Description: Marcus Jones reports that Dr. Laval Wilson, Superintendent of Boston Public Schools, has announced cuts to the school budget. Jones outlines the nature of the cost-saving measures and reports that additional cuts may be necessary. Wilson talks about the budget at a press conference. Interview with John Nucci, President of Boston School Committee, about Wilson's attempt to cut costs in the budget. Jones notes that the Boston School Committee has rejected Wilson's proposal to consolidate eight schools. School Committee meeting. This tape includes additional footage from the end of a news story on mental illness.
1:01:08: Marcus Jones reports that Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) has announced cuts to the school budget. Visual: Shots of Wilson at a press conference; of an audience member looking at a handout of the budget. Footage of Wilson saying that he was faced with difficult decisions when he made the budget cuts. Shots of a list of names of school administrators targeted for layoffs. Jones reports that the superintendent submitted a $292 million budget last month; that the mayor had allotted $288 million for the school budget. Jones notes that the total for the new budget is $289.3 million; that more budget cuts may be necessary. V: Footage of Wilson saying that he has tried not to cut programs; that he has made minimal cuts in the school support staff. Shot of the printed cover of Wilson's preliminary budget. Jones reports that Wilson has recommended layoffs for 90 teachers, administrators and office workers; that Wilson has cut chosen not to implement a $2 million program geared toward reducing the school dropout rate; that Wilson had eliminated a $6 million request for repairs to aging school facilities. V: Footage of John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) saying that Wilson has made a good effort to preserve educational programs while staying within the budget. Jones reports that the School Committee vetoed Wilson's proposal to cut costs by closing or consolidating eight schools. Jones notes that Wilson has made cuts elsewhere in the budget. V: Shots of audience members at a School Committee meeting. The audience members hold up signs protesting school closings. Shot of a sign reading, "JP is a pleasure because JP is a treasure." Shots of Wilson at the meeting. Footage of Nucci saying that the School Committee will not cut educational programs for at-risk youth; that the Boston Public Schools have an "astronomical dropout rate." Marcus Jones stands outside the offices of the Boston School Committee. Jones reports that the School Committee will discuss the new budget proposal next Tuesday; that members of the public will have an opportunity to weigh in on the proposed budget.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/14/1986
Description: Christopher Lydon reports that Mayor Ray Flynn is requesting the creation of a Boston Employment Commission in order to boost the number of Boston residents working in Boston jobs. The Flynn administration would like the Boston work force to be 10% female, 25% minority and 50% Boston residents. Interview with Flynn about employment in Boston. Interview with City Councilor James Kelly, who says that sanctions will be imposed unfairly on the construction industry. Interviews with Mel King and City Councilor Thomas Menino. Lydon notes that critics believe that compliance with the ordinance would cost jobs. Brief interviews with construction workers and white-collar workers about the proposed ordinance. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Minister Don Mohammad speaks out against drug traffic in Roxbury
1:00:02: Visual: Footage of a white male construction worker being interviewed on the street. The man says that he is from Boston. Hope Kelly (WGBH reporter) asks him which neighborhood he is from. The man says that he is actually from Billerica. The man says that he avoids telling people that he is not from Boston. Christopher Lydon reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) is requesting the creation of the Boston Employment Commission; that the Commission's goal would be to boost the number of Boston residents working on Boston jobs. V: Footage of Flynn being interviewed. Flynn says that Boston is experiencing a significant growth period; that there are plenty of opportunities for everyone. Flynn says that people are not fighting over crumbs. Footage of a white male construction worker being interviewed on the street. The man says that Flynn wants to put the "outsiders" out of work; that the "outsiders" are the true professionals who have been in the union for over ten years. Footage of another white male construction worker being interviewed. The man asks where he is supposed to go to work. The man says that the work is in the city of Boston; that he should be allowed to work there. Lydon reports that many construction workers fear displacement by the goals set by the Flynn administration. Lydon reports that the Flynn administration would like the Boston work force to be 10% female, 25% minority and 50% Boston residents. V: Shot of Boston City Hall. Lydon says that the present work force does not resemble Flynn's proposed work force. V: Footage of Hope Kelly interviewing construction workers at International Place. Two white male construction workers say that they are from North Attleborough. Another white male construction worker says that he is from Canton; that ninety percent of the workers on his job are not living in the city. Footage of Hope Kelly interviewing white-collar workers in Post Office Square. A white male says that he is a commuter. Another white male says that he is from Walpole. A white female says that she is from Newton. Another white female says that she is from Brookline. A third white female says that she is from Quincy. Lydon reports that Flynn's proposed ordinance would change the demographics of the work force in the public and private sectors. Lydon says that the greatest opposition so far comes from the unions; that the construction unions say that their field is being singled out. V: Shots of corporate workers crossing the street near Government Center; of a man carrying a brief case as he crosses the street. Shot of two white corporate workers conversing on the sidewalk. Shot of an African American construction worker talking to white colleagues. Shot of the State Street Bank building. Lydon reports that the unions have a political ally in James Kelly (Boston City Council and Sheet Metalworkers Union). V: Footage of James Kelly being interviewed. Kelly says that Flynn's ordinance talks about good faith efforts and voluntary agreements between the city and major corporations. Kelly says that sanctions will be imposed on construction companies. Lydon reports that the sanctions include potential fines against developers whose hiring practices do not meet the standards of the ordinance. Lydon notes that the mayor has issues two previous ordinances with similar goals. V: Shot of a backhoe excavating dirt at a construction site. Footage of Mel King (candidate for US Representative) being interviewed outside of his campaign offices. King says that the mayor has been unable to put "teeth" in the ordinance. Lydon reports that Flynn supporters point to progress. V: Footage of Thomas Menino (Boston City Council) being interviewed. Menino says that some trades are up to 20% and higher. Menino says that progress is being made. Menino says that the city has not yet imposed any sanctions on the construction trades. Lydon reports that King believes that sanctions are necessary. V: Footage of King being interviewed. King says that the ordinance needs "teeth." King says that there is no real monitoring process. Lydon reports that critics believe that compliance with the ordinance could cost jobs. Flynn disagrees with critics. Flynn says that at least six major public works projects are imminent. V: Shot of Flynn. Lydon reports that many workers do not believe Flynn. V: Footage of a white male construction worker being interviewed by Hope Kelly. The construction worker says that he does not believe Flynn. He asks Hope Kelly if she believes Flynn.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/24/1986
Description: David Boeri reports on a demonstration by members of ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now), outside of the offices of Mayor Ray Flynn. Demonstrators advocate for more affordable housing in Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan. Footage of Peggy Jackson (ACORN demonstrator) and Neil Sullivan (Director of housing policy for the Flynn administration) debating the administration's affordable housing policy. Boeri notes that the demonstrators demanded the deed to a vacant lot in order to develop affordable housing themselves.
1:00:03: Visual: Shot of a multi-colored, hand-drawn sign reading, "Welcome to the mayor's office." A group of demonstrators stand outside of the mayor's office chanting, "Mayor Flynn, come on out." One of the demonstrators holds a sign reading, "ACORN: Housing Now." The demonstrators are affiliated with ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now). V: Shot of an office telephone; of the demonstrators. Shot of a sign reading, "Shelter is our need. Give us the deed." David Boeri reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) refused to meet with the demonstrators; that the demonstrators are fighting for affordable housing in Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan. V: Footage of Peggy Jackson (ACORN demonstrator) saying that her organization can build affordable housing if they are given one lot to build on. Boeri reports that the demonstrators say that the housing that the city calls "affordable" is not affordable for Roxbury residents; that the median income in Roxbury is $13,000. V: Footage of Jackson talking to Neil Sullivan (Director of housing policy for Flynn). Jackson says that fewer than 500 units of the city's affordable housing are affordable for Roxbury residents. Sullivan says that fewer than 500 housing units were built by the White administration between 1981 and 1983. Boeri reports that Sullivan blames the housing crisis on Kevin White (former Mayor of Boston) and a lack of federal money. Boeri reports that the Flynn adminstration is bundling low-income units with high-income units; that the Flynn administration is using the high-income units to subsidize the low-income units. V: Shots of Jackson; of the demonstrators. Footage of Sullivan saying that the Flynn administration has built over 500 low-income and moderate-income units in the first 6 months of 1986. The demonstrators respond that they cannot afford these units. Boeri reports that the demonstrators will have to incorporate themselves as non-profit developers before they can bid on a vacant lot. V: Footage of Sullivan telling the demonstrators that other groups have incorporated themselves and are bidding on land. Jackson tells Sullivan that the demonstrators do not have time to incorporate themselves; that another 3,000 people will be homeless before they are able to complete the legal paperwork. Shot of Sullivan. Boeri reports that the ACORN demonstrators ended up walking out; that the demonstrators say that they will take over the land next week. V: Footage of the demonstrators leaving the mayor's office.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/14/1986
Description: Christopher Lydon reports on a controversy over the distribution of contraception in schools. Lydon notes that the Adolescent Issues Task Force of the Boston School Department has recommended that birth control be distributed to students as part of a comprehensive adolescent health program in the city's middle schools and high schools. Lydon's report includes footage of an NAACP press conference with Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP), Joseph Casper (member, Boston School Committee), and Grace Romero (NAACP board member). Robinson and Casper condemn the proposal as racist. Robinson says that the initiative targets African American students. Lydon's report includes footage from interviews with Hubie Jones (member, Adolescent Issues Task Force), Dr. Howard Spivak (member Adolescent Issues Task Force) and Dr. Deborah Prothrow-Stith (Chairwoman, Adolescent Issues Task Force). Jones, Spivak and Prothrow-Stith defend the proposal. Spivak and Prothrow-Stith discuss statistics relating to teen pregnancy. Lydon's report also features interviews with students about teen pregnancy and footage of students in schools.
1:00:11: Visual: Footage of an African American woman saying that she knows "what is going on" with teenagers from listening to them talk. Christopher Lydon reports that teenagers are starting to have sex at an early age. V: Footage of Dr. Howard Spivak (member, Adolescent Issues Task Force) saying that he is alarmed at the numbers of teenagers who are having sex. Spivack says that 25% of teenage girls are sexually active before the age of 15. Footage of Dr. Deborah Prothow-Stith (Chairwoman, Adolescent Issues Task Force) saying that one million girls under the age of nineteen become pregnant each year; that 600,000 of those girls give birth. Prothow-Stith says that teenage pregnancy has become an epidemic. Footage of Spivak quoting a statistic which predicts that 40% of fourteen-year olds will become pregnant before their twentieth birthday. Shot of teenage girls descending a staircase at a school. Lydon reports that the Boston School Department's Adolescent Issues Task Force is recommending the distribution of birth control as part of a comprehensive adolescent health program at Boston's middle schools and high schools. V: Shot of a collection of diaphragms in a health clinic. Shot of a clinic worker and a teenage girl at a school health clinic. Lydon reports that the proposal has been heavily criticized. V: Shot of the street outside of the Boston NAACP office. Footage of Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP) at a press conference. Robinson says that the NAACP is opposed to the distribution of birth control in school health clinics. Joseph Casper (member, Boston School Committee) and Grace Romero (former member, Boston School Committee and NAACP board member) stand beside Robinson at the press conference. Lydon points out that Casper and Romero are unlikely allies for Robinson. V: Footage of Robinson saying that the plan introduces sexual devices into the schools under the guise of a health initiative. Robinson says that African American schools and school districts are the targets of these plans; that the plans are a form of "social engineering." Lydon notes that Robinson believes the proposal to be "insidiously racist." V: Footage of Hubie Jones (member, Adolescent Issues Task Force) saying that the proposal has nothing to do with race. Footage of Casper saying that the proposal targets inner city students; that there are no proposals to distribute birth control among white suburban students. Casper says that "something is afoot." Footage of Jones saying that it is genocidal to allow large numbers of African American teenage girls to become pregnant. Lydon reports that Jones sees the proposal as a "regrettable necessity," needed to combat the incidence of pregnancy in young girls. V: Shots of teenage students in a study hall. Footage of Prothow-Stith saying that the Task Force is concerned about the increase of pregnancies among girls aged ten to fourteen. Footage of a young African American male student saying that a lot of teenage girls are pregnant; of a young Hispanic male student saying that he knows a girl in ninth-grade with a child. Footage of another African American male student saying that he knows a thirteen-year old girl who became pregnant; that the girl has dropped out of school. Footage of a white female student saying that she knows eighth grade girls who are pregnant; that it is wrong for young girls to be pregnant. Shots of students outside of a school. Lydon says that everyone seems to agree that young girls should not be pregnant.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1986
Description: Marcus Jones reports that a group of minority developers will work with Mayor Ray Flynn and the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) to develop a multi-million dollar complex including office, retail, and residential space in downtown Boston. The complex will replace a downtown parking garage. Jones reports that Flynn's "parcel to parcel linkage program" will link downtown development to development in minority neighborhoods. Jones adds that this project will be linked to a parcel of land in Roxbury. Flynn and the developers, called the Columbia Plaza Associates, hold a press conference to announce plans for the development. Interviews with President of City Council Bruce Bolling and Davis Woo of the Chinese Investment Group about the need for development in minority neighborhoods. Interview with Stephen Coyle, the BRA Commissioner, about opportunities for minority involvement in development. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Community leaders talk about the significance of the African Meeting House and Renovation of the African Meeting House
1:00:30: Visual: Shots of downtown Boston; of construction in downtown Boston. Marcus Jones reports that $7 billion has been invested in construction in dowtown Boston over the past nine years. V: Shot of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and a group of minority developers. Jones reports that a group of minority developers are working with Flynn through his "parcel to parcel linkage program"; that the developers will work with the Flynn administraton on a multi-million dollar development which will replace a downtown parking garage. V: Shot of the downtown parking garage. Footage of Flynn saying that a united partnership has been created with members of the Asian, African American, and Hispanic communities. Jones reports that the developers have called themselves the Columbia Plaza Associates; that the developers have raised $2.5 million of their $5.7 million goal. V: Shot of an African American developer standing among the group. Jones notes that the developers represent an important part of Flynn's plan to link downtown development to development in minority neighborhoods such as Chinatown and Roxbury. V: Footage of Bruce Bolling (President, Boston City Council) saying that "those who have been factored out will now be factored in." Footage of Davis Woo (Chinese Investment Group) saying that the developers will work toward buiding new housing in Chinatown; that there is not enough housing in Chinatown. Jones reports that city officials expect to see a development with office, retail, and housing space built to replace the parking garage; that the project is valued at $400 million; that $100 million is earmarked for the minority developers who have won the right to co-develop the project. V: Shot of the parking garage; of a relief of the seal of the city of Boston set into the wall of the garage. Footage of Stephen Coyle (Commissioner, Boston Redevelopment Authority) saying that the minority developers have the "inside track" to develop the project; that this project marks the beginning of a "new era" in the city. Jones reports that up to $15 million spent to purchase the land from the city will be spent by the minority developers to create jobs and to build offices, stores and housing on a 5-acre parcel of land near the Ruggles MBTA Station in Roxbury. V: Overhead shot of the parcel of land in Roxbury. Footage of Coyle saying that the Boston economy will remain strong for the next decade; that teams of minority developers will be able to take advantage of new economic opportunities. Footage of Bolling saying that the work of minority developers will ensure future minority participation in the city. Jones reports that city officials will designate a formal development team for the linkage project in the winter; that construction is slated to start in the spring of 1988. V: Shot of the parking garage.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/19/1986
Description: David Boeri reports that Jesse Jackson spoke at the Massachusetts State House about the importance of access to higher education. Boeri notes that some students cannot afford higher education because of the increasing costs of higher education and federal cuts in student aid. Many supporters turned out to listen to Jackson. Jackson talks to the audience about the importance of education. Jackson addresses the media after his speech.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Kevin Sheehan (State Student Association of Massachusetts) talking about college students who must work forty hours per week on top of taking classes. Footage of Mike Ferrigno (State Student Association of Massachusetts) addressing a crowd at the State House about the debt incurred by many students in college. David Boeri reports that many low- and middle-income college students are incurring heavy debt in colleges; that some students can not afford to go to college. V: Shot of students walking on a campus. Boeri reports that speakers at a State House rally attacked federal cuts in federal aid to students. Boeri notes that the cuts come at a time when tuition and the cost of living are increasing; that grants are less easy to obtain. V: Shot of speakers and the audience inside the State House. Footage of Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) speaking about the importance of access to education. Boeri reports that Jackson said that universities have let the enrollment numbers fall for African American, minority, and low-income students. V: Shots of the members of the audience, including Mel King (community activist), Bill Owens (former state senator) and Shirley Owens Hicks (state representative). Footage of Jackson urging students to protest cuts in student aid. Jackson condemns the priorities of Ronald Reagan (US President). Jackson says that Reagan is "embarking on a trillion dollar misadventure in space." Jackson tells students that they need to stay sober, fight the Star Wars program and to "vote with Red Sox fever." The audience applauds as members rise to their feet. Footage of Jackson speaking to the media after his speech. Jackson uses the parable of Jesus Christ to illustrate society's obligation to cater to the needs of the poor and needy. Jackson says that many children are "locked out and living in the manger." Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) is visible behind Jackson. Boeri reports that the State Student Association has registered over 5,000 new student voters; that the students will vote for more affordable education in November.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/17/1986
Description: David Boeri reports on the Silver Shield case. Boeri reviews the facts of the case and the allegations against the officers involved. Interview with Richard Armstead (Boston Police Department), who talks about the case. Boeri notes that police officers William Dunn and William Kennefick were cleared of the allegations against them after a third investigation into the case by the Boston Police Department. Press conference with Francis "Mickey" Roache (Commissioner, Boston Police Department), Albert Sweeney (Boston Police Department), Arthur Morgan (Boston Police Department), and Minister Don Muhammad (Roxbury Community leader). Roache says that there is not evidence of a crime having been committed. Boeri reports that he has discovered two more police officers who have information on the case. The report includes footage of Boeri interviewing a man in a darkened room. The man's appearance and voice are altered. The man gives information about the rape at the Silver Shield Club. Boeri reports that the two witnesses have requested anonymity for fear of reprisals. He adds that the witnesses' story casts doubt on the story told by the accused officers. Boeri says that he will not reveal his sources.
1:00:04: Visual: Shot of Richard Armstead (Detective, Boston Police Department) walking down a street and entering a house. David Boeri reports that Armstead is "waging a one-man war within the Boston Police Department." Boeri reports that Armstead claims that an African American teenage girl was raped by white police officers at the Silver Shield Club in Roxbury in July of 1982. Boeri notes that Armstead has accused William Dunn (Boston Police Department) of perpetrating the act; that Armstead accuses William Kennefick (Boston Police Department) and six or seven other police officers of witnessing the rape. [Shots of black and white photos of Dunn and Kennifick; of the exterior of the Silver Shield Club in Roxbury.] Boeri notes that Armstead believes that Lucia Kai (murdered Roxbury resident) was the girl who was raped at the club; that Kai was found murdered in Franklin Park in August of 1982. V: Shot of a color photo of Kai; of Franklin Park. Boeri reports that Armstead claims that William Celester (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department) told him about the rape; that Armstead says that Celester learned about the rape from Jose Garcia (Detective, Boston Police Department). V: Shot of Celester in uniform; of a color photo of Garcia. Boeri reports that Celester told Armstead that Jose Garcia (Boston Police Department) was sleeping in the backroom of the Club; that Garcia was awoken by screams. V: Footage of Armstead being interviewed by Boeri in his home. Armstead says that Celester told him that Garcia witnessed a white police officer forcing an African American teenage girl to perform oral sex at gunpoint. Shots of photos of Kennefick, Garcia and Dunn. Boeri reports that the Dunn, Kennefick and Garcia deny that the incident ever happened; that they have taken polygraph tests to prove their innocence. Boeri notes that Celester says that he was telling Armstead a rumor. V: Shot of a color photo of Celester. Boeri notes that the men were cleared last January after a third investigation into the case by the Police Department. V: Footage of Francis Roache (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) at a press conference in January of 1986. Roache says that there is no evidence of a crime having been committed at the Silver Shield Club. Shots of the exterior of the club. Boeri reports that the Ten O'Clock News has discovered that Garcia may have told at least three officers about witnessing the rape at the Silver Shield Club. Boeri stands outside of the former Silver Shield Club. Boeri says that he has spoken to two police officers who claim that Garcia was visibly upset while telling them about witnessing the rape. Boeri says that the two officers have insisted on anonymity because they fear reprisals; that one agreed to speak on camera if his voice and appearance were altered. V: Shot of police officers taking an oath. Footage of Boeri interviewing an unidentified man in a darkened room. The man's words are written out in text on screen. The audio has been altered to prevent recognition of the man's voice. The man repeats what Garcia told him about the rape at the club. The man says that Garcia witnessed a girl to perform oral sex on several white police officers; that he is sure that the girl was being forced to perform oral sex. Boeri reports that the man told him that Garcia drew his gun and rescued the girl from the club at gunpoint. V: Footage of Boeri interviewing the unidentified man. The man says that Garcia told him and three or four other people about witnessing the rape. Boeri reports that a second police officer refused to appear on camera; that he recalls Garcia making explicit accusations against the officers at the Silver Shield club. V: Shot of a uniformed police officer on a motorcycle. The Text of Boeri's questions and the officer's answers appear on screen. Boeri reports that the officer says that Garcia rescued the girl because she was being sexually assaulted by the police officers. Boeri reports that both officers say that Garcia told the story to Celester. [Shot of a color photo of Garcia. Shot of Celester in uniform. Footage of Armstead saying that Garcia told Celester about witnessing the rape. Shot of Celester. Boeri reports that Celester says that he was only passing on a rumor to Armstead. V: Footage of Albert Sweeney (Boston Police Department) at a press conference in January, 1986. Sweeney praises Celester for investigating the rumor about the alleged rape. Footage of Boeri talking to Armstead about a Police Department internal report. Boeri notes that the report says that Celester informed Armistead of the rumor. Armstead says that the report is not true. Armstead adds that Celester never told him that the account of the rape was a rumor. Footage of Roache, Sweeney, Minister Don Muhammed (Roxbury community leader) and Arthur Morgan (Boston Police Department) at a press conference in January of 1986. Boeri reports that Garcia has denied to investigators that the incident ever took place. Boeri notes that testimony of the two unidentified police officers casts doubt on Garcia's story. V: Shot of Boeri interviewing the unidentified man. Boeri stands on a street corner in Upham's Corner in Dorchester. Boeri says that Garcia's car was firebombed in Upham's Corner in August of 1982. Boeri notes that Garcia says that drug dealers were responsible. Boeri adds that others contend that Garcia's car was firebombed in order to keep him quiet about the rape at the Silver Shield. Boeri notes that the two unidentified police officers told him that Garcia changed his story after his family was threatened. V: Close-up shot of a cloth uniform badge on an officer's uniform. The text of the second police officers testimony is written on the screen. Boeri reports that Armstead says that Garcia asked him to drop the investigation. V: Footage of Armstead saying that he refused Garcia's request to drop the investigation. Shots of the photo of Kai; of Franklin Park. Boeri notes that Armstead says that Garcia approached him again after seeing photos of Kai after she was murdered. V: Footage of Boeri interviewing Armstead. Armstead says that Garcia told him that Kai might be the girl who was raped at the club. Shot of the exterior of the Silver Shield Club. Boeri sits in an office at WGBH. Boeri says that the officers and their lawyers will not comment on the case; that the US Attorney's office had not been aware of the two unidentified police officers who spoke to Boeri; that the men have not been approached by any investigators. Boeri says that he will keep his promise not to reveal the names of the men.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/02/1986
Description: Marcus Jones reports that superintendent Laval Wilson is frustrated because the Boston School Committee has twice rejected his proposal to consolidate Boston high schools. Interviews with School Committee members John Nucci, Joseph Casper and John O'Bryant. Nucci says that Wilson is frustrated by a lack of support from some members of the Committee. Casper accuses the minority members of the School Committee of causing trouble for Wilson. O'Bryant resents Casper's accusations that the minority members of the Committee vote in a bloc. Jones notes that some critics accuse the committee of focusing too much on the daily operations of the schools and not enough on educational policy. Interview with City Councilor Michael McCormack. O'Bryant and Casper differ on how much parental participation they think should be encouraged by Wilson and the School Committee. A spokesperson for Wilson says that Wilson has no intention of leaving his post. Footage of a Boston School Committee meeting.
1:00:08: Marcus Jones reports that school officials are are concerned that Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) may leave the Boston Public Schools. Jones notes that Wilson was frustrated after the Boston School Committee's second rejection of his plan to consolidate Boston high schools. Visual: Shots of Wilson and members of the School Committee at a meeting of the Boston School Committee. Footage of John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) saying that Wilson is committed to the Boston Public Schools; that Wilson is frustrated by a lack of support from certain members of the School Committee; that this lack of support needs to be addressed. Jones reports that Wilson's consolidation plan for Boston Latin Academy, Boston Technical High School and Madison Park High School initially won council approval by a margin of 5 to 4; that the four minority votes were abstentions. Jones notes that School Committee members Jean McGuire and John O'Bryant voted against the plan on a second vote. V: Shots of a plaque reading "Boston Latin Academy"; of the sign reading "Boston Technical High School," hanging above the door to the school; of the exterior of Madison Park High School. Shots of McGuire and O'Bryant at a School Committee meeting. Shots of Wilson. Jones notes that the proposal was defeated; that Wilson suggested that the School Committee should begin looking for another superintendent. V: Footage of Joe Casper (member, Boston School Committee) saying that the superintendent is getting "nailed" by the minority members of the School Committee; that the white members of the school committee are not causing trouble for Wilson. Footage of John O'Bryant (member, Boston School Committee) saying that the votes of the minority members of the School Committee are often split; that no one ever accuses white members of the School Committee of voting in a bloc. Jones reports that Wilson has won more battles with the School Committee than he has lost. V: Shots of Wilson and the School Committee members in a meeting. Shots of School Committee members John Grady, Kevin McCluskey, Casper and Thomas O'Reilly. Jones says that some critics see flaws in the ways that the School Committee is administering to the schools. V: Footage of Michael McCormack (Boston City Council) saying that the School Committee needs to focus on educational policy; that the operations of the schools should be left up to the superintendent. Footage of O'Bryant saying that Wilson does not consult parents on issues affecting the schools. O'Bryant says that parental participation in the school system should be encouraged. Footage of Casper saying that parents are being encouraged to attend the meetings to push for their special interests; that Wilson cannot be expected to cater to parents while running the schools effectively. Jones stands outside the offices of the Boston School Committee. Jones quotes a spokesman for Wilson as saying that Wilson has no intention of leaving his post. Jones notes that Wilson will have another encounter with the School Committee at next month's meeting. V: Shot of Nucci.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/21/1987
Description: Report on an alarming increase in the infant mortality rate in Boston. Review of the statistics noting that the infant mortality rate among African Americans is 2.5 times the infant mortality rate among whites and that the increase was most pronounced in the Roxbury neighborhood. Interview with Dr. Bailus Walker, the Commissioner of Public Health, who says that the increase in the infant mortality rate is the result of a cutback in social programs from 1982 to 1984. Mayor Ray Flynn talks about the effects of cutbacks in social programs. The state has put $15 million toward reducing the infant mortality rate. Marian Wright Edelman, the Director of the Children's Defense Fund, speaks at a press conference, saying that the US has one of the highest infant mortality rates of any industrialized nation. The video cuts to black for 45 seconds during this story, from 00:01:34 to 00:02:15, presumably for graphics that weren't added to this copy. Following the edited story is additional b-roll footage of health care workers, parents and children at the Codman Square Health Center.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of a doctor examining a non-white baby with a stethoscope. Hope Kelly reports that the infant mortality rate in Massachusetts is nine out of 1,000 infants; that 22 of every 1,000 African American babies die; that the infant mortality rate for African Americans is 2.5 times higher than the infant mortality rate for whites. V: Footage of three young African American children playing outside of a housing project. Kelly reports that the infant mortality rate is 15 out of 1,000 for babies born in Boston; that the mortality rate for non-white babies born in Boston is 23 out of 1,000. V: Shots of a white child standing near a park bench; of a doctor examining a pregnant African American woman. Kelly reports that infant mortality rates have increased from previous years. V: Shots of an African American infant girl being undressed before a medical examination. Kelly reports that the state-wide infant mortality rate was 8.9 deaths per 1,000 babies in 1984. V: Video cuts out. Black screen is visible. Kelly reports that that the state-wide infant mortality rate was 9.1 per 1,000 babies in 1985. Kelly notes that the African American infant mortality rate was 17 per 1,000 babies in 1984; that the African American mortality rate was 22.1 per 1,000 babies in 1985. Kelly adds that the increase was drastic in the city of Boston. Kelly notes that the African American infant mortality rate in Boston was 11.7 per 1,000 babies in 1984; that the African American infant mortality rate in Boston was 15.4 per 1,000 babies in 1985. Kelly notes that the increase in the infant mortality rate was pronounced in the Roxbury area; that the infant mortality rate in Roxbury rose from 16.5 per 1,000 in 1984 to 23.4 per 1,000 in 1985. Kelly adds that the infant mortality rate in North Dorchester doubled from 1984 to 1985. V: Video cuts back in. Footage of Dr. Bailus Walker (Commissioner of Public Health) saying that he is concerned but not surprised about the rise in the infant mortality rate. Walker says that the infant mortality rate is the result of cutbacks made in social programs from 1982 to 1984. Kelly says that Walker and Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) blame cutbacks by the federal government. V: Footage of Flynn saying that the rise in the infant mortality rate is attributable to dramatic cutbacks in nutrition programs, housing programs, and other social programs. Kelly says that the state put $15 million dollars toward an effort to reverse the increase in the infant mortality rate in 1985. V: Shots of the State House. Footage of Walker saying that it is too soon to see the results of the effort; that the data for 1986-1988 will show the results of the state effort. Shots of a Boston Globe front page article. The headline reads, "Hub infant deaths up 32%. Kelly says that Boston is home to some of the nation's most advanced medical centers. V: Shots of Boston City Hall; of signs for Boston Hospitals, including the New England Medical Center Hospital and Children's Hospital. Kelly reports that the Boston's Mission Hill neighborhood is very close to the Harvard Medical Complex and other hospitals. V: Shots of a child riding a go-cart outside of a housing project in Mission Hill; of a woman standing at the window of her aparment, holding an infant. Shots of African American children playing outside of the housing project. Kelly reports that the infant mortality rate in Mission Hill is 50 deaths per 1,000 births; that the infant mortality rate in Mission Hill is as high as the infant mortality rate in many third-world countries. Kelly reports that there are high infant mortality rates among African American communities across the nation. V: Footage of Marian Wright Edelman (Director, Children's Defense Fund) at a press conference. Wright Edelman says that an African American infant born in Washington D.C. is more likely to die than in infant born in Trinidad and Tobago; that the US and one other nation have the highest infant mortality rates among twenty industrialized nations surveyed. Footage of Walker saying that he will be concerned if this trend continues for three or more years; that a one-year "snapshot" does not yet indicate a trend.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/09/1987
Description: Christy George reports on the outcome of the US Attorney's Silver Shield rape investigation. George notes that a grand jury determined that there was no case to be made against the officers involved. Frank McGee (attorney for William Dunn) and Peter Dowd (attorney for Juan Garcia) speak to the media about the grand jury's findings. Interview with Sadiki Kambon (Boston Black Coalition) about the reaction of the African American community to the findings of the grand jury. The African American community is still pushing for indictments in the case. George reviews the facts of the case and talks about the officers involved. George's report includes photographs of Lucia Kai (Roxbury resident), William Dunn (Boston Police Department), and William Kennefick (Boston Police Department). George's report includes footage of Jose Garcia (Boston Police Department) and Richard Armstead (Boston Police Department) and footage of a press conference with Francis "Mickey" Roache (Commissioner, Boston Police Department), Albert Sweeney (Boston Police Department), Arthur Morgan (Boston Police Department), and Don Muhammad (Roxbury community leader). Following the edited story is additional footage of Dowd and Garcia speaking to the media.
1:00:25: Visual: Footage of Frank McGee (attorney for William Dunn) saying that he is delighted that William Dunn (Boston Police officer) has been cleared by a full investigation by the US Attorney. Footage of Sadiki Kambon (Boston Black Coalition) saying that he did not expect any indictments from the investigation; that the investigation is a victory for the African American community; that the African American community will not allow anyone to murder people on their streets. Footage of Peter Dowd (attorney for Juan Garcia) saying that the allegations of a cover-up by the Boston Police Department have been proven false. Christy George reports that there have always been differing opinions on the Silver Shield rape case; that a federal grand jury has decided that there is no case. V: Shot of an African American man and a white man leaving a public building. Footage of Richard Armstead (Boston Police Department) walking down a street toward a house. George reports that Armstead said that an eyewitness told him that two white police officers raped an African American woman at the Silver Shield Club. V: Shots of black and white photos of Dunn and William Kennefick (Boston Police Officer. Shots of the exterior of the Silver Shield Club in Roxbury. Shots of Jose Garcia (Boston Police Department) and his lawyer walking outside of a Boston Police Department building. George reports that Armstead said that Garcia witnessed the rape. George notes that Garcia denies telling Armstead that he witnessed the rape or that he identified the victim as Lucia Kai (Roxbury resident). V: Shots of a color photograph of Kai. Footage of Garcia and Dowd approaching microphones set up outside of the police department building. Footage of George interviewing McGee. Shot of Armstead entering a house. George reports that Garcia will bring Armstead to court for slander. George notes that McGee says that Dunn may do the same. George notes that the African American community is still pressing for indictments in the case. V: Footage of Kambon being interviewed by George. Kambon says that the African American community did not expect indictments to be brought against white police officers for the rape and murder of an African American teenage girl. Kambon says that the grand jury did not have sufficient evidence to indict the officers. Footage of McGee saying that the grand jury had no probable cause to believe that a crime was ever committed. McGee says that the grand jury has exonerated Dunn. George reports that the findings of the grand jury echo investigations by the Boston Police Department, the District Attorney and the Attorney General. V: Shot of Dowd and another white man in the lobby of a building. Shot of a press conference with Francis "Mickey" Roache (Police Commissioner, City of Boston), Minister Don Muhammed (Roxbury community leader), Albert Sweeney (Boston Police Department), and Arthur Morgan (Boston Police Department). Footage of Kambon saying that David Boeri (WGBH reporter) came up with more evidence than the investigation by the office of the US Attorney. Kambon says that the official investigation was not aggressive enough. Footage of Dowd admitting that WGBH reporters found two police officers who had never come forward; that the officers should have known to come forward; that the testimony of the officers was taken into account by the grand jury. Dowd says that he does not know why the officers did not come forward at the beginning. George stands outside of a Boston Police Department building. George says that there are questions in the case which still need to be resolved. George notes that no one knows who killed Kai or why she was killed; that no one knows which police officer is lying.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/24/1987
Description: Marcus Jones reports on proposals by Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) to improve educational standards in the Boston Public School System. Jones' report includes footage of Wilson at a press conference. Wilson discusses his goals and agenda for improving the level of education in the school system. Jones reviews Wilson's proposals. Jones' report includes footage from an interview with John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee). Nucci comments on Wilson's proposals and talks about efforts by the Boston School Committee to find funding for the proposals.
0:59:59: Visual: Footage of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) at a press conference, talking about his goal to improve the level of education in the Boston Public School System. Marcus Jones reports that Wilson has proposed a comprehensive education improvement plan for the schools; that the plan is now under review by the Boston School Committee. V: Footage of Wilson saying that 20% of first graders did not pass first grade last year; that Boston students do not read well; that students do not perform well on standardized tests. Jones reports that the average senior graduating from Boston Public Schools read at a seventh grade level; that Wilson wants to raise that level. V: Shots of students in a classroom; of male high school students in the hallway of a high school. Footage of Wilson saying that graduating seniors should be able to read at the eighth grade level at least; that eighth graders should be able to read at a sixth grade level. Shot of a school hallway. On-screen text lists Wilson's proposals for stricter promotion standards, for more reading assignments, for programs to retain dropouts and for an increase in writing and math course work. Shots of a teacher teaching reading to elementary school students; of students in the classroom. Jones reports that budget cuts may force the layoff of forty teachers. V: Footage of Wilson saying that some positions and programs can be cut from the budget. Footage of John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) saying that the School Committee needs to find ways to fund Wilson's initiatives; that the School Committee is already cutting the school budget by $10 million. Nucci says that Wilson's proposals are valuable; that the School Committee will cut the budget to fund the proposals. Jones stands outside the offices of the Boston School Committee. Jones reports that Wilson's initiatives will address sixteen areas of concern in the school system; that Wilson submitted thirteen proposals to the School Committee today.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/12/1987
Description: Hope Kelly reports that Superintendent Laval Wilson must improve the reading skills of students in the Boston public schools. Students of all different races read a statement about the importance of literacy. Wilson speaks about the importance of reading skills at a press conference. He says that students are reading below target levels. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Princess Zenani Dlamini and her husband Prince Thumbumuzi Dlamini will attend Boston University
1:00:00: Visual: Shot of a typed document. The first paragraph of the document summarizes the educational mission of the Boston Public Schools. The last line of the document reads, "For young people to be successful, they have to be literate." Footage of students of different ages and races reading the document. Hope Kelly reports that Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) believes that the Boston Public Schools must improve the reading skills of its students. V: Footage of Wilson at a press conference. Wilson says that students are reading below target levels. Footage of students reading the document. One boy has trouble with the word "literate." Kelly asks him what the word means. The boy answers correctly. Footage of an African American female student says that Wilson is right in saying that students need to be literate; of an Asian American male student saying that students must know how to read in order to get a good job. Footage of an African American male student and an Asian American male student standing together. Both boys say that students need to know how to read. Footage of Wilson says that not all of the schools are performing at the same level. Footage of an Asian American male student saying that he needs to read more books in order to become a better reader; of an African American male student saying that he is "a little good at reading, but not a lot." Footage of an African American male student saying that he is an average reader. Footage of an African American female student saying that her learning environment is not ideal; that her school needs better books. Footage of Wilson saying that school promotion standards are not rigorous enough. Footage of a group of female students. A white female student reads a portion of Wilson's speech about the need for improved reading skills; of an African American female student saying that everyone cannot be expected to read at the same pace. Footage of a white female student saying that her father is not a native English speaker; that he taught her to read. Footage of an African American female student saying that Wilson's standards should not be too strict; that high school students may drop out of school if strict standards are imposed. Footage of a male student saying that a parent is responsible for his or her child's performance in school; of an Asian American male student saying that the student is responsible for his or her performance in school. Footage of an African American male student saying that parents need to take responsibility for their children's performance in school; that parents need to help children with their homework every night. Footage of a white female student saying that she would like to be a doctor when she grows up; of a male student saying that he would like to be a basketball player; of an African American male student saying that he would like to be a lawyer.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/13/1987
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on the failure of Ward 7 to elect any minority delegates to the Massachusetts State Democratic Party convention. Minority voters accuse party bosses of discouraging minorities from running as delegates. Ward 7 residents Dianne Wilkerson and Bernard Sneed both ran for delegate in Ward 7 last year. Sneed calls for a change in the election process. Interviews with Wilkerson and Sneed. Wilkerson accuses City Councilor James Kelly of setting up the election to be restrictive and hostile to minority delegates. Vaillancourt quotes Kelly as saying that he set up a fair election and that Wilkerson and Sneed lost. Wilkerson and Sneed were named as delegates on an appeal to the State Democratic Party.
1:00:00: Visual: Footage of Dianne Wilkerson (Ward 7 resident) saying that minority voters have been consistently loyal to the Democratic Party. Wilkerson questions the commitment of the Democratic Party to minority participation. Shots of residents on the streets of Ward 7 in Boston; of minority residents on a busy street corner; of a commercial street in South Boston; of two African American women entering a shoe store; of pedestrians walking by the shoe store. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Boston's Ward 7 has always been a stronghold of the Democratic Party; that Ward 7 stretches from Upham's Corner in Dorchester to South Boston. Vaillancourt notes that Ward 7 has ten precincts; that eight of the precincts are almost totally white; that two of the precincts have large Hispanic and African American populations; that Ward 7 has never elected any minorities as delegates to the state party convention. Vaillancourt reports that minority voters accuse party bosses of discouraging minorities from running as delegates. V: Footage of Wilkerson being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Wilkerson says that party leaders publish notices about party caucuses in the South Boston Tribune newspaper; that minority voters do not read the South Boston Tribune because they do not live in South Boston. Vaillancourt notes that Wilkerson and Bernard Sneed (Ward 7 resident) both ran for delegate in Ward 7 last year; that neither was elected to the position. Vaillancourt reports that Wilkerson and Sneed say that the election for delegates was selectively advertised; that Wilkerson and Sneed say that the election was held in an area of South Boston which was outside of the ward. V: Shot of Vaillancourt interviewing Sneed; of a streetcorner in a minority neighborhood. Footage of Vaillancourt interviewing Wilkerson. Vaillancourt asks if the election was set up to put Wilkerson and Sneed at a disadvantage. Wilkerson says that the election was set up to be "uncomfortable, prohibitive, restrictive, harassing and hostile." Wilkerson notes that James Kelly (Boston City Council) set up the election. Vaillancourt reports that Kelly is Chairman of the Ward 7 Democratic Committee; that Kelly is a vocal opponent of affirmative action. V: Shot of Kelly working behind a desk in an office. On-screen graphics show a quote from Kelly which reads, "We held a full and fair election. And they lost." Vaillancourt reports that Wilkerson accuses Kelly of making her candidacy difficult. V: Footage of Wilkerson saying that the Democratic Party needs to monitor the elections in Ward 7. Footage of Sneed saying that minorities will not be elected as delegates until the process is changed. Shot of residents on a streetcorner in a minority neighborhood. Vaillancourt stands on a streetcorner. Vaillancourt reports that Sneed and Wilkerson have won their appeal to the State Democratic Party Committee; that the Committee has forced Ward 7 to accept Wilkerson, Sneed and three other minority delegates as add-on delegates to the state convention. Vaillancourt notes that much of the work by the other Ward 7 delegates has already been finished.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/21/1987
Description: Christy George reports that Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) has submitted a plan to reform the Boston Public Schools to the Boston School Committee. George notes that the plan represents Wilson's educational philosophy and his vision of how to improve the schools. The School Committee's vote on the plan has turned into a vote of confidence on Wilson. Interviews with School Committee members John Nucci and Joe Casper. Nucci supports Wilson's plan. Casper says the vote will decide if Wilson will lead the school system forward. School Committee members taking a vote. George notes that the Committee appears to have approved most of the plan. George notes that some parents are unhappy with the plan. Interviews with Doris Labitue (parent) and Peter Lowber (parent). Wilson with supporters at a press conference. Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) speaks in support of Wilson's plan.
0:59:59: Visual: Footage of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) at a press conference with African American leaders including Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church). Wilson says the Boston School Committee does not need to approve every detail of his proposals as they are written. Christy George reports that Wilson was talking about compromise before the School Committee voted on his proposals; that Wilson is usually seen as being uncompromising. V: Footage of Wilson at a press conference on May 12. Wilson says that it is not unreasonable to expect a senior in high school to read at an eighth grade level or above. George reports that Wilson's frustration with the system has led him to muse publicly about leaving his post as superintendent. V: Shot of Wilson looking over the shoulder of a student in a classroom. Footage of Stith saying that Wilson's proposals for the schools make sense; that he wants Wilson to stay in his post. Footage of Wilson saying that he plans to stay in his post for a number of years. Shot of Wilson speaking to some elementary school children. George reports that the plan submitted by Wilson to the School Committee represents two years of work by Wilson; that the plan also represents Wilson's future in the School System. V: Footage of John Nucci (Boston School Committee) saying that the plan represents Wilson's vision and his philosophy on how to improve the school system; that he hopes the School Committee will approve the plan. George stands in the rear of the Boston School Committee chambers. The School Committee meeting is in progress. George reports that the referendum on Wilson's plan has turned into a vote of confidence on Wilson. V: Footage of Joe Casper (Boston School Committee) saying that the education plan has Wilson's "fingerprints all over it"; that "the honeymoon is over"; that this evening's vote will decide if Wilson will lead the school system forward. Footage of Edward Winter (Secretary, Boston School Committee) calling the roll for a School Committee vote. School Committee members Casper, William Donlan, John Grady, Kevin McCluskey, Jean McGuire, John O'Bryant and Thomas O'Reilly voting yes. Shot of Wilson conferring with O'Bryant and Nucci. George reports that the School Committee appears to have approved most of Wilson's plan; that some parents are unhappy with the plan. V: Footage of Doris Labitue (Boston parent) saying that she came out to voice her concern about the plan; that the School Committee does not seem interested in the opinions of parents. Labitue says that the members of the School Committee did not seem to understand the fine points of the plan. Footage of Peter Lowber (Boston parent) saying that the School Committe is afraid to reject the plan because they are afraid of losing Wilson as superintendent. George reports that the School Committee was still in session when she filed the report.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/22/1987
Description: Christy George reports that shifts in the state's population have forced the Massachusetts House of Representatives to draw up a redistricting plan for the state's legislative districts. State Rep. Jim Brett has been charged with drafting a redistricting plan. Interview with Brett on his plan. Boston and Cambridge will each lose one seat while the South Shore and Cape Cod will each gain a seat. George notes that the Republican Party and minorities are protective of their legislative districts and that both groups seem to be happy with the plan. Interviews with State Rep. Peter Forman and Byron Rushing. Brett and Peter Vellucci will lose their districts and be forced to run against other incumbent legislators. Interviews with State Rep. Vellucci and Paul White. The legislature has voted in favor of the plan. Speaker of the House George Keverian presides over the proceedings in the House chambers.
1:00:00: Visual: Footage of Jim Brett (Massachusetts House of Representatives) and another lawmaker discussing the Massachusetts House of Representatives' redistricting plan for the state of Massachusetts. Brett and the other lawmaker look at a map of the districts. Shots of Brett and the other lawmaker walking into Brett's office; of Brett sitting down behind his desk. Christy George reports that Brett is the architect of the House redistricting plan; that the job of redistricting is difficult; that Brett's colleagues are eager to have input on the borders of their districts. George reports that Brett appears to have done an excellent job in drafting the redistricting plan. V: Footage of Brett and the other lawmaker looking at the map in Brett's office. Brett gives the map to the other lawmaker, saying that he is tired of looking at the map. The other lawmaker exits Brett's office. George notes that Brett has done a heroic job in performing a thankless task. V: Footage of Brett saying that he was told that the redistricting job was a "losing proposition." Brett says that he thinks that he has managed to please all of the people involved. George reports that Brett's task was to keep all 160 state representatives secure in their districts while making shifts in almost all legislative districts. George notes that a shift in the state's population forced the redistricting of the state. [Shot of Brett explaining the redistricting proposal. Brett stands in front of a map of the districts. George notes that the most recent state census shows that Massachusetts' cities have shrank while suburbs have grown. V: Shot of the districts near Boston shown on Brett's map. George notes that Boston and Cambridge are each losing a seat in the legislature; that two new legislative seats will be created on the South Shore and Cape Cod. V: Shots of Brett pointing to the map; of the audience members. Footage of Brett joking that he might need a security fence around his house after the redistricting plan is filed. Shots of audience members listening to Brett. George reports that minority voters and Republican voters want to protect their districts; that the redistricting may allow Republicans to win one of the new seats on the South Shore. V: Footage of Peter Forman (State Representative from Plymouth) saying that he is very happy with the plan because there are two new districts in suburban areas. Footage of Byron Rushing (State Representative) saying that Brett asks representatives in neighboring districts to come to him with group proposals for redistricting; that Brett's efforts to take those proposals into account have led to acceptance of the plan. Shot of Brett entering the House Chambers with another lawmaker. George reports that it is difficult to combine districts; that the act of combining districts pits two incumbent lawmakers against one another. V: Shot from above of Harvard Square in Cambridge. George notes that the shrinking population in Cambridge forced the combinations of three districts into two districts. George reports that Peter Vellucci (State Representative from Cambridge) voted for the redistricting plan; that Vellucci will lose his Cambridge district and be forced to run in Somerville. V: Footage of Vellucci saying that he does not believe that the plan was drawn up according to the wishes of Charles Flaherty (Majority Leader, Massachusetts House of Representatives). Vellucci says that Flaherty and Saundra Graham (State Representative) have always had districts in Cambridge. George notes that Brett's own district in Dorchester was combined with the district of Paul White (State Representative); that White is expected to run for Senate next year. V: Shots of a residential street in Dorchester. Footage of White saying that Brett will have a long political career ahead of him; that Dorchester voters will have a chance to vote for him and Brett in the future. Shot of an electronic board indicating the results of the vote in the House Chambers; of George Keverian (Speaker of the House) presiding proceedings in the House Chambers. George stands outside of the House Chambers. George reports that the vote was 151 to 1 in favor of the proposal. George notes that Keverian picked Brett to draw up the redistricting plan; that Keverian himself was in charge of a previous redistricting plan years ago.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/13/1987
Description: Harold Washington (Mayor of Chicago) and W. Wilson Goode (Mayor of Philadelphia). The city of Hartford, Connecticut has elected Carrie Perry, an African American woman, as mayor of the city. Marcus Jones notes that Hartford is the only major city in New England with an African American mayor. Jones' report includes footage of Perry at a polling station and at a press conference. Jones reports that Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) is seen as having the best chance at becoming Boston's first African American mayor. Interview with Bolling, who says that he might run for mayor someday, but that he is concentrating on his agenda in the City Council. Jones notes that Bolling differed with Mel King (candidate for Mayor of Boston in 1983) and other African American community leaders over the issue of Roxbury's secession from Boston. Footage of Bolling, King, Andrew Young (Greater Roxbury Incorporation Project) and Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) on the Phil Donahue Show in 1986. Jones notes that the minority community in Boston is becoming impatient for an African American mayor. Interviews with Charles Weeks (Black Political Task Force) about the chances of Boston electing an African American mayor.
1:00:09: Visual: Shots of Harold Washington (Mayor of Chicago) celebrating his victory at the polls; of W. Wilson Goode (Mayor of Philadelphia); of an African American man official from the campaign of Carrie Perry in Hartford. Shot of Carrie Perry (Mayor of Hartford) entering a polling booth. Marcus Jones reports that Carrie Perry is the first African American to be mayor of Hartford; that Hartford is the only major city in New England with an African American mayor. V: Footage of Perry at a press conference. Footage of Bruce Bolling (President, Boston City Council) being interviewed by Jones. Bolling says that the city of Hartford deserves a lot of credit; that Hartford voters have looked beyond race in electing city officials. Jones reports that Bolling is seen as having the best chance of becoming Boston's first African American mayor. V: Footage of Bolling saying that he is not preoccupied with the thought of running for mayor. Bolling says that he is pursuing his agenda in the City Council. Jones notes that Bolling was once seen as a successor to Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston in 1983); that King and Bolling differed publicly on the issue of Roxbury's proposed secession from Boston. V: Shot of King campaigning in Roxbury in 1983. Footage of Bolling, King, Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) and Andrew Jones (Greater Roxbury Incorporation Project) on the Phil Donahue show on October 30, 1986. Bolling says that African Americans and voters from other races supported King's candidacy in 1983 because they wanted a change in the city. Footage of Charles Weeks (Black Political Task Force) saying that there will be an African American mayor in Boston; that the African American mayor will need to be the mayor for all residents, not just African Americans. Jones notes that the Black Political Task Force endorsed Bolling's last bid for re-election to the City Council. V: Footage of Weeks saying that whites are becoming more accustomed to seeing African Americans in positions of authority; that an African American will eventually become mayor of Boston. Footage of Bolling saying that it is possible that he might become mayor someday. Bolling adds that an African American will become mayor of Boston in the future. Footage of African American audience members debating on the Donahue show. Marcus Jones notes that the minority community in Boston is becoming impatient for an African American mayor.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/04/1987
Description: Fritz Wetherbee reports that Annie Johnson, a Boston resident, will receive the Living Legacy Award in Washington DC. Johnson grew up in Boston and organized domestic workers through the Women's Service Clubs of Boston in the 1960s. She led the workers on a campaign for benefits. Interview with Johnson in her home. She talks about the importance of helping others. Johnson discusses her aunt, Eleanor Graves Chandler, who was an early community activist. Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen and visiting a senior citizen meal program at the Grace Baptist Church.
1:00:12: Visual: Footage of Annie Johnson (Living Legacy Award winner) saying that a person can be poor and "colored" and still help everybody. Fritz Wetherbee reports that Johnson is 83 years old; that Johnson will fly to Washington DC to receive her Living Legacy Award. V: Footage of Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen at home. Wetherbee reports that Johnson is preparing the food for Project Soup; that Project Soup is a senior citizen meal program at Grace Baptist Church. V: Footage of Johnson saying that people have called her for help when she is sick in bed; that she will get up to try to help them, before going back to bed to lie down. Wetherbee reports that Johnson grew up in Boston; that she has lived in the same house on Elmwood Street for 46 years; that she raised seven children in the house. V: Shots of Elmwood Street in Boston; of the exterior of Johnson's house on Elmwood Street. Footage of Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen. Wetherbee reports that Johnson organized domestic workers in the 1960s, through the Women's Service Clubs of Boston. Wetherbee notes that Johnson succeeded in winning minimum wage, worker's compensation, social security, and regular days off for the workers. Wetherbee adds that Johnson organized a job training program for the workers. V: Shot of the prepared chicken in a foil dish. Wetherbee reports that Johnson is the niece of Eleanor Graves Chandler. V: Shot of an African American woman serving chicken to elderly women at Project Soup. Footage of Johnson saying that Chandler was a politician; that Chandler believed that African American women should be active in politics and civic life. Johnson says that she can remember taking people to register to vote when she was younger. Johnson talks about another one of her relatives who was "an advocate for her race." Shot of Johnson leaving the Grace Baptist Church, carrying some flowers. Wetherbee reports that Martin Luther King Sr., Jesse Owens, Rosa Parks, A. Philip Randolph, and Roy Wilkins have all been awarded the Living Legacy Award; that Johnson will receive the award this evening. V: Footage of Johnson saying that many other racial groups have followed the lead of African Americans in their struggle for civil rights.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/20/1987
Description: David Boeri reports on Project Mattapan, which is a community-based prenatal care program aimed at reducing the infant mortality rate in Boston. Boeri notes that the infant mortality rate is very high in the city of Boston. He adds that the infant mortality rate in the African American community is 2.5 times the rate in the white community. Boeri interviews June Cooper (Community Health Associate) and John Ramsey (Boston Foundation) about the program. Boeri reports that Project Mattapan is a yearlong project funded by the Boston Foundation. Boeri notes that the program will provide outreach to poor and uneducated women in an effort to combat premature births and low-birth weights. Boeri's report is accompanied by footage of women and health care workers at a health care center, by footage of infants at a hospital nursery, and by footage of children at an urban playground.
1:00:03: Visual; Shot of children playing at an urban playground. Shot of a woman standing at the window of an apartment, holding a baby. David Boeri reports that Boston is the medical capital of the world; that the infant mortality rate in some African American neighborhoods is as high as the infant mortality rate in third-world nations. Boeri notes that the infant mortality rate for African Americans is 2.5 times the infant mortality rate for white Americans. V: Shot of an urban landscape from the window of a health care clinic. Shot of an African-American infant hooked up to breathing equipment. Shot of a white health care worker tending to an infant. The infant is hooked up to breathing equipment. Footage of June Cooper (Community Health Associate) being interviewed. Cooper says that people need to know that prenatal care is important. Cooper says that more prenatal care could result in a decrease of the infant mortality rate. Boeri reports that Cooper is one of the founders of Project Mattapan; that Project Mattapan has launched a community-based campaign against low birth weights and premature births. V: Shot of a poster which reads, "Give your baby a healthy start." Shot of a black and white photo of an infant in a medical brochure. Footage of John Ramsey (Boston Foundation) being interviewed. Ramsey says that Project Mattapan has the cooperation of eight agencies; that Project Mattapan deals with housing, mental health, education, and other issues along with health care. Ramsey says that Project Mattapan promotes stable families. Boeri reports that Project Mattapan is a year-long project; that the Boston Foundation has funded the $100,000 project. Boeri reports that Project Mattapan will help local health care centers to reach out to poor and uneducated women. Boeri notes that these women are in need because federal programs have been cut. V: Shots of a pregnant African American woman being examined; of an African American health care worker filling out a medical chart. Shot of a health care worker and a patient in a medical examination room. Footage of Cooper being interviewed. Cooper says that outreach efforts are nonexistent in many agencies. Cooper says that the project will attempt to provide outreach and services to women. Boeri reports that the founders of Project Mattapan believe that infant mortality and low-weight births can be prevented. V: Shot of a health care worker placing a teddy bear on top of an incubator containing an infant. Shot of an African American infant hooked up to breathing equipment. Shot of a health care worker wheeling an incubator through the nursery of a health clinic.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/10/1987
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that The Boston Herald newspaper has accused Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) of misusing the credit card of the Boston School Department. Vaillancourt notes that Wilson has denied the charges and has demanded a retraction from The Boston Herald. Vaillancourt's report includes footage of Wilson at a press conference with Philip Crowe (attorney for Wilson). Wilson talks about the accusations and denies any wrongdoing. Crowe adds that Wilson may sue The Boston Herald for libel. Vaillancourt notes that Alan Eisner (Editor, The Boston Herald) has refused to print a retraction. Vaillancourt reports that Wilson may have been dropped from consideration for a position with the New York City Public School System because of the Herald article. Vaillancourt adds that Wilson is an "embattled superintendent."
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) at a press conference. Wilson sits at a round table with his lawyer at his side. Wilson says, "That's a blatant lie." Meg Vaillancourt reports that Wilson has adamently denied accusations by The Boston Herald that he has misused a credit card belonging to the Boston School Department. V: Footage of Wilson demanding a front-page retraction of the accusations and an editorial retraction. Shot of a newspaper photo of Wilson. On-screen text details the Herald's accusations against Wilson. Vaillancourt reports that The Boston Herald has accused Wilson of double-billing the city for travel expenses; of taking improper cash advances on the School Department's credit card; of being late in filing expense reports. Vaillancourt notes that the Herald says that Wilson's tardiness in filing expense reports has cost the city $589 in interest charges on the credit card. V: Footage of Wilson saying that the Herald reporter is intentionally misrepresenting the facts. Vaillancourt notes that Wilson admitted to the accrual of interest charges on the credit card due to his tardiness in filing expense reports. Vaillancourt adds that Wilson has denied all of the other charges. V: Shots of Wilson at the press conference. Wilson holds up a notebook for the reporters. Vaillancourt reports that Wilson showed reporters credit card receipts; that Wilson said that he gave those receipts to The Boston Herald to review. Vaillancourt reports that Wilson has accused the Herald of sensationalizing the story. V: Footage of Wilson saying that the story and editorial in the Herald were malicious. Vaillancourt reports that the Herald is standing by its story. V: Shot of reporters in a newsroom. A quote by Alan Eisner (Editor, The Boston Herald) appears on screen in text. Vaillancourt quotes Eisner as saying, "We have no intention of giving Wilson a retraction." Vaillancourt also quotes Eisner as saying, "The city documents we examined show a clear pattern of credit card abuse." Vaillancourt reports that Wilson was in the process of applying for a position with the New York City Public School System when the Herald story was published. V: Shot of Wilson at the press conference. Shot of the Herald article with a headline reading, "State pays for Wilson credit 'abuse'." Vaillancourt quotes sources as saying that Wilson is no longer a finalist for the job in New York. V: Footage of Wilson saying that he intends to find out if the Herald story had a negative impact on his candidacy for the job. Footage of Philip Crowe (attorney for Laval Wilson) saying that Wilson may bring a libel suit against the Herald. Shots of Wilson sitting at a meeting with members of the Boston School Committee in May of 1986; of the audience at the School Committee meeting. Vaillancourt says that it is not clear whether Wilson is innocent or guilty; that the story has created problems for Wilson, who is "an embattled superintendent."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/22/1987