Description: Jan von Mehren reports that African American community leaders expressed their rage over the handling of the Carol Stuart murder case. Von Mehren notes that the leaders accused city officials, the Boston Police Department and the news media of racism in handling the case. Von Mehren's report includes angry speeches by Don Muhammad (Muhammad's Mosque), Rev. Graylan Hagler (Church of the United Community), and Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council). Von Mehren notes that the African American leaders have accused police of ignoring obvious clues during their investigation. Von Mehren adds that some leaders called for the resignation of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and Francis "Mickey" Roache (Commissioner, Boston Police Department). Von Mehren interviews Hagler. Hagler says that police officers ignored community residents who approached them with information about the case. Von Mehren concludes by saying that the African American community suffered a grave injustice in the aftermath of the murder.
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Bill Owens (State Senator) speaking at a press conference. A group of African American community leaders stand behind him. The group includes Graylan Ellis-Hagler (Church of the United Community) and Don Muhammad (Muhammad's Mosque). Owens says that a great injustice has been done to the African-American community. Shots of the attendees at the press conference. Jan von Mehren reports that African American community leaders expressed rage and fury at a press conference today. V: Footage of Ellis-Hagler speaking at the press conference. Ellis-Hagler accuses Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) of placing blame too quickly on the African American community. Ellis-Hagler compares Flynn's actions to that of the Ku Klux Klan. The attendees at the press conference give vocal support to Ellis-Hagler's assertions. Footage of Muhammad at the press conference. Muhammad asks if white public officials will call Charles Stuart (murderer of Carol Stuart) "an animal." The crowd cheers. Von Mehren reports that African American leaders believe that Flynn, the Boston Police Department, and the media rushed to conclusions about the Stuart case. Von Mehren notes that the African American leaders say that racism played a huge role in the case. V: Shots of the press conference; of Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) addressing the press conference. Footage of Muhammad at the press conference. Muhammad says that police usually suspect the husband when a woman is killed. Muhammad says that police automatically suspect an African American man when a woman is killed in an African American neighborhood. Von Mehren stands outside of Muhammad's Mosque. Von Mehren reports that African American leaders have accused the police, the mayor, and the media of ignoring vital information about the case. Von Mehren notes that the African American leaders says that the vital information was circulating on the streets of Roxbury on the day after the shooting. V: Footage of Muhammad at the press conference. Muhammad says that there were rumours on the street that Charles Stuart was a drug addict. Muhammad says that police should have investigated those rumours. The crowd cheers. Von Mehren notes that Ellis-Hagler runs a recovery center for drug addicts out of his church in Roxbury. V: Footage of Ellis-Hagler being interviewed by von Mehren. Ellis-Hagler says that the workers in his recovery center told him that Charles Stuart was the murderer on the day after the murder occurred. Ellis-Hagler talks about a man from the community who went to police with information about the murder. Ellis-Hagler says that the man shared information with police which confirmed the alibi of William Bennett (suspect). Ellis-Hagler says that the police told the man that they had a suspect who suited their purposes. Footage of Muhammad at the press conference. Muhammad says that apologies are worthless; that the damage has already been done. Muhammad says that the city has stabbed the African American community in the back. Muhammad says that the African American community has been devastated. Shot of a sign at the press conference. The sign reads, "What does (sic) Boston and South Africa have in common? Stopping and detaining men because of the color of their skin." Von Mehren reports that some African American leaders called for the resignation of Flynn and Francis "Mickey" Roache (Police Commissioner, City of Boston); that some called for restitution to Mission Hill residents. V: Shots of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) speaking at the press conference; of attendees at the press conference. Shot of Muhammad at the press conference. Von Mehren adds that the African American community was dealt a grave injustice when police, public officials, and the media were taken in by Charles Stuart's hoax.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/05/1990
Description: Hope Kelly reports that city and state officials held a ceremony at the Massachusetts State House to honor Robert Gould Shaw and the soldiers of the 54th regiment. Kelly reviews the history of Shaw and the African American soldiers of the 54th regiment in the Civil War. Kelly reports that the 1989 film Glory tells the story of the 54th regiment. Kelly's report includes clips from the film. Bill Owens addresses the ceremony. Part of the ceremony takes place in front of the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial. Michael Dukakis and Ray Flynn are part of the ceremony proclaiming Glory Day in Massachusetts. Marilyn Richardson, the curator of the Museum of Afro-American History, addresses at audience at the African Meeting House.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of a re-enactment of civil war soldiers marching in front of the Massachusetts State House. Footage from the 1989 film Glory. Hope Kelly reports that Glory took four years to make. Kelly notes that the film is about African American soldiers in the Civil War. V: Footage of Bill Owens (State Senator) reading a proclamation. The proclamation makes reference to John Andrews (former Governor of Massachusetts) who issued a call to arms for African Americans and to Robert Gould Shaw (US Army colonel) who commanded the Massachusetts 54th Regiment. V: Footage from the film Glory. Kelly reports that the Massachusetts 54th Regiment became the first African American fighting unit in the nation's history; that the Regiment was led by Gould; that Gould was a an upper-class white man from Boston. Kelly reports that army officials at the time did not think that African Americans could be competent soldiers. Kelly notes that the Regiment proved army officials wrong. V: Footage from the film, Glory. Kelly reports that city and state officials held a ceremony outside of the Massachusetts State House; that Thursday has been proclaimed Glory day in Massachusetts. V: Shot of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston), Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), and other leaders at the ceremony. The leaders stand quietly in front of the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial as a trumpeter plays "Taps." Shot of the media at the ceremony. Shot of the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial. Kelly reports that the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial has stood on Boston Common for ninety-three years. V: Shot of the face of a soldier carved into the Shaw Memorial. Shot of a group of female singers singing a gospel song. Men in military uniform stand behind them holding flags. Kelly reports that the Shaw Memorial shows Shaw on horseback and the soldiers on foot. Kelly notes that Shaw was on horseback and the soldiers on foot when they charged Fort Wagner in South Carolina in July of 1863. Kelly reports that Shaw and 32 African American and white soldiers were killed in the attack; that Shaw and the soldiers were all buried together. V: Shot of the Shaw Memorial. Footage from the film, Glory. Shot of the re-enactment march in Boston. Kelly reports that today's ceremony started at the Memorial; that the ceremony moved to the African Meeting House on Beacon Hill. Kelly notes that the African Meeting House served as a recruitment center for local African Americans during the Civil War. V: Shot of an African American man in military dress holding an American flag; of a group of African Americans in military dress at the ceremony. Footage from the film Glory. Footage of Marilyn Richardson (Curator, Museum of Afro-American History) addressing an audience in the African Meeting House. Richardson says that society must honor the principles for which the soldiers fought. Footage from the ceremony at the State House. An African American man sings "Glory Hallelujah." A crowd of media and attendees is gathered. V: Footage from the film Glory.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/08/1990
Description: Christy George reports that poor Boston neighborhoods lack access to banking services. Banking leaders met with community leaders today to announce an agreement that will provide better banking services to poor neighborhoods. George reviews the details of the agreement, which will provide bank branches, loans, and increased investment to poor neighborhoods. At the meeting Richard Pollard (Massachusetts Bankers Association) says that redlining did not take place in the 1980s. Charles Stith (Organization for a New Equality), Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council), Willie Jones (Community Investment Coalition), John Hamill (Shawmut Bank),Ronald Homer (Boston Bank of Commerce), and Michael Dukakis all speak out in favor of the proposal. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Julian Bond at Harvard University and Christopher Lydon interviews Sarah Small
1:00:06: Visual: Aerial shot of Somerville. Shot of residents walking on a street in Roxbury. Shots of street signs for Blue Hill Avenue and Dudley Street; of a Western Union office in Roxbury; of signs in the window of the Western Union office. Shot of a man walking into the Western Union office. Christy George reports that poor communities lack access to banking services. George reports that Boston banks have few branches in poor communities. V: Footage of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) at a gathering of Massachusetts bankers. Dukakis shakes hands with meeting attendees. George reports that Dukakis outlawed the practice of redlining in the 1970s; that bankers and business leaders were upset about the law. George says that poor communities still lack banking services in spite of the law. George reports that Dukakis has supported a program to get banks to give better service to poor communities. V: Footage of Dukakis standing with banking leaders and community leaders at the meeting. Footage of Richard Pollard (Massachusetts Bankers Association) saying that he will not admit that redlining has been taking place in the 1980s; that redlining is illegal. Shots of banking leaders and community leaders socializing. George says that banking leaders met with community leaders today. George reports that banking leaders have agreed to open 10 to 15 new branches of downtown banks in poor neighborhoods over the next five years; that banking leaders have agreed to open 20 to 35 new ATM machines in poor communities. George reports that banking leaders have agreed to restructure mortgage programs; that the new program will grant mortgages to families earning as little as $27,000 per year. George reports that the banks will participate in a $100 million affordable housing pool to finance renovation and construction of affordable housing. George reports that bank leaders will support a $10 million corporation which will direct investments to minority-owned businesses. V: On-screen text details the specifics of the agreement between bank leaders and community leaders. Footage of Charles Stith (Organization for a New Equality) at the meeting. Stith encourages the leaders to join hands and raise them in the air. The leaders raise their hands and say "Amen." Stith stands next to Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council). Shots of Dukakis and other leaders. Shots of the media; of Stith. George reports that the leaders need to decide how to monitor progress; that both sides were optimistic about the plan. V: Footage of Stith speaking at the meeting. Stith says that it has taken a long time to reach an agreement. Footage of Bolling speaking at the meeting. Bolling says that the agreement is like "a Catholic marriage"; that there is no divorce. Footage of John Hamill (Shawmut Bank) speaking at the meeting. Hamill says that the agreement is not like a new marriage; that the agreement is "a renewal of vows." Footage of Ronald Homer (Boston Bank of Commerce) speaking at the meeting. Homer says that "the only way to say 'I love you' in business is with money. Footage of Dukakis saying that the agreement is "fantastic." George says that the agreement was reached when communication between the two sides improved. V: Footage of Pollard speaking at the meeting. Pollard says that the community used to have the feeling that the banks had unlimited funds with which to provide mortgages. Pollard says that the banks needed to explain their business model to the community. Footage of Willie Jones (Community Investment Coalition) speaking at the meeting. Jones says that the banks have realized that poor communities are looking for basic services instead of "bells and whistles." George stands in a residential neighborhood. George reports that banking rules have made it difficult for poor people to qualify for loans and mortgages. George reports that banks have restructured their rules to allow access for poor people. George notes that the banks will make money in poor communities; that they will not make as much money as in wealthy communities.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1990
Description: Meg Vaillancourt profiles Nthabiseng Mabuza, a teenager from South Africa. Mabuza was 12 years old when she was paralyzed from injuries sustained during a raid of her home by South African security forces. The Fund for a Free South Africa has helped Mabuza and her family settle in Boston. She will receive medical care and here and willl teach local students about life under apartheid. Interview with Mabuza about growing up in South Africa under apartheid. Interview with her mother Anna Mabuza about the raid on their home by security forces. Interviews with Dr. Jane Schaller of the Floating Hospital and Themba Vilakazi of the Fund for a Free South Africa about their work with Nthabiseng Mabuza.
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Nthabiseng Mabuza (South African girl) talking about being shot by South African security forces. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Mabuza was 12 years old when South African security forces raided her home in South Africa. Vaillancourt reports that Mabuza's aunt was killed in the raid; that her uncle was wounded. V: Shot of Mabuza sitting on a couch with Anna Mabuza (mother of Nthabiseng Mabuza) and her sister. Footage of Anna Mabuza talking about escaping from the Security Forces when they raided the house. Anna Mabuza talks about the members of her family who were shot by the security forces. Anna Mabuza says that Nthabiseng Mabuza is lucky to be alive. Footage of Nthabiseng Mabuza saying that violent raids by the Security Forces are common in South Africa. Shots of a photo of Nthabiseng Mabuza with a group of black children; of a photo of the father of Nthabiseng Mabuza. Vaillancourt reports that Nthabiseng Mabuza's father had been an active member of the African National Congress (ANC). Vaillancourt notes that the ANC has been banned in South Africa; that its members are considered terrorists. Vaillancourt reports that the Mabuza family lived in Botswana; that Nthabiseng Mabuza's father died in 1983. Vaillancourt reports that South African Security Forces attacked the Mabuza family in a cross-border raid. V: Shot of a color photo of Nthabiseng Mabuza. Footage of Dr. Jane Schaller (Floating Hospital) saying that Nthabiseng Mabuza had been shot in the abdomen and in the back; that Nthabiseng Mabuza's spinal cord was damaged. Schaller says that Nthabiseng Mabuza is paralyzed. Footage of Nthabiseng Mabuza in a wheel chair. A mechanical device allows her to be transported up the front stairs of a home. Anna Mabuza wheels Nthabiseng into the house. Vaillancourt reports that the Fund for a Free South Africa has helped Nthabiseng Mabuza settle in Boston; that Mabuza will teach local students about life under apartheid. V: Footage of Nthabiseng Mabuza being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Nthabiseng Mabuza says that it is hard for local students to understand what life is like under apartheid. Nthabiseng Mabuza says that children in South Africa grow up with apartheid; that black children in South Africa know danger and fear. Shot of her sister in the room with Nthabiseng Mabuza. Vaillancourt reports that Nthabiseng Mabuza will go to school full-time next month; that Nthabiseng Mabuza will receive free physical therapy from Boston Floating Hospital. V: Footage of Nthabiseng Mabuza working with her physical therapist. Footage of Schaller saying that doctors are trying to work with Nthabiseng Mabuza. Schaller says that she does not know if Nthabiseng Mabuza will ever walk again. Footage of Nthabiseng Mabuza in a wheelchair. She wheels herself through the house and into a room. Audio of "I'm Forever Your Girl" by Paula Abdul plays in the background. Shot of Nthabiseng Mabuza in her bedroom. Vaillancourt reports that Nthabiseng Mabuza has kept her spirits up in the face of hardship. V: Footage of Themba Vilakazi (Fund for a Free South Africa) saying that Nthabiseng Mabuza is like many people who live in South Africa. Vilakazi says that Nthabiseng Mabuza is optimistic and hopeful about the future. Shots of Nthabiseng Mabuza in her bedroom. Shots of posters on the wall; of Nthabiseng Mabuza reading a book; of her sister playing with a doll. Footage of Nthabiseng Mabuza being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Nthabiseng Mabuza says that she wants to meet other people her age. Shot of a color photo of Nthabiseng Mabuza in Africa.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/18/1990
Description: Christopher Lydon interviews Vice President Dan Quayle. Quayle talks about his visit to Mission Hill Elementary School and the Carol Stuart murder case. He says that respect among people will bring racial harmony. Quayle talks about his upcoming visit to Latin America and US foreign policy in Panama. He also talks about the Republican Party's position on abortion. Following the edited story is additional footage of the interview, mostly the second camera view of the same content in the edited story.
1:00:04: Footage of Dan Quayle (US Vice President) being interviewed by Christopher Lydon. Quayle describes his visit to Mission Hill Elementary School. Quayle says that the kids were involved; that the parents were committed to education; that the teachers were respected by the students. Lydon asks who came up with the idea for a visit to Mission Hill Elementary School. Quayle says that his staff asked Bernard Cardinal Law (Archbishop of Boston) for suggestions about which school to visit; that Law recommended Mission Hill Elementary School. Lydon asks Quayle about the Stuart murder case. Quayle says that he talked about the Stuart murder case in a private meeting with parents, administrators, and teachers at the school. Quayle says that people must respect one another. Quayle says that respect will bring racial harmony. Lydon asks about Quayle's upcoming visit to Latin America. Lydon mentions the US invasion of Panama. Quayle says that some Latin American leaders have expressed concerns about the US invasion of Panama. Quayle says that he will meet with Carlos Andres Perez (President of Venezuela); that he will ask Perez and other leaders to help build a democracy in Panama. Quayle says that the public statements of some Latin American leaders do not represent their private sentiments. Quayle says that there is strong support for the US invasion in Panama and across Latin America. Lydon asks if the US should assume some responsibility for the rise of Manuel Noriega (leader of Panama). Quayle says that the US should assume no responsibility for Noriega. Quayle says that Noriega declared war on the US; that Noriega's forces killed and wounded an innocent US marine soldier; that Noriega's forces sexually harassed US women. Quayle says that the US should not assume responsibility for the stolen election in Panama. Lydon asks Quayle about the Republican Party's position on abortion. Quayle says that the party platform advocates the protection of the unborn. Quayle says that many party members disagree with the platform; that the Republican Party is inclusive. Quayle says that people are welcome to disagree with the platform. Quayle says that abortion is a divisive issue. Quayle accuses the Democratic Party of becoming a one-issue party. Quayle says that pro-life supporters are not welcome in the Democratic Party. Quayle says that he does not want pro-choice Republicans to abandon the party.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/22/1990
Description: Hope Kelly reviews the major events and key issues during the tenure of Boston superintendent of schools Laval Wilson. The Boston School Committee has voted to remove him from his post. Kelly adds that there are racial overtones in the vote to dismiss Wilson. Kelly notes that Wilson's opponents are all white. Kelly reviews Wilson's interview and selection, his record and the school bus drivers' strike. Kelly also discusses the school consolidation controversy and his contract renewal in 1989. The Boston Public Schools experienced a rise in achievement test scores and a decrease in the dropout rate under Wilson. Kelly's report is accompanied by footage illustrating these events during Wilson's tenure. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Controversy surrounds the Boston School Committee's decision to fire Laval Wilson and Meg Vaillancourt interviews Nthabiseng Mabuza about the release of Nelson Mandela
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) being interviewed by Eileen Jones (WGBH reporter) on July 19, 1985. Wilson says that he wants to convince the Boston Public School community that he is the best person for the job of superintendent. Shots of posters prepared by Wilson for his presentation to the Boston School Committee; of Wilson adjusting the position of the charts. Hope Kelly reports that Wilson interviewed for the position of superintendent in July of 1985. Kelly notes that Wilson showed little charisma; that he was well prepared for the interview. V: Footage of Wilson being interviewed by the Boston School Committee in the School Committee chambers on July 19, 1985. Wilson says that his planning skills are excellent. Shots of Wilson and the members of the School Committee. Kelly reports that Wilson stressed his planning skills; that Wilson was self-confident and stubborn. Kelly notes that Wilson did not mention his people skills or his passion. V: Footage of Wilson being interviewed by Jones on July 19, 1985. Wilson repeats that he classified himself "as a school superintendent." Shot of Wilson during his interview with the School Committee. Kelly reports that Wilson never made any reflections on race. V: Footage of Wilson being interviewed by the School Committee on July 19, 1985. Wilson says that he is an educator who happens to be African American. Footage of the members of the School Committee as they cast their votes for the position of superintendent on July 31, 1985. Jean McGuire (Boston School Committee) votes for Dr. Peter Negroni (candidate for superintendent of schools). School Committee members John O'Bryant and Thomas O'Reilly vote for Wilson. Kelly notes that Wilson had held the position of superintendent of schools in Rochester, New York, and Berkeley, California. Kelly reports that the Boston School Committee voted nine-to-four in favor of hiring Wilson. Kelly reports that Wilson became Boston's first African American superintendent of schools. Kelly adds that the Boston Public School System was rife with poverty and patronage in 1985. V: Footage from August 21, 1985. Wilson walks on Devonshire Street with a group of school officials, including John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee), Ellen Guiney (Citywide Education Coalition), John Grady (Boston School Committee), and Julio Henriquez (aide to School Committee member Daniel Burke). Footage of Wilson at a press conference of May 12, 1987. Wilson says that 20% of first-graders did not pass first grade last year. Kelly reports that a bus strike paralyzed the school system in Wilson's fourth month on the job. Kelly notes that students and parents became enraged at Wilson's plan to consolidate schools. V: Shot of buses parked outside of South Boston High School. African American students walk among the buses. Shot of a group of angry protesters. Shots of students and parents protesting outside of the Boston School Committee headquarters on Court Street. The students and parents hold signs. Shot of a jacket being held up in the air. Writing on the jacket reads, "Save our school." Kelly reports that Wilson threatened to resign over the school consolidation issue; that Wilson pursued a job offer from the New York City Public School System in 1987. Kelly notes that Wilson receives a salary of nearly $100,000 per year. Kelly adds that there were questions about his performance. V: Shot of Wilson at a press conference. Footage from a Boston School Committee meeting on October 11, 1988. Shot of Daniel Burke (Boston School Committee). Shot of Wilson saying that progress is being made. Shot of the audience at the meeting. Kelly reports that progress is being made in the school system; that achievement scores are rising. Kelly notes that the drop-out rate has declined to its lowest level in eleven years. V: Shots of Wilson in an elementary school classroom; of Wilson and school officials walking through a high school corridor. Footage from a Boston School Committee on April 11, 1989. Don Muhammad (Muhammad's Mosque) addressing the members of the School Committee. Muhammad says that Wilson's contract should be renewed; that Wilson has begun to turn the school system around. Shots of audience members crowded into the School Committee chambers; of the School Commitee members in the School Committee chambers. Kelly reports that Wilson's contract was renewed in 1989; that Wilson survived by one vote. Kelly reports that Wilson did not receive a ringing endorsement from the Boston School Committee; that Wilson had wanted a four-year contract in 1989; that he did not receive one. Kelly notes that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) suggested abolishing the Boston School Committee during the summer of 1989. V: Footage of Flynn at a press conference in May of 1989. Flynn says that the present system fails the schoolchildren and parents of Boston. Shot of the members of the School Committee seated at the front of the School Committee chambers. Kelly reports that Flynn wanted to replace the elected school committee with an appointed school committee. V: Footage from July of 1985. Wilson sits at a press conference with Flynn, Edward Doherty (President, Boston Teachers Union), Peggy Davis-Mullen (Boston School Committee), Rita Walsh-Tomasini (Boston School Committee) and other school officials. The officials stand up and raise their linked hands. Kelly reports that the debate over the schools has become divisive and political. Kelly reports that Flynn took no questions about Wilson today; that Flynn released a short statement. V: Footage of Wilson being interviewed by the School Committee on July 19, 1985. Wilson says that issues are more important than skin color. Kelly stands outside of the headquarters of the Boston School Committee. Kelly notes that the situation has racial overtones. Kelly reports that an all-white majority on the School Committee has voted to remove an African American superintendent from a school system with a 75% non-white student population.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/14/1990
Description: Jan von Mehren reports that Boston superintendent Laval Wilson was let go by the Boston School Committee. Wilson attended an event honoring the partnership between the Boston Public Schools and the John Hancock Insurance Company. Interview with Sandra Willet of the John Hancock Company, who praises Wilson for his support of business-school partnerships. Wilson speaks to reporters at the event. He says that reading and math scores improved dramatically while he was superintendent. Wilson accuses the School Committee of not working with the superintendent to achieve goals. School Committee members Rita Walsh-Tomasini and Abigail Browne are in attendance at the event. Interviews with Browne and Walsh-Tomansini, who say that Wilson is not the right person to manage the Boston Public Schools. Von Mehren reports that some members of the School Committee believe that racism is behind Wilson's firing. Interview with Committee member John O'Bryant says that Wilson would have had a different experience if he were white. Von Mehren notes that O'Bryant has compared Wilson's firing to the firing of the superintendent in Selma, Alabama. Von Mehren's report features footage from a student demonstration in Selma, Alabama in 1990. Walsh-Tomasini says that race had nothing to do with Wilson's situation. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Hope Kelly reviews the major events and key issues during the tenure of Laval Wilson and Meg Vaillancourt interviews Nthabiseng Mabuza about the release of Nelson Mandela
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/14/1990
Description: Jan von Mehren reports on the "Black Wings" exhibit at the National Park Service Visitors Center on State Street. She walks through the exhibit with a group of African American World War II veterans. The men all trained at the Tuskegee airfield during World War II. Interviews with Frank Roberts (retired US Army major), George Hardy (retired US Army Lieutenant Colonel) and John Roach (retired US Air Force Reservist) about their experiences in the military. The men talk about racism and the missions in which they participated. Roberts and Hardy describe their experiences while training at Tuskegee Airfield. Roach talks about the career of Benjamin Davis (first African American general in the US Air Force). The men point out photos in the exhibit and reminisce together.
1:00:14: Visual: Shots of Frank Roberts (retired US Army major) and another man at the "Black Wings" exhibit at the National Park Service Visitors Center on State Street. The men point to the red tail on a model of a WWII airplane. Shot of color picture of a red-tailed bomber plane. Shot of a of a red-tailed model plane. Jan von Mehren reports that red-tailed airplanes were piloted by African American pilots during WWII. V: Footage of Roberts talking about his experience as a pilot in WWII. He says that a group of white bomber pilots once expressed gratitude to him and his colleagues. Von Mehren reports that the African American pilots experienced blatant racism during WWII. Von Mehren reports that African American military pilots trained at the Tuskegee Airfield in Alabama; that Tuskegee opened in 1941 to the dismay of top military brass. Von Mehren reports that some people at the time believed that African Americans did not have the mental or moral fiber to fly in combat. V: Shots of a group of former Tuskegee pilots at the exhibit. The group includes Roberts. Shots of black and white photos of African American trainees and pilots at the Tuskegee Airfield. Footage of George Hardy (retired US Army Lieutenant Colonel) saying that his group flew over 200 missions; that they never lost a bomber to enemy fighters. Shot of a color image of a red-tailed bomber plane from the exhibit. Footage of John Roach (retired US Air Force reservist) talking about the distinct sound of the planes flown during the war. The other men agree that the planes had a very distinct sound. Roberts talks about filling gas tanks in mid-flight. Shot of a black and white photo of Roberts as a pilot during WWII. Von Mehren reports that Roberts graduated from Tuskegee in 1944; that he flew combat missions in Europe. V: Footage of Roberts saying that he was twenty-six when he graduated from Tuskegee; that he was one of the oldest men in his class. Roberts says that the men studied very hard in order to make the grade of lieutenant; that the men were committed to becoming Tuskegee airmen. Footage of Hardy saying that the Tuskegee Airfield provided a "cocoon" for the men. Hardy tries to recall the name of the local sheriff. Hardy says that the men tried to avoid getting into trouble outside of the airbase. Shot of an exhibit poster detailing the biography of Benjamin Davis (first African American general in the US Air Force). Footage of Roach saying that Davis graduated from West Point in the 1930s; that Davis was the only African American cadet at West Point at the time; that no one spoke to him for four years. Von Mehren reports that Roach is a retired colonel in the Air Force Reserve; that Roach left the military to work for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Von Mehren reports that Roach worked to evaluate pilots for commercial airlines; that commercial airlines would not hire African American pilots at the time. V: Shot of a black and white photo of a group of African American pilots in front of a plane. Roach is among them. Shot of a black and white photo of Roach in the cockpit of a military plane. Shots of Roach and another man looking at part of the exhibit. Von Mehren reports that the Tuskegee Airmen were very young when they trained to become pilots during WWII; that this exhibit allows the men to see themselves documented in history. V: Shots of the group of men at the exhibit. Footage of Roberts as he points to a photo of himself in the exhibit. Powers says that the photo was taken after the group had completed 200 missions. Shot of the photo in the exhibit. Shot of a black and white photo of the Tuskegee Airmen lined up for an inspection.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/19/1990
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that members of the Citywide Parents Council have criticized the Boston School Committee's decision to release superintendent Laval Wilson from his contract. Press conference with Council members Jackie van Leeuwen and Glenola Mitchell. Van Leeuwen says that School Committee members acted unethically and unfairly in firing Wilson. Mitchell says that she believes that race played a role in Wilson's firing. School Committee members were critical of Wilson's communication skills, but rated him as fair or better in all other categories. School Committee members deny that race played a role in the firing. Parents are demanding a voice in the selection of Wilson's successor. Vaillancourt adds that the School Committee has been forced to cut back on spending and that money will be tight for the next year. Vaillancourt's report is accompanied by footage of a Boston School Committee meeting and footage of Wilson speaking to the media.
1:00:06: Visual: Footage of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) speaking to the media on February 14, 1990. Wilson says that he is Boston's first African American superintendent of schools; that he has been a successful superintendent who has worked hard for all groups. Meg Vaillancourt reports that the Boston School Committee voted to replace Wilson last week. Wilson notes that Wilson has had problems in the past with the Citywide Parents Council; that the organization spoke out in support of Wilson today. V: Footage of Jackie van Leeuwen (Citywide Parents Council) at a press conference. Van Leeuwen says that members of the Boston School Committee acted unethically and unfairly in firing Wilson; that Wilson should have been provided an opportunity to discuss his evaluation. Vaillancourt reports that the School Committee evaluation rated Wilson as fair or better in all categories; that members were critical of his communication skills. V: Shot of John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) speaking to members of the School Committee during a break in a meeting in February of 1989. Wilson looks on. Vaillancourt reports that Wilson's supporters believe that his professionalism is more important than his personality; that Wilson's supporters question the professionalism of the School Committee. V: Shots of a white female teacher teaching students in a classroom. Shots of individual white and African American students. Footage of Glenola Mitchell (Citywide Parents Council) at the press conference. Mitchell questions how the School Committee found the money to buy out Wilson's contract. Mitchell says that the School Committee could not find any money for crucial programs or teacher contracts. Footage of Von Leeuwen saying that the School Committee is supposed to represent the interests of parents and schoolchildren. Von Leeuwen says that the School Committee has shown no regard for the opinions of parents and students. Shot of members of the media in the audience. Vaillancourt asks Mitchell if race played a role in the School Committee's vote against Wilson. Mitchell says that the pattern of the vote shows that race did play a role for some members. Footage from a School Committee meeting in February of 1989. Shots of the members of the School Committee seated at the front of the School Committee chambers; of audience members crowded into the School Committee chambers. Shot of Wilson standing alone as he drinks from a cup. Shots of School Committee members Daniel Burke, Peggy Davis-Mullen, Kitty Bowman, and Robert Cappucci conferring during a break in the meeting. Vaillancourt reports that white members of the School Committee deny that race played a part in the decision; that Wilson declined comment on camera today. Vaillancourt reports that Wilson is being considered for superintendent's post in Florida. V: Shot of the audience at the press conference of the members of the Citywide Parents Council. Vaillancourt notes that the Miami Herald has quoted Davis-Mullen as saying that Wilson is a "rigid, inflexible centralist." Vaillancourt notes that the Miami Herald quoted Davis-Mullen as saying that Wilson is unable to take criticism or move with the flow. V: Shot of Davis-Mullen speaking at a School Committee meeting. The quote by Davis-Mullen appears written in text on-screen. Vaillancourt reports that parents have demanded to meet with the School Committee; that parents want a voice in the selection of Wilson's replacement. V: Shots of attendees at the Citywide Parents Council press conference. Shot of Julio Henriquez (aide to School Committee member Daniel Burke) standing at the rear of the room. Footage of Mitchell saying that she is concerned about the members who do not have children in the school system; that those members are not users of the system. Vaillancourt reports that the School Committee's decison to fire Wilson comes at a bad time; that the state budget crunch has forced the School Committee to cut back on spending. Vaillancourt notes that the Boston City Council has not come up with funding for next year's teacher contracts; that a new student-assignment plan was scheduled to go into effect in the fall. Vaillancourt adds that Wilson will have to meet those challenges as "a lame-duck superintendent."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/20/1990
Description: Marcus Jones reports that the DiMaiti family has created the Carol DiMaiti Stuart Foundation to memorialize Carol Stuart, who was murdered. The foundation will fund scholarships for residents of the Mission Hill neighborhood and activities to bolster race relations in the city of Boston. DiMaiti family members hold a press conference. Carol's father Giusto DiMaiti talks about his daughter. Interview with Carol's brother Carl DiMaiti, who is the president of the foundation. He talks about his sister and the activities of the foundation, saying that the foundation would like to grant scholarships to students who have achieved academically or who have contributed to their schools. DiMaiti says that the foundation and its advisory board will try to fund innovative programs to improve race relations in the city. DiMaiti says that more must be done to improve race relations. This tape also includes footage from WCVB news coverage of the Stuart murder case. Editor's note: The b-roll following this edited story on the tape was entire comprised of third party footage, and so has been edited out.
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Giusto DiMaiti (father of Carol Stuart) at a press conference on January 25, 1990. DiMaiti says that Carol Stuart was a loving, caring person. Marcus Jones reports that the DiMaiti family has created a foundation to memorialize Carol Stuart; that they hope to fund scholarships for residents of the Mission Hill neighborhood; that they hope to fund activities to bolster race relations in the city of Boston. V: Shots of the members of the DiMaiti family at a press conference; of the media at the press conference. Shot of a color photo of Stuart wearing a bridal veil. Jones reports that the foundation has received over $260,000 worth of donations. Jones reports that Carl DiMaiti is the president of the foundation; that Carl DiMaiti hopes to begin granting scholarships in the fall. V: Footage of Carl DiMaiti being interviewed by Jones. Jones asks what kind of people will receive the scholarships. Carl DiMaiti says that the foundation would like to grant scholarships to hard-working students who have achieved academically or who have contributed to their school. Carl DiMaiti says that the foundation would like to grant scholarships to students who want to give something back to society. Carl DiMaiti says that Carol Stuart was a tax attorney; that Stuart volunteered her time at a Latino community center in Somerville; that Stuart helped people with their taxes during tax season. Jones asks about the foundation's goal of funding activities to improve race relations. Carl DiMaiti says that the foundation would like to fund innovative programs that bring together people from different backgrounds. Carl DiMaiti talks about an city-wide basketball league or an exchange between suburban and inner-city schools. Carl DiMaiti says that the foundation will look to its advisory board for guidance. Carl DiMaiti says that more can be done to improve race relations in Boston. Jones asks Carl DiMaiti for his opinion on race relations in Boston. Carl DiMaiti says that race relations can be improved; that the Carol DiMaiti Stuart Foundation cannot improve race relations by itself. Carl DiMaiti says that some people have been surprised that the family started the foundation. Carl DiMaiti says that the family has derived many benefits from creating the foundation. Carl DiMaiti says that the family has begun to see how many good people live in the city of Boston.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/26/1990
Description: Marcus Jones reports that Bobby Seale, the founder of the Black Panther Party, visited Boston University as part of his Black History Month speaking tour. Seale is currently working on his doctorate at Temple University and promoting his new cookbook, Barbeque'n with Bobby. His visit coincides with controversy at Boston University over remarks made by Jon Westling, the Interim President of Boston University, about Nelson Mandela. Jones reports that Westling said that students should not consider Mandela as a hero because he supports armed resistance to apartheid. Seale speaks to a small group of BU students about his book and condemns Westling's remarks about Mandela. Interview with Robert Rogers, a freshman at Boston University,who calls for Westling's resignation. Interview with Seale who defends Mandela and says that he is disappointed that racism is still a problem in the US.
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of Bobby Seale (founder, Black Panther Party) talking to students in a classroom at Boston University. Marcus Jones reports that Seale founded the Black Panther Party twenty-four years ago; that Seale is still a radical thinker. Jones notes that Seale is working on his doctorate at Temple University; that Seale is promoting his new barbecue recipe book. V: Shot of the cover of Seale's book, Barbeque'n with Bobby. Footage of Seale saying that he would like to produce a video to demonstrate his barbecue recipes. Seale says that revolutionaries eat; that revolutionaries should know how to cook. Jones notes that Seale visited Boston University as part of his Black History Month speaking tour; that Seale met with a small group of students and faculty before delivering his main speech. V: Shots of BU students meeting with Brown; of Brown speaking to students. Jones reports that Seale's visit coincides with a period of African American student unrest at Boston University. Jones notes that Jon Westling (interim president of BU) recently said that students should not consider Nelson Mandela (black South African leader) as a hero because he supports armed resistance to apartheid. V: Shot of a newspaper with a headline reading, "Westling: Mandela comments may have 'missed the mark.'" Jones reports that Westling met with students this evening to discuss his comments and other grievances; that Westling declined to comment on camera. V: Shot of Westling entering a room, followed by students. Footage of Robert Rogers (freshman, Boston University) saying that Westling should resign. Footage of Seale saying that Mandela is no different from colonial Americans who fought in the Revolutionary War; that Mandela is no different than soldiers who fought against Adoph Hitler (German dictator) during World War II. Seale says that Mandela should stand his ground; that armed resistance is justified against the violent and repressive apartheid regime. Seale says that Westling must really be an "acting" president. Seale gives a thumbs down sign when talking about Westling. Jones reports that Seale stepped down as chairman of the Black Panther Party in the mid-1970s. Jones notes that Seale praised student actions at Boston University. V: Footage of Seale being interviewed by Jones. Seale says that he sees a lot of students interested in activism. Seale says that he is disappointed that racism never went away. Seale says that there has not been a resurgence in racism; that racism never went away.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/28/1990
Description: Director and curator of Gardner Museum and art historian speculate on identity and motives of thief of major works from museum at a press conference and in an interview. Comments on the museum's security system. Photos of stolen pieces.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/19/1990
Description: The film Common Ground is based on a book about the history of school desegregation in Boston. Christy George reports that a group of people who were involved in school desegregation in Boston watched the film together last night. Afterwards, they hold a discussion of the film. Former Mayor Kevin White says that the film provoked strong reactions in everyone. City Councilor James Kelly and Former School Committee Member Elvira "Pixie" Palladino speak out against busing. George Walker, a member of the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground, speaks out against "closed communities." Jim Conway, a Charlestown resident, says that the film promotes a negative image of Charlestown. Lisa McGoff, a member of the McGoff family portrayed in Common Ground, and Cassandra Twymon, a member of the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground, also speak at the meeting. McGoff says that the film concentrates on the negative events of the busing crisis. Twymon says that the film gives an accurate portrayal of her experiences as an African American student in a white school. George's report includes footage from the film. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Jan von Mehren talks to students about school desegregation and race relations
1:00:03: Visual: Footage from the opening credits of the film, Common Ground from CBS/WHDH and Lorimar. Audio of Kevin White (former Mayor of Boston) saying that the film represents a piece of history; that no one should regret looking at piece of history. Christy George reports that the film, Common Ground, looks at the history of court-ordered school desegregation in Boston. George notes that a group of people who were involved in school desegregation in Boston watched the film together last night. V: Footage of White saying that everyone felt strong emotions after watching the film. V: Footage from the film, Common Ground. V: Footage of James Kelly (Boston City Council) addressing the gathering at the screening on March 19, 1990. Kelly says that there was something sacred about Boston's neighborhoods. Kelly says that busing for school desegregation "was not worth it." Footage of Cassandra Twymon (from the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground) addressing the gathering at the screening. Twymon says that she is sorry that some people are "embarrassed" about what they did to Boston's schoolchildren. V: Footage from the film Common Ground. V: Footage of Elvira "Pixie" Palladino (former Boston School Committee member) addressing the gathering at the screening. Palladino says that forced busing always has been wrong and always will be wrong. Footage of George Walker (member of the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground) addressing the gathering at the screening. Walker says that people need to realize that "closed communities" do not work. Walker addresses Palladino by name. V: Footage from the film Common Ground. V: Footage of Jim Conway (Charlestown resident) addressing the gathering at the screening. Conway says that men did not walk around Charlestown with open cans of beer while the mothers were demonstrating against busing. Conway says that the producers' image of Charlestown is not accurate; that the nation will see that image in the film. Footage of Lisa McGoff (member of the McGoff family portrayed in Common Ground) addressing the gathering at the screening. McGoff says that she did not attend any anti-busing meetings in barrooms; that the meetings did happen. McGoff says that bad things did go on in Charlestown. V: Footage from the film, Common Ground. George reports that Common Ground is a risky series for network television to air; that CBS is devoting four hours of prime time to the series. George reports that the movie is based on a book that tells the story of Boston's busing crisis through the experiences of three families. George reports that the book focuses on the experiences of Rachel Twymon, a widow who believed in the importance of education for her children. George reports that the book also focuses on the experiences of Alice McGoff, who believed in the importance of neighborhood communities. V: Footage from the film, Common Ground. George reports that the book also focuses on the adolescent experiences of Cassandra Twymon and Lisa McGoff. V: Footage of McGoff addressing the gathering at the screening. McGoff says that she and Twymon were kids who were trying to understand the situation as it happened. McGoff says that the film only shows the negative events during the busing crisis. McGoff says that the students were "guinea pigs"; that the success or failure of school desegregation has little to do with them. V: Footage from the film, Common Ground. V: Footage of Twymon addressing the gathering at the screening. Twymon says that people acted like the African American students were going to take over the school. Twymon says that she only wanted "to do her time" in school and return home. Twymon says that she did not want to deal with the added stress put on her by the busing crisis. Twymon says that she is glad the movie will air; that the movie gives an accurate portrayal of her experience. V: Footage from the film, Common Ground. George reports that the movie ends on a note of hope; that the argument at the screening continued after the film ended. V: Footage of Palladino addressing the gathering at the screening. Palladino says that now is not the time for this film. Footage of Walker saying that minorities are always told that the present is not the right time. Walker asks when the right time will come. Footage from the film, Common Ground.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/20/1990
Description: Marcus Jones interviews Louis Elisa, from the State Office of Environmental Affairs. Jones notes that Elisa is a neighborhood environmental activist in Roxbury. Elisa and Jones walk through Roxbury and Franklin Park while they talk. Elisa talks about the need for the environmental movement to open up to minorities. Elisa notes that many people do not believe that African Americans are committed to the environment. Elisa talks about his efforts to improve his own neighborhood. Elisa notes that he is trying to prevent the dumping of garbage on a nearby vacant lot. Jones and Elisa discuss the rehabilitation of Franklin Park in Roxbury. Elisa says that the Franklin Park Coalition sought corporate funding to clean up the park, leading to a public/private partnership. Elisa talks about the need to give young people access to the outdoors. He adds that access to the outdoors and recreational activities might decrease violence in the city. Following the edited story is additional footage of Elisa and Jones walking through the city as they discuss environmental issues.
1:00:05: Visual: Shots of the exterior of the Saltonstall Building on Cambridge Street in Boston; of Louis Elisa (State Office of Environmental Affairs) and Marcus Jones (WGBH reporter) exiting the building. Marcus Jones reports that Elisa works in the Saltonstall Building for the State Office of Environmental Affairs. Jones notes that Elisa is a neighborhood environmental activist in Roxbury. V: Footage of Elisa being interviewed by Jones on the street. Elisa says that the environmental movement is often associated with rural and suburban areas; that many urban residents are concerned about the environment. Jones notes that Elisa is an African American urban resident; that the environmental movement has not done enough to reach minority and urban constituents. V: Footage of Elisa being interviewed by Jones. Elisa says that the environmental movement has been shortsighted; that many people see a great divide between rural and urban areas. Elisa says that many people do not believe that African Americans are committed to the environment. Elisa says that the environmental movement does not understand that African Americans use and enjoy parks and open spaces. Elisa says that the environmental movement needs to open up to minorities. Shot of Elisa and Jones walking down a Roxbury street. Jones reports that problems with crime and violence take precedence over environmental issues in Roxbury; that a group of environmentalists in Roxbury are trying to make a difference. Jones notes that Elisa and his neighbors have been trying to get a lot near his apartment building cleaned off. V: Shots of Jones and Elisa walking through an abandoned lot. Audio of Elisa saying that the lot is an eyesore; that the lot is an affront to the residents of the community. Elisa says that he called the city of Boston to complain about garbage being dumped on the lot. Elisa says that the city told him that the owner of the lot could do what he wanted with the lot. Elisa says that the neighboring houses are looked after carefully. Jones reports that Franklin Park is an example of an environmental success story in Roxbury. V: Shot of a golfer hitting a golf ball at Franklin Park. Footage of Elisa saying that a group of Roxbury residents including Elma Lewis got together to advocate for Franklin Field Park; that the advocates began to clean up the park. Elisa says that the park was created by Frederick Law Olmsted (landscape architect); that the park is an asset for the city. Elisa says that the advocates found corporate funding to clean up the park. Elisa says that the rehabilitation of the park is an example of a public-private partnership. Shots of golfers walking across the fairway at the golf course at Franklin Park; of the golf course. Shot of Elisa and Jones walking along a path in Franklin Park. Audio of Elisa saying that it is important for young people to have access to parks, campgrounds, ice skating rinks and coastal areas. Elisa says that more access to the outdoors might decrease violence in the inner city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/18/1990
Description: Marcus Jones reports that artist Robert Guillemin, also known as "Sidewalk Sam," is working with elementary-school students to create a mural to celebrate Boston's ethnic diversity. The mural will be two stories tall, made up of 30,000 personal drawings by children and student, and it will hang in the Grand Concourse of South Station. Guillemin talks to students about the mural and works with them in the classroom. Students sit together as they work on drawings for the mural. Jones interviews a fourth grade student from Hurley School, who talks about her drawing for the mural. Mayor Ray Flynn has endorsed the mural project, and he visits the classroom and talks to individual students about their drawings. Interview with Flynn, who says that the mural promotes peace and unity in the city. Jones reports that volunteers at Roxbury Community College are putting the mural together, and it will be unveiled to the public tomorrow. Following the edited story is additional b-roll footage of Guillemin and students working on the mural and footage of volunteers at Roxbury Community College putting together the mural.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/14/1990
Description: This tape includes a short piece documenting a celebration at the Grand Concourse in South Station. Students and city officials celebrate the unveiling of a mural created by Sidewalk Sam and Boston elementary-school students. The mural is made up of personal drawings by students and it celebrates ethnic diversity and racial harmony in Boston. A choir of students performs in South Station. A city official congratulates the students. Sidewalk Sam leads students in a cheer. This tape includes additional footage of the celebration at South Station. Ray Flynn looks on as a student choir performs. Additional footage includes shots of the mural
1:00:30: Visual: Shot of a man conducting a children's choir. The children begin to sing. Shot of a sign reading, "Boston youth celebrate ethnic diversity and harmony." Shots of students in the choir. Footage of a city official speaking from a podium. The official says that the children are promoting racial harmony and peace. Footage of students singing in the choir. Shots of a large mural created by elementary-school students in the Boston Public School System. Shots of students waving at the camera. Shots of a section of the mural, hanging in the Grand Concourse of South Station in Boston. Shots of students in the choir. Shot of Robert Guillemin (artist), also known as "Sidewalk Sam" leading the students in a cheer. Shots of the mural; of the individual drawings making up the mural.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/15/1990
Description: Marcus Jones reports that drug addicts and community leaders held a demonstration in front of the Massachusetts State House, lobbying for more funding for drug treatment centers in Massachusetts. There are not enough publicly funded treatment programs to meet demand. Demonstrators hold signs and chant. Reverend Graylan Hagler and others address the demonstrators. Hagler says that access to drug treatment is a class issue. State Rep. Gloria Fox tells demonstrators to let state legislators know that drug treatment centers are needed. Interview with recovering addict David Watson about the need for treatment centers. Interview with another recovering drug addict who says that she intends to register to vote. Jones reports that the demonstrators went into the State House to register to vote after the rally, and they intend to vote against legislators who do not support their cause.
1:00:15: Visual: Footage of a demonstration in front of the Massachusetts State House. Supporters of treatment facilities for drug addiction are gathered. A man leads the demonstrators in a cheer. Shot of a sign reading, "Don't treat addiction as a crime. Treat it as a disease." Marcus Jones reports that hundreds of people were expected to attend today's demonstration outside of the State House; that rainy weather may have kept some demonstrators away. Jones notes that the demonstration went on as planned; that the demonstrators are committed to their cause. V: Shots of speakers and attendees at the demonstration. Footage of Nathaniel Askia (drug treatment provider) addressing the crowd. Askia tells the demonstrator to remain committed to the cause. Askia predicts that the movement will be successful. Shot of a button pinned to the shirt of a demonstrator. The button reads, "Treatment on demand." Jones reports that the demonstrators support drug treatment on demand; that the demand for drug treatment in Massachusetts is growing. Jones notes that over 1,000 drug addicts are turned away from treatment facilities each day in Massachusetts; that there are not enough publicly funded treatment programs to meet the demand. V: Shots of the demonstrators. The demonstrators carry umbrellas and wear hats to protect themselves from rain. Footage of Reverend Graylan Ellis-Hagler (Church of the United Community) addressing the crowd. Ellis-Hagler says that access to drug treatment is a class issue. Ellis-Hagler says that Kitty Dukakis (wife of Governor Michael Dukakis) has access to treatment because she belongs to the upper class. Ellis-Hagler says that class, race, gender, and sexual preference may bar some from treatment for their addictions. Jones reports that David Watson (recovering drug addict) was recently admitted to a treatment program; that Watson is recovering from 24 years of substance abuse. V: Footage of Watson being interviewed by Jones. Watson says that citizens will end up paying the price if more treatment centers are not built. Watson says that addicts are likely to steal and commit crime in order to pay for their habits. Watson says that he began stealing to support his habit at one point in the past. Footage of the supporters cheering at the demonstration. A leader leads the supporters in chanting, "What do we want? Treatment. When do we want it? Now." Footage of Gloria Fox (State Representative) addressing the crowd. Fox says that the demonstrators must let the legislators know that drug treatment centers are needed; that the legislators will soon begin work on the state budget. Footage of Brenda (recovering drug addict) being interviewed by Jones. Jones asks Brenda if she has registered to vote. Brenda says that she is going to register to vote today. Brenda says that she intends to vote; that she thinks her vote will make a difference. Jones stands outside of the State House. Traffic passes on the street behind him. Jones reports that demonstrators went into the State House to register to vote after the rally. Jones reports that the demonstrators will vote against legislators who do not support an increase in the present drug treatment program.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1990
Description: Marcus Jones reports that a shrinking school budget may force teacher layoffs in the Boston Public School System, and a final federal court order may require layoffs to be based on affirmative action quotas instead of union seniority. White teachers with seniority are at odds with newer minority teachers. Members of the Boston Teachers Union picketing outside of the Boston School Department. The president of Concerned Black Teachers of Boston, Robert Marshall, speaks at a press conference. Marshall says that seniority is a biased and discriminatory criterion for determining layoffs. Interview with Boston Teachers Union President Edward Doherty, who says that more minority teachers must be hired. He adds that affirmative action quotas should not force white teachers out of their jobs. At a Boston School Committee meeting Antonieta Gimeno, a parent, tells the School Committee that Haitian, Asian, Cape Verdean, and African students find no reflection of their heritages in the school curriculum or in the school faculty. The federal court withdrew from supervision over the Boston Public schools last month, but deep-seated racial problems still plague the system.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of teachers picketing in front of the headquarters of the Boston School Department at 26 Court Street. Teachers hold signs reading, "No layoffs." Shots of individual teachers in the picket lines. Marcus Jones reports that the federal court no longer oversees the operation of the Boston Public School System; that the teachers have a new contract which includes a salary increase and more input into decisions affecting the schools. Jones notes that Dr. Laval Wilson (former Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) has left the school system. Jones reports that the Boston Public School System is still underfunded and racially divided. V: Shot of Joseph McDonough (Interim Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) walking to his seat at the front of the Boston School Committee chambers. Footage of Edward Doherty (President, Boston Teachers Union) standing in front of the School Department headquarters. Doherty says that next year will be difficult unless teacher lay-offs can be avoided. Shots of teachers picketing the School Department headquarters. Jones reports that more than 150 teachers may be laid off this summer; that the city of Boston has refused to grant McDonough's $409 million budget request. Jones notes that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has said that the schools must make do with a budget request of $400 million. Jones reports that the final federal court orders require lay-offs to be based on affirmative action quotas instead of union seniority. Jones notes that white teachers with seniority are at odds with newer minority teachers. V: Shot of Robert Marshall (President, Concerned Black Teachers of Boston) holding a press conference. Supporters stand behind him. Shot of teachers unfurling a union banner in front of the School Department headquarters. Footage of Marshall speaking at the press conference. Marshall says that minority teachers and progressive white teachers have urged the Boston Teachers Union not to appeal the federal court orders. Marshall accuses the Boston Teachers Union of racism. Marshall says that the Boston Teachers Union continues to defend seniority; that seniority has been ruled to be a biased and discriminatory criterion. Footage of Doherty being interviewed by Jones outside of the School Department headquarters. Doherty says that more minority teachers must be hired; that white teachers should not be forced out of their jobs by affirmative action quotas. Doherty says that minority teachers should look at the unfairness of the situation. Footage of Antonieta Gimeno (parent) standing with other parents at the front of the Boston School Committee chambers. Members of the Boston School Committee are seated in their seats at the front of the chambers. Gimeno says that the parents have come to protest the School Committee meeting. Gimeno holds up a sign reading, "We demand excellence for all children." The audience applauds Gimeno. Gimeno says that School Committee meetings are a "mockery" and an "insult" to the intelligence of community members. Shots of one of the parents at the front of the chambers with Gimeno. Jones reports that disgruntled parents aired their grievances before today's School Committee meeting. V: Footage of Gimeno saying that Haitian, Asian, Cape Verdean, and African students find no reflection of their heritages in the school curriculum or in the school faculty. Jones stands outside the chambers of the Boston School Committee. Jones reports that the federal court closed the books on school desegregation in Boston last month; that there remain deep-seated racial problems in the system. Jones reports that there may be a court battle concerning faculty desegregation in Boston Public Schools.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/19/1990
Description: David Boeri profiles Teko Manong, a South African exile, author and playwright, who has been living in the US for thirty years. Boeri notes that Manong was jailed in South Africa for anti-apartheid activities. Manong escaped from prison and fled to Ghana and then to the US. Interview with Manong, who talks about apartheid in South Africa and his participation in the defiance campaign and the potato boycott in South Africa in the 1950s. Manong talks about Nelson Mandela. Manong tells Boeri that his plays have received little critical recognition or success in the US. He says that his time in exile has been wasted. Manong says that he does not want to return to South Africa because he does not trust white South Africans. Boeri reports that black playwrights like Manong have found little success with US audiences. He notes that Manong has been supporting himself by working in the kitchen of a local restaurant. Boeri adds that Manong represents the thwarted hopes of many black South Africans. Boeri's report includes footage of Manong working in the kitchen of a restaurant.
1:00:08: Visual: Footage of Teko Manong (South African exile) walking across a parking lot and entering a building. Footage of Manong working in the kitchen of a restaurant. Boeri reports that Manong is one of the thousands of South Africans who are exiled from their homeland. Boeri reports that Manong has been in the US for thirty years; that Manong grew up in Soweto. V: Shot of a black and white photo of Manong as a boy in Soweto. He stands with two other boys. Footage of Manong working in the restaurant kitchen. Boeri reports that Manong joined the defiance campaign and the potato boycott in South Africa in the 1950s. V: Footage of Manong being interviewed by Boeri. Manong says that white South African potato farmers would bury the bodies of murdered black South Africans in their fields. Manong says that the potato farmers would brag about the size of their crops and the effectiveness of their "fertilizer." Close-up shot of Manong flipping through his South African passbook. Boeri reports that black South Africans were forced to carry their passbooks at all times. Boeri notes that Manong organized a pass burning campaign in the 1960s; that the campaign resulted in mass arrests. Boeri reports that Manong was jailed without trial; that his promising career as playwright and composer was brought to an end. V: Footage of Manong in the restaurant kitchen. Manong breaks eggs into a large metal pan. Manong pours the eggs into a large pot. Shot of Manong leaving a building and walking across a parking lot. Boeri reports that Manong escaped from prison and journied to Ghana. Boeri notes that Manong worked for the South African resistance movement while in Ghana; that Manong met Nelson Mandela (black South African leader). V: Shot of a framed drawing of Mandela. Footage of Manong being interviewed by Boeri. Manong says that Mandela was a great leader; that Mandela helped him personally. Manong says that Mandela would often defend people without money when he was a lawyer; that Mandela was a remarkable man. Shot of Manong's US documents identifying him as a refugee. Boeri reports that Mandela helped Manong get to England; that Manong had hoped to pursue his career in England. Boeri reports that Manong has been politically silenced in South Africa; that Manong has been commercially silenced in the US. V: Shot of a poster for the South African play Survival. Boeri reports that white South African playwrights have found producers and audiences in the US; that Manong has had little success because he is black and foreign. V: Footage of Manong being interviewed by Boeri. Manong says that his time in exile has been wasted. Boeri asks about the plays he has written while in exile. Manong says that he never should have escaped from prison; that he should have served time in jail for the cause like Mandela did. Boeri reports that Manong has not seen his wife or daughter for thirty years; that he was unable to return to South Africa for the funeral of his mother. V: Shot of a photo of a young black South African woman; of a black and white photo of Manong's parents; of a black and white photo of a gathering of black South Africans. Footage of Manong being interviewed by Boeri. Manong says that he does not want to return to South Africa; that he does not trust white people in South Africa. Footage of Manong working in the restaurant kitchen. Boeri reports that Manong has written a play titled Excuse Me While I Disappear. Boeri notes that Manong represents the blighted hopes of many talented South Africans.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/21/1990
Description: Meg Vaillancourt talks to Nthabiseng Mabuza, who was exiled from South Africa, about the upcoming visit by Nelson Mandela to Boston. Mabuza will sing a welcome for Mandela when he visits Madison Park High School tomorrow. She practices her welcome song. Interview with Mabuza, who was only twelve years old when she was paralyzed from injuries sustained during an attack on her home by South African security forces. Interview with her month Anna Mabuza and Jane Schaller from the New England Medical Center, Floating Hospital. The Fund for a Free South Africa has helped Mabuza and her family settle in Boston. Nthabiseng Mabuza also talks about the inhumane policies and practices of the South African government. She says that she is not bitter about what happened to her. Mabuza talks about the importance of achieving democracy in South Africa.
1:00:06: Visual: Footage of Nthabiseng Mabuza (South African exile in the US) singing a song about South Africa. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Mabuza was born in South Africa; that her father was a member of the African National Congress (ANC). V: Footage of Mabuza being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Mabuza talks about being shot by South African Security Forces when they raided her home. Vaillancourt reports that Mabuza was twelve years old when South African Security Forces raided her home; that her aunt was killed in the raid; that an uncle was wounded; that her mother barely escaped. V: Shot of a color photo of Mabuza as a young girl. Footage of Anna Mabuza (mother of Nthabiseng Mabuza) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Anna Mabuza says that Nthabiseng Mabuza is lucky to be alive. Footage of Dr. Jane Schaller (New England Medical Center, Floating Hospital) describing Nthabiseng Mabuza's injuries. Schaller says that Nthabiseng Mabuza was shot in the abdomen and in the back. Schaller says that Mabuza is paralyzed from the chest down. Shot of Nthabiseng Mabuza maneuvering herself into her wheelchair. Vaillancourt reports that the Fund for a Free South Africa (charity) has helped Nthabiseng Mabuza come to Boston; that Nthabiseng Mabuza is receiving free medical care at the Floating Hospital. Vaillancourt reports that Nthabiseng Mabuza is teaching local students about life under apartheid. V: Footage of Nthabiseng Mabuza being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Nthabiseng Mabuza talks about the cruel treatment of an eight-year old boy at the hands of the South African government. Nthabiseng Mabuza says that children and adults are imprisoned and killed by the South African government. Footage from January of 1990 of Nthabiseng Mabuza working with her physical therapist. Vaillancourt reports that Nthabiseng Mabuza has physical therapy twice a week; that doctors are doing what they can for her. Vaillancourt reports that Nthabiseng Mabuza keeps her spirits up; that she has responded to her trials with courage and dignity. V: Footage of Nthabiseng Mabuza in a wheelchair. She wheels herself through the house and into a room. Audio of "I'm Forever Your Girl" by Paula Abdul plays in the background. Shot of Nthabiseng Mabuza in her bedroom. Footage of Nthabiseng Mabuza being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks Nthabiseng Mabuza if she is bitter. Nthabiseng Mabuza says that she gets angry sometimes; that she is not bitter. Nthabiseng Mabuza says that South African citizens must work toward achieving a democratic society. Vaillancourt reports that Nthabiseng Mabuza will meet Nelson Mandela (ANC leader) tomorrow; that Nthabiseng Mabuza will talk to Madison Park High School students about the struggle against apartheid; that Nthabiseng Mabuza will sing a welcome for Mandela. V: Shot of Nthabiseng Mabuza on her bed. She takes off her shoes and begins to study a notebook. Audio of Nthabiseng Mabuza singing a song. Audio of Nthabiseng Mabuza saying that she was not yet born when Mandela went to prison; that today's youth will be tomorrow's leaders. Footage of Nthabiseng Mabuza singing her welcome for Mandela.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/22/1990
Description: Marcus Jones reports on city-wide preparations for Nelson Mandela's visit. Jones report includes footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and a group of city officials raising the flag of the African National Congress (ANC) on City Hall Plaza and footage of preparations for a rally on the Esplanade. Jones interviews Maurice Lewis (Public Affairs Director, WBCN radio) and a senior from the Jeremiah Burke High School about Mandela's visit. Jones reports that more than 4,000 people are expected to take part in a Walk For Freedom from Roxbury to the Esplanade. Jones notes that students from the Trotter Elementary School will perform for Mandela at a reception. Jones interviews Trotter Elementary School students about Mandela. Jones' report includes footage of Trotter school students rehearsing a musical piece. Students make posters in preparation for Mandela's visit. Jones notes that vendors are selling souvenir merchandise with images of Mandela. Jones interviews Jacob Abdul Khllaq (General Manager, A Nubian Notion) about the books, T-shirts and posters sold at his store. Jones interviews Lisa Grant (resident) about Mandela. Jones' report includes footage of an African American man and boy talking about Mandela and footage from Mandela's visit to New York City.
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and a group of city officials unfurling a flag of the African National Congress (ANC). The group of city officials with Flynn include Boston City Councillors Charles Yancey, Bruce Bolling, and David Scondras. Shots of the media assembled on City Hall Plaza; of the ANC flag being raised on a flag pole. Marcus Jones reports that there is much excitement surrounding the preparations for the arrival of Nelson Mandela (ANC leader) in Boston. V: Footage of Flynn addressing a gathered crowd. Flynn says that the people of Boston and the United Way will give Mandela a big welcome tomorrow. Shot of preparations being made on the Esplanade for Mandela's visit; of preparations at the Hatch Shell. Jones reports that Mandela's visit is as important as the visit by Pope John Paul II in the 1980s. V: Footage of Maurice Lewis (Public Affairs Director, WBCN radio) being interviewed. Lewis says that the whole city is pulling together to prepare for Mandela's visit; that the city of Boston is rising to the occasion. Shots of a group of people of diverse races walking along a street. Jones reports that more than 4,000 people are expected to take part in a Walk for Freedom tomorrow morning; that the walk will begin in Roxbury and end at the Esplanade. V: Footage of Loraine Sterling (senior, Jeremiah Burke High School) being interviewed. Sterling says that the organizers of the walk wanted to show their support for Mandela. Jones reports that students from the William Trotter Elementary School are rehearsing a prayer for Mandela; that the work was composed two years before. Jones reports that the students will perform for Mandela at a private reception tomorrow evening at the Copley Plaza Hotel. V: Shots of students rehearsing at the Trotter School. Shots of students rehearsing on stage; of a teacher watching the students; of students playing music on water glasses; of students playing percussion instruments; of students on stage. Footage of Priscilla Purvis (fifth grader, William Trotter School) being interviewed. Purvis says that Mandela helps people; that not everyone helps people. Footage of Molly Costello (fourth grader, William Trotter School) being interviewed by Jones. Costello says that Mandela fights for freedom; that he does not give up. Shots of students making posters in preparation for Mandela's visit. Shot of a sign reading, "Mandela, Roxbury loves you." Jones reports that Mandela's name and image appear on souvenir merchandise being sold across the city; that proceeds support Mandela's mission in South Africa. V: Shot of books about Mandela; of a woman putting pamphlets about Mandela on a rack; of T-shirts with Mandela's face; of buttons with Mandela's image. Shot of a worker in the store A Nubian Notion. The worker folds a Mandela T-shirt and puts it in a bag. Footage of Jacob Abdul Khllaq (General Manager, A Nubian Notion) being interviewed in the store. Khllaq says that people recognize the impact that Mandela has had on the world; that people want a piece of history. Footage of an African American man and a small boy standing in front of a poster of Mandela. The man tells the boy that Mandela is a great leader. Footage of Lisa Grant (resident) being interviewed. Grant says that Mandela has sacrificed twenty-seven years of his life. Grant says that Mandela is a hero. Shot of Nelson Mandela and Winnie Mandela (wife of Nelson Mandela) in New York City with David Dinkins (mayor of New York City). This news story is accompanied by intermittent music.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/22/1990
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on black South African leader Nelson Mandela's visit to Madison Park High School. Vaillancourt reports that a large crowd waited in the hot gymnasium for Mandela to arrive. She adds that Madison Park High School was one of many stops on Mandela's itinerary during his visit to Boston. Vaillancourt's report includes footage of the crowd in the gymnasium and footage of a musical group performing traditional African music. Vaillancourt reports that the crowd erupted in ecstatic cheers when Mandela arrived. Vaillancourt's report also includes footage of Mandela's arrival at the high school. Members of the crowd are on their feet as they cheer. Mandela talks about the importance of education to today's youth. Vaillancourt reports that Mandela also spoke of the struggle against apartheid and the importance of sanctions. Vaillancourt notes that many people in the crowd consider Mandela to be a hero. Vaillancourt's report includes shots of Mandela with Winnie Mandela (wife of Nelson Mandela) and his entourage on stage at the high school.
1:00:01: Visual: Footage of a crowd filling the bleachers of a gymnasium at Madison Park High School on June 23, 1990. The crowd claps and applauds. Shots of crowd members on the bleachers. Meg Vaillancourt reports that many Roxbury residents waited at Madison Park High School for an opportunity to see Nelson Mandela (black South African leader). Vaillancourt notes that Mandela is a hero to many people of color; that the Roxbury community used the Mandela visit as an opportunity to showcase its strenghts. V: Footage of Roxbury community members performing for the audience. A musical group in African dress plays on African instruments. African-American girls perform a dance in front of the audience. A man plays a rhythm on a drum strung around his neck. Vaillancourt reports that Mandela's plane arrived late at Logan Airport; that a luncheon at the John F. Kennedy Library ran long. Vaillancourt reports that every stop on Mandela's itinerary ran long; that a faithful crowd at Madison Park High School waited while chanting his name. V: Shots of the crowd standing on the bleachers. The crowd sings, claps and chants. Many crowd members hold up signs welcoming Mandela. Vaillancourt reports that the gymnasium was sweltering; that the crowd stayed to wait for Mandela. Vaillancourt notes that the crowd erupted in cheers when Mandela arrived. V: Shots of members of the crowd; of people fanning themselves. Footage of Mandela approaching the stage as the crowd cheers. Mandela and Winnie Mandela (wife of Nelson Mandela) wave at the crowd. Mandela raises his clenched fist. Mandela is accompanied by an entourage including Charles Yancey (Boston City Council). Vaillancourt reports that the crowd's ovation for Mandela lasted five minutes. V: Shots of the crowd on its feet. The crowd cheers for Mandela. Vaillancourt reports that Mandela spoke of the struggle against apartheid and the importance of sanctions. V: Footage of Mandela addressing the crowd. Mandela says that he and others are concerned by the high drop-out rate among schoolchildren in Boston. Mandela says that the youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow. Shots of the crowd. Vaillancourt reports that Mandela emphasized education. Vaillancourt notes that the drop-out rate in Boston Public Schools is nearly 40%. V: Footage of Mandela addressing the crowd. Mandela says that many students leave school because of poverty and frustration. Mandela urges students to stay in school. Shots of the crowd. Many members of the crowd fan themselves. Vaillancourt reports that Mandela spoke briefly; that Mandela's visit to Madison Park High School was the high point of Mandela's visit for many Roxbury residents. V: Footage of Mandela addressing the crowd. Mandela tells the crowd that he loves them. The crowd cheers. Mandela greets community leaders who are on stage with him, including Shirley Owens Hicks (State Representative), Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) and Byron Rushing (State Representative). Themba Vilakazi (South African exile) and Louis Elisa (NAACP) are on stage with Mandela.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/25/1990
Description: Christy George reports that Ernie Branch teaches karate to urban kids. Interview with Branch, who talks about the value of karate. Branch says that hard work, dedication, and concentration are all important in karate. Branch holds a class with a group of kids. Interviews with the children in Branch's class about why they like karate and about what they would like to be when they grow up. Interviews with parents Haroldine Haley and Michael Langelow about the benefits of the karate classes. Branch's karate classes are funded by the Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency (MHFA).
0:59:58: Visual: Footage of minority youth in a karate class. Shots of individual youth as they perform their exercises. Shot of Ernie Branch (karate instructor). Christy George reports that Branch is a volunteer; that Branch is also a father and a former marine. V: Footage of Branch counting out loud as the youth do their exercises. Shots of individual youth in the class. Branch circulates among the class members. Footage of Branch being interviewed. Branch says that young kids have not yet decided if they want to be "good guys" or "bad guys." Branch says that the "good guys" do not offer any incentives; that the "bad guys" do offer incentives. Branch says that kids must learn that short term greed does not pay off in the end. Branch says that he tries to teach kids that hard work, dedication, and concentration will pay off. Branch says that kids need to learn how to think. George reports that Branch teaches karate to kids; that karate is a form of self-defense; that karate teaches confidence, structure, and self-respect. V: Branch instructs the members of the class to sit down. They sit down. Shots of individual members of the class. A young African American boy performs exercises in front of the class. Footage of Branch being interviewed. Branch says that major sports like basketball and football do not appeal to all kids. Branch says that some kids who fail in other sports find success in karate. Branch says that there is no failure in karate; that kids can progress at their own rate of speed; that kids receive individual attention. Footage of the members of the class being interviewed by George. George asks what karate teaches them about not fighting. King Branch (age eleven) says that karate has taught him that people will make trouble for you if you make trouble for them. King Branch says that he does not want to be the one who starts a fight; that he might be the one who gets beat up. Footage of Nathaniel Pomales (age eleven) says that it is important to remember hand blocks so that others cannot hit you. George remarks that karate requires a lot of concentration. Pomales says that he keeps it all in his head. Footage of Camille Langelow (age nine) saying that she has learned discipline and how to stand up for herself. Footage of James Haley (age nine) saying that karate has taught him to avoid bad behavior; that he usually has bad behavior. Footage of Andrew Cherry (age ten) saying that karate has taught him to avoid fights; that karate has taught him to ignore what others say about him. George reports that two of the children in Branch's class have special needs; that they are overactive and have trouble concentrating. George notes that these students have no problem in Branch's class. V: Shot of Branch instructing the members of the class as they do their exercises. Footage of Haroldine Haley (mother of James Haley) sitting with James Haley. Haroldine Haley says that she used to have trouble getting James Haley to do his homework. Haroldine Haley says that she told James Haley that he could not go to karate if his homework is not finished. Haroldine Haley says that James Haley always has his homework done before karate now. George reports that Haroldine Haley and Michael Langelow (father of Camille Langelow) think that parents need to be more involved with their children. Footage of Michael Langelow sitting with Camille Langelow. Michael Langelow says that kids are being destroyed by drugs, gangs, and violence. Michael Langelow says that parents need to be responsible for their children. Shots of two members of the class performing exercises in front of the others. George reports that Branch's karate classes are funded by the Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency (MHFA); that the MHFA finances low-interest mortgages for low-income housing. George reports that the MHFA has found that the best way to protect its real estate is to protect the tenants. George notes that the MHFA conducts classes and counseling in areas including substance abuse, single parenting, suicide prevention, and karate. V: Shot of Branch demonstrating hand movements for the class. Footage of Pomales saying that he wants to be a scientist and an astronaut when he grows up; of Cherry saying that he would like to be a basketball player. Footage of a young girl in the class saying that she would like to be a doctor. Footage of Camille Langelow saying that she would like to be a runner or another kind of athlete. Footage of King Branch saying that he would like to be a US Marine sergeant. Shots of the students in karate class. George says that not all kids have someone who cares about them. V: Footage of Ernie Branch being interviewed. Branch says that he cares about youth because they represent the future. Shots of the students performing exercises in unison. Branch corrects one of the girls in class.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/26/1990
Description: Christy George interviews Maria LeBron about her experiences as a tenant in Boston's public housing, specifically in the Mission Hill Housing Project. George notes that LeBron is one of 370 tenants who have been compensated for the discriminatory policies of the Boston Housing Authority (BHA). The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and a federal court found the BHA policies to be discriminatory. The Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights filed a lawsuit on behalf on tenants. LeBron talks about how she was placed on a waiting list for an apartment even though there were empty apartments in housing projects in South Boston and Charlestown. She talks about the discriminatory policies of the BHA. LeBron says that it is very difficult to be homeless. She adds that people of color should not be afraid to challenge government agencies. George reports that nearly 1,000 people are eligible for settlement money from the BHA.
1:00:11: Visual: Footage of Maria LeBron (public housing tenant) calling to her children in the courtyard of the Mission Hill Housing Project. LeBron takes one of her children by the hand. She walks with along with them toward one of the buildings in the development. Christy George reports that the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) placed LeBron in the Mission Hill Public Housing Project three years ago. George notes that LeBron is Puerto Rican; that LeBron's neighbors are Puerto Rican and African American. George reports that the BHA used to assign tenants by race; that LeBron was forced to wait for a long time to be placed in an apartment. George adds that LeBron signed up for public housing after the city condemned the building in which she was living; that LeBron was six months pregnant. V: Footage of LeBron sitting in her apartment with her two sons. LeBron says that she wondered why the BHA took so long to place her in an apartment. LeBron says that she knew that there were empty apartments. LeBron says that she waited three months before being placed in an apartment. Shots of LeBron working in the kitchen of her apartment. George reports that LeBron spent three months shuttling between a homeless shelter and the Milner Hotel. George notes that BHA apartments in Charlestown and South Boston sat empty while LeBron waited for an apartment. V: Shot of one of LeBron's sons sitting on the floor of the apartment. A toy car is in the foreground of the shot. George reports that LeBron was assigned to an apartment in Mission Hill two weeks before her baby was born. V: Shot of LeBron's two sons in the kitchen with her while she works. Footage of LeBron being interviewed by George. LeBron says that she noticed that there were no white families in the housing project where she was placed. LeBron says that a neighbor told her that the BHA only places white families in Charlestown and South Boston; that there are no white people outside of those two areas. LeBron says that she thinks that is wrong. Shots of LeBron in the kitchen with her sons. LeBron gets some chocolate milk for one of her sons. Shot of the boy drinking from a small bottle of chocolate milk. George reports that the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and a federal court ruled that the BHA housing policies were discriminatory. George reports that the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights filed suit on behalf of the NAACP and tenants. V: Shots of Lebron giving her other son a cup of milk. Shot of an $500 invoice made out to LeBron from the BHA. George reports that LeBron received $500 from the BHA yesterday; that LeBron will receive a total of three checks as compensation for the discriminatory practices of the BHA. George notes that she will receive two more checks for $250. V: Shot of LeBron and her two sons on the couch. Footage of LeBron being interviewed by George. LeBron says that the BHA learned an expensive lesson. LeBron says that there are many people who do not have homes. LeBron says that it is hard to be homeless; that homeless people do not know where they will go for their next meal or for shelter. LeBron says that she wanted a home. Shot of the housing development from a window in LeBron's apartment. George reports that LeBron is one of 370 people who have been compensated for the BHA's discriminatory policies. George notes that nearly 1,000 more people are eligible for settlement money. George notes that these people will be hard to find; that some do not speak English; that others may be afraid to collect. V: Shot of three people standing at the entrance to one of the development buildings. Footage of LeBron being interviewed by George. LeBron says that many people of color are intimidated by large government bureaucracies like the BHA. LeBron says that people should not be intimidated, especially if they are in the right. Shot of LeBron handing each of her sons a coin. LeBron stands near a bureau. George reports that LeBron will use her first check to bring her sons to Puerto Rico for a visit to their grandparents. George notes that LeBron would like to attend college in the future to study law. George adds that LeBron has already won her first case. V: Shot of LeBron following her sons out of a room in the apartment.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/02/1990
Description: Hope Kelly reports that Democratic candidates for governor Evelyn Murphy and Francis Bellotti talked about civil rights issues at the Boston Globe Forum on Civil Rights. While the candidates agreed on most of the issues, they disagreed about the death penalty. Murphy and Bellotti talk about minority set-asides, development in minority communities, and the civil rights bill in the state legislature. They also discuss their positions on death penalty. Bellotti talks about his participation in the civil rights movement in the 1960s. Reporters look bored, some reporters read the newspaper while the candidates talk. Kelly reports that many voters are not familiar with the civil rights records of either candidate. Interviews with people on the street, none of whom believe that either candidate has shown strong leadership in the area of civil rights.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Evelyn Murphy (Democratic candidate for governor of Massachusetts) and Francis Bellotti (Democratic candidate for governor of Massachusetts) at the Boston Globe Forum on Civil Rights. A moderator introduces the forum. Murphy and Bellotti sit together at a table. Panelists sit at tables adjacent to the candidates. Members of the media are at the back of the room. Hope Kelly reports that there was no debate at the Boston Globe Forum on Civil Rights this morning; that the candidates agree on the issues. V: Footage of Murpy speaking at the Forum. Murphy says that she believes in minority set-aside rules; that she would like to see the program expanded. Shots of members of the media sitting on a couch to one side of the room. Kelly says that the forum's atmosphere was low-key. V: Shots of Bellotti; of two reporters reading the newspaper as Murphy speaks. Shots of two men conferring as Murphy speaks; of another reporter reading the newspaper. Shot of a man playing with his pen; of another man looking up at the ceiling. Shot of the moderator with his chin cupped in his hand. Audio of Murphy talking about minority businesses. Kelly notes that both candidates got equal time at the forum. V: Footage of Bellotti talking about development in minority communities. Kelly reports that both candidates say that they support the same agenda; that both candidates support the civil rights bill before the US Congress; that both candidates support the gay rights bill in the state legislature. V: Shot of Murphy speaking at the forum. Kelly reports that both candidates support minority set-aside programs; that both candidates will try to improve access for all. V: Shots of panelists at the forum. Kelly reports that Murphy brought up the only difference between the two candidates; that the difference was highlighted in the days following the murder of Carol Stuart (resident of Reading, Massachusetts). V: Footage of Murphy speaking at the forum. Murphy says that her opponents talked about their support of the death penalty in the days following the Stuart murder. Murphy says that she has always been an opponent of the death penalty; that Bellotti had threatened to "pull the switch." Footage of Bellotti speaking at the forum. Bellotti says that he was not statesmanlike when he talked about pulling "the switch." Bellotti says that he has always been honest about his position on the death penalty. Bellotti says that he would never lobby for the death penalty. Kelly reports that the candidates talked about their past records; that the candidates talked about how they would govern the state. V: Footage of Bellotti speaking at the forum. Bellotti says that he marched with Martin Luther King Jr. (civil rights leader) in 1965; that people threw rocks at the marchers. Shots of Bellotti and Murphy at the forum. Kelly reports that both candidates boasted of their records on civil rights. Kelly notes that many voters are not familiar with the civil rights records of either candidate. V: Footage of an African American man being interviewed by Kelly outside of a post office. Kelly asks if the man is familiar with the civil rights records of Murphy or Bellotti. The man says that he cannot think of anything that either candidate has done in the area of civil rights. Footage of a white man being interviewed by Kelly. Kelly asks the man to name some local civil rights leaders. The man responds that she has posed a tough question. Footage of an African American man being interviewed by Kelly. The man cannot come up with an answer to Kelly's question about local civil rights leaders. Footage of a white man being interviewed by Kelly. The man says that he would not consider Bellotti to be a leader in the area of civil rights. Footage of an African American woman being interviewed by Kelly. Kelly asks the woman if she knew that Bellotti grew up in Roxbury. The woman says that she never knew that fact. Shot of the candidates and panelists rising at the end of the forum.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/07/1990
Description: Parents and infants in the lobby of a health care center. Rebecca Rollins reports that many Massachusetts state legislators have said that the state's rising infant mortality rate is a priority. State Rep. John McDonough and State Sen. Edward Burke were the only two of seventeen members of the Legislative Health Care Committee attended a recent meeting on the infant mortality rate. Rollins notes that some legislators said that they were not aware of the meeting. Interviews with Burke and Dr. Jean Taylor of the Roxbury Comprehensive Community Health Center. Taylor says that the all of the members of the committee would have attended if the subject were white infant mortality. Rollins notes that the infant mortality rate is three times higher in the African American community than in the white community. Rollins reports that any legislation related to infant mortality will most likely be written by Burke and McDonough.
1:00:02: Visual: Footage of a health care worker speaking to an African American woman in the lobby of a health care center. The man holds an infant on his lap. Shot of the infant. Rebecca Rollins reports that African American infants in the Boston area are three times more likely than white babies to die in their first year. Rollins reports that many Massachusetts state legislators have said that the state's rising infant mortality rate is a priority. Rollins reports that the Legislative Health Care Committee gave its full attention to the issue of insurance; that the infant mortality issue did not get the same attention. V: Shots of legislators at a meeting of the Legislative Health Care Committee. Rollins reports that there are seventeen members of the Legislative Health Care Committee; that only two members were present at recent hearings on the rising infant mortality rate. V: Shots of black and white photos of the members of the Legislative Health Care Committee, including state representatives Athan Catjakis, Marjorie Claprood, Sherwood Guernsey, Robert Howarth, Frank Hynes, Joseph McIntyre, John McNeiil, Chester Suhoski. Shot of a black and white photo of John McDonough (State Representative). Rollins reports that McDonough and Edward Burke (State Senator) were the only two members who attended the hearings. V: Footage of Burke being interviewed in his office. Burke says that he does not know why other members were prevented from attending the hearings. Rollins says that most of the fifteen legislators were unavailable for comment. V: Shots of black and white photos of state senators on the Legislative Health Care Committee, including Senators Louis Bertonazzi, Robert Buell, John Houston and Thomas White. Shot of a black and white photo of Robert Howarth (State Representative). Rollins reports that Howarth said that he was not aware of the meetings. V: Shot of a black and white photo of John Bartley (State Representative). Rollins reports that Bartley said that he thought the meeting had been scheduled for the day after the primary election. Rollins reports that Bartley said that he had no intention of attending the meeting. Rollins notes that Bartley called back later to say that he had never been notified of the meeting. V: Footage of Burke being interviewed in his office. Burke says that the members were probably notified about the hearings. Burke says that notifications were sent out from his office and from the office of the House Chairman of the committee. Rollins reports that Dr. Jean Taylor (Roxbury Comprehensive Community Health Center) testified at both hearings. V: Footage of Taylor being interviewed by Rollins. Taylor says that all of the members of the committee would have attended the hearings if the subject was related to white infant mortality. Rollins stands in front of the Massachusetts State House. Rollins reports that the previous day's hearings were the final hearings on infant mortality for this year. Rollins notes that any legislation related to infant mortality will most likely be written by Burke and McDonough. Rollins notes that the absence of the fifteen legislators may have compromised progress in the state's health care system.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/16/1990
Description: Marcus Jones reports that State Rep. Byron Rushing and Republican candidate Mike Duffy are competing for the state representative seat in the ninth Suffolk District. Interviews with both Rushing and Duffy. Rushing accuses Duffy of lying about Rushing's political record. Rushing says that Duffy cannot find issues on which to challenge him. Duffy says that Rushing is arrogant and out of touch with his constituents. Duffy calls Rushing presumptuous for declaring himself "the lesbian and gay candidate." Duffy is openly gay in a district with a high percentage of gay and lesbian voters. Rushing has been endorsed by several gay and lesbian activists. He adds that lesbian and gay voters may decide the race. Jones reviews the candidates' positions on the issues. Jones notes that Rushing must prove himself to voters. He adds that there is hostility toward incumbents on the part of many voters during this election season. Jones report is accompanied by footage of both candidates campaigning and by footage of both candidates at their campaign headquarters. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Winnie Mandela speaks at the Twelfth Baptist Church
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of Byron Rushing (State Representative) campaigning in the street. Rushing speaks to an African American man and an African American woman who are seated on the front steps of a building. Shot of Rushing shaking hands with an African American man and a white woman on the street. Marcus Jones reports that Democrats outnumber Republicans ten to one in Rushing's district. Jones notes that Rushing is campaigning hard against Mike Duffy (Republican candidate for state representative) in the Ninth Suffolk District. Jones notes that Duffy is a twenty-seven year old Republican. V: Shot of Duffy working at a desk. Duffy answers the telephone. Footage of Rushing being interviewed on the street. Rushing says that he is taking the campaign seriously. Rushing accuses Duffy of lying about Rushing's political record. Rushing says that Duffy is waging a "dirty campaign." Rushing says that Duffy does not deserve to get any votes. Footage of Rushing campaigning on the street. Rushing shakes hands with an African American woman on the street. A Rushing supporter stands nearby, holding a campaign sign. Rushing approaches a white woman on the street. He shakes her hand. Jones reports that the Ninth Suffolk District includes parts of the South End, the Fenway, Back Bay, and lower Roxbury. Jones reports that the race may be decided by lesbian and gay voters in the district. Jones reports that Duffy has been going door-to-door in order to introduce himself to voters. Jones notes that Duffy has never denied his homosexuality. Jones reports that Duffy believes that his homosexuality may give him an advantage. Jones adds that the district has a high concentration of gays and lesbians. Jones reports that Duffy proposes to increase the government's role in the fight against AIDS. V: Footage of Duffy knocking on the door of a housing development building. Duffy enters the building and climbs the stairs. Duffy knocks on an apartment door. Footage of Duffy being interviewed. Duffy says that the state government needs to do more to fight AIDS. Jones reports that Rushing is not conceding the lesbian and gay vote to Duffy. Jones reports that Rushing is not gay; that Rushing has been endorsed by several lesbian and gay activists. V: Shot of Rushing in his office with a campaign worker. Shots of Rushing's campaign literature; of a campaign flyer which reads, "Rushing is the lesbian and gay candidate." Footage of Rushing being interviewed on the street. Rushing says that most of his lesbian and gay constituents support him. Rushing says that he wanted his campaign literature was prepared by lesbian and gay supporters. Rushing says that he wants his campaign literature to focus on his support in the gay and lesbian community. Footage of Duffy being interviewed by Jones. Duffy says that Rushing's campaign literature is offensive; that Rushing should not call himself the "gay and lesbian candidate." Duffy says that it is unthinkable for a candidate who is not African American to run as the African American candidate. Duffy says that Rushing is presumptuous; that Rushing's campaign is offensive and demeaning. Jones reports that the two candidates differ on issues of affordable housing, crime prevention, and the budget. Jones notes that both candidates oppose the tax-rollback petition. V: Shot of Duffy and a group of campaign workers folding campaign literature. Shot of a campaign sign opposing the tax rollback; of a campaign sign for William Weld (Republican candidate for governor of Massachusetts) and Paul Cellucci (Republican candidate for lieutenant governor of Massachusetts). Jones reports that Duffy has accused Rushing of being out of touch with the people who have elected him. Jones notes that Rushing may be vulnerable to attacks on that issue. Jones adds that there seems to be hostility toward incumbents during this election season. V: Shot of Rushing waving to cars passing by on the street. Footage of Duffy being interviewed by Jones. Duffy says that voters harbor a great degree of resentment toward Rushing. Duffy says that Rushing is arrogant; that Rushing has not been there for his constituents. Footage of Rushing being interviewed. Rushing says that Duffy cannot find an issue on which to disagree with him. Rushing says that Duffy is now lying about Rushing's record. Jones stands on a street in the Ninth Suffolk District. Jones reports that the Ninth Suffolk District is evolving socially; that the district may be evolving politically. Jones notes that Rushing must prove to voters that he is still in touch with them.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/22/1990
Description: Winnie Mandela speaks to churchgoers at the Twelfth Baptist Church. South African exile Themba Vilakazi stands by her side. Children from the congregation stand at the front of the church. Mandela talks about the importance of love and says that South Africans must relearn the values taken for granted by the rest of the world. She talks about the political climate in apartheid South Africa and about how South African children suffered under the apartheid regime. Mandela thanks the audience for supporting the black South Africans in their quest for liberation. The audience applauds for Mandela. Mandela embraces Reverend Michael Haynes. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Byron Rushing campaigns for re-election
1:00:05: V: Footage of Reverend Michael Haynes (Twelfth Baptist Church) speaking from the pulpit of the Twelfth Baptist Church. Shots of two African American women seated in a pew. Haynes sings from the pulpit accompanied by a choir standing behind him. A group of African American children file toward the front of the church. The church attendees stand and applaud, then seat themselves. Footage of Winnie Mandela (wife of South African leader Nelson Mandela) speaking to the congregation. Themba Vilakazi (South African exile) stands by her side. Mandela thanks the congregation for their warm reception. Mandela says that the kind of love shown by the congregation does not exist in South Africa. Mandela says that the people of South Africa must relearn the values taken for granted by the rest of the democratic world. Shot of an African American man in the audience. Mandela says that South Africans must relearn how to love one another, themselves, and their children. Mandela says that apartheid has deprived South African children of their childhood. Mandela tells the children in the congregation that they are lucky to grow up in a loving community. Shots of two young girls sitting in the audience. Mandela says that South Africans have lost faith in God; that they must restore their faith in God. Mandela says that South Africans wonder why God has let them suffer for so long. Mandela says that South African mothers did not know how to teach their children to love; that South African mothers could not teach their children the difference between wrong and right. Mandela says that most black South Africans have spent time in jail for political crimes; that South African children do not learn that people go to jail for doing something wrong. Mandela says that people who have not spent time in jail may be sympathizers with the government. Shots of a group of African-American children standing at the front of the church. Mandela says that South Africans have a lot to learn from the congregation. Mandela talks about Hector Peterson. Mandela says that Peterson was seven years old when he was killed by South African government forces; that Peterson was the first victim during an uprising in 1976. Mandela says that the white government had passed a law calling for black children to be taught in the Afrikaaner language; that Peterson was among a group of children protesting the law. Mandela says that people should have the right to protest in a democratic society. Mandela says that thousands of South African children were killed while protesting against apartheid. Mandela thanks the congregation for recognizing the efforts made by South Africans for liberation. Mandela says that liberation in South Africa means liberation in the US. Shot of an African American woman seated in the audience. Mandela raises her clenched fist. She embraces Haynes. The members of the audience applaud and rise to their feet.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/22/1990
Description: Marcus Jones reports on efforts to provide positive male role models for young African American boys through the Paul Robeson Institute for Positive Self-Development. Third and fourth grade boys attend the Institute every Saturday, and 25 men from diverse backgrounds assist the boys in developing their understanding of math, science and history. Interviews with Pamela Brodie and Delores Wilson, who are both teachers at the Holland Community School. Both teachers praise the program. Brodie talks about the need for positive male role models. Interview with Keith Motley, a member of the Paul Robeson Institute, about the program. Motley says that programs like this one can help to end the violence on the streets. Interviews with two African American boys who attend the Institute. Following the edited story is additional footage of Brodie and her students in class at the Holland School.
1:00:14: Visual: Footage of students in a classroom at the Holland Community School in Dorchester. Shot of students are getting out their textbooks. The students are seated at their desks. Pamela Brodie (teacher, Holland Community School) stands at the front of the room. Shot of students raising their hands to be called on. Most of the students are non-white. Marcus Jones reports that the majority of students in public elementary schools in Boston are non-white. Jones reports that most of the teachers are female. Jones notes that male authority figures are limited; that African American male authority figures are virtually absent. V: Footage of Brodie being interviewed. Brodie says that most school systems have a lot of female teachers. Brodie says that it is important to have positive male role models for students; that some students do not have a male role model at home. Brodie says that schools need more male role models. Jones reports that elementary school students are in their formative years. Jones reports that a group called Concerned Black Men of Massachusetts visit the Holland School to help students make the right choices. V: Shots of students eating lunch at their desks. Shots of an African American boys walking around the classroom. Footage of Keith Motley (Paul Robeson Institute) being interviewed. Motley says that the group wants to fight against violence; that education is necessary to end violence. Footage from the Paul Robeson Institute. An African American man addresses a group of African American boys. The man speaks from a podium, while the boys sit in seats. The man encourages the boys to be the best people they can be. The man says that the future depends on them. Jones reports that the organized effort to provide positive role models is called The Paul Robeson Institute for Positive Self-Development. Jones reports that African American boys from the third and fourth grades in the Holland and Fifield Schools are involved in the program; that the boys visit the African American Institute at Northeastern University on Saturdays. Jones reports that 25 men from diverse backgrounds assist the boys in developing their understanding of math, science, and history. Jones says that the Institute focuses on African American history. V: Shot of an African American man speaking to a group of African American boys in a classroom. The boys are seated at desks. Shot of a sign for the African American Institute on the exterior of a building. Shot of an African American man standing at the front of a classroom. African American boys are seated at desks. A second African American man leans on a chalkboard as the other man teaches. Shot of a group of African American boys in orange T-shirts standing in a circle. The boys hold hands. An African American man stands in the center of the circle. African American men stand in a circle surrounding the boys. Footage of an African American boy being interviewed by Jones. Jones asks if the teachers at the institute are teaching him to be proud of himself. The boy says yes. Footage of another African American boy being interviewed by Jones. The boy says that the program has taught him that he can do something else besides sell drugs on the street. Shots of Brodie standing in her classroom; of an African American boy flipping through a textbook. Jones reports that the Robeson Institute has been operating for a year; that the Robeson Institute has earned praise from parents and teachers. V: Footage of Delores Wilson (teacher, Holland Community School) being interviewed. Wilson talks about one of her students who has behavior problems. Wilson says that the student's behavior has improved since attending the Robeson Institute. Wilson says that the student now helps other kids. Footage of Motley being interviewed. Motley says that programs like the Robeson Institute should be promoted and encouraged; that men and women should get involved. Shot of the African American boys at the Institute standing in a circle while holding hands. African American men form a circle around the boys. An African American man stands in the center.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/13/1990
Description: Rebecca Rollins reports that the murder rate in the city is rising. She notes that an overwhelming number of teenagers are involved in these homicides. Rollins interviews teenagers Grantley Payne, Michael Duval, and Pinto Triplett about why teenagers carry guns. Payne says that guns provide protection and grant status to teenagers. Payne and another teenager play basketball on an outdoor court. Rollins interviews Franklin Tucker (counselor) about teenagers and guns. Tucker talks about how teenagers obtain firearms. Tucker talks about the lack of programs aimed at preventing violence. He adds that many teenagers involved in violence come from disadvantaged backgrounds. Rollins' report is accompanied by footage of an African American teenager being treated by paramedics. This tape includes additional footage of Payne and another teenager playing basketball on an outdoor court.
1:00:01: Visual: Footage of a body on a stretcher being wheeled by medics to an ambulance; of an African American police officer speaking to an African American male suspect. Shots of Grantley Payne (age 18) and another teenager playing basketball on an outdoor court. Rebecca Rollins reports that the death toll in the city is rising at record pace; that the number of homicides may total 150 by the end of the year. Rollins notes that an overwhelming number of teenagers are involved in the homicides as victims or suspects. V: Shot of medics lifting the body of an African American teenager onto a stretcher. Shots of guns and weapons laid out on a table. Footage of Payne being interviewed. Payne says that guns provide protection and grant status to teenagers. Footage of Franklin Tucker (Barron) being interviewed by Rollins. Tucker says that teenagers are importing their own guns; that teenagers are ordering them by mail from states with lenient gun laws. Barron says that guns are being brought in by bus and car. Tucker says that teenagers are carrying new guns and serious firearms. Rollins reports that Tucker is an expert on the subject of kids, guns, and schools; that Tucker directs counseling services for kids caught with weapons on or near school property. V: Footage of Tucker being interviewed by Rollins. Tucker says that many teenagers carry guns for protection. Footage of Michael Duval (age 16) being interviewed by Rollins. Duval says that fighting and violence have progressed from hands to knives to guns. Duval says that a lot of movies have violence. Duval mentions the 1988 film Colors. Rollins asks why kids carry guns. Pinto Triplett (age 18) says that it is difficult to be a teenager in the projects; that teenagers who carry guns live in rough neighborhoods. Triplett says that many of these teenagers do not come from good backgrounds; that many teenagers cannot get jobs. Triplett says that some of these teenagers are the victims of racial discrimination. Footage of Tucker being interviewed by Rollins. Tucker says that there are no programs focusing on prevention; that society is trying to put these kids in jail. Tucker says that prisons are already overcrowded. Rollins stands in front of a basketball court. A group of teenagers play basketball on the court. Rollins says that the Boston Police Department and City Hall will officials will meet to discuss the problem of guns and violence.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/19/1990
Description: Marcus Jones reports that anti-war activists protested across the nation to rally public opinion against the use of force in the Persian Gulf, including in downtown Boston. Jesse Jackson visited MIT to speak out against going to war in the Middle East on the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. Jones notes that the MIT Initiative for Peace in the Middle East brought Jackson to the campus. Jackson says that the US must not rush to war on January 15. Interviews with MIT graduate students Corrie Lathan and Steve Penn, who oppose the war. Interview with Jesse Jackson, who says that the US and Iraq should negotiate because war is inevitable if talking is impossible. Jones' report includes footage from Inside Edition of Jackson in Iraq. Following the edited story is additional b-roll of anti-war demonstrations and of Jackson at MIT talking about Martin Luther King, Jr.
1:00:36: Visual: Footage of anti-war protesters on Winter Street in downtown Boston. The protesters carry signs protesting the Gulf War. They chant together, "We remember Vietnam. We won't go." Shot of two police officers standing in front of a building. Marcus Jones reports that a group of anti-war protesters demonstrated outside of the Army recruiting headquarters in Boston. V: Shot of a protesters carrying a sign reading, "U.S. Troops out of the Gulf." The protesters chant, "We won't fight for Texaco." Shot of a protester handing out leaflets. Jones reports that anti-war activists took to the streets across the country today; that the protesters are trying to rally public opinion against the use of force in the Persian Gulf. V: Shot of an older white woman wearing a sign around her neck. The sign reads, "Bring our troops home." Shot of two white children standing among the protesters. Jones reports that Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) visited MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) tonight; that the members of the MIT Initiative for Peace in the Middle East brought Jackson to the campus. Jones reports that Jackson spoke out against going to war in the Middle East on the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. (civil rights activist). V: Shots of Jackson greeting an MIT student; of Jackson greeting students as he walks to the podium. Shots of students in the audience. Footage of Jackson addressing the students. Jackson says that the US must not rush to war on January 15. Jackson says that efforts toward peace must be made on King's birthday. Footage of Corrie Lathan (MIT graduate student) being interviewed. Lathan says that she is opposed to the war; that the situation should be resolved in a non-violent manner. Footage of Steve Penn (MIT graduate student) being interviewed by Jones. Penn says that decision-makers in the US understand pressure; that the voice of the people must speak out against the war. Jones reports that Jackson's call for restraint may reflect a change in his thinking. Jones notes that Jackson met with Saddam Hussein (Iraqi leader) last year. Jones reports that Jackson said last year that war would be inevitable if talking proved impossible. V: Footage from Inside Edition of Jackson entering a building in Iraq; of Jackson speaking to Hussein. Jones questions whether Jackson has changed his position. V: Footage of Jackson speaking at MIT. Jones asks Jackson if he has changed his position. Jackson says that he has kept the same position. Jackson says that war is inevitable if talking is impossible. Jackson says that the US and Iraq should "talk"; that the two countries must choose negotiation over confrontation. The audience applauds for Jackson as he walks away from the podium.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/14/1991
Description: An ecumenical prayer service is held at St. Paul's Cathedral in Boston. Members of the clergy including Reverend Diane Kessler of the Massachusetts Council of Churches, Bishop Methodius of the Greek Orthodox Diocese of New England, Reverend Kenneth Grant of the Presbyterian Church, and Bishop Barbara Harris of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts lead people in prayers for a peaceful resolution to the Persian Gulf Crisis. Interviews in front of the cathedral with attendees of the prayer meeting, who express their desire for peace. Portions of the news story are accompanied by a hymn. Following in the edited story is additional b-roll of exteriors and interiors of St. Paul's Cathedral and people attending the prayer service.
1:00:14: V: Shot of a banner hanging outside of the Cathedral Church of St. Paul. The banner reads, "Let reason and compassion replace the temptation of war." Shots of people entering the cathedral. Footage of an older man being interviewed outside of the cathedral. The man talks about the joy of prayer. Shots of people seating themselves in the church. Footage of the Reverend Diane Kessler (Massachusetts Council of Churches) addressing the prayer meeting. Shots of attendees of the prayer meeting; of attendees praying. Footage of Bishop Methodius (Greek Orthodox Diocese of New England) leading a prayer. Bishop Methodius prays for George Bush (US President) and Saddam Hussein (Iraqi leader). Bishop Methodius prays for a peaceful resolution of the Persian Gulf crisis. Footage of a white woman being interviewed outside of the church. The woman talks about the spiritual impact of a group of people gathered in prayer. Shots of an attendee singing a hymn; of the prayer service. Footage of the Reverend Kenneth Grant (Presbyterian Church, USA) addressing the prayer meeting. Footage of a white man being interviewed outside of the church. The man says that he is afraid for Americans, Kuwaitis, Iraqis, and other human beings. Shots of attendees praying; of Kessler and Bishop Barbara Harris (Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts) standing at the altar. Shots of the prayer meeting. Footage of an older white man being interviewed in front of the church. The man says that miracles can happen; that good can come from evil. Footage of Harris addressing the prayer meeting. Harris says that the alternatives to war have not been fully explored by those in power. Portions of the new story are accompanied by a hymn.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1991
Description: Hope Kelly reports that students from the Boston University School of Theology held a ceremony to celebrate the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. She notes that attendees at the gathering also prayed for peace in the Persian Gulf. Interviews with BU Theology students Virgil Hammett, Leon Chestnut, Jessica Davis, and Roxie Coicou. The students talk about civil rights, the legacy of King, and their desire for a peaceful resolution to the Persian Gulf Crisis. Chestnut, Hammett and Davis address the gathered students and lead prayers to end the war. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Carmen Fields reports on African American soldiers in the Persian Gulf War
1:00:16: Visual: Footage of students from the Boston University School of Theology walking on the Boston University (BU) campus at dusk. The students sing, "We Shall Overcome." The students gather together and link arms near the Martin Luther King Memorial statue near Marsh Chapel. Shots of the students. Hope Kelly reports that students at the BU School of Theology were celebrating the life of Martin Luther King Jr. (civil rights activist); that the celebration of peace is happening while the nation is at war. V: Footage of Virgil Hammett (student, BU School of Theology) being interviewed. Hammett says that he sees the connection that King saw between civil rights and the Vietnam War. Hammett says that some US soldiers in Kuwait are fighting for rights that they do not possess at home. Footage of Leon Chestnut (student, BU School of Theology) being interviewed. Chestnut says that charity begins at home. Chestnut says that the US must set its own house in order before going off to war. Footage of Jessica Davis (student, BU School of Theology) being interviewed. Davis says that a lot of money is spent on weapons; that the government is not providing for the needs of the people. Kelly reports that Davis is a divinity student who is studying to be a minister. Kelly notes that Chestnut is a Hebrew Bible scholar and a preacher. V: Shot of Chestnut and Davis standing in a chapel. Footage of Chestnut addressing the gathering of divinity students on the BU campus. Chestnut quotes from a psalm. Footage of Chestnut being interviewed. Chestnut talks about the importance of having faith. Footage of Chestnut addressing the gathering of divinity students. Chestnut talks about faith. Footage of Roxie Coicou (student, BU School of Theology) being interviewed. Coicou says that people need to pray and to talk about the war. Kelly reports that Coicou was born in 1968, which was the year that King was assassinated. V: Footage of Davis being interviewed. Davis talks about seeing King speak when she was a little girl. Davis says that society's problems have changed little since the 1960s. Footage of Coicou being interviewed. Coicou says that politics will continue; that people need to pray. Shot of BU students at the gathering. Footage of Hammett addressing the gathering. Hammett prays for love and understanding. Hammett prays for the realization of King's goals. Footage of Davis addressing the gathering. Davis prays for an end to the war. Shots of the students at the gathering.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/21/1991
Description: Alexandra Marks reports on the Jeter family's business. These entrepreneurs started Jet-A-Way trash disposal and recycling business in Boston in 1967. Interview with Jesse Jeter on the lack of media attention on successful African American people and other minority businesses. He also talks about the racism he experiences in some of his business relationships. Interview with Ed and Darlene Jeter on the hard work they put into their business. They also discuss the help that affirmative action has given their company. Footage from the NAACP's Leadership Development Training Conference. Interview with entrepreneur William Singleton, president of Quest, who talks about the lack of financing for minority companies. Following the edited story is additional b-roll footage of the Jet-A-Way company at work. Recycling yard, dumpsters, heavy machinery.
1:00:07: Visual: Shots of machinery sorting trash at a Jet-A-Way sorting facility. Alexandra Marks reports that Jet-A-Way owns a state-of-the-art trash-sorting plant; that Jet-A-Way is a multi-million dollar Boston company; that Jet-A-Way recycles trash, industrial waste, and construction debris. V: Footage of Jesse Jeter (marketing director, Jet-A-Way) being interviewed at the facility. Jeter says that they recycle materials from projects as far away as South Korea and Japan. Marks reports that Jeter's parents started Jet-A-Way in 1967; that Jet-A-Way is one of the fastest-growing minority firms in the US. V: Shots of bales of paper being moved around a warehouse; of Jeter watching standing in the warehouse as a white worker maneuvers a piece of equipment. Shot of a Jet-A-Way truck. Footage of Jeter being interviewed by Marks. Jeter says that people are not familiar with successful African American entrepreneurs; that the media concentrate on crime, drug and poverty in the African American community. Marks reports that Jeter says that people make prejudicial assumptions about many minority businesses. V: Footage of Jeter being interviewed by Marks. Jeter says that people will second-guess the decisions of a minority firm. Jeter says that prospective clients will ask to see the client lists of minority firms; that prospective clients doubt the legitimacy of minority firms. Jeter says that his firm services MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the John Hancock Company, and the Town of Newton. Footage of Ed Jeter (Jet-A-Way) and Darlene Jeter (Jet-A-Way) being interviewed. Ed Jeter says that the company has succeeded through hard work. Marks reports that Darlene and Ed Jeter have seen the company through several economic downturns; that they are good businesspeople. V: Footage of Ed Jeter being interviewed. Ed Jeter says that the company benefitted from minority quotas that were in place when the business began. Footage of Darlene Jeter being interviewed. Darlene Jeter says that Jet-A-Way formed good business relationships with their early clients; that they have served some clients for over twenty years. Marks reports that business success was the theme of a last week's NAACP Leadership Development Training Conference. Marks reports that prominent African American women modeled business fashion; that young entrepreneurs worked the crowd at the luncheon. V: Footage from the NAACP Leadership Development Training Conference. Shot of an African American man singing and playing the piano at the luncheon. Shot of an African American woman modeling a dress on a catwalk. The audience at the luncheon applauds. Shot of a second African American woman modeling an outfit. Shot of William Singleton (President, Quest Publishing Company) talking about his company to two conference attendees. Footage of Singleton being interviewed at the conference. Singleton says that most people do not see the activity of African American entrepreneurs; that African American entrepreneurs are underfinanced and working hard. Marks reports that Singleton's company publishes the magazine "Black History Is No Mystery." Marks notes that Singleton believes that the lack of financing for African American entrepreneurs is due to ignorance. V: Shot of Singleton talking to conference attendees at a table. Footage of Singleton being interviewed at the conference. Singleton says that financers do not understand how the African American community works; that people are starting to understand. Marks reports that there are challenges for African-American businesses. V: Shots of workers sorting trash and debris on an assembly line. Jesse Jeter surveys the operation in the facility. Footage of Jesse Jeter being interviewed. Jesse Jeter says that racism exists in Boston and in the US. Jesse Jeter says that racism affects contracts, business relationships, and personal relationships. Shots of machinery moving trash in the Jet-A-Way facility; of Jeter directing operations in the facility.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/29/1991
Description: Carmen Fields reports that Richard Taylor, the Massachusetts Secretary of Transportation and Construction, will preside over the Central Artery/Third Harbor Tunnel Construction Project in Boston. Taylor is one of the few African American Republicans in Massachusetts. Interview with Taylor, who talks about his reasons for being a Republican and his career in business. Taylor talks about his commitment to affirmative action and his plans to encourage participation by women and minorities in the Central Artery/Third Harbor Tunnel Project. Taylor says that he has always pushed for fair and equitable opportunities for minority businesses. Fields notes that Taylor says that his appointment signals a commitment to affirmative action on the part of Governor William Weld. Fields' report is accompanied by footage of Rev. Graylan Hagler and unemployed construction workers at a press conference at a construction site in Roxbury. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Alexandra Marks interviews businessmen Derek Jeter and William Singleton on the challenges faced by minority businesses in Boston
1:00:03: Visual: Footage of Richard Taylor (Secretary of Transportation and Construction) being interviewed. Taylor says that he supports limited taxes, limited regulation, more research, and development and more private sector involvement. Carmen Fields reports that Taylor is a wealthy, well educated entrepreneur; that Taylor is a Republican; that Taylor is also African American. Fields reports that Taylor is part of a small but growing band of African American Republicans. V: Shot of Taylor in his office. Footage of Taylor being interviewed. Taylor says that some have argued that all African Americans should be Republicans; that Abraham Lincoln (former US president) was a Republican. Taylor says that he believes in limited taxation and limited government involvement. Taylor says that the Republican Party encourages people to pursue economic independence; that the Republican Party discourages people from looking to the government for sustainment. Fields reports that Taylor is the State Transportation Secretary; that he presides over the Central Artery-Third Harbor Tunnel Construction Project. V: Shot of Taylor greeting an African American man and a white man as they enter his office. Footage of Taylor at a meeting with the two men and another woman. Taylor talks about the risk of delays in the project. Fields reports that Massachusetts has a high unemployment rate; that the construction project will provide jobs. Fields notes that the Republican Party is often viewed as being anti-minority, anti-women, and anti-civil rights. V: Shots of Taylor at the meeting. Footage of Taylor being interviewed by Fields. Fields asks Taylor if he is against affirmative action. Taylor says that affirmative action is necessary. Taylor says that minority businesses should participate in the project if it strengthens their skills; that minority businesses should be paid for a job well done. Taylor says that affirmative action helps minority businesses be competitive; that affirmative action is part of the remedial process. Taylor says that some affirmative action models are troublesome. Taylor says that he does not support quotas. Taylor says that some affirmative action models do not give minority businesses enough significant responsibility. Fields asks if he will be a reluctant or an enthusiastic supporter of affirmative action. Taylor says that he is inclined to have active and strong participation by women and minorities. Taylor says that he has always pushed for fair and equitable opportunities for minority businesses. Taylor talks about his career in business before entering government.Taylor says that he will do a good job in this area. Fields reports that Roxbury residents halted construction on a new Post Office facility in Dudley Square recently. Fields notes that residents wanted more jobs for community workers on the project. V: Footage of Graylan Ellis-Hagler (Church of the United Community) speaking at a press conference held at the construction site of the new Post Office in Dudley Square. A group of African American men stand behind Hagler. Hagler says that he and the men will not go away with "crumbs." Shots of the construction site. Fields notes that Taylor says that he has learned from the experience in Roxbury. V: Footage of Taylor being interviewed by Fields. Taylor says that the MBTA recently began a $9 million project to renovate Dudley Station. Taylor says that he incorporated some recent provisions from the Post Office project into the MBTA project. Turner says that it is important for the major contractor to be in agreement with the provisions of the contract. Turner says that he hopes that these provisions will be used in the Central Artery Project. Fields reports that Taylor says that his appointment signals the commitment of William Weld (governor of Massachusetts) to affirmative action. Fields notes that Turner believes that there are many opportunities for qualified people of color. V: Shots of Taylor in his office. Footage of Taylor being interviewed by Fields. Taylor talks about a recent business seminar at the Boston World Trade Center. Taylor says that the seminar focused on how minority businesses could participate in the Central Artery Project. Taylor says that he will soon meet with major contractors for the Central Artery Project. Taylor says that he hopes to link minority businesses with the major contractors in order to provide work for minorities.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/29/1991
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on the annual Black/Jewish Seder Supper at the Union United Methodist Church. Interviews with Leonard Zakim from the Anti-Defamation League, Charles Stith from the Union United Methodist Church, and Eric Karp from the Temple Ohabei Shalom about the importance of the Black/Jewish Seder supper. Zakim says that the supper celebrates the continuing struggle for freedom and civil rights on the part of both communities. Stith talks about the kinship between the two communities. Karp says that both communities have struggled against oppression. Interviews with attendees about the significance of the supper. Vaillancourt notes that this year's Seder supper falls on the eve of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: James Williams protests lack of minority faculty at MIT
1:00:07: Visual: Shot of the steeple of the Union United Methodist Church at dusk. Shots of the annual Black/Jewish Seder supper at the Union United Methodist Church. Shot of an African American woman and a white man speaking at the supper. A choir sings, "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot." Meg Vaillancourt reports that a group of local African Americans and Jews celebrated the Seder. V: Footage of Leonard Zakim (Anti-Defamation League) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Zakim says that the supper celebrates the continuing struggle for freedom and civil rights. Footage of Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church being interviewed. Stith says that society is polarized along racial lines; that the supper is an celebrates efforts to promote peaceful coexistence between groups of people. Stith says that the supper affirms the goals of Martin Luther King Jr. (civil rights leader). Vaillancourt reports that attendees gathered at the Union United Methodist Church) for the eleventh Black/Jewish Seder. V: Shots of attendees reading from a religious text. The attendees hold pieces of matzoh in their hands. Footage of Eric Karp (Temple Ohabei Shalom) being interviewed. Karp says that the Seder celebrates the deliverance of the Jewish people from oppression; that the African American community has fought a long battle against oppression. Karp says that the two communities can learn from one another. Footage of an African American woman being interviewed at the supper. The woman says that she is attending her first Seder; that the two communities are brought together through their belief in God. Footage of an older Jewish woman being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks what the two communities have in common. The woman says that the two communities share a lot of things including prejudice and hard times. Footage of an older African American woman being interviewed by Vaillancourt. The woman says that African Americans and Jews are treated the same way. Footage of a young Jewish boy being interviewed. The boy says that "prejudice stinks." Shots of attendees at the supper. Vaillancourt reports that the ceremony is Jewish; that the date is important to those involved in the civil rights struggle. Vaillancourt notes that King gave his last speech twenty-three years ago tonight; that King was murdered in Memphis on the following day. Vaillancourt stands outside of the room where the supper is held. Vaillancourt reports that the Passover meal is symbolic of the exodus from Egypt by the Israelites after 400 years of slavery. V: Footage of Stith being interviewed. Stith says that enslaved African Americans identified with the struggle of Moses and the people of Israel. Stith says that there is a theological kinship between the two communities. Footage from the Seder supper. A choir sings, "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/03/1991
Description: Alexandra Marks reports that the Center for Disease Control (CDC) has reported that women are the fastest-growing segment of the HIV-positive population. Marks reports that many believe that the CDC has radically underestimated the number of women with AIDS. Interview with April Moore, a recovering drug addict, who has recently been diagnosed with AIDS, but has no health insurance and no steady job. A conference on women and AIDS was held in Boston recently. Interview with Jean McGuire of the Harvard School of Public Health and Martha Moon of the Fenway Community Health Center at the conference. McGuire and Moon believe that many women are dying of AIDS without being diagnosed. Moon says that the CDC definition of AIDS does not include the symptoms of female victims. McGuire and Moon say that many female victims are not eligible for medical benefits because they do not meet the CDC definition of the disease. The CDC says that there is not enough evidence to link the symptoms of women patients to AIDS. McGuire and Moon criticize the CDC's lack of initiative on the issue.
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of April Moore (recovering drug addict) walking with Alexandra Marks (WGBH reporter) through a local park. Moore and Marks sit down on some stairs outside of the playground. Marks reports that Moore is a former drug addict and prostitute who is now in recovery. Marks reports that Moore recently completed her GED (Graduate Equivalency Diploma); that Moore is looking forward to finding a job. Marks notes that Moore was diagnosed as HIV positive last year. V: Footage of Moore being interviewed by Marks. Moore says that she was in a state of disbelief when she found out about her condition; that she has known for a year now. Moore says that she does not know how long she has been infected with the HIV virus. Shots of Moore; of Marks. Marks reports that Moore is low-income, a minority and has no health insurance; that Moore is a typical woman with AIDS. Marks reports that the Center for Disease Control (CDC) has said that women are the fastest-growing segment of the HIV population. Moore notes that the CDC estimates that women comprise 11% of the HIV population. Marks reports that some experts believe that the CDC radically underestimates the number of women infected. V: Footage of Jean McGuire (Harvard School of Public Health) being interviewed by Marks. McGuire says that women are dying before they are diagnosed with AIDS. McGuire says that the medical field does not have an accurate image of the AIDS population. McGuire says that the women who die without being diagnosed were never eligible for benefits like Medicaid and Social Security. Marks reports that McGuire spoke at a conference on women and AIDS in Boston today. Marks reports that McGuire believes that the CDC has a narrow definition of AIDS. V: Shots of the conference on women and AIDS. Shots of a small AIDS quilt hanging on a wall; of attendees and panelists at the conference. Footage of McGuire being interviewed by Marks. McGuire says that the CDC definition was constructed to track an epidemic; that the CDC definition is constructed around narrow presentations of the disease. McGuire says that the CDC wants to be sure that it is definitively tracking the disease. McGuire says that the CDC definition narrows the population to males with AIDS. Footage of Martha Moon (Fenway Community Health Center) being interviewed by Marks. Moon says that women develop symptoms unknown to men with the disease; that the symptoms of women are not counted in the CDC definition. Moon says that women with HIV experience chronic yeast infections, recurrent cervical cancer, uterine tumors, and other pelvic diseases. Marks reports that Moon is the clinical director of the Fenway Community Health Center; that the Fenway Community Health Center was the sponsor of the conference. V: Footage of Moon being interviewed by Marks. Moon says that surgery eliminates cervical cancer in most women; that some HIV-positive women have recurring bouts of cervical cancer. Moon says that some of these women are completely disabled by the disease; that they are not eligible for medical benefits because they do not meet the CDC definition of the disease. Marks quotes Thomas Skinner (CDC Spokesperson) as saying that "We established this case definition of AIDS for our surveillance purposes. We do not control the use of the definition by other government agencies." V: Skinner's quote appears written on-screen in text. Footage of McGuire being interviewed by Marks. McGuire says that Medicaid has relied on the CDC definition; that the CDC refuses to take responsibility for the reimbursement structure of the government agencies. McGuire says that HIV-positive women do not care which agency is responsible. Footage of Moore being interviewed by Marks. Marks asks Moore what she will do if Medicaid will not cover her medical bills if she becomes ill. Moore says that she has not thought about it; that she tries not to think about it because stress could make her become ill. Marks stands on Commonwealth Avenue. Marks reports that the CDC says that there is not enough medical evidence to link female opportunistic infections to AIDS; that the CDC refuses to change its definition. V: Footage of McGuire being interviewed by Marks. McGuire says that the CDC refuses to include some symptoms in its definition; that those symptoms are those which are experienced by poor people and people of color. McGuire says that poor people and people of color are those who will need benefits. McGuire wonders if the dynamics of race, gender and class have anything to do with the government's reluctance to move forward on the issue. Marks reports that Moore has been unaffected by this issue so far. V: Shots of Moore walking on Commonwealth Avenue with Marks. Audio of Moore saying that she must keep an open mind; that she must stay aware in order to remain alive. Footage of Marks being interviewed by Moore. Moore talks about being afraid.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/19/1991
Description: Alexandra Marks reports that the infant mortality rate in Boston is higher than in many third-world countries. Marks interviews Dr. Ronald White of the Martha Eliot Health Care Center. White talks about the problems facing low-income populations in Boston. White talks about changes in US government policy that ended the link between health care policy and economic development policy. Marks interviews Dr. Rodrigo Guerrero, one of several experts from the developing world to visit Boston for a conference on the health care crisis. Guerrero explains that people's health is related to income and says that reducing poverty will improve people's health. White agrees with Guerrero's recommendations about attacking poverty. Marks reports that attendees at the conference recommended that the city of Boston levy a twenty-five cent tax on cigarettes to pay for new health care programs. Interview with Mayor Ray Flynn about the need for quality health care in the city. Marks' report also features footage of women and children at health clinics in Boston and footage from Frontline of Colombian cities and villages.
0:59:19: Visual: Footage from Frontline of native residents of a village in Colombia. Alexandra Marks reports that the infant mortality rate in Colombia is seventeen deaths per 1,000 infants. Marks notes that Boston is the home of some of the most sophisticated medical technology in the world; that the infant mortality rate in parts of Boston is higher than in Colombia. V: Shot of a young African American boy walking near parked cars. Audio of Dr. Ronald White (Martha Eliot Health Center) saying that medical officials and government officials must acknowledge the crisis in health care. Marks reports that White is director of the Martha Eliot Health Care Center; that the Center is an affiliate of Children's Hospital. Marks reports that the clinic is in the frontlines of the fight against disease and violence in Boston's low-income neighborhoods. V: Shot of the exterior of the Martha Eliot Health Care Center. Shot of a woman with an infant and a child entering the health care center. Footage of White being interviewed. White says that substance abuse, violence, AIDS, infant mortality, and the decreased life expectancy of minority males are all problems of the low-income population. Footage of Dr. Rodrigo Guerrero (Carvajal Foundation) being interviewed by Marks. Guerrero says that development is not a problem of resources. Guerrero says that people must be mobilized. Marks reports that Guerrero is in Boston to give advice to White and his colleagues. Marks reports that Guerrero is the executive director of a Colombian charitable foundation; that programs sponsored by Guerrero's foundation helped to decrease the infant mortality rate in Colombia. V: Footage from Frontline of children in a Colombian village. Marks reports that Guerrero is one of several experts from the developing world who gathered in Boston today; that the medical experts are here to help medical workers in Boston deal with the health care crisis. V: Shots of attendees at the conference; of a speaker at the conference. Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) being interviewed. Flynn says that people look at Boston as a center of medical expertise; that Boston needs to provide quality health care for poor and needy people. Marks reports that Flynn has pressured two of Boston's leading maternity hospitals into providing $3 million over three years to decrease the infant mortality rate. V: Shot of a Latina woman and infant in the lobby of a pediatric clinic. The woman enters an examination room, followed by a white female health care worker. Shot of the infant on an examination table. The two women stand over the infant. Marks notes that the hospitals will provide more doctors and midwives; that health clinics will receive funding for more prenatal care. V: Footage of Flynn being interviewed. Flynn says that there have been cuts in federal and state spending on health care; that the city must rely on private hospitals to provide quality health care for all people. Footage of Guerrero being interviewed. Guerrero says that his foundation began opening health clinics and schools in poor areas of Cali, Colombia. Guerrero says that his foundation had limited success at first. Marks reports that Guerrero believes that providing medical care is not enough. Marks reports that Guerrero switched his focus from the development of health clinics to economic development. Marks notes that Guerrero's program trained people how to open small businesses like soda shops and beauty parlors; that the program provided technical assistance and loans to the businesses. V: Footage of an urban area in Colombia; of residents and traffic on the streets; of small businesses in a commercial area. Footage of Guerrero being interviewed. Guerrero says that income is related to health. Guerrero says that an increase in a family's income will result in better health for family members. Footage of White being interviewed. White says that Guerrero's idea is an excellent one. White says that this idea was behind the construction of neighborhood health centers during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration's War on Poverty. White says that the neighborhood health centers were originally under the jurisdiction of the Office of Economic Opportunity. Marks reports that the health centers were shifted to the jurisdiction of the Office of Health, Education and Welfare during the Richard Nixon administration. Marks notes that the shift in jurisdiction marked the end of the connection between health care and economic status. Marks reports that White believes that this shift led to a decline in health care. V: Footage of a white female health care worker and a Latino woman in a medical examination room. An Latino infant is on the examining table. The Latino woman changes the boy's diaper. Footage of White being interviewed. White says that jobs must be provided in order to reduce violence. White says that economic development provides opportunities for people. Marks stands outside of the Martha Eliot Health Care Center. Marks reports that attendees at the conference recommended that the city of Boston levy a twenty-five cent tax on cigarettes to pay for new health care programs. Marks reports that the measure is expected to be controverial; that the measure will probably be opposed by merchants. V: Footage of White being interviewed. White says that new revenue is needed to provide minimal programs; that programs are needed to make headway against AIDS, violence, drug abuse, and infant mortality. Marks reports that it is unlikely that new taxes or new health or development programs will be funded during this economic crisis. Marks reports that it is possible that poor people in Colombia will lead longer and healthier lives than poor people in Boston. V: Footage of an infant being weighed on a medical scale. A Latina woman and a white female medical worker look on.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/26/1991
Description: Alexandra Marks reports that Paul Tsongas addressed the members of the Organization for a New Equality (ONE) at a luncheon meeting. ONE is an organization committed to opening up new economic opportunities for minorities. The members of ONE welcomed Tsongas' pro-business, liberal agenda. Tsongas criticized the policies of George Bush in his speech and has accused him of promoting a racially divisive agenda. Tsongas is calling for a combination of tax incentives and government spending to revitalize inner-city neighborhoods. Interview with Robert Reich (professor, John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University) about Tsongas' position on economic issues and education. Interview with Tsonga, who talks about the importance of education. Interviews with Dorchester residents Chico Joyner and Faries Odom about Tsongas.
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Paul Tsongas (Democratic candidate for US President) at a luncheon for ONE (Organization for a New Equality). Tsongas walks to the podium as attendees applaud. Alexandra Marks reports that Tsongas is not known as a passionate speaker; that Tsongas showed his passion at a speech to ONE members. Marks reports that Tsongas spoke about the budget approved by the Massachusetts State Legislature. Marks notes that the State Legislature is controlled by Democrats. V: Footage of Tsongas addressing the attendees. Tsongas says that his generation will be the first to give less to their children than they got. Tsongas says that his generation should be uncomfortable with this state of affairs. Tsongas says that the legislators should not congratulate themselves for balancing the budget by ruining the schools. Shots of attendees at the luncheon. Marks reports that the attendees welcomed Tsongas' pro-business, liberal agenda. Marks reports that ONE is committed to opening up new economic opportunities for minorities. V: Footage of Tsongas addressing the attendees. Tsongas says that a politician needs to be "pro-business" in order to be "pro-jobs." Tsongas says that Democrats need to learn that it is hypocritical to be "pro-jobs" and "anti-business." Marks reports that Tsongas berated George Bush (US President) for championing ideology over common sense in supporting the previous day's Supreme Court ruling on abortion. Marks notes that the ruling upholds a federal regulation which forbids the mention of abortion in clinics where federal funds are used. V: Shots of Tsongas speaking; of attendees; of a cameraman at the conference. Marks reports that Tsongas chided Bush for using the racially divisive Willie Horton advertisement in the 1988 presidential campaign. Marks reports that Tsongas chided Bush for vetoing the Civil Rights Bill and for sabotaging efforts to salvage the bill. V: Footage of Tsongas addressing the attendees. Tsongas says that Bush opposed the Civil Rights Bill because he wants race to be an issue in the 1992 campaign. Marks stands on Blue Hill Avenue. Marks says that Tsongas is calling for a combination of tax incentives and government spending to revitalize inner-city neighborhoods. Marks says that Tsongas believes that government money is necessary to leverage private investment. Marks says that economists have mixed feelings about Tsongas' philosophy. V: Footage of Robert Reich (John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University) being interviewed by Marks. Reich says that the private sector in the US is globalizing quickly. Reich talks about the foreign activities of IBM and General Electric. Reich says that the government needs to be selective in its support of the private sector; that the government should not support companies who create jobs outside of the US. Marks reports that Reich believes that the key to economic development is to enhance the productive capabilities of individual Americans. V: Footage of Reich being interviewed by Marks. Reich says that education and infrastructure are important. Reich says that Tsongas emphasizes these things in his proposal. Footage of Tsongas being interviewed. Tsongas says that there is no future without education. Marks reports that some inner-city residents are supportive of Tsongas. V: Shots of Blue Hill Avenue. Footage of Chico Joyner (Dorchester resident) being interviewed. Joyner says that most people will rebel against a tax increase. Joyner says that new businesses would help the community. Footage of Faries Odom (Dorchester resident) being interviewed. Odom says that community involvement is crucial to the success of any initiatives in the neighborhood. Footage of Tsongas addressing attendees at the ONE luncheon. Tsongas says that all people are connected to one another; that people's actions have an affect on themselves and others. Marks reports that Tsongas intends to send this message during his presidential campaign; that Tsongas wants to fight against the racially divisive agenda of the Bush administration. V: Shot of Tsongas riding down an escalator with attendees. An African American man shakes his hand and wishes him luck.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/24/1991