Description: Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) speaks to an audience in the chambers of the Boston School Committee. He is introduced by Jean Sullivan McKeigue (President, Boston School Committee), who notes that the School Committee will vote on March 5 about whether to keep Spillane in the post of Superintendent. Spillane addresses the issues of school desegregation and school violence. Spillane says past students in Boston Public Schools had been denied a good education due to segregated schools and cynicism among educators. Spillane talks about the continued involvement of Arthur Garrity (federal judge) in the supervision of the Boston Public Schools. Spillane says that the Boston School Department must begin to take responsibility for school desegregation. Spillane reminds the audience that racial discrimination will not be tolerated in the Boston Public School system; that the climate in the schools must be improved. Spillane stresses the importance of faculty integration. Spillane talks about school discipline and the fair implementation of the disciplinary code. Spillane says that a monitoring process will assure that minority students are no longer singled out for disciplinary action. Spillane promises to establish a task force to investigate school violence. Spillane says that school desegregation will have been a failure if quality education cannot be assured. Spillane also talks about additional programs for students, teacher training, teacher evaluation and community involvement in the schools. John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) is interviewed by the media after the speech. O'Bryant says that Spillane has addressed school desegregation in a courageous manner; that he will vote for Spillane on March 5.
1:00:04: Press and members of the community are gathered in the Boston School Committee chambers. Jean Sullivan McKeigue (President, Boston School Committee) enters the room and announces that the vote on the office of school superintendent will take place on March 5. McKeigue introduces Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools). Spillane enters the room and sits down. Spillane thanks McKeigue. He acknowledges the fact that the School Committee will be voting on whether to continue his superintendency. Spillane addresses the need for community involvement in Boston schools. Spillane says that he started as superintendent seven months ago; that he was aware of the social, fiscal and educational problems faced by Boston schools; that he has tried to provide constructive leadership. Spillane says that the schools are working with reduced resources; that he is trying to address the educational and social needs of nearly 60,000 students. Spillane refers to school desegregation across the nation. He says that Boston public school students had been denied a good education due to segregated schools and a cynicism among educators. Spillane says that he would like to address two problems today: school desegregation and school violence. Spillane talks about Judge Arthur Garrity's efforts to produce agreement among the parties in the Boston school desegregation case (Morgan v. Hennigan). He says that these agreements aim to secure the advances made by eight years of school desegregation; that these agreements would form the basis of a final set of court orders; that Garrity would cease to supervise the schools after these consent decrees were put in place. Spillane says that the consent decrees provide an opportunity to assess the progress made in school desegregation. Spillane reviews the state of the Boston Public School System before desegregation. Spillane says that he would like to eliminate racial inequality while improving educational quality. Spillane says that he would like to institute a long-range plan for the schools; that the plan would be presented to Garrity through the consent decree process. Spillane says that Boston schools must take responsibility for school desegregation; that equal educational opportunities must exist for all students; that the staff must be integrated as well as the students. Spillane says that the schools require strong leadership, a clear curriculum, conscientious teaching and a safe school climate. Spillane says that students must be prepared for higher education or the job market; that schools must work with parents to improve education. Spillane says that racial discrimination cannot be tolerated in and out of school; that he will not tolerate those who say that some children cannot learn. Spillane says that teachers must work hard to educate all children. Spillane says that he supports the integration of school faculty; that school staff must represent a cross-section of American society; that minority staff have been denied access to jobs in the past. Spillane says that African Americans and other minorities will be represented in key positions in the school administration. 1:10:44: Spillane says that youth violence is a problem in Boston's schools and neighborhoods. Spillane says that order must be kept in the schools; that alternative programs must be provided for all students in need of them. Spillane says that violence can stem from a lack of success in school; that school staff must help students to learn and achieve as best they can. Spillane says that fair and equitable disciplinary action must be assured; that minority students may have been singled out for disciplinary action in the past. Spillane says that he will set up a process to monitor disciplinary action and insure fair implementation of the disciplinary code. Spillane says that he will establish a task force to investigate school violence; that the task force can make recommendations on how to counter school violence. Spillane notes that students who are not taught to read and write are victims of another kind of violence; that some students are not encouraged to learn; that all students must be prepared to function as active and contributing members of society. Spillane says that desegregation will be rendered ineffective if quality education is not assured; that urban schools can make a difference in the lives of their students. Visual: Shot of a young African American boy who is fidgeting in the back of the room. Spillane says that teacher training is important. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane talks about alternative programs for students with special needs. V: Jump cut in videotape. Shots of audience from Spillane's perspective. Spillane says that a fair process of teacher evaluation will be implemented; that assistance and training must be given to teachers; that superior performance should be recognized and inferior performance should be addressed. V: Shot from the back of the room of Spillane addressing the audience. Spillane talks about the need for high academic standards. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane says that he will continue to work with the business community on employment and training programs for students. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane talks about the need for good vocational education programs. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane addresses the need for strong bilingual education programs. Spillane says that the programs must be assessed to assure that they are meeting the needs of the students. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane says that education must be a priority in the city; that civic leaders, parents and school administrators must work together to improve the schools; that all groups concerned about the schools must be listened to. V: Jump cut in videotape. The audience claps for Spillane. V: Jump cut in videotape. John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) is interviewed by the media. He says that he is impressed with Spillane's growth since his stormy meeting with the school committee on February 8; that he will vote for Spillane. O'Bryant says that Spillane addressed school desegregation in a courageous manner; that very few high-profile officials talk about the beneficial effects of school desegregation in Boston; that few people give Garrity credit for instituting desegregation in Boston schools. O'Bryant says that he is optimistic about Spillane's ability to do the job. The media continues to question O'Bryant.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/02/1982
Description: Interview with South End based artist Allan Rohan Crite. He tells a story about selling paintings in the 1940s, tracking them down, and recently finding them. He talks about his paintings, inspired by different parts of African American lives, including religion. He also talks about the poetry and essays he's been working on recently. They focus on his version of the African American experience. They shoot cutaways with no sound.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/04/1982
Description: The Boston School Committee holds a meeting in the School Committee chambers. Members of the School Committee discuss school business. John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) reports on the need for school repairs; Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) reports on staffing issues. Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) interviews Kathleen Kelly (President, Boston Teachers Union) about a proposed school choice plan. Kelly says that many parents support a school choice plan because the current system allows little flexibility. Kelly says that the school choice plan must be considered carefully to prevent a return to segregated schools. Stevens interviews O'Bryant about the proposed school choice plan. O'Bryant says that the plan promotes greater access to schools across the city; that the current system is archaic and inflexible. Stevens interviews Barbara Gray (parent) about the proposed school choice plan. Gray says that parents should be allowed to choose a school with programs suited to the needs of their children. Gray says that the schools need to be improved; that the Boston Public Schools are not truly integrated because there are few white students. Stevens has extended conversations with interviewees while cutaways are shot. Takes of Stevens doing standup about supporters of the school choice plan working on an official proposal for the end of the month. The audio quality on this tape is uneven.
1:00:12: Visual: A Boston School Committee meeting is held in the chambers of the Boston School Committee. School committee members Jean McGuire, John O'Bryant, Jean Sullivan McKeigue, Kevin McCluskey, and Rita Walsh Tomasini are seated at the front of the room. Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) sits at the front with the members of the School Committee. Community members and the press are seated in the audience. O'Bryant talks about the need for $40 million to make school repairs. He says that the mayor, the Boston City Council, and the community must be made aware of the money needed for repairs. Shots of the various committee members. McKeigue agrees that school repairs are needed. A vote is taken on approving a draft of a letter to the mayor and the Boston City Council. O'Bryant thanks Spillane for his report. O'Bryant asks Spillane a question about staffing. Spillane says that more staff is needed before instituting a certain program. Audio is muffled. Shots of Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter); of members of the audience; of the stenographer; of the committee; of the audience. The committee members discuss school business. Audio remains muffled. Shot of the committee members from the perspective of the audience. 1:05:10: Visual: Spillane talks about setting objectives for the school Social Studies programs. Shots of the committee members; of the audience. Audio is muffled. The committee members take a vote. Committee members discuss school contract issues. Shot of Stevens; of Kathleen Kelly (President, Boston Teachers Union) speaking to another audience member; of audience members. 1:08:15: V: Stevens sets up an interview with Kelly. Stevens asks Kelly about a "freedom of choice" proposal supported by some African American parents. Kelly says that she has not yet seen the proposal; that many African American and white parents support a "freedom of choice" plan because the geocode system allows little flexibility; that parents are more interested in good education than racial statistics. Kelly says that a control mechanism must be put in place to prevent a return to segregated schools; that the plan must be given careful thought. Kelly says that the choice of educational programs is more important than the choice of school location. Stevens asks Kelly if busing is "almost dead." Kelly says that busing is no longer the only remedy for Boston schools; that busing can serve as a tool to further the goals of desegregation and educational quality. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and Kelly. Stevens and Kelly speak informally. 1:12:36: V: Stevens sets up an interview with O'Bryant. Stevens asks for O'Bryant's opinion of the "freedom of choice" proposal. O'Bryant says that parents are trying to reform the rigid geocode system; that students have been denied access to schools because of the geocode system. O'Bryant mentions students who have been denied access to the Trotter School. O'Bryant says that the parents are asking for more accessibility to the schools; that the "freedom of choice" proposal has been made into a bigger issue than it should be. O'Bryant says that the geocode system assigns students to schools based upon their residence; that the geocode system is archaic and inflexible; that the geocode system must be addressed in the consent decrees put forth by the court; that leaving the geocode system in place would have "disastrous" consequences. Stevens asks O'Bryant about NAACP intervention in the court case, and NAACP opposition to the "freedom of choice" plan. O'Bryant says that there is a lack of communication between the NAACP and supporters of the plan; that supporters of the plan want greater access to the schools. Stevens asks if the "freedom of choice" plan could result in a return to segregated schools. O'Bryant says that schools in Boston are already segregated because white parents refuse to send their children to most schools located in African American communities; that African American parents want greater access to quality schools all over the city. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and O'Bryant. O'Bryant says again that the "freedom of choice" plan does not represent a return to segregated schools. 1:16:13: V: Stevens sets up an interview with Barbara Gray (parent), who supports the "freedom of choice" plan. Gray says that the supporters of the plan want greater access to all of the schools; that supporters of the plan want an end to the rigid geocode system. Gray explains that the geocode system assigns children to schools according to address and race. Gray says that all of Boston schools need to have high standards; that the each of the schools should have different programs designed to suit specific needs; that students should be able to choose a school whose programs suit their needs. Gray says that education needs to be improved so that all of the schools are equally competitive and able to provide a good education. Stevens asks if the "freedom of choice" plan could result in a return to segregated schools. Gray says that she does not want to go back to segregated schools; that true integration does not exist in Boston because there are not enough white students in the school system; that white students might return to the system if the schools are reformed. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and Gray. Gray says that parents want more control over the education of their children. 1:19:59: V: Stevens records the closing segment of the story from outside of the headquarters of the Boston School Committee. She reports that the supporters of the "freedom of choice" plan are working on an official proposal for the end of the month; that the Massachusetts State Board of Education will propose an end to court intervention in the Boston School System. Stevens does two more takes of the closing segment.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/08/1982
Description: Interview with jazz pianist and band leader Count Basie at the Berklee Performance Center. He talks about his long career and current musicians.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/25/1982
Description: Charles Bennett interviews a longtime fisherman on the state of the fishing industry and the change in quota regulations. Boat docked at Fish Pier in snow flurries. Boston Fish Market Corporation building on pier. Seagulls hover over water in the Boston Harbor. Assorted catch offloaded by the bucketful and sorted by hand into wooden bins. Fishermen in yellow and orange rain gear. Tracking hauls wooden bins of fish. Men inside booth listening to the radio.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/06/1982
Description: Final stretch and finish line of the Boston Marathon. Wheelchair competitors crossing finish line. Blimps in above the crowd. Announcer makes comments on how closer the leading runners are to each other. Runners cross finish line. Alberto Salazar and Dick Beardsley finish very close together, running the marathon faster than anyone had in the history of the race. Kevin White awards winner Alberto Salazar with medal and laurel wreath. Third place runner, John Lodwick, crosses finish line. Fourth place runner, Bill Rodgers, crosses finish line. Other runner cross finish line. Charlotte Teske, winner of the women's race of the Boston Marathon, awarded medal and laurel wreath. Women's second place runner, Jacqueline Gareau, crosses finish line. Glenda Manzi does several takes of reporter standup. Interview with Charlotte Teske.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/19/1982
Description: Long Wharf Marriott. Chart House restaurant. New England Aquarium. Pedestrians. Parked taxi. View from Waterfront Park to expressway, Government Center skyline in background. Many shots inside Deer Island sewage treatment plant. Temperature and pressure gauges. Screen splits (top half of image appears on the bottom have of the screen) in the middle of the video.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/26/1982
Description: Exteriors of Hynes Auditorium, Prudential Center, and Boylston Street. Traffic and fire truck. Man roller skating in the road. Pedestrians and bicyclists.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/07/1982
Description: Interview with the Crown Prince of Jordan at the Ritz-Carlton. He talks about his optimism for negotiations in the Middle East. He talks about relations between individual Middle Eastern countries, specifically Jordan, Israel, and Palestine. He adds his advice to the US administration in working with the Middle Eastern countries. They have an informal discussion while getting a wide shot. Lydon reasks questions for cutaways.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/18/1982
Description: Audio goes in and out. Some video deterioration. MBTA southwest corridor construction site for orange line relocation. Urban Mass Transportation Project sign. Gov. Edward King gets out of car, shakes hands with bystanders. Secretary of Transportation James Carlin introduces King who talks about economic vitality created by largest construction project in Boston history. Signs bill transferring land from MDC. Governor King responds to question on extending Logan runways, and the actions of the board of the Massachusetts Port Authority and the executive director of Logan International Airport.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/13/1982
Description: John Lakian holds a press conference at the Parker House during his 1982 bid for governor of Massachusetts. Reporters gather and get handed press packets. Lakian and his wife enter room to applause. Lakian denies Boston Globe allegations about his background and considers suing them for libel. He takes questions from the press. Some questions concern his membership in the Republican Party. Lakian supporters call out throughout the conference.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/19/1982
Description: Second half of John Lakian press conference at the Parker House during his 1982 bid for governor for Massachusetts. He continues taking questions from the press and setting the record straight about the issues raised by the Globe article, which he claims in libelous.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/19/1982
Description: Some drop out at the beginning. Construction site of Lafayette Place. Cement truck. Workers in hard hats. Heavy equipment. Chain link fence surrounds site. Wide shot of excavated site. Volpe/Shuman campaign sign.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/10/1982
Description: No audio. Boston bank building exteriors. First National Bank of Boston. Shawmut. State Street Bank. Fidelity.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/04/1982
Description: B-roll footage of Charles Street Jail building models from various angles; footage of snow outside and jail building; Suffolk County Jail exterior and sign shots from various angles. CHARLES STREET JAIL, SUFFOLK COUNTY SHERIFF DENNIS KEARNEY, JUDGE W. ARTHUR GARRITY PRESS CONFERENCE, INTERIOR, EXTERIORS, BARBED WIRE, TRUCKS
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/08/1982
Description: No audio at beginning of video. Marquees and signs for: Publix, The Book Mart, Adult Books, First Amendment Ltd., The Scene XXX Adult Movies, 200 Book Club, Book Store, Books Peeps, Fantasy Book Shop, La Connoisseur, 14th Amendment. Some with boarded up shop fronts.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/26/1982
Description: Studio interview with Sen. Paul Tsongas. They discuss the federal government's infrastructure investment for the long term. He talks about the way both political parties are portraying the proposed program to the public. He discusses the best way to sell the conservative Ronald Reagan on the program. He talks about the difference in decisions that will be made by the federal government and state government. He describes ways they could pay for the program.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/09/1982
Description: Front and back exterior views of Faneuil Hall on gray day, showing it nestled among modern buildings. Pedestrians around building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/18/1982
Description: B-roll footage of Boston Garden box office and surrounding structures. Pedestrians and automobiles pass by. Close up of people purchasing tickets from box office window. Pans around interior of box office area; digital clock and sign; line of people waiting to purchase tickets. Close up of exterior of Causeway Ticket Agency and lighted sign with concert listings. Footage from a moving vehicle passing Boston Garden box office and building with Newport Cigarettes ad above sign. Green line trolleys enter North Station under Boston Garden building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/06/1982
Description: Byron Rushing (State Representative) addresses a rent control demonstration outside Boston City Hall. He encourages tenants to fight for their rights, urges voters not to support anti-rent control candidates, and advocates a citywide referendum on the issue. Pat Burns (Catholic Connection) speaks about Sojourner House, a shelter for homeless families and the Catholic Connection's support for rent. Boston City Councilors Ray Flynn, Michael McCormack, Christopher Iannella and Maura Hennigan confer in the chambers of the Boston City Council. Boston City Councilors Frederick Langone, Albert "Dapper" O'Neil, Terence McDermott, Bruce Bolling , and Joseph Tierney are also present. The gallery of the chambers is filled with observers, many wearing pro-rent control buttons. Ianella calls the meeting to order and the clerk reads appropriation orders and requests submitted by Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) for the approval of the council. The council discusses and votes on orders from the mayor concerning the Public Works Department and the Public Facilities Commission. The clerk reads a request from the mayor concerning the financing of a bond for the Winthrop Printing Company. The Council conducts business on the chamber floor with Langone discussing a proposed law concerning the cleanliness of dumpsters in the city and about building affordable housing instead of high-priced condominiums. Sounds cuts out near the end and then comes back in.
1:00:04: Visual: Byron Rushing (State Representative) speaks into a microphone. He says that working class and poor people need to fight for their rights as tenants. The crowd claps. Rushing says that voters must vote against politicians who do not support rent control; that rent control must be brought to the ballot as a citywide referendum. The crowd claps. Shots of the crowd outside of City Hall. A white woman addresses the crowd, saying that it is not a good idea to classify tenants as elderly, disabled or low-income; that those classes of tenants will have difficulty finding apartments. Shots of two older men in the crowd. One of them is wearing a button which reads, "Rent Control: Continue and Strengthen it. Ban condominium conversion evictions." Shot of the button. Pat Burns (Catholic Connection) addresses the crowd. Burns talks about Sojourner House, which is a shelter for homeless families. Burns says that the Catholic Connection supports rent control in order to stop the increasing number of homeless families. Shot of a man holding a rent control sign reading, "No rent control plus no condo ban equals no housing." Shots of the crowd listening to Burns. Several crowd members are holding pro-rent control signs. 1:02:23: V: The white woman addresses the crowd as they move into the City Hall building. Shots of the crowd as they enter City Hall. One woman holds up a sign reading, "Landlords get the money. Tenants get the shaft." 1:03:33: V: Boston City Councilors Ray Flynn, Michael McCormack, Christopher Ianella and Maura Hennigan confer in the chambers of the Boston City Council. Frederick Langone (Boston City Council) confers with a woman on the floor of the chambers. Langone sits down in his chair, with his cigar in his mouth. The gallery of the chambers is filled with observers. Many observers wear pro-rent control buttons. Albert "Dapper" O'Neil (Boston City Council) joins the group of councilors. 1:05:51: V: Hennigan sits in her chair on the floor of the chambers. She flips through some papers on the table in front of her. Flynn sits down in his seat. Langone lights his cigar. Terence McDermott (Boston City Council) is sitting in his seat on the floor of the chamber. Albert "Dapper" O'Neil (Boston City Council) sits in his seat. The clerk calls the roll of city council members. Ianella brings the meeting to order. 1:08:28: V: The clerk reads appropriation orders and requests submitted by Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) for the approval of the council. The council discusses and votes on orders from the mayor concerning the Public Works Department and the Public Facilities Commission. Shots of McDermott; of McCormack; of Langone; of audience members in the Council gallery. The clerk calls the council roll for a vote on the order concerning the Public Facilities Commission. Shot of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council). The clerk reads a request from the mayor concerning the financing of a bond for the Winthrop Printing Company. 1:12:03: V: Shots of audience members in the gallery; long shot of the floor of the Council Chamber from the gallery. Audio is muffled. Langone discusses a proposed law concerning the cleanliness of dumpsters in the city. More shots of audience members. 1:15:45: V: Councilors conduct business on the floor of the Chamber. Langone talks about housing. Shots of Christy George (WGBH reporter); of Bolling, Flynn and Hennigan; of Bolling; of Flynn; of Joseph Tierney (Boston City Council). The Council continues to conduct business. Langone talks about building affordable housing instead of high-priced condominiums.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/15/1982
Description: Interview with Andrew Young, Mayor of Atlanta at the Parker House. Young talks about his efforts to facilitate international trade between Atlanta businesses and third-world nations. He says that urban mayors can help local businesses by leading trade delegations and encouraging local businesses to get involved in emerging markets. Young criticizes the federal government's reliance on the military in conducting foreign policy. He says that the US must act with intelligence and rely on diplomacy to solve world problems. He talks about US involvement in Vietnam, Lebanon, and El Salvador. Young and Christy George discuss African Americans in politics. Young does not believe that a candidate should not represent one single constituency. Young says that more African Americans need to be elected as senators, mayors and governors before an African American is elected as president. George reasks questions for cutaways. Young attends a cocktail party at the Parker House. Other guests include Bruce Bolling, Boston City Councilor, and Hubie Jones, Dean of the School of Social Work at Boston University.
1:00:04: Visual: Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) is interviewed by Christy George in the Parker House. George asks about urban mayors taking on international roles. George notes that Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) is interested in Young's work in Atlanta with third-world nations; that Kevin White (Mayor of Boston) calls Boston a "world-class city." Young says that most governments help businesses; that the federal government has done little to help businesses. Young says that mayors can help local businesses. Young talks about leading trade delegations of Atlanta businessmen to other parts of the world. Young says that businessmen can gain access to government officials through the mayor. Young says that he took businesspeople, educators and a YMCA soccer team on a trip to Jamaica and Trinidad. Young says that the businesspeople did $150 million of business during a one-week trade mission. Young says that business people were allowed to see the decision-makers in foreign governments. Young says that white mayors can do the same thing. Young says that the mayors of Seattle and Indianapolis have done the same thing. Young says that there are large concentrations of Dutch and Japanese businesses in Georgia; that he is trying to build on that. George notes that African-American mayors are now dealing with third-world countries. Young says that the emerging markets are in the third world. Young says that he will visit Nigeria next week. Young says that Nigeria is buying products from Atlanta; that Nigeria is developing at a rapid rate. Young notes that Japanese and German businesses have been doing business with the third world for a long time. Young says that US businesses never needed to do business abroad until 1975. George notes that Young had been talking about doing business with the third world when he worked for Jimmy Carter (former US President). George remarks that the Democratic Party has not advocated more trade with the third world. Young says that Ronald Reagan (US President) sees everything in terms of an East-West conflict. Young says that the US needs to look beyond the East-West conflict. Young talks about US involvement in Egypt and Panama in the 1970s. Young says that diplomatic treaties can undercut communist influence. Young says that military solutions seem popular, easy and "macho." Young says that military solutions have seldom succeeded for the US or for the Soviet Union. 1:05:15: V: George asks what the Democratic Party should be doing to prepare for the 1984 elections. Young says that the Democratic Party must approach world problems with "reason and sanity." Young talks about how the US was drawn into the Vietnam War. Young says that US ships are present off the coasts of Central America and Lebanon; that the US could easily become trapped in a military situation in one of these regions. Young says that there is no military solution in Lebanon; that the US has no business there. Young says that there is no military solution in El Salvador. Young says that the US needs to show its strength through intelligence; that the US should not show its strength through destructiveness. Young says that the Democratic Party must offer clear a alternative to Reagan. Young says that the US is living on the brink of war; that this policy is insane. George asks how the Democratic Party should deal with political unrest and revolutions in the third world. Young says that the US needs to understand the impulses behind revolutions in third world country. Young says that Harry Truman (former US President) probably did not know that Ho Chi Min (former Vietnamese leader) worked as a chef at the Parker House while he was a student in Boston. Young talks about the influence of American ideas of freedom on Ho Chi Min in the 1940s. Young says that third world leaders should not be discounted as Marxists. Jump cut in videotape. George asks if African Americans need an African American candidate for president in 1984 in order to gain political influence. Young says that he disagrees; that politicians should not represent only one segment of the population. Young says that the present Democratic candidates have strong records on civil rights and minority issues. Young says that African Americans need to be involved in the campaign of a winning candidate. Young says that candidates never live up to promises made at the convention. George asks if it is time for an African American presidential candidate. Young says that there need to be more African American mayors, governors and senators before there is an African American president. George closes the interview. 1:09:57: V: The crew takes cutaway shots of George. 1:14:40: V: Footage of a cocktail reception at the Parker House. Attendees eat, drink, and socialize. Attendees include Hubie Jones (Dean of the School of Social Work, Boston University), Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council), Carol Bolling (wife of Bruce Bolling), Young, and others. Shot of Young socializing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/22/1983
Description: Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) endorses Mel King (candidate for Mayor of Boston) at a press conference at Northeastern University. Jim King (Senior Vice President, Northeastern University) introduces Young. Young talks about King's candidacy for mayor of Boston. King says that he and Young have discussed ideas for local job creation and for trade between local businesses and third world markets. In response to audience questions, Young talks about his recommendation that King set up a trade mission to export local manufactured goods. King discusses the value of his endorsement of King and the differences among the political situations in Boston, Chicago, and Philadelphia. Young says that he does not consider Boston to be a racist city. Young talks about the potential impact of the African American community on the election outcome. Young refuses to comment on the the presidential campaign of Jesse Jackson.
1:00:06: Visual: Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) walks sits down at a table next to Mel King (candidate for Mayor of Boston). Mel King's campaign signs are visible on the walls of the room. Behind King and Young is a Northeastern University flag. A young African American woman announces that Young and "future mayor" Mel King will speak; that they will take questions after. Jim King (Senior Vice President, Northeastern University) introduces Young. He reviews Young's accomplishments. Shots of the audience. Young says that King's leadership will benefit Boston. Young talks about the importance of housing and neighborhood revitalization. Young says that King will work to reduce unemployment; that King will work with existing businesses and help to build new businesses. Young says that King is familiar with urban problems. Young commends King for his strong marriage, his family, and his values. 1:03:33: V: King calls Young "Mayor Class." King says that Young is one of the classiest politicians in the world; that Young has a world view which allows him make connections between his city and events in the greater world. King says that he and Young discussed how to create jobs in Boston; that Young has given him advice on how to unlock third world markets; that the city can help neighborhoods and businesses take advantages of these markets to create jobs. King thanks Young for coming to Boston. The audience applauds. 1:05:53: V: The audience asks questions. An audience member asks Young about his experiences as the Mayor of Atlanta. Young says that it is "fun" to solve local problems. Young says that he has recommended that King set up an export trading company to help export the city's manufactured goods. Young talks about trade missions that he has undertaken as Mayor of Atlanta. Young says that he has gone on trade missions to Trinidad and Jamaica, and is planning a trade mission to Nigeria. Young talks about how trade missions can benefit local businesses and industry. Young says that he and Henry Cisneros (Mayor of San Antonio) share the leadership of a task force for the National League of Cities; that mayors can create jobs by promoting international opportunities for local industry. Young says that Boston could export many products; that King is concerned about creating jobs through exports. Young says that he appointed a woman as Deputy Chief of Police in Atlanta; that her appointment heightened awareness of crimes against women in the city. Young says that it is important for a mayor to be responsive to problems of those who have been ignored; that King will be responsive. 1:09:59: V: An audience member asks Young about the value of his endorsement of King. Young says that Boston needs a good mayor; that he does not judge Boston to be a racist city on the basis of the actions of a few "hoodlums"; that there are voters who will elect King on the basis of his values and his positions on unemployment and crime; that skin color is not important. Young says that he is here as an urban mayor to remind people about important urban issues; that he is able to get television exposure for King. The audience applauds. An audience member asks Young about similarities in the political situations in Boston, Chicago and Philadelphia. Young says that there are few similarities; that there was a "revolution" against the mayor in Chicago; that there is more racial antagonism in Chicago than there is in Boston. Young says that Wilson Goode (candidate for Mayor of Philadelphia) will be elected because of his experience and broad support. Young says that he hopes King will emerge with broad support in Boston. Young refers to Boston's revolutionary history, saying that he hopes the city will rally around King. 1:14:11: V: An audience member points out that Boston has a small African American community with a record of low voter turnout. Young uses the example of Los Angeles as a city with a small minority population and a popularly elected African American mayor. An audience member asks Young to speculate on the chances of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) being elected to the presidency. Young says that it is too soon to speculate on anyone's campaign for the presidency. 1:16:23: V: Young answers more questions from the audience. Shots of Young from behind the audience and media; of members of the audience. Audio cuts in and out during this segment. Young talks about the need for "open and honest" government and a good relationship with the press. King answers a question about his campaign. The moderator announces an end to the press conference. 1:18:45: V: Young and King greet members of the audience and the media.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/22/1983
Description: Mayoral candidates Mel King and Ray Flynn participate in a forum on education sponsored by the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC) at English High School. Flynn talks about his experience in government and his commitment to the public schools. He notes his familiarity with the city and school budgets, and he discusses the importance of public education and public housing. King stresses the importance of early childhood education programs and a "child-centered" school system. King speaks of the need for the mayor to work together with the Boston School Committee. King says that the city must continue to demonstrate its support of integrated schools. King and Flynn respond to a question about requiring students to pass a standardized test in order to graduate. Tape 1 of 2.
1:00:05: Visual: Four members of the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC) sit at a table on stage at English High School. A member of the CWEC welcomes mayoral candidates Ray Flynn and Mel King to the annual meeting of the CWEC. Flynn and King are seated at a table at the center of the stage. Shots of Flynn and King. The CWEC member says that the candidates and the audience will discuss the future of public education in Boston. 1:01:55: V: Flynn thanks the moderator and the CWEC. Flynn mentions his experience as a state legislator and a member of the Boston City Council. He says that he was a student in the Boston Public Schools. Flynn congratulates the CWEC for their commitment ot public education. Flynn stresses the importance of public education and a good school system. Flynn says that he has a Master's Degree in education from Harvard; that he is committed to education. Flynn says that he would visit a few public schools and a few public housing projects on his first day as mayor; that education and public housing will be major concerns for his administration. Flynn says that the mayor should be involved in public education; that politicians in Boston have distanced themselves from the public schools since desegregation. Flynn says that the mayor should serve as an ex-officio member of the Boston School Committee; that the mayor needs to be aware of the situation in the schools. Flynn says that he is familiar with the city and school budgets. Flynn says that fiscal stability and predictable student placements are important for the schools. The audience applauds. 1:07:56: V: King thanks the audience and the CWEC. King says that the students in the school system must be served from birth to graduation; that early childhood education programs are important. King says that resources must be allocated to support Head Start programs and other early childhood education programs. King says that "child-centered" school system must guarantee education for all students; that the school system must believe that all children can be educated. King says that the mayor must work with the Boston School Committee; that the members of the School Committee will be newly elected; that the mayor and the Boston School Committee must determine the problems and the needs of the school system. King says that the newly elected School Committee must be unified in support of integrated schools. Jump cut in videotape. King says that he would provide leadership on the issue of education; that he would work to create a good climate and to end divisiveness on the issue of education. King says that the Boston Public School System must demonstrate its commitment to integrated education. The audience applauds. 1:14:52: V: An audience member asks if students should pass a standardized test in order to graduate from high school. King says that standards need to be established in the early grades as well as upon graduation. King says that the school administration must be held responsible for the education of the students; that diagnostic testing and evaluation is needed at every grade level, not just upon graduation.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/13/1983
Description: State Senator Jack Backman opens a press conference in support of Mel King (Boston mayoral candidate) in front of the State House. Other participants include Byron Rushing (State Representative from the South End), Mary Jane Gibson (State Representative from Belmont), Susan Schur (State Representative from Newton), Mary Goode (former State Representative from Roxbury), and Barney Frank (US Congressman). Frank voices his support for King's candidacy and discusses the reasons for his endorsement, specifically, Frank talks about King's views on economic development and about his leadership abilities. Frank says that King is a creative leader who will bring "enlightened policy" to the city. Various reporters point out that Frank endorsed Dennis Kearney (candidate for mayor of Boston) in the primary elections. King arrives, shakes hands with Frank, thanks endorsers, and asserts that his administration will focus on employment, education, and the youth of the city.
1:00:10: Visual: Shot of a Mel King campaign sign. Jack Backman (State Senator) opens a press conference in front of the State House. He notes that Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) has not yet arrived. He voices his support for King. He introduces Byron Rushing (State Representative from the South End), Mary Jane Gibson (State Representative from Belmont), Susan Schur (State Representative from Newton), Mary Goode (former State Representative from Roxbury). Bachman lists off some state representatives who are due to arrive shortly at the press conference. Shots of Schur; of Rushing. Bachman introduces Barney Frank (US Congressman). 1:02:33: V: Frank says that he will support King for mayor of Boston; that he served with King for eight years in the legislature. Frank says that King is an advocate for enlightened policy for the city of Boston. Frank talks about King's ideas for economic development programs; about the Community Development Corporation. Frank says that King's ideas for development are in tune with the needs of city residents; that King is sensitive to the problems of displacement and the needs of area residents. Frank says that King can speak effectively on behalf of a diverse group of people; that King was an effective and respected legislator. Frank says that King will make an excellent mayor. A reporter asks Frank about his previous endorsements for mayor. Frank says that he is not always good at picking the winning candidate; that he speaks out on behalf of candidates who have good ideas and programs. A reporter notes that Frank endorsed Dennis Kearney (State Representative) in the primary election. He asks Frank how Kearney would have been a better mayor than King. Frank says that he endorsed Kearney in the primary because he thought Kearney was a good candidate with a good chance of winning. Frank says that Kearney and King take similar positions on the issues. Shot of King supporters standing behind Frank. Shot of Christy George (WGBH reporter). Audio is muffled. 1:07:45: V: Frank says that the many of the candidates in the race had similar positions on the issues; that King has helped shape the debate on the issues; that King was one of the first people to talk about the adverse effects of development on the elderly and the poor. Frank says that King is responsible for focusing the attention of the city on the management of economic development in a compassionate and effective manner. Frank says that he respects Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston); that King is more creative, thoughtful and consistent candidate; that King has proven himself to be an effective leader. Frank refuses to speculate on who he would have endorsed if King were not in the race. Frank says that he is endorsing a candidate because he is an elected official with an opinion; that he does not know what effect his endorsement has on a candidate's chances. A reporter asks Frank about the differences between King and Flynn. Frank says that the differences between the candidates stem from their past records; that King has proven himself to be a consistent and effective leader on economic issues for many years; that King has the capacity to stay with these issues. Frank notes that he does not agree with King on a mayor's role in foreign policy. A reporter asks Frank if King needs to highlight the issues on which he differs from Flynn. Frank says that King has stuck with the same issues for ten years; that his leadership has brought attention to these issues. Frank says that this has been a good mayoral campaign; that it has focused on issues. 1:13:15: V: Frank jokes with the reporters about his endorsement bringing in the voters from Brookline and Newton. A reporter asks Frank how King can get white liberal voters to support him instead of Flynn. Frank says that King can win voter support by focusing on the issues; that his positions on economic development may win over voters from traditionally "conservative" neighborhoods. A reporter asks Frank about his campaign advice for King. Frank says that King is doing the right thing by focusing on the issues; that King has proven his ability to be a leader on the issues. 1:16:32: V: King's supporters clap as he arrives at the State House. King and Frank shake hands. King thanks Frank and the assembled state representatives for their endorsements and support. King says that his administration will make the city open and accessible; that his administration will focus on employment, education, and the youth of the city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/21/1983
Description: Barney Frank (US Representative) and Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) shake hands in front of the Massachusetts State House. Frank has endorsed King for mayor of Boston. Christy George interviews King in front of the State House. King talks about the current policies of the White administration and White's recent appointments to the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA). King says that his administration would eliminate the BRA in order to consolidate city development under a community development office. King criticizes White for making mayoral appointments without regard for his successor. King adds that the current police commissioner must be forced to resign. King says that the Boston City Council should not approve White's new housing proposal. He adds that the City Council should wait until the next mayor is elected before making new policy.
1:00:05: Visual: Mel King stands in front of the State House with his supporters and talks to the media about his candidacy for mayor. He talks about the "politics of inclusion." A reporter asks King how he feels about being "Barney Frank's second choice." King says that Barney Frank (US Representative) makes good choices; that he is glad to be one of Frank's choices. Mel King thanks the media. He shakes hands with Frank. Frank and King speak to one another. 1:01:12: V: Christy George sets up an interview with King. George asks King if Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) is consolidating power. She also asks him about mayoral appointments to city jobs. King says that political patronage is unfortunate; that White has not considered his appointments from the viewpoint of his successor. King says that the police commissioner must be asked to resign; that the new administration must work around the commissioner if he refuses to resign. George comments that the business community is wary of King and Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston). She asks if White is making appointments to the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) before the mayoral elections in order to satisfy the business community. King says that the new administration must take a balanced approach to development; that the needs of the whole city must be considered. King says that his administration would consolidate the development functions of the city; that his administration would work to eliminate the BRA board as it is now; that a community development office would oversee development in the neighborhoods and in the downtown area. George notes that White's appointments to the BRA are not unusual for a mayor leaving office. King says that these candidates will be "holdovers"; that "holdover" appointments should only be allowed for a minimum period of time; that these appointments undermine public confidence in government. George asks King about White's plans to create a Neighborhood Housing Trust. King says that he hopes that the Boston City Council will not approve the program until a new mayor has been elected. King says that he will lobby the council not to approve the program. George ends the interview.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/21/1983
Description: Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston), accompanied by 15 supporters of all ages, greets and talks with residents in a housing project. King walks through the streets with children and adult supporters. The children hold campaign signs and chant "Vote for Mel King" and "Mel King for mayor." A campaign truck voices support for King. King greets drivers in their cars.
1:00:06: V: Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) walks across a parking lot and continues down a street. King is surrounded by 15 supporters of all ages. Supporters on the street hold campaign signs for King. A campaign truck drives slowly down the street; the driver voices support for King over the loudspeaker. King enters the front door of an apartment in a housing project. His supporters wait for him outside. King exits the project and crosses the street to the housing project on the other side. King walks through the project, shaking hands with passersby and greeting people. King encourages people to come out of their houses to talk to him. A man comes out to his front stoop to talk to King. King continues to walk through the project, greeting people. 1:03:25: V: King greets and shakes hands with four young African American men. King continues to walk through the projects, followed by his supporters. He greets two older women. 1:04:15: V: King approaches the Shawmut Variety store. His young supporters chant, "Vote for Mel King." King greets people as he passes them in the street. King greets drivers as they sit in their car at a red light. He gestures to his young supporters to stay on the sidewalk. King continues to greet drivers in their cars as they pass by on the street. His young supporters chant, "Mel King for mayor."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/01/1983
Description: B-roll of campaign workers holding campaign signs and handing out flyers for mayoral candidates Ray Flynn and Mel King, and other political candidates. Poll workers check in voters at polling stations. Voters stand in line to vote. A poll worker holds a stack of absentee ballots. Exteriors of the Mel King for Mayor headquarters. Campaign staff members work and make telephone calls at the campaign headquarters of Flynn and King. A Flynn worker telephones voters to remind them to vote for Flynn. Campaign workers for King and Flynn are gathered outside of a polling station in the evening. Some campaign workers approach voters. One campaign worker remarks on the cold weather. Voters stand in line and vote at a polling station. Shot of a voting booth.
1:00:00: Visual: Shot of a street corner posted with campaign signs for Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) and Craig Lankhorst (candidate for Boston School Committee). Footage of campaign workers holding signs for Mark Roosevelt (candidate for Boston City Council), King, Lankhorst, and Abby Browne (candidate for Boston School Committee). The workers give out flyers to people as they enter a building. Shot of poll workers sitting at a table. Voters are lined up in front of the table. 1:00:48: V: Shots of campaign workers in front of a building, holding signs for Roosevelt, King, Browne, Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston), and others. Shots of the interior of a a polling station. Poll workers are seated at a table. Two women confer on one side of the room. One of the women examines a stack of absentee ballots, which she holds in her hands. Shot of a voter list being examined by a poll worker. Shots of poll workers at the table with the voter lists. Shot of the stack of absentee ballots on the poll workers' table; of the cover of the "City of Boston List of Registered Voters" for 1983. 1:04:17: V: Shots of the headquarters for the King mayoral campaign. King campaign signs are posted in the window. A man is heard speaking into a bullhorn, urging voters to vote for King. Shots of the crowded interior of the King headquarters. Several campaign workers are present. One campaign worker is organizing a ride to the polls for a voter. Shot of a sign for the Rainbow Coalition. 1:05:57: V: Shots of the interior of the Flynn campaign headquarters. Campaign workers are telephoning voters to remind them to vote for Flynn. 1:06:47: V: Shot of two campaign workers standing in front of a building, holding Flynn campaign signs. In the background is a King supporter with a King campaign sign. People are gathered in front of the building. Shot of the white King supporter talking to an African American man. Shots of the people gathered in front of the building; of two men walking away from the building. 1:08:18: V: Footage of a woman entering a polling station in the evening. She refuses the flyers offered to her by campaign workers. The campaign workers joke about how cold it is outside. The campaign workers hand out more flyers to voters as they enter the polling station. Shot of campaign signs covering a pole on the sidewalk of a busy street. 1:09:48: V: Footage of the interior of a polling station. Poll workers sit behind a table as they check in voters. A white voter is shown to a polling booth. Poll workers continue to check in voters. 1:12:00: V: Footage of an African American male voter checking in with the poll workers. Voters stand in line to enter the polling booths. Shot of a ballot on a voting machine with levers. Shot of voters feet as they stand in the voting booths.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/05/1983