McGran, member of the superintendent's office on budgetary matters. Councilors Louise Day Hicks, Albert "Dapper" O'Neil, Larry DiCara are among those on the panel questioning Fahey. Mayor White and Superintendent Fahey both address the effect of Judge Arthur Garrity's 1975 court order on the Boston School Department budget. Video goes black in the middle for a few second, but audio continues.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/20/1976
Description: An overview of the modified (Phase IIB) Boston public schools court ordered desegregation plan: district schools, magnet schools at elementary and middle levels, specialized high school programs, technical and vocational schools. Explanation of the application process and how to indicate choices for focused programs.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/24/1976
Description: Boston City Hospital patient admitting desk with English and Spanish signs in corridor. Ambulance bay and emergency entrance sign. One ambulance departs with flashing lights and siren. Several takes of reporter standup on an investigation involving the hospital.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/03/1976
Description: Exteriors of the Massachusetts State House. AFSCME (American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees) state workers on strike, picketing outside State House with placards. Closeup on Beacon St. street sign.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/21/1976
Description: Mayor Kevin White releases report on racial violence in Boston. He does not comment on the findings because he has not yet reviewed them. The report was written by a committee consisting of 13 diverse members, chaired by Speaker Thomas McGee and Judge David Nelson. They met ten times over two months to interview 17 community leaders, both supporters and opponents of busing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/24/1976
Description: Three interviews on southwest corridor mass transit and development project. Areas affected include the South End, Roxbury Crossing, and Jamaica Plain. Construction will create numerous jobs and have an affirmative action goal with a 30% minority set-aside. $391 million (80% federal funds) will be for orange line and railroad relocation; plus an arterial street, community college, housing, and industrial park will make for at least a half billion dollar project. Residents are concerned about impact of noise and disruption in the adjacent neighborhoods, equitable employment opportunities, and environmental issues. Community groups want to be sure the new road and transit routes do not split the surrounding areas along socioeconomic lines.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/15/1976
Description: Press conference at City Hall. Boston Mayor Kevin White and Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia read prepared statements about the following day's school opening in the third year of court-ordered busing. White expresses confidence in a peaceful opening of schools. DiGrazia says that police have been instructed to use minimum force, but to act decisively against any disruptions of public order. Both men hope that police can be removed from schools as soon as possible. White notes that the atmosphere seems calmer this year than during the previous two years. White says that he would like to remove police from the schools as soon as possible because their presence hinders the development of a healthy learning environment. Reporters question them on the school opening. Shots of Pam Bullard listening to the press conference.
2:09:33: Visual: Members of the press are assembled for a press conference at City Hall with Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) and Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston). White begins reading a statement, then stops because there is a problem with sound. 2:11:53: V: White reads a prepared statement. He says that school opens tomorrow; that fewer students face assignments to new schools this year; that more students are attending the schools of their choice; that many schools are benefitting from programs linked with universities and businesses; that three new schools are opening; that he is confident that the school year will be productive. White says that the city is prepared to guarantee the safety of all schoolchildren; that he hopes to reduce the police presence at the schools this year; that police will restore order if disruptions occur. White urges citizens to share in the responsibility for a peaceful school opening; that the city will focus on improving schools this year. 2:14:32: V: DiGrazia reads a prepared statement. He expresses confidence in a peaceful school opening. He reports that police have received instructions to allow peaceful demonstrations, but to maintain public order; that police officers have been instructed to use minimum force and to treat those arrested with respect and courtesy. DiGrazia says that police will not tolerate any acts of violence or disruption; that these acts are often committed by only a few citizens. 2:15:56: V: White invites questions from the reporters. A reporter asks DiGrazia what kind of preparations have been made for additional police support. DiGrazia says that Massachusetts State Police will be assigned to South Boston; that MDC Police will be assigned to Charlestown; that US Marshals will be present for the opening of schools. DiGrazia says that the atmosphere on the streets seems calm; that a few citizens are engaging in disruptive behavior; that the atmosphere seems calmer than in the previous two years; that police presence will be less visible than last year; that additional police will stand by for support. DiGrazia says that the police have not received any indication that there will be outside agitators at the schools. DiGrazia says that he hopes there will be little overtime for police officers this year. DiGrazia says that uniformed State Police officers will be assigned to South Boston High School; that community service officers and juvenile officers will be assigned to monitor the other schools. 2:18:52: V: A reporter asks about cooperative efforts between the School Department, the city of Boston, and the Police Department. White says that the three entities have been working together on school desegregaton for three years; that differences about the school budget have not affected efforts to achieve a successful school opening. DiGrazia says that police will continue to enforce ordinances forbidding the assembly of more than three people along a bus route, or assemblies within 100 yards of schools. Shot of Pam Bullard. White says that he would like to remove police from schools as soon as possible; that police presence hinders a healthy learning atmospheres; that police can be removed if citizens refrain from disrupting the schools. A reporter asks DiGrazia to clarify the term "minimum force" in police conduct. DiGrazia says that he hopes police can dissuade citizens from engaging in disruptive behavior; that he would like to see the police removed from the schools as soon as possible. DiGrazia refuses to elaborate on minimum tolerance policy guidelines, but says that warnings will be given to disruptors before action is taken. DiGrazia says that the school department instituted the use of metal detectors at the schools; that they will be used again this year. DiGrazia refuses to give out information on the number of police officers assigned to the schools
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1976
Description: Pam Bullard interviews Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools). Fahey talks about the assignment of bus monitors and school aides for the coming school year. Fahey explains the roles of transitional aides, security aides and instructional aides. She says that there will also be more special needs aides and bilingual aides in the schools. Fahey comments on the need for all students to attend school in order to learn basic skills. She says that parents should be confident in the educational programs at the Boston public schools. Tape 2 of 2.
0:00:13: Visual: Pam Bullard interviews Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) in her office. Fahey sits behind her desk. Fahey says that bus monitors will ride the buses with students again this year; that parents have made it clear that they want bus monitors on the buses with their children. Fahey says that there will be just as many aides this year as in previous years; that there will be fewer transitional aides in the school buildings; that transitional aides will perform duties assigned to them by the headmasters of the schools. Fahey says that the transitional aides will be supplemented by security aides from the Safety and Security Department; that the security aides have additional training in dealing with crises. Fahey says that there will be many instructional aides in the classrooms; that instructional aides will be funded under Title I of the Emergency School Assistance Act; that instructional aides will work with elementary and middle school students in reading and math. Fahey says that there will be bilingual aides as well as aides for the special needs programs in the schools. Bullard asks Fahey what she would tell parents who are skeptical about the quality of the Boston Public Schools. Fahey says that it is important for parents to send their children to school; that parents who keep their children out of school are condemning their children to an unproductive future. Fahey says that the Boston Public Schools have strong educational programs; that school faculty and staff are always working to improve school programs; that students in the Boston Public Schools receive good instruction in basic skills like reading, math and communication. Bullard closes the interview. 0:04:53: V: Bullard and Fahey speak informally. Fahey says that Boston schools are no longer in the "numbers game." Fahey notes that the focus is no longer on desegregation; that her staff is focusing on assessing the performance of students and teachers; that the tension caused by school desegregation hindered classroom learning. Shot of a spreadsheet on Fahey's desk. The spreadsheet gives the racial breakdown of students in each grade level.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1976
Description: Exterior of Boston English High School. Interview with Boston police commissioner Joseph Jordan about how successful he thinks the third year of court-ordered desegregation will be. Interview with Headmaster of English High School Robert Peterkin on the opening of school, and English High School as a magnet school. Interview with two students, Maura and Sharon, about what they like about English High School. Interiors of the school, lockers, students in hallways, on the escalator, in the cafeteria, in the classroom.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: First day of school in Boston, Phase IIB of court ordered desegregation. 1) Superintendent Marion Fahey is proud of faculty and students. Associate superintendent Charles Leftwich reports van and three buses were stoned. Mayor Kevin White says unlawful conduct will not be tolerated. 2) Gary Griffith reports on opening commotion at Charlestown High. One-third of enrolled students show up. Federal marshals and police outside. One arrest for disorderly conduct. Neighborhood crowd gathers in street. 3) Pamela Bullard at South Boston High. Black students get off bus to less tension than last year. Police are present but not in riot gear. 4) Art Cohen at Mackey Middle School where teacher student ratio is 1:18. Principal Lloyd Leake. 5) Bullard on magnet program encompassing 21 schools. Exterior, interior of English High. Gregory Anrig, state commissioner of education. Headmaster William Peterkin. 6) Karin Giger on bilingual program at Grover Cleveland Middle School. 7) Bullard talks to boycotting (white) Cormiers of Charlestown. Mother keeps son out of Timilty School where he was assigned to be bused; he has part-time tutoring. 8) Steve Curwood talks to participating (black) Price family from Roxbury, whose children are bused to white neighborhoods. 9) 5 Hyde Park High students, 3 minority, 2 white, discuss racial separation inside school. They expect conflict to be less than last year. 10) Steve Nevas was almost thwarted from covering a Kevin White press conference because mayor felt Nevas could not be objective. (He had investigated fundraising in White campaign.) White attempts to disassemble Channel 2 microphone and asserts he can exclude any reporter from access. Ed Baumeister says this raises First Amendment issue.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: High, wide, long shots of Boston environs from observation deck of Hancock Tower. Nearly aerial views of South End, Charles River, Boston Harbor, State House, and orange line T moving along elevated tracks.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/10/1976
Description: Dedication ceremony of John Hancock glass tower, in lobby. General James M. Gavin is introduced and addresses the audience. Gavin and other speakers talk about the history of the building project. Thomas O'Neill and Kevin White are also on stage. Unveiling of massive reproduction of Declaration of Independence on wall of lobby. English High School chorus sings patriotic songs. Hundreds of guests crowded in lobby.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/15/1976
Description: Longshoremen's hiring hall. Men crowd around window for work assignments. Interview with union worker, who says job shortage due to progress and automation. He has not been paid under contract guaranty because of loopholes. He predicts October 1 strike against Boston Shipping Association. Containerization calls for fewer workers, from about 1,200 men to about 400 men, though tonnage of port has remained stable. Man hours have decreased, some men have left the industry, others try to collect their guaranty. A man being interviewed says that the men are very angry.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/24/1976
Description: Robert DiGrazia resigns as Boston police commissioner to become police chief in Montgomery County, Maryland. Gives press conference on strengths and weaknesses in his department.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/04/1976
Description: Tape dropout in beginning. Combat Zone environs. Thriving pornography district. XXX rated movies, peep shows, Naked i, Pussy Cat Cinema, adult book store, State and Pilgrim Theaters, Intermission Lounge. Garish marquees with flashing lights. MBTA and Boston police cars.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/15/1976
Description: High shots of Park Square during snowstorm. Hillbilly Ranch, Continental Trailways bus terminal, Playboy Club, billboards. Man digging out a car. Buses and cars driving on snow covered roads. Pedestrians walking through snow.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/29/1976
Description: Charles Street Jail exteriors. A reporter asks members of administration about issues with the Charles Street Jail and Deer Island regarding the possibility of a new combined facility. Stated problems with building a new jail include security and the size of the proposed site. Charles Street physical plant issues include plumbing, recreation facilities, eating facilities, kitchen facilities, and noise level.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/25/1977
Description: Deer Island prison exterior with snow. Main brick dormitory and several outbuildings. Boston skyline across harbor with whitecaps on waves. Plane flying low on approach to Logan Airport touches down on runway in distance.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/27/1977
Description: Diana Ross rehearses at Music Hall. She wears a "Boston Loves Diana Ross" T-shirt. She answers questions from reporters at the edge of the stage. She talks about playing Dorothy in the Wiz and her inspirations. She talks about having children.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/10/1977
Description: B-roll of parking tickets, parking meters, and parking enforcement officer near Government Center. Man argues ticket with officer. "No Parking" and "Tow Zone" signs.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/11/1977
Description: Combat Zone environs. Marquees and store signs: “adult movies,” “uncensored books,” “nude review,” “XXX.” Publix Theater, Pussycat Cinema, Naked i, Two O'Clock Lounge. New England Medical Center adjacent. Display of pornographic materials and erotic books. District police headquarters sign and police station on Washington Street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/15/1977
Description: B-roll of bulldozer clearing debris from Symphony Road fire. Exteriors of buildings with broken and boarded up windows and smoke stains. Interview with David Scondras of Symphony Tenants Organizing Project. He talks about why the rash of 29 fires in three years is suspected as arson: absentee landlords, high vacancy rate, poor condition of structures, lodging houses, lapsed mortgages. He adds that there is nothing the city can do about the problem and explains why. He hopes that State legislators will back his organization's bill which removes the financial motivation for landlords to burn down houses in poor condition. He discusses the number of people affected while they shoot cutaways. Reporter reasks question for editing purposes. Exteriors of a Red Cross Disaster Service Center. Several takes of reporter standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/23/1977
Description: Former CIA director George H. W. Bush speaks on national security and foreign affairs. In regards to relations with South American countries, Bush explains his belief that one should not use 1977 morals to pass judgment on events that happened in the past. Denies allegations that the CIA used the African Swine Fever Virus in Cuba to "destabilize". Also denies that he ever authorized any use of chemical or biological warfare agents. He touches briefly on his potential candidacy for presidency.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/08/1977
Description: Lee Nelson introduces The Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Nelson reads a news brief about US Army testing of live bacteria on civilians in simulated germ warfare attacks. Art Cohen reports on racial controversy during jury selection in the Andrew Puopolo murder trial. Cohen reports that the defense attorneys have accused the prosecution of excluding African Americans from the jury. Gary Griffith reports on Mayor Kevin White's proposed fiscal legislation. The report includes footage of Jim Young (Treasurer, City of Boston) explaining the fiscal package. Steve Curwood reports on George Bush's address to the Middlesex Club of Republicans. The report includes footage of Bush answering questions about his tenure as CIA Director, biological warfare, and the overthrow of foreign governments. Mike Kolowich reports on Thomas Widmer (Vice President, Thermo Electron), who advocates energy efficiency and conservation through the application of technology. Footage of Widmer talking about technology and energy policy. Christopher Lydon comments on the early days of the Carter presidency and Carter's outspoken position on human rights. Footage from another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Steve Nevas hosts the Ten O'Clock News. Nevas reports on the possibility of peace talks in the Middle East. Lydon interviews Richard Reeves (political writer) on Jimmy Carter's character and his public image. Nevas editorializes on US policy regarding marine resources. Footage from another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Nevas closes the show. David Ives (President, WGBH) sings a fundraising song for on-air fundraising promotion
0:00:10: Volunteers in studio for on-air fundraising. WGBH station identification. 0:01:12: The Ten O'Clock News opening credits. Lee Nelson introduces the show. Nelson reports that the US Army has tested live germs on civilians in simulated germ warfare attacks from 1949 to 1969; that the Pennsylvania Turnpike, the City of San Francisco and Washington's national airport were targets over a twenty-year period; that over 500 project employees suffered infections. Nelson reports that four jurors were chosen in the trial of three men connected with the death of Harvard football player Andrew Puopolo. 0:02:16: Art Cohen reports on the Puopolo murder trial at Suffolk Superior Court. Visual: Artist's drawing of courtroom. Cohen reports that Puopolo had been in the Combat Zone with fellow Harvard football players Thomas Lincoln and Steve Saxon; that Lincoln and Saxon suffered only minor injuries; that Puopolo died of stab wounds. Cohen reports that Richard Allen, Edward Soares and Leon Easterling are charged with Puopulo's murder; that the three defendents are African American. V: Artist's drawing of defendants. Cohen reports that Judge James Roy asked each prospective juror if the racial profiles of the defendents and plaintiffs would affect their judgment; that Roy dismissed several jurors who were unsure. V: Artist drawing of Roy by Sonja Benson. Cohen reports that there were only four African Americans out of 70 prospective jurors; that the defense lawyers accused the prosecution of excluding African Americans from the jury; that Thomas Mundy (Assistant District Attorney, Suffolk County) challenged three of the African American jurors without cause; that the fourth African American juror was dismissed by Roy. V: Artists drawings of lawyers at table; of Mundy. Cohen reports that three women and one man have been chosen for the jury so far; that these four jurors are an electronics engineer, a manager with a local insurance company, a school monitor, and a housewife from South Boston. Cohen reports that jury selection is expected to go on until Thursday. 0:03:48: Nelson reads the national headlines: the US House of Representatives voted to pass a major segment of President Jimmy Carter's economic stimulus program, including $50 tax rebates for many taxpayers; Carter will travel to London in May for his first summit with leaders from Canada, West Germany, France, Italy, Japan, and Great Britain; France threatened economic reprisals unless the SST (Concorde) is allowed to land in New York; Carter favors granting temporary landing rights for the Concorde, but the decision is up to the states of New York and New Jersey. 0:04:39: Nelson reports that the White Administration is concentrating on the passage of its fiscal legislation; that Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) is on vacation on an unnamed Caribbean island. V: Footage of James Young (Treasurer, City of Boston) saying that the mayor's fiscal legislation addresses the management problems in the city; that it attempts to redress imbalances in the fiscal relationship between the state and the city; that it enables the city to improve its financial situation by allowing it to impose modest taxes. Gary Griffith reports that the fiscal package includes 28 bills broken into three major categories; that there are 11 bills in a revenue sharing package which increases city fines and parking fees, and denies registration to vehicles with unpaid fines and taxes; that there are 10 bills in a state share package which mandates the state to assume the costs of county government, of school desegregation and of veteran benefits; that there are 7 bills in a new tax package which includes a payroll excise tax and new excise taxes on hotels, motels and college dorms. Griffith reports that some of the bills in the state share package and the new tax package are not expected to pass; that the city's property tax is expected to rise next year. V: Shots of downtown Boston; of a meter maid giving a parking ticket. Footage of Young saying that the city will not go bankrupt; that the city will be forced to reduce the services it provides to residents; that the city will see a decline in its character and standard of living. Griffith reports that legislative hearings on the bills will be held on March 23; that votes will take place by May. V: Shots of reporters at Young's press conference. 0:07:23: Stock report: Dow Jones Industrials at 952.04; New York Stock Exchange volume was 19,520,000 shares; American Exchange volume was 3,110,000 shares. 0:07:48: Nelson reports that Brady Tyson (US Deputy Delegate to the UN Human Rights Commission) expressed regrets to the government of Chili for CIA involvement in the 1973 overthrow of the government of Salvador Allende; that the State Department said later that Tyson's remarks at the meeting of the UN Human Rights Commission were personal and not approved by the State Department. Nelson reports that Idi Amin (military ruler of Uganda) claims he is on a CIA death list; that Amin met with leaders at the Afro-Arab summit in Cairo; that Amin refused to allow a probe into human rights violations in Uganda. 0:08:37: Nelson reports that George Bush (former CIA Director) visited Cambridge to address the Middlesex Club of Republicans; that there is speculation about Bush running for president in 1980. Steve Curwood reports that Bush became CIA Director in 1976. V: Footage of Bush saying that he was often asked about the Allende affair as CIA Director; that he would not have apologized for the Allende affair. Bush says that he would support action to destabilize or overthrow certain governments, or "a Hitler." Curwood asks Bush about allegations concerning CIA use of the African Swine Fever Virus in Cuba to destabilize the Castro government. Bush responds that the allegations are false; that he never authorized the use of any chemical or biological warfare agents as CIA Director; that he will not comment on the use of those agents by other countries. Bush says that he does not believe that the CIA will be hurt by going along with rules and regulations not followed by other countries; that he worries about narrow guidelines concerning counterintelligence strategy. Curwood says that Bush does not deny the possibility of his running for the presidency in 1980. 0:11:47: Sports scores: Bruins beat Atlanta, 3 - 2. 0:12:00: Nelson reads headlines: Joseph Califano (HEW Secretary) announced a major reorganization of HEW; a law professor from the University of Chicago warned the House of Representatives not to let Carter reorganize the federal government. 0:12:19: Nelson reports that Carter will present a comprehensive energy program on April 20; that Carter's planners are soliciting input from citizens; that conservation and "personal sacrifice" will be at the heart of the program. Mike Kolowich reports that the US is the largest consumer of energy in the world; that the US wastes some of its most valuable energy resources. V: Shots of steam rising from smokestacks, chimneys and sewers. Kolowich reports that Thomas Widmer (vice president, Thermo Electron) advocates a more efficient use of energy; that Thermo Electron is a thermodynamic research and manufacturing firm in Waltham. V: Footage of Widmer saying that there is no energy crisis; that the US is not using energy effectively; that there is a "surplus of entropy." Kolowich reports that Widmer endorses conservation in a report he prepared for the Carter administration; that Widmer believes conservation is not enough. V: Shots of Widmer's report. Footage of Widmer saying that he does not endorse conservation through curtailment of energy use; that he endorses conservation through technology; that energy must be used more efficiently. Kolowich reports that "technological fixes" have been used in West Germany; that West Germany uses energy more efficiently than the US. V: Shots of smokestacks; of cars and trucks on highway; of factories; of houses with chimneys. Kolowich reports that US cars and trucks are too large; that the US steel making industry is not using energy as efficiently as it could; that new technology could help US industries use energy more efficiently. Kolowich reports that the federal government would need to provide incentives for industry to become more energy efficient; that the government would need to impose controls on the consumer level. V: Audio of Widmer saying that there should be mandatory controls on the efficiency of air conditioners, lighting, new home construction and commercial buildings; that it is possible to set mandatory efficiency standards for industry. Footage of Widmer saying that energy taxes could be imposed on industry; that tax credits could be given to energy efficient industries. Kolowich reports that Widmer thinks this policy would result in economic growth without an increase in energy use; that Widmer's ideas were once considered revolutionary; that Carter's energy program may rely on some of Widmer's ideas. 0:16:56: Weather report and area ski conditions. 0:17:45: Nelson reports that Henry Gonzales (Democratic Representative from Texas) resigned as chairman of the House Assassinations Committee; that Lewis Stokes (Democratic Representative from Ohio) will be the new chairman. Nelson reports that Governor Michael Dukakis is looking for quick legislative approval of his proposed Industrial Development Authority, an agency to encourage business development in Massachusetts. Nelson reports that state officials will not comment on a listening device found in the telephone of Owen Clarke (State Tax Commissioner); that tax records were recently seized in an investigation of his agency. Nelson reports that Leo Nolan is appealing his conviction for the murder of a Haverhill grocer fifty years ago. 0:18:30: Nelson introduces commentary by Christopher Lydon on the first few months of the Carter presidency. Lydon says that critics have doubts about Carter's performance; that critics doubt his understanding of foreign policy issues. Lydon says that Carter knows what he is doing when he speaks out on human rights; that Carter's outspoken support of human rights can lead to inconsistencies in foreign policy; that Carter wrote a letter in support of Soviet dissident Andrei Sakharov, but told the Soviet ambassador that human rights should not get in the way of relations between the two countries. Lydon points out other contradictions in the intersection of human rights and foreign policy in the Carter administration. Lydon says that Carter speaks out on human rights to remind Americans of the importance of human liberties and the values represented by the US. 0:20:38: Nelson closes the show with a joke. Credits roll. 0:21:19: Footage from another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Steve Nevas reports that Secretary of State Cyrus Vance says that there is a chance for Middle East peace talks during the second half of the year; that Arab states might allow Israel to keep some of the West Bank; that the Arab states will insist on the return of the Gaza Strip, the Golan Heights and the Sinai Desert; that Vance asked Congress not to try to enlist other nations in measures against the Arab boycott of Israel. 0:21:57: Sports scores: Golden State beats the Celtics, 101 - 94; the Bruins beat Detroit, 8 - 3. 0:22:20: Nevas reports that Carter spoke to employees at the Pentagon today; that Carter says he does not want to revive the draft, but will not rule it out completely. 0:22:36: Nevas introduces Christopher Lydon's interview with Richard Reeves (political writer). Lydon asks Reeves about Carter's public persona. Reeves says that Carter's ruthlessness and toughness is not visible in his public image; that Carter had to be calculating and tough to get to the top; that Carter has picked up campaign tips and tricks from political novels. Lydon comments on Reeves' theory that Carter's early success in the campaign was played up in the media; that the media ignored later setbacks because they had already created an image of him as a winning candidate. Reeves says that Carter planned a good campaign; that the media chose to give extensive coverage to the primary election; that the media created a momentum around Carter and it worked in his favor. Lydon asks Reeves' opinion on Carter and his success. Reeves says that Carter's public image will be destroyed if he gets caught lying. 0:25:55: Weather report and ski conditions. 0:26:55: Nevas reports that the US has taken control of the fishing grounds along the east coast. He gives a brief history of fishing in the western Atlantic. Nevas reports that the US now controls nearly 1/5 of the world's marine fish resources; that the US took control of east coast fishing grounds in the name of conservation; that taking control of the fishing grounds should not become a jingoistic exercise. Nevas closes the show. Credits roll. 0:28:23: Footage from another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Christopher Lydon comments on Carter's energy policy. He speculates on Carter's relations with the natural gas industry. Nevas closes the show. Credits roll. 0:29:50: Footage from the end credits of another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Fundraising promotion featuring David Ives (President, WGBH) singing a fundraising song accompanied by guitar.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/08/1977
Description: Former Chancellor Willy Brandt of the Federal Republic of Germany holds small press conference at World Affairs Council in Boston. Answers questions on European affairs and thoughts on becoming commissioner. He explains the importance of preserving peace with the Soviet Union.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/10/1977
Description: Several takes of reporter standup on the Boston Public Library having to shut down the bookmobile. Exteriors of Boston Public Library older (McKim) building. Pan of the inscription “The Commonwealth requires the education of the people as the safeguard of order and liberty.” Move to the attached modern building entrance. Interiors of the Library. Sign reads “Effective Sunday, February 13, the Library will be closed on Sundays until further notice.” Patrons in line at circulation desk in lobby. Librarian stamps due dates on borrowing cards. Patrons at reading tables in research room.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/15/1977
Description: B-roll of the site of a proposed multilevel garage for Quincy Market, which is currently a parking lot between Haymarket and the Expressway. Close-ups on cars in the parking lot. Several takes of reporter standup on the Boston Redevelopment Authority's plans. Exteriors of Faneuil Hall before North Market was developed. Several takes of another portion of reporter standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/24/1977
Description: Celtics vs Houston Rockets with Moses Malone. John Havlicek, Scott, Curtis Rowe, JoJo White, Dave Cowens. Souvenirs for sale. Fans entering Boston Garden. Audience says tickets cost about $9 per seat. They discuss ticket pricing and player salary.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/06/1977
Description: No audio. First half runs in black and white, second half in color. Exteriors of Boston City Hall, wide and close shots. People crossing plaza, and going through revolving door at entrance to City Hall. Municipal workers exit building; some carry briefcases.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/11/1977
Description: Boston police car marked “towing enforcement.” Sign at tow lot on Albany Street listing charges of $12 plus hourly storage fees. Interview on creation of Parking Violations Bureau to consolidate enforcement and collection of fines. Cost of unpaid ticket will double after 21 days. Denver boot used to immobilize cars of scofflaws. Police commissioner Joseph Jordan announces clamp down on illegal parking in city. Cavalcade of police tow trucks enter lot carrying vehicles.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/26/1977
Description: E. Edward Clark, a ninety-two-year-old African American man, speaks to a racially integrated class at the Hennigan Elementary School. The son of slaves, Clark tells vivid stories about his family's experiences in the south following emancipation and about growing up in Cambridge. He stresses the importance of a good education and respect for people of all races. The students ask Mr. Clark questions. Tape 1 of 2.
1:00:00: Visual: E. Edward Clark speaks to a racially integrated class at the Hennigan school. Clark describes the lives of his parents, who were slaves. Clark's father bought his freedom eight years before emancipation. His father bought the freedom of his mother, then the two were married. Clark's parents had 13 children. Clark describes the schools he attended as a boy, and the good education he received from New England missionaries who traveled south to teach former slaves. Clark describes race relations in the south after the Civil War. Clark says that his family moved to a cold-water flat at 143 Erie Street in Cambridge in 1898. Clark talks to the students about the importance of a good education and respect for others; about his impressions of how the world has changed. Clark warns the students that an education will prepare them to make a living later on. He reminds the students that the teachers are there to help them. Clark describes growing up in Cambridge in the early part of the century. He describes how the city has changed and how little things cost back then. 1:18:32: V: Clark invites the students to ask him questions. One student asks him about the secret to long life. Clark says that his parents were healthy; that he does not drink or smoke; that he does not believe in hate or violence. Clark stresses again that an education is necessary for success in life. Another student asks Clark if he was ever married.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/27/1977
Description: Press conference on the court-ordered plan for Phase III desegregation of the Boston Public Schools. Elvira "Pixie" Palladino (Boston School Committee), Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) and John Nucci (East Boston community activist) are among the interested parties and reporters in attendance. Attendees read over the court order. Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) and Marvin Scott (Associate Dean of Education, Boston University) review the court order. They discuss efforts to desegregate Boston kindergartens. They announce the opening of the Mattahunt Elementary School and Madison Park High School. Smith and Dentler discuss the decision to close the McKinley School, the Storrow School and the Higginson Elementary School, because they remain segregated despite all efforts to integrate the student population.
0:00:13: Visual: People are seating themselves in a lecture hall before a press conference about the court-ordered plan for Phase III desegregation of Boston Public Schools. Elvira "Pixie" Palladino sits with several white women at a table at the front of the room. Walt Sanders (WBZ reporter) reads the paper at his seat, also near the front of the room. Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) greets people as they enter the room. The media set up cameras to record the press conference. 0:03:20: V: Marvin Scott (Associate Dean of Education, Boston University) and Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) seat themselves at the front of the room. The moderator announces that copies of the court-ordered Phase III desegregation plan will be passed out. Audience members approach him for copies of the report. Scott and Dentler wait as the moderator passes out the report. 0:05:51: V: The moderator introduces Dentler and Scott, and says that they will answer questions about the report. Dentler and Scott are seated at a table with microphones. They quietly confer with one another and check their watches. The press conference attendees quietly read over the report. John Nucci (East Boston community activist) quietly studies it. Leftwich flips through the report. An attendee asks Dentler how the plan will affect East Boston. Dentler says that he will answer questions after the attendees have had a chance to read over the report. 0:09:49: V: Smith says that the court order for Phase III desegregation focuses on stability and continuity. He says that he and Dentler will review the order and then take questions. Smith says that a third theme of the court order is the disengagement of the court from the schools. Smith refers to the court order and explains some statistics. He points out how some school assignments have changed from last year to this year. He makes reference to the assignment of students to examination schools. Dentler notes that kindergarten classrooms in Boston have never been desegregated; that neighborhood kindergarten classrooms remain more accessible to white students than to African American students; that fewer minority students enter kindergarten. Dentler adds that the Phase III desegregation plan aims to increase accessibility to neighborhood kindergarten for all; that some students will be assigned to citywide magnet kindergartens for desegregation purposes; that magnet kindergarten assignments are made with the idea that children will stay in the same building for the elementary school grades. Dentler says that the goal of kindergarten desegregation was first stated in the original court order. Smith mentions some of the details of student assignments to District 9 schools. Dentler says that the court aims to stabilize the high student turnover rate. He names the deadlines for initial assignments and corrective assignments of students. Dentler notes the statistic that one in three students transfers from one school to another under the current plan; that there will be limitations on student transfers. Dentler says that a high turnover rate is detrimental to classroom learning. Smith announces the opening of the Mattahunt Elementary School and Madison Park High School. Dentler announces the closings of four schools. He says that the McKinley School, the Storrow School, and the Higginson Elementary School will be closed because they have remained segregated despite all efforts to integrate the student population. Dentler notes that alternative plans to desegregate these schools are infeasible or unconstitutional; that the student populations in these schools are small. Dentler notes that there are 60 students enrolled in the McKinley School; that there are less than 100 students enrolled in the Storrow School; that there are less than 150 students at the Higginson School, not including kindergarten students.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/06/1977
Description: Man gives scholarly history of theater architecture in Boston, commenting on Boston's Theater District - Saxon (Majestic), Colonial, Wilbur, Tremont, Music Hall (Metropolitan). Includes interior details of Saxon - red velvet curtains and rails; gilded rococo balconies; relief of fruit, flowers, leaves, masks, angels.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/17/1977
Description: Grand lobby, interior of Music Hall. Ornate chandelier, marble columns, heavenly mural. Gilded architectural details — carved moldings, capitals, medallions, angels. Interview with Harry Lodge, who gives history of Music Hall (formerly Metropolitan Theater), originally designed in 1920s by Clarence Blackhall for Vaudeville and movies. Describes the proposed restoration program to be completed in fall 1980 if lease secured and funds raised. In order to bring the Metropolitan Opera to Boston, the theater needs deeper stage for performing arts, updated communication systems, ventilation systems, and a renovated auditorium (seats 4,300). The theater is used for ballet, concerts, movies. Lodge states that this renovation with revitalize Boston as a major center for the performing arts. Lodge shows a drawing of the proposed plan.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/21/1977
Description: Mayor Kevin White honors seven distinguished Bostonians at a gala reception at the Parkman House. Women's rights advocate Florence Luscombe, community activist Melnea Cass, former senator and governor Leverett Saltonstall, former senator and ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, theater critic Elliot Norton, historian Walter Muir Whitehill, entrepreneur Sidney Rabb (of Stop & Shop). Personal narratives of the honorees with archival stills of their lives.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/06/1977
Description: People standing in claims line at unemployment office in Hurley building in government center. English/ Spanish bilingual signs. A man explains the issues with estimating unemployment rates and the importance of receiving a reliable common resolution. Answers the question "How do you measure unemployment?"
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/11/1977
Description: Interview with Boston coin dealer Ed Leventhal who says people are not flocking to buy the newly offered South African Krugerrand, one troy ounce of gold selling for about $163. B-roll of gold and coin dealer's stores. Several takes of reporter standup from the Boson coin district on Bromfield Street. Interview with Margaret Marshall who explains why investment in the Krugerrand supports discriminatory gold mining industry and therefore apartheid. Contemporary TV ads for Krugerrands, for editing into the news story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1977
Description: Downtown exteriors of Boston banks. Monolithic view of Federal Reserve Bank from Summer Street. High rises in financial district. Keystone building. Severe angle view of Shawmut. Revolving clock at entrance to State Street Bank. Hornblower & Weeks, Hemphill, Noyes sign. First National Bank of Boston. Gillette headquarters along water.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/25/1977