Description: Evening Compass special. In-studio operators take phone calls from parents with questions about school assignments and busing for the next school year. Ed Baumeister gives the answers to several true-or-false questions regarding the state plan to achieve racial balance in Boston schools. Judy Stoia gives statistics for the maximum travel distance of students and the racial makeup of schools in each elementary and intermediate school district. Paul deGive reports on a plan proposed by the Boston School Department to hire aids to help care for children and locate parents in case of sickness or family emergency. Baumeister and Pam Bullard (Boston Herald American) interview John Coakley (Boston School Department) and Dr. Charles Glenn (Massachusetts State Department of Education) about implementation of the racial balance plan. Both men respond to questions about the busing of kindergarten students. Judy Stoia explains the term geocode. Stoia and Bob Murray (Boston School Department) give on-air answers to some of the most common questions received by the operators. In studio Bullard, Baumeister and Dr. John Finger of Rhode Island College discuss plan developed to integrate schools. WGBH reporter and Bob Murray have question-and-answer session with questions from callers. Joan Buckley, representative from Boston Teachers Union, discusses plan for teachers with Bullard and Baumeister.
0:02:11: Visual: Introduction to A Compass Special: September in April, a special broadcast concerning the state racial balance plan for the Boston schools. Ed Baumeister is in the studio, along with several volunteers covering the phones. Baumeister introduces the program as informational, designed to answer parents' questions about the plan and its implementation. Baumeister gives out a number for parents to call to reach volunteers in the studio. Baumeister provides true/false answers to basic questions about the plan. Questions touch on the reimbursement of transportation costs, general travel distances for students of various ages and numbers of white and non-white students to be bused. 0:06:08: V: Paul deGive reports on parents who worry about being able to reach their child at a distant school in the case of sickness or emergency. He reports that the Boston School Department will propose a plan to hire transitional aids at each school to contact parents and to care for children in an emergency. 0:09:15: V: Baumeister encourages parents to call studio for information. Volunteers answer the phones. 0:09:55: Report on the Boston elementary school districts under the racial balance plan. Narrator describes the standardization of grade structure in elementary schools and the changes to various elementary school districts. The districts are as follows: Hennigan Kennedy, Bacon Dearborn, Tobin Farragut, Washington Park, Sumner-Conley, Tileston Chittick Greenwood, Lee, Murphy, Marshall Dever Mason, Mendell-Parkman, Paine-Audobon, Milmore, Prince, Faneuil, Lincoln Quincy, Hurley-Bates, Carter, Eliot, South Boston, Hyde Park, Cannon, Ohrenburger, Parker Longfellow. V: Shot of a map of Boston's elementary school districts. Narrator gives information for each district, including district boundaries, names of schools within the district, maximum travel distance for any student in the district and projected non-white enrollment for each school in the district. A map of each district is shown as the narrator reads the information for that district. 0:20:11: V: Judy Stoia encourages parents to call the studio for information concerning their child's school assignment. Shots of telephone volunteers. Stoia mentions that the volunteers are from the Citywide Education Coalition, the Teachers Union and the Boston School Department. Stoia talks to volunteer Lee Grant and explains the term "geocode." Stoia talks to volunteer Scott Campbell about what kind of information he can give to parents over the phone. 0:23:30: V: Baumeister introduces Pam Bullard (Boston Herald American) and John Coakley (Education Planning Center of the Boston School Department). Baumeister refers to Coakley as the man charged with making the racial balance plan work. Coakley refutes the claim that he is in charge of the plan, but discusses preparation for implementation of the plan. Baumeister asks Coakley if the School Department has any flexibility in implementing the plan. Bullard asks Coakley to respond to parental complaints about kindergarten assignments. Bullard presses kindergarten issue, asking if kindergarten children will be bused to the Martha Baker School or to kindergarten centers. Coakley summarizes School Department efforts to minimize busing of kindergarten students and cites the inadequacies of state plan concerning kindergarten students. Baumeister asks Coakley how he would change plan if he could. Coakley cites preliminary plans for integration by the Boston School Department and the Boston School Committee. Coakley says these plans were never developed. Baumeister thanks Coakley. 0:33:27: V: Baumeister provides answers to more true/false questions about the racial balance plan. Questions touch on the following issues: state reimbursement for travel under the desegregation plan, reimbursement of MBTA travel under the plan, major thoroughfares as school district boundaries, classification of Spanish-speaking students, overcrowding of Boston schools. 0:35:14: Report on intermediate school districts under the racial balance plan. Narrator talks about the redistricting of intermediate schools under the plan. Narrator gives the following information for each district: district boundaries, maximum travel distance for any student in the district and percentage of non-white students within each intermediate district school. Narrator reads the information for each district over a map of that district and a shot of the district school. The districts follow: Cleveland, Curley, Dearborn, Edison, Gavin, Holmes, Irving, King, Lewenberg, Lewis, Mackey, McCormack, Michelangelo, Roosevelt, Shaw, Taft, Thompson, Timilty, Wilson. V: Shot of a map of Boston's intermediate school districts. 0:44:41: V: An in-studio reporter asks a volunteer named Fran to describe the phone calls she has received. The reporter addresses a specific situation concerning the placement of 6th grade students in Hyde Park. 0:46:31: V: Baumeister and Bullard interview Dr. Charles Glenn (Office of Equal Education Opportunity of the State Department of Education). Baumeister asks Glenn how the plan determines which children will be bused at the high school level. Bullard asks Glenn about the busing of kindergarten students under the state plan. Glenn explains the intricacies of the plan and its implementation. Baumeister asks Glenn why the state plan to desegregate schools is better than any put forth by the Boston School Committee. Glenn explains that the state desegregation plan goes as far as it can under state law. Bullard questions Glenn about hurried implementation of the racial balance plan, and if the communities involved will be adequately prepared. Glenn responds that the plan has been implemented as well as can be expected in the time given. 0:55:15: V: Baumeister provides answers to more true/false questions. Questions touch on the following issues: definition of non-white students, school assignments and school assignment changes, Massachusetts state racial imbalance regulations, teacher assignments. 0:56:49: V: Stoia and Bob Murray (Education Planning Center of the Boston School Department) answer the most difficult questions received by phone volunteers. Questions involve travel distance within a school district, whether Dr. Glenn lives in Boston, the assignment of students in sub-system schools (Trotter school, Lewis school and Copley High School), and the assignment of seniors in the high schools.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 04/22/1974
Description: A compilation of three Evening Compass shows from 1974-75. Evening Compass newscast from September 12, 1974. Paul deGive reports on the first day of school at the Rochambeau Elementary School. He reports that some parents, including Barbara King (local resident), are keeping their children out of school for fear of violence. Judy Stoia reports on the peaceful opening of the Martin Luther King School. Greg Pilkington and Diane Dumanoski report on their experiences riding buses with students to and from South Boston High School and Hyde Park High School. The bus Pilkington rode on was stoned in South Boston. Pilkington and Dumanoski report on the reactions of students. Joe Klein reports on the first day of school for a Hyde Park student, bused to the Lewenberg School in Mattapan. Klein reports that the student says that he will return to school tomorrow. Evening Compass newscast from December 12, 1974. Stoia reports on a violent mob gathered outside South Boston High School after the stabbing of a white student by an African American student. Stoia reports on clashes between the crowd and police. Pilkington reports from the Bayside Mall, where African American students arrived on buses after being trapped for several hours in South Boston High School. The students and their parents are angry and frightened. Peggy Murrell reports on the reactions of Thomas Atkins (President, NAACP) and Mel King (State Representative) to the violence at South Boston High School. Murrell reports that Atkins and King say that schools should be shut down if the safety of African American students cannot be guaranteed. Pam Bullard reports that the plaintiffs in the Boston school desegregation case (Morgan v. Hennigan) will demand that the federal court increase safety measures for African American students in South Boston. She also reports on a pending deadline for the Boston School Committee to file a school desegregation plan for 1975. Bullard notes that the School Committee risks being held in contempt of court if it does not file a plan. Evening Compass special from March 14, 1975. Pam Bullard reviews the major events concerning the desegregation of Boston schools in 1974. Her report includes footage and still photos of key figures and events in the busing crisis. Judy Stoia reports on an alternative school in Hyde Park, created by white parents to avoid busing, and on an alternative school for African American students. White parents at the alternative school in Hyde Park say that African American students are welcome to attend their school. Baumeister reports on Raymond Flynn, the only mayoral candidate to campaign on an antibusing platform. Baumeister also analyzes busing coverage by The Boston Globe and The Boston Herald American. Bullard reports on the school desegregation plan for the 1975-76 school year. Her report includes comments by Peter Ingeneri (Area Superintendent, Dearborn District) and Isaac Graves (Manager, Roxbury Little City Hall. She reports on segregation among Boston school faculty and administrators, and on plans to integrate school faculty in 1975. End credits reflect personnel working on all Evening Compass shows for the weeks of December 12, 1974 and March 14, 1975. Produced and directed by Charles C. Stuart.
0:00:15: Ed Baumeister introduces Paul deGive's report on the first day of school at the Rochambeau Elementary School in Dorchester. DeGive reports that the opening was peaceful; that a rumored white boycott failed to materialize; that buses were empty; that the absentee rate was 50% for both white and African American students. Degive comments that many parents were present at the opening. DeGive reports on an interview with Barbara King (local resident) who was present to observe the opening but did not send her daughter to the school for fear of violence. The nearby Murphy school also opened without incident. The attendance rate at the Murphy was estimated at two-thirds. 0:02:50: Baumeister introduces Judy Stoia's report on the Martin Luther King School. Stoia reports on the peaceful opening of the Martin Luther King School, which had been an African American school the previous year: the attendance rate was 50%; 130 white students attended, out of a possible 634; many parents kept their children at home because the King school was expected to be a trouble spot. 0:04:25: Baumeister talks to reporters Greg Pilkington and Diane Dumanoski. Pilkington spent the day with African American students who were bused into South Boston. Pilkington describes the students' reactions to their arrival at South Boston High School and their departure on buses which were stoned by an angry crowd. Diane Dumanoski describes a peaceful bus ride to Hyde Park High School with just one white student on the bus. Pilkington remarks on the low attendance at South Boston High School and describes the teachers as tense and ambivalent about busing. Dumanoski describes hostility from some white students at Hyde Park High School. 0:11:46: Baumeister reports on statistics: 47,000 students out of possible 70,000 attended Boston schools; police made 6 arrests; buses made 450 runs. Joe Klein reports on the first day of school for Jimmy Glavin, a Hyde Park student bused to the Lewenberg school in Mattapan. Visual: Report is a montage of still photographs. Shots of a photo of Claire O'Malley (bus monitor); of Glavin waiting for the bus; of Glavin on the bus. Klein reports that Glavin was the only student at the first stop; that the bus made several stops; that some parents refused to put their children on the bus. Klein reports that children of non-local parents in Coast Guard housing attended school. V: Shots of photographs of students and parents at various bus stops. Shots of photographs of students boarding the bus. Klein reports that the Lewenberg school was quiet; that the nearby Thompson School was quiet; that there were few white students in attendance at the Thompson School. Klein reports that the white students left the Lewenberg School on buses in the afternoon. Klein notes that Glavin says that he will return to school the next day. V: Shots of photographs of students in classrooms. Shots of photographs of students exiting the school and boarding buses; of Glavin exiting the bus. Baumeister ends the show. 0:16:17: Baumeister introduces the show. (Opening credits are cut.) Judy Stoia reports on violence at South Boston High School, where an African American student stabbed a white student. Stoia reports that an angry crowd of 1500 people had assembled outside of the high school by 1:00pm. Stoia reports that Louise Day Hicks (Boston City Council) tried to calm the crowd. V: Shots of photographs of huge crowds assembled on G Street, in front of the school; of helmeted police officers keeping the crowd at bay. Shot of a photograph of Hicks. Footage of Hicks assuring the crowd that the assault will be investigated. William Bulger (State Senator) stands beside Hicks. Hicks pleads with the crowd to let African American students return home safely. The crowd boos Hicks. Stoia reports that the crowd was hostile to police; that police units from the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF), the MDC Police Department and the Massachusetts State Police Department were outnumbered by the crowd; that the crowd threw bricks and bottles at police. Stoia reports that the crowd angrily stoned school buses headed toward the school. V: Shots of photographs of the huge crowd; of a TPF unit; of an MDC police officer on a motorcycle; of mounted police on the street. Shots of photographs of a police car with a broken window; of arrests being made. Shots of photographs of the crowd; of stoned school buses. Stoia reports that the buses were decoys and that African American students had escaped through a side door and were bused to safety. V: Shots of photographs of a side entrance of South Boston High School. 0:21:06: Pilkington reports on atmosphere at the Bayside Mall, where buses arrived with African American students who had been trapped in South Boston High School. Pilkington reports that students and parents were frightened and angry. V: Footage of buses and police officers in the mall parking lot. Angry groups of African American students speak directly to the camera about their experiences in South Boston. One student comments on the angry and violent parents in the South Boston crowd. An angry African American woman says that white children go to school peacefully at the McCormack school in her neighborhood, but that African American students cannot go safely to South Boston. She says that Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) is not doing his job. A man shouts into a bullhorn that there is no school on Thursday or Friday. Pilkington reports that the anger of the African American community seems to be directed at the city, the police, and the Boston School Committee for not controlling the situation in South Boston. 0:22:55: Peggy Murrell reports on the reaction of Thomas Atkins (President, NAACP) and Mel King (State Representative) to the violence at South Boston High School. She says that both leaders are determined to continue with school desegregation; that both are concerned for the safety of African American students in the schools. She quotes Atkins as saying that schools should be shut down and students should be reassigned if the safety of African American students cannot be guaranteed. Murrell reports that King agrees with Atkins about shutting down the schools if safety cannot be assured; that King says African American students will continue to attend school despite the violence. V: Shots of photographs of Atkins and of King. Murrell quotes King's condemnation of the violence at South Boston High School. Murell reports that Atkins charged the South Boston Home and School Association with holding a racist rally inside the high school and with encouraging a school boycott by white students. Murell says that Virginia Sheehy (South Boston Home and School Association) denies the charges. Murell reports that Sheehy says that white students should be able to hold meetings in school just like African American students do. State Senator William Owens (Chairman of the Emergency Committee Against Racism in Education) agrees that schools should be shut down if a peaceful solution cannot be found, and says that a march against racism planned for Saturday will proceed. 0:26:52: Pam Bullard reports on a special hearing before Judge Garrity planned for the next day: the African American plaintiffs in the desegregation case (Morgan v. Hennigan) have called the hearing to demand the following: the presence of state police and the national guard in South Boston; a ban on parents in schools; a ban on gatherings of more than five people in South Boston; a ban on the use of all racial epithets. Bullard reports that Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs) says that South Boston will not escape desegregation. Bullard notes that the Boston School Committee is under court order to file a second phase desegregation plan on the following Monday; that the new plan will desegregate schools city-wide and will allow parents to choose between flexible and traditional educational programs. V: Footage of John Coakley (Boston School Department) talking about the differences between the traditional and flexible program choices under the new plan. Coakley says that the new plan allows parents to choose programs, but not specific schools. Bullard reports that the Boston School Committee has repeatedly refused to endorse any form of desegregation; that the committee risks being held in contempt of court if they do not approve a plan to submit to the court. Bullard reports on speculation that William Leary (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) will submit the plan without the approval of the School Committee, to avoid being held in contempt of court. 0:31:56: Baumeister comments on the silence of both Mayor Kevin White and Governor Frank Sargent regarding the violence in South Boston. V: Footage of White on September 12, 1974, condemning violence and promising that it would not be tolerated. Credits roll. 0:34:14: Evening Compass special: The Compass Weekly: A Delicate Balance. Pam Bullard's report sums up the events concerning the desegregation of schools in Boston during the 1974 school year. V: Report includes footage of antibusing demonstrations at City Hall Plaza in August and September of 1974; of William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School) reporting low attendance figures on September 13, 1974; of white students and black students discussing forced busing outside of Hyde Park High School; of a car on the street with two KKK signs displayed; of Kevin White addressing the busing issue on October 8, 1974; of Gerald Ford stating his opposition to forced busing on October 9, 1974; of national guardsmen on October 16, 1974; of students discussing their feelings about busing; of William Leary (Superintendent, Boston School Department) announcing the reopening of South Boston High School on January 7, 1974. Report also includes footage of children in classrooms, antibusing protests, school buses escorted by police, police in South Boston, and still photos of important figures in the busing controversy. 0:45:27: Stoia reports on alternative schools set up in Hyde Park by parents opposed to forced busing. Stoia reports that some teachers are accredited and are paid from the students' fees; that the curriculum is similar to public school curriculum and classes are smaller. V: Footage of a teacher and students in an alternative classroom. Footage of Henry Lodge (Hyde Park parent) being interviewed by Stoia. Lodge talks about the good education provided by the alternative schools; about parents' need to escape from forced busing and inferior public schools. Stoia reports that 125 white students attend alternative schools in Hyde Park and South Boston; that organizers plan to open Hyde Park Academy, which will have its own building to accommodate 500 students; that these schools are open to African Americans, but are mostly white. Stoia reports on an alternative school for African American students. V: Footage of African American teacher and students in an alternative classroom. Stoia reports that African American parents do not want to send their children into a hostile environment. Stoia remarks that parents are looking for "quality education," which is a term often heard in the desegregation debate. V: Footage of Thomas Atkins (President of the NAACP) calling on leaders to stop politicizing the school desegregation process. 0:49:22: Baumeister comments that many Boston residents are opposed to busing but that Raymond Flynn is the only mayoral candidate opposed to busing. Baumeister reports that Flynn campaigns on the busing issue and is the only antibusing politician to run for mayor. V: Shots of still photographs of candidates White, Thomas Eisenstadt, and Flynn. Shots of photographs of busing opponents Louise Day Hicks, William Bulger (State Senator), Avi Nelson (radio talk show host). Baumeister reports on media coverage of busing by The Boston Globe and The Boston Herald American. Baumeister reports that both papers urged compliance with the court order and played down any violence resulting from desegregation; that the Globe is especially distrusted by the antibusing movement; that antibusing leaders have set up their own information centers; that television stations have largely escaped the anti-media feeling of the anti-busers; that a large media presence will exacerbate the tense situation. V: Shots of front-page busing coverage in The Boston Globe and The Boston Herald American. Footage of William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School) on September 15, 1974. Reid tells the media to stop filming and photographing his students. 0:54:15: Bullard reports on the peaceful integration of some schools and on the next phase of school desegregation in Boston, which will include schools in Charlestown, East Boston, and Roxbury. V: Footage of Peter Ingeneri (Area Superintendent, Dearborn District) on November 21, 1974. Ingeneri talks about larger social problems which will make school desegregation difficult in Roxbury. Footage of Isaac Graves (Manager, Roxbury Little City Hall) on January 9, 1975. Graves talks about African American commitment to better schools and integration. Footage of Chris Mitchell (student) on January 9, 1975. Mitchell talks about how important it is to graduate from high school. Report also includes footage of students boarding buses; of students in integrated classrooms; of African American schoolchildren; of buses transporting schoolchildren. Bullard reports on a Supreme Court ruling which dealt a blow to the antibusing movement's plan to include the suburbs in desegregation. Bullard reads statistics regarding the segregation of Boston school teachers and administrators. She reports on the plan to integrate teachers and administrators and to hire more African Americans in the school system. Bullard reports on the budget for police and security required to desegregate Boston's schools; on expectations for more resistance to busing in the next school year; on efforts to reverse or stop the court order. V: Credits roll over footage of African American students boarding buses.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/12/1974
Description: Interview with two members of Boston Police Tactical Patrol Force (TPF), explaining their tactics in making arrests, use of force, countering resistance.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/11/1975
Description: Many camera moves on Hancock tower. Pan from top of older Hancock building to newer one. Close-up on sheer plane of windows. Glass monolith isolated against sky. At street level, Trinity Church and Copley Square concrete park.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 10/23/1975
Description: WEEI reporters Mike Ludlum and Les Woodruff are the moderate a portion of 1975 Boston mayoral debate in WEEI studio between incumbent Mayor Kevin White and Senator Joseph Timilty. Timilty accuses the White administration of fiscal irresponsibility. White defends his administration's accomplishments, citing building projects to provide new facilities for the city's neighborhoods. Both candidates comment on "white flight" from the city and the state of the Boston school system; public facilities.Tape ends during White's closing statement.
10:13:52: Recording begins in mid-speech. Visual: Joseph Timilty, Kevin White and 2 moderators sit at a table in the WEEI studios. Moderators are Les Woodruff and Mike Ludlum from WEEI.) Timilty questions the White administration's ability to deliver the economic reform necessary to attract new industry to the city. 10:14:28: V: Woodruff asks Timilty how he would handle economic reform. Timilty responds that he would push for a broadening of the city's tax base; that he would look to reform city programs, citing a need for reform in the Little City Hall Program; that he would make budget cuts; that he would target urban renewal through neighborhood-based community development corporations and push for growth in the city's neighborhoods . 10:17:00: V: Ludlum asks White to address the issues raised by Timilty. White asks Timilty to explain an earlier accusation regarding high percentage rates paid by the city on its bonds. White defends his administration's record on reducing unemployment and attracting industry to the city. He cites his accomplishments in the areas of welfare and the city budget. White again asks Timilty about percentage rates on bonds. 10:19:00: V: Timilty responds that the city's debt has increased 176% during White's tenure as mayor. He mentions high interest payments paid by the city. Timilty contests White's claim of responsibility for the transfer of welfare costs from the city to the state, and claims that real estate taxes have increased 67% under White. Timilty says that credit for stabilizing the tax rate should go to the state legislature, which increased funds for the city. White taps his pen against the table, looking frustrated. 10:20:11: V: Ludlum says that White deserves a chance to respond. White returns to the question of the bond percentage rate. Timilty responds that Boston probably pays 4%. A heated exchange ensues concerning the bond market and the percentage rates paid by the city of Boston. Timilty again claims that Boston pays rates that are too high, and that the city has amassed a dangerous amount of debt. White contends that he has saved taxpayer money by raising the bond rate; White says that he has spent bonded monies on increased services and growth for the neighborhoods. White asks if Timilty supports these neighborhood projects. 10:23:08: V: Timilty says that fiscal responsibility is important. He accuses White of overspending on projects that have made little difference to the neighborhoods. Timilty says that White's spending has decreased the city's rating on the bond market, and that the city is in fiscal jeopardy. 10:24:03: V: Ludlum interrupts Timilty to let White respond. White asks Timilty if he agrees that bonded monies are needed for new construction projects. Timilty responds that bonded monies are needed, but too much debt puts the city in jeopardy. White says the building projects were sorely needed by the neighborhoods, and bonding was necessary to get the money. Timilty counters that the neighborhoods need a reduction in the crime rate more than they need new buildings. 10:26:05: V: Woodruff invites the candidates to address the issues of decreasing white enrollment in schools, decreasing white population in the city, the viablility of the public schools and contract negotiations with teachers. White says that ethnic diversity is important for the city, but he recognizes that some citizens fear the growing minority population, and adds that a low tax-rate might help to keep these people from moving out of the city. Timilty interrupts and asks what the tax-rate has to do with the school system. White defends himself by saying that a low tax-rate and good city amenities prevent "white flight" and keep white children in the school system. White adds that further improvements to the schools will attract more white students. He cites Charlestown as an example of a neighborhood with a stable white population and B.C. High as an example of a good school attracting white students to the city. White concludes by saying that the school system needs to improve. 10:30:03: V: Woodruff sums up White's position and invites Timilty to respond. Timilty says there has been little effort to improve the public schools. He says that families are eager to move out of the city because of bad schools, the high cost of living, and high property taxes. He proposes a plan for magnet schools in the city which is more fully developed than the one in place. 10:32:16: V: Ludlum poses a series of questions and demands brief answers from the candidates. Moderator asks about the issues that strike a chord with the voters. White's answer is the stabilization of the tax rate. Timilty's answer is a responsive city government. Ludlum asks each candidate the difference between him and his opponent. White's answer is experience and performance. Timilty answers that he has a plan for the city. 10:34:25: V: Mayor White gives his closing statement. He cites his performance as mayor, his efforts to stabilize the tax rate, his fight against valuation, his efforts to build facilities for the neighborhoods, and to appoint competent people. He mentions three critical issues: tax reform, healing racial wounds, and improving education.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 10/23/1975
Description: Senator Joseph Timilty's closing statement in 1975 mayoral race debate against current mayor Kevin White, filmed in WEEI studio. Radio broadcast closed by announcer Mike Ludlum. Following close of broadcast is silent footage of participants and others shaking hands conversing in studio. Reel 3 of 3.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 10/23/1975
Description: Kevin White gives press conference after mayoral reelection victory. He says the campaign was the toughest political battle of his life. He denies entertaining ambitions for national office. He also denies involvement in an accusation of one reporter being involved with organized crime.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 11/05/1975
Description: Boston School Committee meeting proceedings. Chair John McDonough, David Finnegan, and Kathleen Sullivan criticize Superintendent Marion Fahey for negative remarks she made about the school committee in a newspaper interview. Paul Tierney supports Fahey, and Pixie Palladino comes down in the middle of the issue. Fahey defends her right to speak out on the Hyde Park High incident.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/02/1976
Description: School committee meeting. Chairman John McDonough, Elvira Pixie Palladino, Paul Tierney, David Finnegan, Kathleen Sullivan. McDonough accuses Superintendent Marion Fahey of political expediency. She responds. Committee member Elvira Pixie Palladino comments on the situation and states her position on anti-bussing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/02/1976
Description: Boston School Committee meeting, with Mayor Kevin White in attendance, where he discusses school desegregation and states his support for the recently elected school committee. Says Judge Arthur Garrity should cede some control to that body.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/11/1976
Description: Pam Bullard reports on the Tobin Elementary School, which is located near the Mission Hill Housing Project.Bullard reports that 75 white children are bused into the Tobin school with no problems. Interviews with students and teachers talking about how much they like the school. Bullard reports that Charlie Gibbons, the principal, encourages teachers to develop innovative programs for students. During the report Principal Gibbons was in Puerto Rico learning about the schools there to better be able to serve the Latino students at his school. Bullard notes that the school has a good atmosphere and enjoys a good rapport with the community.
9:50:07: Visual: Shots of street sign for Tobin Ct.; of the Mission Hill Housing Project. Pam Bullard reports that the Mission Hill Housing Project is in one of Boston's toughest neighborhoods; that racial fighting occurred there two weeks before school opened; that the housing project is in the heart of a depressed neighborhood. Bullard reports that the Tobin Elementary School is located near the housing project. V: Footage of an African American male student (Derek) saying that he has attended the Tobin School for four years; that he knows all of the teachers and gets along with them; that the school is special because of the teachers, the kids, and the field trips. A white male student (Richard) says that Derek is his friend; that he likes the Tobin school; that he has fun taking the bus everyday; that he has met a lot of new people. Bullard reports that Charlie Gibbons (principal, Tobin School) and his assistant are in Puerto Rico; that they are learning about the Puerto Rican school system in order to understand the needs of Spanish-speaking students; that Gibbons and his assistant are paying for their own trips. V: Shots of Gibbons' office; of a button reading "I go to the best - Tobin School, Roxbury"; of a thank-you note written to Gibbons from the students. Bullard reports that the Tobin School has extensive reading and physical education programs set up with Boston University; that there is a program for dental care set up with the Harvard Dental school; that the Tobin School has one of the city's best bilingual programs; that the students receive a lot of individual attention. Bullard reports that Gibbons and the teachers at the Tobin set up most of these programs themselves. V: Footage of student reading Spanish; of a student writing on a chalkboard; of bilingual posters in a classroom. Footage of a teacher at a chalkboard; of students in classroom. A white female teacher says that the students respond well to the school's programs; that she tries to give the students individual attention; that she likes the students and the parents at the Tobin. Footage of children playing learning games. An African American female teacher says that she agrees with Gibbons that the Tobin is the best school in Boston; that the Tobin has a warm atmosphere, a good faculty and a lot of support from the community. An African American male student says that he likes the Tobin because he learns things. Bullard reports that the Tobin school is located in a predominantly African American neighborhood; that 75 white students have been bused in with no problems; that students and teachers like the school very much. V: Footage of children playing on a field outside of the school. The Church of Our Lady of Perpetual Help is visible.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/26/1976
Description: Grand facade of Boston's Old City Hall (now housing Maison Robert restaurant). Marker for Freedom Trail and information booth on edge of Boston Common. People walk through the park, gather around information booth. Sign for Freedom Trail. Boston Common environs. People getting off Peter Pan bus.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/05/1976
Description: Exteriors of Harvard Medical School, Longwood Campus. Main building with ionic columns on Shattuck Street. A few students in front of the building. Countway library next door. Audio goes in and out throughout.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1976
Description: Mayor Kevin White exchanges banter with journalist, and goes on to deliver statement on increasing Boston property tax (one-time levy at $16.40) to finance the $27.5 million deficit caused by court ordered desegregation, at Judge Arthur Garrity's request. City treasurer Jim Young elaborates on choosing assessment method over borrowing. Mayor White takes questions from reporters. White accuses school committee of mismanagement in busing effort. He also comments that the teachers will have to work knowing they are in a debt situation.
0:00:30: Visual: Members of the press wait for Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) to arrive at press conference at City Hall. Walt Sanders (WBZ) and Gary Griffith (WGBH) are among the reporters. White arrives, begins reading his statement and is interrupted by a knock on the door. He jokes lightheartedly about the interruption. 0:01:53: V: White reads a statement about the school deficit caused by desegregation and school mismanagement. He says that an additional $16.40 will be added to property taxes this year; that Boston's property tax is already the highest in the nation; that Judge Garrity has ordered the city to find new revenue sources to fund the court-ordered desegregation. White says that he is submitting three pieces of legislation to the city council: an appropriation order for $10 million to cover the costs of police overtime; an appropriation order for $17.5 million to keep the schools operating for the remainder of the term; legislation to raise new revenue through the property tax. White says that he is faced with an unpleasant task; that this tax levy is the most efficient way to raise funds; that the tax will be levied only once. White says that he hopes Garrity acts to overhaul the city's school system, personnel, and management; that mismanagement of the school system has caused the deficit. 0:06:50: V: James Young (Treasurer, City of Boston) explains that the taxpayers must pay for the expenditures of the city government; that a tax levy is the most prudent and cost-effective way to raise revenues. Young says that borrowing money to cover the deficit is not a financially sound course of action; that the appropriation orders will allow the city to continue paying for the police and schools; that the tax levy will cover the appropriations; that the tax levy is related to a home rule petition to be brought before the state legislature. 0:08:26: V: White takes questions from reporters. White says that he does not know how quickly the city council will respond; that the tax levy is the most responsible way to cover the deficit. A reporter asks if a lengthy review of the legislation by the city council will allow enough time for the money to be raised. White says that he does not know how long the city council will take to make a decision on the legislation; that he did his best to respond expeditiously to the request by Judge Garrity. A reporter brings up other suggestions of ways to fund the deficit. White says that there are only a few rational and responsible ways to raise the funds; that the tax levy is the easiest, fairest, and cheapest way to cover the deficit. White says that extra police overtime is directly related to the desegregation order and should be covered along with the school deficit; that the taxes will be levied only to cover expenses resulting from the court order; that the deficit does not reflect any of the busing costs from the previous year. 0:12:19: V: A reporter asks about a rumored $8 million surplus in the budget. Young refutes those numbers and says there is no surplus. White says that money needs to be allocated in order to cover the next School Department payroll on June 1; that presently there is no more money to cover School Department payroll; that payroll will be owed to employees if the hours are worked. Young admits that there will be short-term borrowing to cover the deficit until the tax is levied; that he does not know how much will be borrowed; that $5.5 million is needed to cover payroll in 2 weeks. White says that he will not comment on speculation that some city residents will not pay the tax. A reporter accuses White of waiting until the last possible moment to raise the funds. White says that he notified all parties of the shortfall six months ago; that Judge Garrity did not consider the shortfall to be an emergency situation; that he warned the School Committee to make cuts; that neither the court nor the School Committee responded to his warnings. White accuses the School Committee of "total mismanagement" of the desegregation process. White says that some people have profited from school desegregation; that the city absorbed the costs of desegregation without comment last year; that the school deficit must be brought to the attention of the taxpayers. 0:19:03: V: White says that he does not want to close the city schools; that he refuses to borrow money to cover the costs of mismanagement of the school system. White admits that school teachers are going to work with the knowledge that there is no money for payroll; that the management of the schools must be overhauled next year. White says that he is responding to a request from the court to cover the deficit.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1976
Description: Railroad terminal yard in Allston adjacent to Mass. Turnpike. Freight containers and container beds parked on train tracks. Sole engine moving slowly into yard. Traffic on elevated section of pike in background. Hancock Towers and Prudential in hazy distance.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/19/1976
Description: Sound dropout in the beginning of the video. Boston City Council meeting on the Boston School budget. City Councilor reads communications from Mayor White to the City Council. Boston schools superintendent Marion Fahey testifies to City Council about school budget deficit. Accompanying Fahey are Paul Kennedy, Associate Superintendant in charge of personnel and John McGran, member of the superintendent's office on budgetary matters. Councilors Louise Day Hicks, Albert "Dapper" O'Neil, Larry DiCara are among those on the panel questioning Fahey. Mayor White and Superintendent Fahey both address the effect of Judge Arthur Garrity's 1975 court order on the Boston School Department budget. Video goes black in the middle for a few second, but audio continues.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/20/1976
Description: An overview of the modified (Phase IIB) Boston public schools court ordered desegregation plan: district schools, magnet schools at elementary and middle levels, specialized high school programs, technical and vocational schools. Explanation of the application process and how to indicate choices for focused programs.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/24/1976
Description: Boston City Hospital patient admitting desk with English and Spanish signs in corridor. Ambulance bay and emergency entrance sign. One ambulance departs with flashing lights and siren. Several takes of reporter standup on an investigation involving the hospital.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/03/1976
Description: Exteriors of the Massachusetts State House. AFSCME (American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees) state workers on strike, picketing outside State House with placards. Closeup on Beacon St. street sign.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/21/1976
Description: Mayor Kevin White releases report on racial violence in Boston. He does not comment on the findings because he has not yet reviewed them. The report was written by a committee consisting of 13 diverse members, chaired by Speaker Thomas McGee and Judge David Nelson. They met ten times over two months to interview 17 community leaders, both supporters and opponents of busing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/24/1976
Description: Three interviews on southwest corridor mass transit and development project. Areas affected include the South End, Roxbury Crossing, and Jamaica Plain. Construction will create numerous jobs and have an affirmative action goal with a 30% minority set-aside. $391 million (80% federal funds) will be for orange line and railroad relocation; plus an arterial street, community college, housing, and industrial park will make for at least a half billion dollar project. Residents are concerned about impact of noise and disruption in the adjacent neighborhoods, equitable employment opportunities, and environmental issues. Community groups want to be sure the new road and transit routes do not split the surrounding areas along socioeconomic lines.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/15/1976
Description: Press conference at City Hall. Boston Mayor Kevin White and Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia read prepared statements about the following day's school opening in the third year of court-ordered busing. White expresses confidence in a peaceful opening of schools. DiGrazia says that police have been instructed to use minimum force, but to act decisively against any disruptions of public order. Both men hope that police can be removed from schools as soon as possible. White notes that the atmosphere seems calmer this year than during the previous two years. White says that he would like to remove police from the schools as soon as possible because their presence hinders the development of a healthy learning environment. Reporters question them on the school opening. Shots of Pam Bullard listening to the press conference.
2:09:33: Visual: Members of the press are assembled for a press conference at City Hall with Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) and Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston). White begins reading a statement, then stops because there is a problem with sound. 2:11:53: V: White reads a prepared statement. He says that school opens tomorrow; that fewer students face assignments to new schools this year; that more students are attending the schools of their choice; that many schools are benefitting from programs linked with universities and businesses; that three new schools are opening; that he is confident that the school year will be productive. White says that the city is prepared to guarantee the safety of all schoolchildren; that he hopes to reduce the police presence at the schools this year; that police will restore order if disruptions occur. White urges citizens to share in the responsibility for a peaceful school opening; that the city will focus on improving schools this year. 2:14:32: V: DiGrazia reads a prepared statement. He expresses confidence in a peaceful school opening. He reports that police have received instructions to allow peaceful demonstrations, but to maintain public order; that police officers have been instructed to use minimum force and to treat those arrested with respect and courtesy. DiGrazia says that police will not tolerate any acts of violence or disruption; that these acts are often committed by only a few citizens. 2:15:56: V: White invites questions from the reporters. A reporter asks DiGrazia what kind of preparations have been made for additional police support. DiGrazia says that Massachusetts State Police will be assigned to South Boston; that MDC Police will be assigned to Charlestown; that US Marshals will be present for the opening of schools. DiGrazia says that the atmosphere on the streets seems calm; that a few citizens are engaging in disruptive behavior; that the atmosphere seems calmer than in the previous two years; that police presence will be less visible than last year; that additional police will stand by for support. DiGrazia says that the police have not received any indication that there will be outside agitators at the schools. DiGrazia says that he hopes there will be little overtime for police officers this year. DiGrazia says that uniformed State Police officers will be assigned to South Boston High School; that community service officers and juvenile officers will be assigned to monitor the other schools. 2:18:52: V: A reporter asks about cooperative efforts between the School Department, the city of Boston, and the Police Department. White says that the three entities have been working together on school desegregaton for three years; that differences about the school budget have not affected efforts to achieve a successful school opening. DiGrazia says that police will continue to enforce ordinances forbidding the assembly of more than three people along a bus route, or assemblies within 100 yards of schools. Shot of Pam Bullard. White says that he would like to remove police from schools as soon as possible; that police presence hinders a healthy learning atmospheres; that police can be removed if citizens refrain from disrupting the schools. A reporter asks DiGrazia to clarify the term "minimum force" in police conduct. DiGrazia says that he hopes police can dissuade citizens from engaging in disruptive behavior; that he would like to see the police removed from the schools as soon as possible. DiGrazia refuses to elaborate on minimum tolerance policy guidelines, but says that warnings will be given to disruptors before action is taken. DiGrazia says that the school department instituted the use of metal detectors at the schools; that they will be used again this year. DiGrazia refuses to give out information on the number of police officers assigned to the schools
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1976
Description: Pam Bullard interviews Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools). Fahey talks about the assignment of bus monitors and school aides for the coming school year. Fahey explains the roles of transitional aides, security aides and instructional aides. She says that there will also be more special needs aides and bilingual aides in the schools. Fahey comments on the need for all students to attend school in order to learn basic skills. She says that parents should be confident in the educational programs at the Boston public schools. Tape 2 of 2.
0:00:13: Visual: Pam Bullard interviews Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) in her office. Fahey sits behind her desk. Fahey says that bus monitors will ride the buses with students again this year; that parents have made it clear that they want bus monitors on the buses with their children. Fahey says that there will be just as many aides this year as in previous years; that there will be fewer transitional aides in the school buildings; that transitional aides will perform duties assigned to them by the headmasters of the schools. Fahey says that the transitional aides will be supplemented by security aides from the Safety and Security Department; that the security aides have additional training in dealing with crises. Fahey says that there will be many instructional aides in the classrooms; that instructional aides will be funded under Title I of the Emergency School Assistance Act; that instructional aides will work with elementary and middle school students in reading and math. Fahey says that there will be bilingual aides as well as aides for the special needs programs in the schools. Bullard asks Fahey what she would tell parents who are skeptical about the quality of the Boston Public Schools. Fahey says that it is important for parents to send their children to school; that parents who keep their children out of school are condemning their children to an unproductive future. Fahey says that the Boston Public Schools have strong educational programs; that school faculty and staff are always working to improve school programs; that students in the Boston Public Schools receive good instruction in basic skills like reading, math and communication. Bullard closes the interview. 0:04:53: V: Bullard and Fahey speak informally. Fahey says that Boston schools are no longer in the "numbers game." Fahey notes that the focus is no longer on desegregation; that her staff is focusing on assessing the performance of students and teachers; that the tension caused by school desegregation hindered classroom learning. Shot of a spreadsheet on Fahey's desk. The spreadsheet gives the racial breakdown of students in each grade level.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1976
Description: Exterior of Boston English High School. Interview with Boston police commissioner Joseph Jordan about how successful he thinks the third year of court-ordered desegregation will be. Interview with Headmaster of English High School Robert Peterkin on the opening of school, and English High School as a magnet school. Interview with two students, Maura and Sharon, about what they like about English High School. Interiors of the school, lockers, students in hallways, on the escalator, in the cafeteria, in the classroom.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: First day of school in Boston, Phase IIB of court ordered desegregation. 1) Superintendent Marion Fahey is proud of faculty and students. Associate superintendent Charles Leftwich reports van and three buses were stoned. Mayor Kevin White says unlawful conduct will not be tolerated. 2) Gary Griffith reports on opening commotion at Charlestown High. One-third of enrolled students show up. Federal marshals and police outside. One arrest for disorderly conduct. Neighborhood crowd gathers in street. 3) Pamela Bullard at South Boston High. Black students get off bus to less tension than last year. Police are present but not in riot gear. 4) Art Cohen at Mackey Middle School where teacher student ratio is 1:18. Principal Lloyd Leake. 5) Bullard on magnet program encompassing 21 schools. Exterior, interior of English High. Gregory Anrig, state commissioner of education. Headmaster William Peterkin. 6) Karin Giger on bilingual program at Grover Cleveland Middle School. 7) Bullard talks to boycotting (white) Cormiers of Charlestown. Mother keeps son out of Timilty School where he was assigned to be bused; he has part-time tutoring. 8) Steve Curwood talks to participating (black) Price family from Roxbury, whose children are bused to white neighborhoods. 9) 5 Hyde Park High students, 3 minority, 2 white, discuss racial separation inside school. They expect conflict to be less than last year. 10) Steve Nevas was almost thwarted from covering a Kevin White press conference because mayor felt Nevas could not be objective. (He had investigated fundraising in White campaign.) White attempts to disassemble Channel 2 microphone and asserts he can exclude any reporter from access. Ed Baumeister says this raises First Amendment issue.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: High, wide, long shots of Boston environs from observation deck of Hancock Tower. Nearly aerial views of South End, Charles River, Boston Harbor, State House, and orange line T moving along elevated tracks.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/10/1976
Description: Dedication ceremony of John Hancock glass tower, in lobby. General James M. Gavin is introduced and addresses the audience. Gavin and other speakers talk about the history of the building project. Thomas O'Neill and Kevin White are also on stage. Unveiling of massive reproduction of Declaration of Independence on wall of lobby. English High School chorus sings patriotic songs. Hundreds of guests crowded in lobby.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/15/1976
Description: Longshoremen's hiring hall. Men crowd around window for work assignments. Interview with union worker, who says job shortage due to progress and automation. He has not been paid under contract guaranty because of loopholes. He predicts October 1 strike against Boston Shipping Association. Containerization calls for fewer workers, from about 1,200 men to about 400 men, though tonnage of port has remained stable. Man hours have decreased, some men have left the industry, others try to collect their guaranty. A man being interviewed says that the men are very angry.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/24/1976
Description: Robert DiGrazia resigns as Boston police commissioner to become police chief in Montgomery County, Maryland. Gives press conference on strengths and weaknesses in his department.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/04/1976
Description: Tape dropout in beginning. Combat Zone environs. Thriving pornography district. XXX rated movies, peep shows, Naked i, Pussy Cat Cinema, adult book store, State and Pilgrim Theaters, Intermission Lounge. Garish marquees with flashing lights. MBTA and Boston police cars.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/15/1976
Description: High shots of Park Square during snowstorm. Hillbilly Ranch, Continental Trailways bus terminal, Playboy Club, billboards. Man digging out a car. Buses and cars driving on snow covered roads. Pedestrians walking through snow.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/29/1976
Description: Charles Street Jail exteriors. A reporter asks members of administration about issues with the Charles Street Jail and Deer Island regarding the possibility of a new combined facility. Stated problems with building a new jail include security and the size of the proposed site. Charles Street physical plant issues include plumbing, recreation facilities, eating facilities, kitchen facilities, and noise level.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/25/1977
Description: Deer Island prison exterior with snow. Main brick dormitory and several outbuildings. Boston skyline across harbor with whitecaps on waves. Plane flying low on approach to Logan Airport touches down on runway in distance.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/27/1977
Description: Diana Ross rehearses at Music Hall. She wears a "Boston Loves Diana Ross" T-shirt. She answers questions from reporters at the edge of the stage. She talks about playing Dorothy in the Wiz and her inspirations. She talks about having children.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/10/1977
Description: B-roll of parking tickets, parking meters, and parking enforcement officer near Government Center. Man argues ticket with officer. "No Parking" and "Tow Zone" signs.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/11/1977
Description: Combat Zone environs. Marquees and store signs: “adult movies,” “uncensored books,” “nude review,” “XXX.” Publix Theater, Pussycat Cinema, Naked i, Two O'Clock Lounge. New England Medical Center adjacent. Display of pornographic materials and erotic books. District police headquarters sign and police station on Washington Street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/15/1977
Description: B-roll of bulldozer clearing debris from Symphony Road fire. Exteriors of buildings with broken and boarded up windows and smoke stains. Interview with David Scondras of Symphony Tenants Organizing Project. He talks about why the rash of 29 fires in three years is suspected as arson: absentee landlords, high vacancy rate, poor condition of structures, lodging houses, lapsed mortgages. He adds that there is nothing the city can do about the problem and explains why. He hopes that State legislators will back his organization's bill which removes the financial motivation for landlords to burn down houses in poor condition. He discusses the number of people affected while they shoot cutaways. Reporter reasks question for editing purposes. Exteriors of a Red Cross Disaster Service Center. Several takes of reporter standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/23/1977
Description: Former CIA director George H. W. Bush speaks on national security and foreign affairs. In regards to relations with South American countries, Bush explains his belief that one should not use 1977 morals to pass judgment on events that happened in the past. Denies allegations that the CIA used the African Swine Fever Virus in Cuba to "destabilize". Also denies that he ever authorized any use of chemical or biological warfare agents. He touches briefly on his potential candidacy for presidency.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/08/1977
Description: Lee Nelson introduces The Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Nelson reads a news brief about US Army testing of live bacteria on civilians in simulated germ warfare attacks. Art Cohen reports on racial controversy during jury selection in the Andrew Puopolo murder trial. Cohen reports that the defense attorneys have accused the prosecution of excluding African Americans from the jury. Gary Griffith reports on Mayor Kevin White's proposed fiscal legislation. The report includes footage of Jim Young (Treasurer, City of Boston) explaining the fiscal package. Steve Curwood reports on George Bush's address to the Middlesex Club of Republicans. The report includes footage of Bush answering questions about his tenure as CIA Director, biological warfare, and the overthrow of foreign governments. Mike Kolowich reports on Thomas Widmer (Vice President, Thermo Electron), who advocates energy efficiency and conservation through the application of technology. Footage of Widmer talking about technology and energy policy. Christopher Lydon comments on the early days of the Carter presidency and Carter's outspoken position on human rights. Footage from another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Steve Nevas hosts the Ten O'Clock News. Nevas reports on the possibility of peace talks in the Middle East. Lydon interviews Richard Reeves (political writer) on Jimmy Carter's character and his public image. Nevas editorializes on US policy regarding marine resources. Footage from another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Nevas closes the show. David Ives (President, WGBH) sings a fundraising song for on-air fundraising promotion
0:00:10: Volunteers in studio for on-air fundraising. WGBH station identification. 0:01:12: The Ten O'Clock News opening credits. Lee Nelson introduces the show. Nelson reports that the US Army has tested live germs on civilians in simulated germ warfare attacks from 1949 to 1969; that the Pennsylvania Turnpike, the City of San Francisco and Washington's national airport were targets over a twenty-year period; that over 500 project employees suffered infections. Nelson reports that four jurors were chosen in the trial of three men connected with the death of Harvard football player Andrew Puopolo. 0:02:16: Art Cohen reports on the Puopolo murder trial at Suffolk Superior Court. Visual: Artist's drawing of courtroom. Cohen reports that Puopolo had been in the Combat Zone with fellow Harvard football players Thomas Lincoln and Steve Saxon; that Lincoln and Saxon suffered only minor injuries; that Puopolo died of stab wounds. Cohen reports that Richard Allen, Edward Soares and Leon Easterling are charged with Puopulo's murder; that the three defendents are African American. V: Artist's drawing of defendants. Cohen reports that Judge James Roy asked each prospective juror if the racial profiles of the defendents and plaintiffs would affect their judgment; that Roy dismissed several jurors who were unsure. V: Artist drawing of Roy by Sonja Benson. Cohen reports that there were only four African Americans out of 70 prospective jurors; that the defense lawyers accused the prosecution of excluding African Americans from the jury; that Thomas Mundy (Assistant District Attorney, Suffolk County) challenged three of the African American jurors without cause; that the fourth African American juror was dismissed by Roy. V: Artists drawings of lawyers at table; of Mundy. Cohen reports that three women and one man have been chosen for the jury so far; that these four jurors are an electronics engineer, a manager with a local insurance company, a school monitor, and a housewife from South Boston. Cohen reports that jury selection is expected to go on until Thursday. 0:03:48: Nelson reads the national headlines: the US House of Representatives voted to pass a major segment of President Jimmy Carter's economic stimulus program, including $50 tax rebates for many taxpayers; Carter will travel to London in May for his first summit with leaders from Canada, West Germany, France, Italy, Japan, and Great Britain; France threatened economic reprisals unless the SST (Concorde) is allowed to land in New York; Carter favors granting temporary landing rights for the Concorde, but the decision is up to the states of New York and New Jersey. 0:04:39: Nelson reports that the White Administration is concentrating on the passage of its fiscal legislation; that Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) is on vacation on an unnamed Caribbean island. V: Footage of James Young (Treasurer, City of Boston) saying that the mayor's fiscal legislation addresses the management problems in the city; that it attempts to redress imbalances in the fiscal relationship between the state and the city; that it enables the city to improve its financial situation by allowing it to impose modest taxes. Gary Griffith reports that the fiscal package includes 28 bills broken into three major categories; that there are 11 bills in a revenue sharing package which increases city fines and parking fees, and denies registration to vehicles with unpaid fines and taxes; that there are 10 bills in a state share package which mandates the state to assume the costs of county government, of school desegregation and of veteran benefits; that there are 7 bills in a new tax package which includes a payroll excise tax and new excise taxes on hotels, motels and college dorms. Griffith reports that some of the bills in the state share package and the new tax package are not expected to pass; that the city's property tax is expected to rise next year. V: Shots of downtown Boston; of a meter maid giving a parking ticket. Footage of Young saying that the city will not go bankrupt; that the city will be forced to reduce the services it provides to residents; that the city will see a decline in its character and standard of living. Griffith reports that legislative hearings on the bills will be held on March 23; that votes will take place by May. V: Shots of reporters at Young's press conference. 0:07:23: Stock report: Dow Jones Industrials at 952.04; New York Stock Exchange volume was 19,520,000 shares; American Exchange volume was 3,110,000 shares. 0:07:48: Nelson reports that Brady Tyson (US Deputy Delegate to the UN Human Rights Commission) expressed regrets to the government of Chili for CIA involvement in the 1973 overthrow of the government of Salvador Allende; that the State Department said later that Tyson's remarks at the meeting of the UN Human Rights Commission were personal and not approved by the State Department. Nelson reports that Idi Amin (military ruler of Uganda) claims he is on a CIA death list; that Amin met with leaders at the Afro-Arab summit in Cairo; that Amin refused to allow a probe into human rights violations in Uganda. 0:08:37: Nelson reports that George Bush (former CIA Director) visited Cambridge to address the Middlesex Club of Republicans; that there is speculation about Bush running for president in 1980. Steve Curwood reports that Bush became CIA Director in 1976. V: Footage of Bush saying that he was often asked about the Allende affair as CIA Director; that he would not have apologized for the Allende affair. Bush says that he would support action to destabilize or overthrow certain governments, or "a Hitler." Curwood asks Bush about allegations concerning CIA use of the African Swine Fever Virus in Cuba to destabilize the Castro government. Bush responds that the allegations are false; that he never authorized the use of any chemical or biological warfare agents as CIA Director; that he will not comment on the use of those agents by other countries. Bush says that he does not believe that the CIA will be hurt by going along with rules and regulations not followed by other countries; that he worries about narrow guidelines concerning counterintelligence strategy. Curwood says that Bush does not deny the possibility of his running for the presidency in 1980. 0:11:47: Sports scores: Bruins beat Atlanta, 3 - 2. 0:12:00: Nelson reads headlines: Joseph Califano (HEW Secretary) announced a major reorganization of HEW; a law professor from the University of Chicago warned the House of Representatives not to let Carter reorganize the federal government. 0:12:19: Nelson reports that Carter will present a comprehensive energy program on April 20; that Carter's planners are soliciting input from citizens; that conservation and "personal sacrifice" will be at the heart of the program. Mike Kolowich reports that the US is the largest consumer of energy in the world; that the US wastes some of its most valuable energy resources. V: Shots of steam rising from smokestacks, chimneys and sewers. Kolowich reports that Thomas Widmer (vice president, Thermo Electron) advocates a more efficient use of energy; that Thermo Electron is a thermodynamic research and manufacturing firm in Waltham. V: Footage of Widmer saying that there is no energy crisis; that the US is not using energy effectively; that there is a "surplus of entropy." Kolowich reports that Widmer endorses conservation in a report he prepared for the Carter administration; that Widmer believes conservation is not enough. V: Shots of Widmer's report. Footage of Widmer saying that he does not endorse conservation through curtailment of energy use; that he endorses conservation through technology; that energy must be used more efficiently. Kolowich reports that "technological fixes" have been used in West Germany; that West Germany uses energy more efficiently than the US. V: Shots of smokestacks; of cars and trucks on highway; of factories; of houses with chimneys. Kolowich reports that US cars and trucks are too large; that the US steel making industry is not using energy as efficiently as it could; that new technology could help US industries use energy more efficiently. Kolowich reports that the federal government would need to provide incentives for industry to become more energy efficient; that the government would need to impose controls on the consumer level. V: Audio of Widmer saying that there should be mandatory controls on the efficiency of air conditioners, lighting, new home construction and commercial buildings; that it is possible to set mandatory efficiency standards for industry. Footage of Widmer saying that energy taxes could be imposed on industry; that tax credits could be given to energy efficient industries. Kolowich reports that Widmer thinks this policy would result in economic growth without an increase in energy use; that Widmer's ideas were once considered revolutionary; that Carter's energy program may rely on some of Widmer's ideas. 0:16:56: Weather report and area ski conditions. 0:17:45: Nelson reports that Henry Gonzales (Democratic Representative from Texas) resigned as chairman of the House Assassinations Committee; that Lewis Stokes (Democratic Representative from Ohio) will be the new chairman. Nelson reports that Governor Michael Dukakis is looking for quick legislative approval of his proposed Industrial Development Authority, an agency to encourage business development in Massachusetts. Nelson reports that state officials will not comment on a listening device found in the telephone of Owen Clarke (State Tax Commissioner); that tax records were recently seized in an investigation of his agency. Nelson reports that Leo Nolan is appealing his conviction for the murder of a Haverhill grocer fifty years ago. 0:18:30: Nelson introduces commentary by Christopher Lydon on the first few months of the Carter presidency. Lydon says that critics have doubts about Carter's performance; that critics doubt his understanding of foreign policy issues. Lydon says that Carter knows what he is doing when he speaks out on human rights; that Carter's outspoken support of human rights can lead to inconsistencies in foreign policy; that Carter wrote a letter in support of Soviet dissident Andrei Sakharov, but told the Soviet ambassador that human rights should not get in the way of relations between the two countries. Lydon points out other contradictions in the intersection of human rights and foreign policy in the Carter administration. Lydon says that Carter speaks out on human rights to remind Americans of the importance of human liberties and the values represented by the US. 0:20:38: Nelson closes the show with a joke. Credits roll. 0:21:19: Footage from another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Steve Nevas reports that Secretary of State Cyrus Vance says that there is a chance for Middle East peace talks during the second half of the year; that Arab states might allow Israel to keep some of the West Bank; that the Arab states will insist on the return of the Gaza Strip, the Golan Heights and the Sinai Desert; that Vance asked Congress not to try to enlist other nations in measures against the Arab boycott of Israel. 0:21:57: Sports scores: Golden State beats the Celtics, 101 - 94; the Bruins beat Detroit, 8 - 3. 0:22:20: Nevas reports that Carter spoke to employees at the Pentagon today; that Carter says he does not want to revive the draft, but will not rule it out completely. 0:22:36: Nevas introduces Christopher Lydon's interview with Richard Reeves (political writer). Lydon asks Reeves about Carter's public persona. Reeves says that Carter's ruthlessness and toughness is not visible in his public image; that Carter had to be calculating and tough to get to the top; that Carter has picked up campaign tips and tricks from political novels. Lydon comments on Reeves' theory that Carter's early success in the campaign was played up in the media; that the media ignored later setbacks because they had already created an image of him as a winning candidate. Reeves says that Carter planned a good campaign; that the media chose to give extensive coverage to the primary election; that the media created a momentum around Carter and it worked in his favor. Lydon asks Reeves' opinion on Carter and his success. Reeves says that Carter's public image will be destroyed if he gets caught lying. 0:25:55: Weather report and ski conditions. 0:26:55: Nevas reports that the US has taken control of the fishing grounds along the east coast. He gives a brief history of fishing in the western Atlantic. Nevas reports that the US now controls nearly 1/5 of the world's marine fish resources; that the US took control of east coast fishing grounds in the name of conservation; that taking control of the fishing grounds should not become a jingoistic exercise. Nevas closes the show. Credits roll. 0:28:23: Footage from another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Christopher Lydon comments on Carter's energy policy. He speculates on Carter's relations with the natural gas industry. Nevas closes the show. Credits roll. 0:29:50: Footage from the end credits of another Ten O'Clock News broadcast. Fundraising promotion featuring David Ives (President, WGBH) singing a fundraising song accompanied by guitar.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/08/1977
Description: Former Chancellor Willy Brandt of the Federal Republic of Germany holds small press conference at World Affairs Council in Boston. Answers questions on European affairs and thoughts on becoming commissioner. He explains the importance of preserving peace with the Soviet Union.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/10/1977
Description: Several takes of reporter standup on the Boston Public Library having to shut down the bookmobile. Exteriors of Boston Public Library older (McKim) building. Pan of the inscription “The Commonwealth requires the education of the people as the safeguard of order and liberty.” Move to the attached modern building entrance. Interiors of the Library. Sign reads “Effective Sunday, February 13, the Library will be closed on Sundays until further notice.” Patrons in line at circulation desk in lobby. Librarian stamps due dates on borrowing cards. Patrons at reading tables in research room.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/15/1977
Description: B-roll of the site of a proposed multilevel garage for Quincy Market, which is currently a parking lot between Haymarket and the Expressway. Close-ups on cars in the parking lot. Several takes of reporter standup on the Boston Redevelopment Authority's plans. Exteriors of Faneuil Hall before North Market was developed. Several takes of another portion of reporter standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/24/1977
Description: Celtics vs Houston Rockets with Moses Malone. John Havlicek, Scott, Curtis Rowe, JoJo White, Dave Cowens. Souvenirs for sale. Fans entering Boston Garden. Audience says tickets cost about $9 per seat. They discuss ticket pricing and player salary.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/06/1977
Description: No audio. First half runs in black and white, second half in color. Exteriors of Boston City Hall, wide and close shots. People crossing plaza, and going through revolving door at entrance to City Hall. Municipal workers exit building; some carry briefcases.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/11/1977
Description: Boston police car marked “towing enforcement.” Sign at tow lot on Albany Street listing charges of $12 plus hourly storage fees. Interview on creation of Parking Violations Bureau to consolidate enforcement and collection of fines. Cost of unpaid ticket will double after 21 days. Denver boot used to immobilize cars of scofflaws. Police commissioner Joseph Jordan announces clamp down on illegal parking in city. Cavalcade of police tow trucks enter lot carrying vehicles.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/26/1977
Description: E. Edward Clark, a ninety-two-year-old African American man, speaks to a racially integrated class at the Hennigan Elementary School. The son of slaves, Clark tells vivid stories about his family's experiences in the south following emancipation and about growing up in Cambridge. He stresses the importance of a good education and respect for people of all races. The students ask Mr. Clark questions. Tape 1 of 2.
1:00:00: Visual: E. Edward Clark speaks to a racially integrated class at the Hennigan school. Clark describes the lives of his parents, who were slaves. Clark's father bought his freedom eight years before emancipation. His father bought the freedom of his mother, then the two were married. Clark's parents had 13 children. Clark describes the schools he attended as a boy, and the good education he received from New England missionaries who traveled south to teach former slaves. Clark describes race relations in the south after the Civil War. Clark says that his family moved to a cold-water flat at 143 Erie Street in Cambridge in 1898. Clark talks to the students about the importance of a good education and respect for others; about his impressions of how the world has changed. Clark warns the students that an education will prepare them to make a living later on. He reminds the students that the teachers are there to help them. Clark describes growing up in Cambridge in the early part of the century. He describes how the city has changed and how little things cost back then. 1:18:32: V: Clark invites the students to ask him questions. One student asks him about the secret to long life. Clark says that his parents were healthy; that he does not drink or smoke; that he does not believe in hate or violence. Clark stresses again that an education is necessary for success in life. Another student asks Clark if he was ever married.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/27/1977
Description: Press conference on the court-ordered plan for Phase III desegregation of the Boston Public Schools. Elvira "Pixie" Palladino (Boston School Committee), Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) and John Nucci (East Boston community activist) are among the interested parties and reporters in attendance. Attendees read over the court order. Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) and Marvin Scott (Associate Dean of Education, Boston University) review the court order. They discuss efforts to desegregate Boston kindergartens. They announce the opening of the Mattahunt Elementary School and Madison Park High School. Smith and Dentler discuss the decision to close the McKinley School, the Storrow School and the Higginson Elementary School, because they remain segregated despite all efforts to integrate the student population.
0:00:13: Visual: People are seating themselves in a lecture hall before a press conference about the court-ordered plan for Phase III desegregation of Boston Public Schools. Elvira "Pixie" Palladino sits with several white women at a table at the front of the room. Walt Sanders (WBZ reporter) reads the paper at his seat, also near the front of the room. Charles Leftwich (Associate Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) greets people as they enter the room. The media set up cameras to record the press conference. 0:03:20: V: Marvin Scott (Associate Dean of Education, Boston University) and Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) seat themselves at the front of the room. The moderator announces that copies of the court-ordered Phase III desegregation plan will be passed out. Audience members approach him for copies of the report. Scott and Dentler wait as the moderator passes out the report. 0:05:51: V: The moderator introduces Dentler and Scott, and says that they will answer questions about the report. Dentler and Scott are seated at a table with microphones. They quietly confer with one another and check their watches. The press conference attendees quietly read over the report. John Nucci (East Boston community activist) quietly studies it. Leftwich flips through the report. An attendee asks Dentler how the plan will affect East Boston. Dentler says that he will answer questions after the attendees have had a chance to read over the report. 0:09:49: V: Smith says that the court order for Phase III desegregation focuses on stability and continuity. He says that he and Dentler will review the order and then take questions. Smith says that a third theme of the court order is the disengagement of the court from the schools. Smith refers to the court order and explains some statistics. He points out how some school assignments have changed from last year to this year. He makes reference to the assignment of students to examination schools. Dentler notes that kindergarten classrooms in Boston have never been desegregated; that neighborhood kindergarten classrooms remain more accessible to white students than to African American students; that fewer minority students enter kindergarten. Dentler adds that the Phase III desegregation plan aims to increase accessibility to neighborhood kindergarten for all; that some students will be assigned to citywide magnet kindergartens for desegregation purposes; that magnet kindergarten assignments are made with the idea that children will stay in the same building for the elementary school grades. Dentler says that the goal of kindergarten desegregation was first stated in the original court order. Smith mentions some of the details of student assignments to District 9 schools. Dentler says that the court aims to stabilize the high student turnover rate. He names the deadlines for initial assignments and corrective assignments of students. Dentler notes the statistic that one in three students transfers from one school to another under the current plan; that there will be limitations on student transfers. Dentler says that a high turnover rate is detrimental to classroom learning. Smith announces the opening of the Mattahunt Elementary School and Madison Park High School. Dentler announces the closings of four schools. He says that the McKinley School, the Storrow School, and the Higginson Elementary School will be closed because they have remained segregated despite all efforts to integrate the student population. Dentler notes that alternative plans to desegregate these schools are infeasible or unconstitutional; that the student populations in these schools are small. Dentler notes that there are 60 students enrolled in the McKinley School; that there are less than 100 students enrolled in the Storrow School; that there are less than 150 students at the Higginson School, not including kindergarten students.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/06/1977
Description: Man gives scholarly history of theater architecture in Boston, commenting on Boston's Theater District - Saxon (Majestic), Colonial, Wilbur, Tremont, Music Hall (Metropolitan). Includes interior details of Saxon - red velvet curtains and rails; gilded rococo balconies; relief of fruit, flowers, leaves, masks, angels.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/17/1977
Description: Grand lobby, interior of Music Hall. Ornate chandelier, marble columns, heavenly mural. Gilded architectural details — carved moldings, capitals, medallions, angels. Interview with Harry Lodge, who gives history of Music Hall (formerly Metropolitan Theater), originally designed in 1920s by Clarence Blackhall for Vaudeville and movies. Describes the proposed restoration program to be completed in fall 1980 if lease secured and funds raised. In order to bring the Metropolitan Opera to Boston, the theater needs deeper stage for performing arts, updated communication systems, ventilation systems, and a renovated auditorium (seats 4,300). The theater is used for ballet, concerts, movies. Lodge states that this renovation with revitalize Boston as a major center for the performing arts. Lodge shows a drawing of the proposed plan.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/21/1977
Description: Mayor Kevin White honors seven distinguished Bostonians at a gala reception at the Parkman House. Women's rights advocate Florence Luscombe, community activist Melnea Cass, former senator and governor Leverett Saltonstall, former senator and ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge, theater critic Elliot Norton, historian Walter Muir Whitehill, entrepreneur Sidney Rabb (of Stop & Shop). Personal narratives of the honorees with archival stills of their lives.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/06/1977
Description: People standing in claims line at unemployment office in Hurley building in government center. English/ Spanish bilingual signs. A man explains the issues with estimating unemployment rates and the importance of receiving a reliable common resolution. Answers the question "How do you measure unemployment?"
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/11/1977
Description: Interview with Boston coin dealer Ed Leventhal who says people are not flocking to buy the newly offered South African Krugerrand, one troy ounce of gold selling for about $163. B-roll of gold and coin dealer's stores. Several takes of reporter standup from the Boson coin district on Bromfield Street. Interview with Margaret Marshall who explains why investment in the Krugerrand supports discriminatory gold mining industry and therefore apartheid. Contemporary TV ads for Krugerrands, for editing into the news story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1977
Description: Downtown exteriors of Boston banks. Monolithic view of Federal Reserve Bank from Summer Street. High rises in financial district. Keystone building. Severe angle view of Shawmut. Revolving clock at entrance to State Street Bank. Hornblower & Weeks, Hemphill, Noyes sign. First National Bank of Boston. Gillette headquarters along water.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/25/1977
Description: Edward F. King (not to be confused with Edward J. King) holds a press conference to announce his Republican gubernatorial candidacy at Park Plaza Hotel. Otto Walrab, former Chairman of the Republican State Committee, introduces King. King talks about his past experience and Massachusetts economic policy. He talks about cutting across traditional party lines, especially in Massachusetts, a heavily Democratic state. He criticizes Michael Dukakis for tax plan and for his judicial appointments, including Robert Bonin and Margaret Burnham. King takes questions from the press. Several takes of reporter standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/04/1978
Description: Convening of a Joint Committee of the Massachusetts Senate and House of Representatives. Interiors of the State House. Michael Dukakis proceeds into the chamber and delivers the State of the State address (for his first term as governor). His address touches on the state of Massachusetts towns, specifically North Adams, and the great benefits Massachusetts is able to provide people who need extra attention, including the elderly, handicapped, mentally disabled, mentally ill, and disadvantaged children. George Keverian, Kevin Harrington, William Bulger, Tom O'Neill and other state government dignitaries are present. Some video dropout. reel 1 of 2.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/11/1978
Description: Start of Boston marathon. Bill Rodgers crosses finish line with police escort. Shots of runners and moving feet clad in running shoes.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/17/1978
Description: Mayor Kevin White press conference on city budget. Topics discussed include employment, crime prevention, the elderly, taxes.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/02/1978
Description: Waterfront park, Harbor Towers, Mercantile Wharf, Long Wharf, Chart House, Lewis Wharf, Joseph's Aquarium restaurant, Union Wharf. Sign 'lobsters shipped anywhere.' Commercial Wharf building boarded up. Prince building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/12/1978
Description: State House exteriors in summer. Several views including looking up Park Street. Straight on and angle perspectives. Golden dome, cupola. Henry Cabot Lodge statue.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/19/1978
Description: Quincy Market environs, domed roof of long market building. Extremely high shot looking beyond expressway. Exterior of market, children eating ice cream. Entrance to Crate & Barrel, Crabtree & Evelyn, The Berkeley Shop, other shops. Grasshopper weather vane on gold cupola of Faneuil Hall.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/22/1978
Description: Governors Conference in Boston. Sen. Edward Kennedy and Rep. John Anderson meet with the National Governors Association, including Govs. Jerry Brown, Ella Grasso, Reubin Askew, Dixie Lee Ray, Ed Herschler, James Longley, Harvey Wollman, Richard Lamm, Meldrim Thomson, Mike O'Callaghan, and Richard Snelling. End of the discussion on health care and insurance policy. Governor Dukakis speaks and Senator Kennedy responds. Many closeups on Kennedy, Dukakis, and audience pans. Governor Snelling introduces John Anderson and the panel on government regulations. Cuts of Anderson's speech about the problem of over-regulation by Congress and the legislative veto, with shots of governors around the table. The Director of the US Office of Management and Budget, James T. McIntyre, speaks to the same issues. Rep. Anderson takes questions.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/28/1978
Description: Interview with Albert "Dapper" O'Neil during his run for Suffolk County sheriff. He accuses his oppenent of corruption and complains that no Boston newspapers will report the negative allegations he has made against his opponent. He discusses his plan to make the sheriff's department more visible and says "I'm a law and order man." He discusses his plan for the Charles St. Jail. He defends the office of the sheriff in the face of claims that the state should take over its responsibilities. He accuses the current sheriff of patronage and speaks against it in his campaign. He expresses his conservatism against the liberalism of the current sheriff., which includes his position against furloughs and halfway houses. He explains how he got the nickname "Dapper." He explains why he thinks former mayor and governor James Curley is the greatest man that ever lived. Video dropout in the middle of the video.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1978
Description: Michael Dukakis speaks at State House after upset defeat by Edward King in gubernatorial primary. Kitty, Frank Keefe, Barbara Ackermann, Evelyn Murphy.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/20/1978
Description: Massachusetts State House interiors. Senate door with sign on transom. House of Representatives door. House chamber empty; wide shot of rows of seats, podium, balcony. Reporter and camera operator discuss shots off camera. Several takes of reporter standup on the new 1979 state congress, specifically the power of Speaker Tom McGee.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/26/1978
Description: Anthony's Pier 4 and ship “Peter Stuyvesant” sinking next to restaurant as a result of blizzard damage earlier in the year. Tobin (Mystic River) Bridge, full view from across water. Discussion between cameraman, reporter, and Anthony's Pier 4 representative on permission to shoot footage of the restaurant and ship. Several takes of reporter standup for story on Ed King's gubernatorial campaign, his spending as head of Massport, and his budget campaign promises. Exterior shots of Jimmy's Harborside restaurant, and TASC office building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/03/1978
Description: Senator Edward Brooke concedes the Senate race to Paul Tsongas in the ballroom of the Copley Plaza Hotel. With him on the stage are supporters including State Sen. William Owens, his mother Helen Brooke, community leader Elma Lewis, and campaign field director Thomas Trimarco. Sharon Stevens reports from behind the cheering crowd, anticipating Brooke's speech; Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) is on the stage, waiting to interview Brooke after the speech. Brooke thanks the crowd, his family, and his campaign staff. Brooke congratulates Tsongas for waging an honorable campaign. Brooke says that he will do his best to assure the smooth transition of the Senate seat and that he continues to support full equality and justice for all. Brooke thanks voters for giving him the opportunity to have served as both State Attorney General and US Senator and assures those who did not vote for him that he has no bitterness toward them. Brooke shakes hands and answers questions from the press as he slowly makes his way off stage surrounded by an entourage. B-roll of Brooke supporters in ballroom after the speech.
0:58:17: Visual: Shot of Edward Brooke (US Senator) at a podium, waving to a cheering crowd in the ballroom of the Copley Plaza Hotel. A large campaign banner behind him reads, "Brooke - United States Senator." William Owens (State Senator), Helen Brooke (Edward Brooke's mother), Elma Lewis (African American community leader), Thomas Trimarco (field director for Brooke's campaign) and other supporters are all on stage with Brooke. Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) stands behind the cheering crowd, anticipating Brooke's speech. 0:59:15: V: Brooke thanks the crowd, which continues to cheer for him. Brooke says that preliminary results show Paul Tsongas (candidate for US Senator) to be the victor. Brooke congratulates Tsongas for waging an honorable campaign. Brooke says that he will do his best to assure the smooth transition of the Senate seat. Brooke thanks his campaign workers and contributors for their support. Brooke notes that there are US Senators who will continue to fight for senior citizens, minorities, the poor, and the handicapped. Brooke says that he continues to support full equality for women and equal justice for all. Brooke thanks voters for giving him the opportunity to have served as both State Attorney General and US Senator. Brooke assures those who did not vote for him that he has no bitterness toward them. Brooke says that he leaves the Senate with the feeling that there is much left to be accomplished; that he remains committed to the causes he has supported. Brooke paraphrases Lillian Hellman, saying that "I could never cut my consciensce to fit the fashion of any year." Brooke commends his supporters for their hard work, faith and courage. Brooke thanks his family, his campaign manager, John Volpe (chairman of Brooke's campaign committee), and Trimarco. Brooke says that he regrets not having spent enough time with the voters of Massachusetts during the campaign. He notes that his Senate responsibilities kept him in Washington D.C. during much of the campaign. Brooke says that he wishes Tsongas well; that he is sorry he did not deliver a victory for his campaign workers and supporters. Brooke says that he is very happy that a woman has been elected to the US Senate. He jokes about going out to look for a job and wishes his supporters well. 1:09:35: V: Brooke shakes hands with members of the crowd. Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) is on the stage with a microphone, waiting to interview Brooke. The crowd continues to clap for Brooke. Stevens recaps Brooke's speech. Brooke is still on the stage, talking to members of the media. The crowd remains on the floor. 1:11:11: V: Brooke remains on the stage. He waves to supporters. Members of the media surround him. He answers questions about the race and his future plans. A jazz band plays and the noise of the crowd is audible. Brooke attempts to move off of the stage. The media continue to surround him. Brooke waves at the crowd as he moves slowly off the stage. Flashbulbs go off as the media take his photograph. 1:15:51: V: Shot of a sign reading, "We still love you Ed. You're the best.". Shots of campaign supporters on the floor; of members of the crowd. Shots of the media and their equipment in the corner of the room. Members of the crowd mill about in the ballroom. Shot of the jazz band playing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1978
Description: Edward King gives victory speech at Park Plaza Hotel after winning gubernatorial election. He thanks the community and introduces his family.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1978
Description: Several takes of reporter standup in empty Boston Garden. Bruins banners hang over ice rink. Long circular pan of unoccupied seats.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/18/1978
Description: Bruins retire Bobby Orr's number 4 in center ice ceremony at Boston Garden. Raise number to rafters. Crowd cheers relentlessly. Johnny Bucyk helps make presentation. Bobby dons jersey and makes a thank-you and farewell speech.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/09/1979
Description: 'Ann Corio' on Charles Playhouse marquee. Pilgrim, Paramount, State, Savoy, E.M. Loews, Center, Star, Modern, Lyric Stage and Next Move Theater exteriors. Hotel Avery sign. Boylston building. Parking lot. “Adult films, Chinese movies, martial arts,” Combat zone, theater district.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/10/1979
Description: Structural details and signage on combat zone architecture. E.M. Loew's Publix Theater ('vaudeville, burlesque' words on brick side). Marquees of: The Scene: Adult Movies, Center Theater, featuring Chinese martial arts movies. Paramount and State Theater signs. Pussycat Cinema next to New England Medical Center. Interiors of a theater building, in the theater district. Sign for "Modern Theatre Restoration Circus." Interview with theater manager about reopening the theater, the shows they will feature, the restoration they will do on the building, including work with the Boston Redevelopment Authority, and neighborhood development.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1979
Description: Boston Garden seating plan showing ticket prices from $4 to $10 for Celtics games. Team photos from 1956-1957, 1964-1965, 1972-1973. Empty seats and concession stand. Interview with Celtics vice president Jeff Cohen.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/26/1979
Description: Green line T pulling into and out of Kenmore station underground during rush hour. Old style PCC trolley and newer LRV cars. Driver's point of view, looking down tracks into dark subway tunnel. Passengers get on and off.Passenger reading Benjamin Disraeli. Passenger complains about MBTA service.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/15/1979
Description: Boston College's 103rd commencement. Walter Mondale speaks to press on strategic arms reduction, before addressing Boston College commencement. He states the need to ratify the recently concluded strategic arms agreement with the Soviet Union. Graduates of the class of 1979 file onto field while band plays. Views of crowd, graduates. Speech welcoming friends and family.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/21/1979
Description: Boston mayoral candidate David Finnegan speaks outside Faneuil Hall in opposition to low property taxes paid by developer of Quincy Market pursuant to deal made with city. He compares the tax rates paid by Faneuil Hall and Milton Street in Dorchester.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/23/1979
Description: Boston waterfront. Dock scenes. Just caught fish in barrels on dock. Lumpers with rubber gloves and overalls. Boston Fish Market Corporation building. Press conference led by Massport director David Davis, who announces renovation of Fish Pier. Rep. Joseph Moakley speaks. He goes over the history of the fishing industry in Boston, Massachusetts, and the United States. He provides details on the redevelopment of the pier, and mentions the effects of the 200 mile limit enacted by Congress. Helen Keyes of the U.S. Dept. of Commerce speaks. George Kariotis, transportation secretary Barry Locke, Lt. Gov. Tom O'Neill are present.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/15/1979
Description: Jane Fonda and Tom Hayden hold press conference at State House to give their progressive stances on social justice issues, and to discuss their work with grass roots organizations. They hope to influence the 1980 presidential election.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1979
Description: Interview with Seiji Ozawa at the start of his seventh season as music director and conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He talks about his first visit to America to study at Tanglewood, which started his relationship with the BSO. He talks about the character and tradition of the orchestra and Boston's pride in it — just as for the Red Sox. They shoot establishing shots and cutaways for editing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/04/1979
Description: Boston Celtics vs Houston Rockets at Boston Garden. Red Auerbach sits with Celtics owner Harry Mangurian. Quarterly statistics hoisted on cord to announcer's booth above court. Interview with Houston owner George Maloof.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/12/1979
Description: Bernadette Devlin McAliskey (Irish Republican activist) holds a press conference in Boston as part of a 13-city tour of the United States. Devlin speaks about her recent candidacy for the European parliament and says that her speaking tour is intended to help defray debts incurred during her campaign. Devlin's campaign was organized around a human rights platform. Devlin notes that international organizations have condemned the human rights abuses in Northern Ireland but that the United Nations and western countries will not speak out against Great Britain. Devlin expresses cynicism towards politicians and doubts about an American political response to the situation in Northern Ireland. She equates the oppression in Northern Ireland to the inequalities that exist in the United States and notes that Irish Americans engage in oppression of African Americans in Boston. Devlin compares the dearth of Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland to the lack of white working class support for busing in Boston; recounts the history of the Irish conflict from the Irish elections in 1918; and discusses changes that must be made by Great Britain in Northern Ireland. Devlin discusses her activities in the years since she left parliament; the use of violence by Catholics in Northern Ireland; the death of Lord Louis Mountbatten (British official). She accuses the international press of hypocrisy; answers questions about her speaking schedule and her life in Ireland.
0:58:09: Visual: Bernadette Devlin McAliskey (Irish Republican activist) prepares for a press conference as part of a 13-city tour of the United States. She sits at a small table in front of a microphone and takes questions from reporters. The press conference takes place in an informally furnished room; the walls are covered with handmade political posters. A reporter asks Devlin if she is doing the speaking tour to pay off debt accumulated during her recent campaign for a seat in the European parliament. Devlin says that her candidacy focused on human rights issues; that her candidacy was announced only three weeks before the election; that she ran on behalf of the H-Block political prisoners. Devlin says that her political party still has a debt of $10,000 after the elections; that she has come to the US to raise money through speaking engagements and from contributions. Devlin says that she has raised about $3,000 so far. A reporter asks Devlin's opinion on US involvement in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that Amnesty International, the International Red Cross and the European Court of Human Rights have all condemned the human rights abuses in Northern Ireland; that Jimmy Carter (US President) condemns human rights abuses all over the world, but ignores the deprivation of human rights in Northern Ireland. Devlin questions Carter's sincerity on human rights issues. Devlin says that the United Nations and western countries will not speak out against Great Britain; that she is trying to raise awareness of the situation among the white population of the US. The reporter asks Devlin if she expects a response from Irish Americans and Irish American politicians. Devlin says that she has a cynical view of politicians; that Edward Kennedy (US Senator) and Carter might speak out against the situation in Northern Ireland if they thought it would win them some votes; that she is not sure if Irish American politicians will take any action. Devlin says that the Irish American community has been made to feel guilty about giving money to Ireland; that they are made to feel like they are supporting violence. Devlin says that US politicians do not want Irish Americans to take interest in the situation in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that there are enough Irish Americans in the US to pressure the US government to take some firm action about Northern Ireland; that Irish Americans might become aware of the inequalities in US society if they started to think about the oppression in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that it saddens her to see Irish Americans involved in the oppression of African Americans in Boston. Devlin says that Irish Americans would get themselves on the "right side" of the civil rights struggle in the US if they understood the situation in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that Catholics in Northern Ireland were inspired by the civil rights movement in the US; that they identify with the struggles of African Americans. Devlin says that Irish Americans appear to be actively involved in the oppression of African Americans. Devlin says that she could probably raise money more easily if she avoided discussing the role of Irish Americans in the oppression of African Americans; that she is not willing to keep silent for money. Devlin says that she hopes Irish Americans will become more aware of their contradictory behavior; that many fled oppression in Ireland only to become oppressors in the US. 1:07:11: V: Devlin says that there is little Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland. She compares the amount of Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland to the amount of white working class support for busing in Boston. Devlin says that Great Britain needs to withdraw the undemocratic veto given to Protestants in Northern Ireland in 1921; that Great Britain needs to support change in Northern Ireland. Devlin reviews the history of the Irish conflict from the Irish elections in 1918 to the partition of the country by Great Britain. Devlin accuses Great Britain of partitioning the country in order to create a Protestant majority where there was none before. A reporter asks Devlin what she did during the years before the most recent election. The reporter comments that Devlin had not been visible on the political scene. Devlin responds that she has never stopped working for her cause; that the media ignored her activities because she was no longer a member of the British Parliament. Devlin says that the world took no notice of the violence used by Great Britain to oppress Catholics in Northern Ireland before 1969; that the oppressed Catholics are adopting the methods of violence used by Great Britain. Devlin questions why the Catholics are condemned for using violence, when they are only reacting to the violence used to oppress them. Devlin says that the international media have portrayed Lord Louis Mountbatten (British official) as a brave soldier and an aristocrat; that the oppressed peoples of the British Empire see Lord Mountbatten as a symbol of oppression. Devlin adds that public figures who represent the oppression of the British Empire will inevitably become targets of the oppressed. Devlin questions why the life of Mountbatten is worth more than the lives of all the Irish people who have died at the hands of the British; that the Irish victims fought for their country as Mountbatten did; that they were portrayed as terrorists by the international press. Devlin accuses the international press of hypocrisy. She says that the Irish people will not be "chastened" by the press coverage of Mountbatten's death. Devlin adds that if Great Britain was not occupying Northern Ireland, Mountbatten would be alive today. A reporter asks Devlin about Princess Margaret of England's comment that the Irish are "pigs." Devlin responds with a translation of an old Irish saying that "a pig thinks the whole world is pigs." Devlin answers questions about her speaking schedule and her life in Ireland. Devlin says that she has three children; that she does not have a regular job; that she works in the resistance movement. Devlin adds that she works with Catholics whose welfare benefits have been taken away by the British government. Devlin says that the money she raises will pay off her party's campaign debt. She adds that if the debt is paid, the rest of the money will go to a fund to benefit Irish prisoners.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/19/1979
Description: Father Michael Groden (Advisor to Humberto Cardinal Medeiros) introduces a press conference with Cardinal Medeiros (Archbishop of Boston), Bishop Edward Carroll (United Methodist Church) and Donald Luster (President, Ministerial Alliance). Medeiros denounces incidents of violence and hatred and encourages citizens to celebrate the diversity of the urban community. Medeiros says that the clergy has prepared a Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony to be signed by the citizens of Boston. Medeiros urges the clergy and every city institution to dedicate itself to working towards peace in the city. Medeiros announces a gathering of religious leaders on the Boston Common on November 19 that will initiate a movement to help the city heal its wounds. Bishop Edward Carroll (United Methodist Church) reads a letter inviting the city's clergy to gather at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross the following Friday. Carroll speaks about the clergy's responsibility to cooperate in promoting peace, justice and harmony in the city; denounces recent acts of violence and hatred; and encourages all citizens to unite. Donald Luster (President, Ministerial Alliance) reads the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony. Groden reviews the series of events planned by the clergy to promote peace in the city. Groden and Luster respond to questions from the media about the movement for peace and the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony.
0:22:45: Visual: Father Michael Groden (Advisor to Cardinal Medeiros) welcomes the press to a press conference. He introduces Humberto Cardinal Medeiros (Archbishop of Boston). Medeiros approaches the podium and addresses the press. Medeiros says that Boston's religious leaders are calling on citizens of all races and religions to examine the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony." Medeiros says that incidents of violence and hatred in the city cannot be tolerated; that citizens must act together to celebrate the diversity of the urban community. Medeiros says that a spirit of religious and pastoral solidarity is growing; that all of the clergy in the city are invited to a meeting on Friday at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross. Shot of the front of the podium. A branch with different colored leaves is pictured on a matted print hanging from the podium. Shots of the press in the audience. Medeiros urges the clergy to join together in an effort to improve the atmosphere in the city. Medeiros says that every institution and business in the city must dedicate itself to working toward a peaceful atmosphere in the city. Medeiros says that the city's religious leader will gather on the Boston Common on November 19; that the clergy will initiate a movement to help the city heal its wounds. Shots of Donald Luster (President, Ministerial Alliance), Bishop Edward Carroll (United Methodist Church) and Groden sitting at a table beside the podium. Medeiros says that the ecumenical movement will encourage citizens to act peacefully toward one another. Medeiros quotes Pope John Paul as saying that a city needs to have a soul; that the citizens are the soul of a city. Medeiros quotes Pope John Paul as saying that Boston has always been a community in which diverse people live and work together peacefully. Medeiros says that every citizen of Boston will be asked to sign the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony; that citizens will be expected to uphold their pledge to work toward a better atmosphere in the city. Medeiros thanks the media and retreats from the podium. 0:29:10: V: Groden introduces Bishop Carroll. Carroll reads a letter inviting the city's clergy to gather at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross on Friday. The letter reads that the clergy must work together to foster an atmosphere of peace, justice and harmony in the city. Shot of the matted print hanging from the podium. The letter mentions a growing spirit of pastoral and religious solidarity. The letter denounces the recent acts of violence and hatred in the city. The letter encourages all citizens to unite in a spirit of solidarity. Shots of Luster, Medeiros and Groden , sitting at the table beside the podium. The letter urges the clergy to participate in the meeting. The letter reads that the clergy have an obligation to encourage its citizens to love one another; that the clergy must join together to renew their Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony. Shots of the members of the media at the press conference. The letter is signed by Medeiros and Carroll. 0:31:59: V: Groden introduces Luster. Luster reads the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony. The covenant celebrates freedom and call for the pursuit of equal rights and justice for all. The covenant calls for citizens to celebrate the diversity of the city's communities. The covenant calls for a mood of healing and forgiveness. The covenant denounces conflict and violence. The covenant denounces the atmosphere of hatred and fear in the city. The covenant rejects "special interest groups" which divide the community. Luster finishes reading and sits down at the table beside Medeiros. 0:35:16: V: Groden thanks Luster. Groden reviews the events organized by the city's religious leaders in the coming weeks. Groden mentions the meeting at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross on Friday. Groden says that religious leaders are working on a pastoral letter which will be read at religious services on the weekend of November 17 and 18. Shot of a nun taking a photo. Groden talks about the ecumenical gathering on the Boston Common on November 19. Groden says that civic, political, and religious leaders will be invited to the gathering on the Common; that leaders will be encouraged to examine and sign the covenant; that leaders will be encouraged to take the covenant to their constituents. Shots of the members of the press. Groden says that another ecumenical event will take place in December; that the event will celebrate the signing of the covenant. 0:38:10: V: Groden and Luster respond to questions from the audience. A reporter asks how the leaders will get signatures for the covenant. Luster says that city leaders will sign the covenant on November 19; that these leaders will take the covenant to their constituents, who may sign it. Luster notes that these leaders will be given pins to wear; that the pins will signify peace. A reporter asks which religious leaders will be involved in the movement. Luster says that clergy from all denominations and faiths will gather together on November 19; that business and political leaders will be invited as well. A reporter asks what this series of ecumenical meeting and events will accomplish. Luster says that the events will try to capitalize on the atmosphere of goodwill created by the covenant; that the religious leaders will work to strengthen this atmosphere by preaching the scripture. A reporter asks if these efforts will improve the racially charged atmosphere in the city's schools. Luster says that the religious leaders have a responsibility to set a good example for young people; that the religious leaders need to sound a warning to those who are promoting the negative atmosphere. A reporter asks how the religious leaders will reach out to those who do not attend church. Groden says that religious leaders know that they cannot reach out to all citizens through religious services; that religious leaders will reach out to schools and to the neighborhoods. A reporter asks if the efforts by religious leaders are connected to a recent neighborhood summit. Luster says that their movement has been put together by religious leaders; that religious leaders have a "higher mandate" which propels them to preach the gospel of peace. A reporter asks if the religious leaders expect political leaders to speak out on these issues. Groden says that political leaders have accused religious leaders of not doing enough; that the religious leaders are fulfilling their responsibilities with this movement; that he hopes other leaders will join in. A reporter asks a question about the reference to "special interest groups" in the covenant. Groden says that religious leaders encourage membership in and support of "positive" community groups; that religious leaders are asking people to disassociate themselves from groups whose behavior is not constructive. Groden says that they will not single out any groups.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/29/1979
Description: Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) holds a press conference to discuss his victory the previous day in the mayoral election. White discusses his potential role as a national spokesman on urban issues. White says that he has no plans to assume a national role. White predicts great success in his next term; rejects Boston's reputation as a racist city; guarantees the safety of all citizens in the city; discusses the city's affirmative action program as it relates to his administration; and says his administration will not tolerate racial violence. White notes the community's responsibility to speak out against racial violence; discusses the recent shooting of Darryl Williams (African American Jamaica Plain student). White talks about former city employee James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) and the need to be sensitive in making appointments to city jobs. White discusses the city's poor racial climate, and assesses the extent to which he is responsible for it, and his belief that other cities are more racist than Boston. White talks about his support base in the mayoral election and about his opponent, Joseph Timilty. He discusses the US Senate race and notes that he has not been asked to endorse Edward Kennedy (US Senator) or any other candidates. White expresses confidence in the vitality of the city and talks about his priorities for the next term, including tax reform and the development of the North Station area. White is very relaxed and has a good rapport with the media.
0:00:11: Visual: Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) walks into a small room where a press conference will be held. He greets the members of the media informally, saying "Hi everybody." He jokes with the media about having forgotten his tie. White sits down on a couch. Microphones are set up on the coffee table in front of him. White says that he is pleased about his victory. A reporter asks White if he and Henry Maier (Mayor of Milwaukee) will join Dick Hatcher (Mayor of Gary, Indiana) as national spokesmen for urban issues. White says that he will speak out on urban issues as he always has; that he has no plans to assume a national role. White adds that there are mayors in other cities who will become influential and make themselves heard. He mentions Bill Green (Mayor of Philadelphia) and Don Frasier (Mayor of Minneapolis). Another reporter asks White if he will be eclipsed by these new urban mayors. White makes a joke, "the old gray mare, he is what he used to be." White says that he will speak out on national issues which affect Boston. A reporter asks what the next four years will bring to Boston. White says that the next term will be the greatest of his terms as mayor. He mentions that Bob Ryan (Director, Boston Redevelopment Authority) is optimistic about new building projects. A reporter comments on Boston's reputation as the most racist city in the nation. White says that Boston's reputation as a racist city is not correct. He notes that he cannot rid the city of racism and hypocrisy. White guarantees that people of all colors and nationalities will be able to walk the streets safely by the end of his term. A reporter asks White if he will hire more African Americans to key positions in the city administration. White says that there is a good affirmative action program in place; that the African American community supported him in the election. White says that racial violence will not be tolerated in the city. He says that the residents of Charlestown helped to apprehend the youth involved in the shooting of Darryl Williams (Jamaica Plain student); that the residents of Charlestown did not want to be seen as harboring racist criminals. White says that his administration will not tolerate racial violence. 0:06:24: V: White notes that the Charlestown Business Association held a press conference within hours of the Williams shooting; that they condemned racial violence in the press conference; that people in the community need to speak out against racist violence. White says that he will enlist his supporters in the neighborhoods to speak out. A reporter asks White if he will be more sensitive about whom he puts on the city payroll after the "Jimmy Kelly affair." White says that he is always sensitive about whom he puts on the city payroll; that the media will always disagree with his hiring decisions. White notes that James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) resigned from his city job; that he was not fired. The reporter asks if it is a good idea to have Kelly representing the city by holding a city job. White says that he was not willing to fire Kelly in order to court African American voters during the campaign. White says that he wanted to be elected on his record, not for his ability to play upon the emotions of voters. White adds that Kelly was qualified to do the job for which he was hired; that hiring Kelly was not a mistake. White says that he does not want to fire city workers because of their beliefs, even if their beliefs are unpalatable. 0:09:32: V: A reporter asks White if he feels responsible for the poor racial climate in the city. White says that he cannot change it all by himself; that he has never ducked a crisis. White adds that the city will not come together until more people become active; that the voters need to elect good people to the Boston School Committee and the Boston City Council. A reporter asks White how Boston got its reputation as a racist city. White says that racism is a national problem; that problems in Boston get more media coverage than problems in other cities. White mentions that there are severe racial problems in Detroit and other cities; that many affluent communities are very racist. White says that Boston has lived through busing and has learned from it; that there are racial problems in Boston; that he does not think of Boston as the most racist city in the US. A reporter asks White about low voter turnout in the election. Jump cut on videotape. 0:13:14: V: White says that he expanded his political base in this election; that he did not lose support in areas where he has always been popular. He expresses confidence in the vitality of the city. White says that he has not been approached for an endorsement of Edward Kennedy (US Senator) or any other candidates for US Senate. White jokes with reporters about not needing to talk to the media now that he has been reelected. A reporter asks White about his priorities for the next term. White talks about tax reform and the development of the area around North Station. A reporter asks White why he did not attend Kennedy's announcement at Faneuil Hall this morning. Jump cut on videotape. 0:15:16: V: White talks further about the race for the US Senate. A reporter asks White to analyze the campaign strategy of Joseph Timilty (former mayoral candidate). White says that he does not like to pick apart the strategy of an opponent. White says that both he and Timilty knew that Timilty had a good chance to win the election. A photographer focuses on White and takes his photo. A reporter asks if he will lay off workers from the city payroll. White deflects the question with a joke. He has a good rapport with the reporters. White closes the press conference. He commends the reporters on their professionalism, saying that they treated both him and Timilty fairly. White and the reporters prepare to leave the room. White speaks informally to Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) and others.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1979
Description: George McGovern visits Boston to raise funds among liberals for his 1980 Senate reelection campaign in South Dakota. He doubts that there will ever be a senate race run purely on funds contributed within the border of the state. He thinks that campaigns should be financed publicly. Speaks about his nomination for presidency in 1972. Additional footage includes McGovern meeting and speaking with liberal Massachusetts politicians at a gathering.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/20/1979
Description: Tone at beginning of video. Reception at Harvard Club for prominent Bostonians who appeared on Time magazine covers., in celebration of Boston's 350th anniversary. Closeups on Time cover portraits, including those of Nathan Pusey, D. Brainerd Holmes, Julia Child, Buckminster Fuller, Sarah Caldwell. Several Time's Men of the Year covers. Interview with man about the event. B-roll of guests at the party. Those in attendance include Buckminster Fuller, John Collins, Barney Frank, and Julia Child.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/10/1980
Description: Boston Marathon finish line. Wheelchair finisher. Bill Rodgers on Hereford Street. Man running in a tutu.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/21/1980
Description: B-roll footage of African American and white students at work in the pottery studio at English High School. Footage of an African American teacher teaching a history class at English High School. The class discusses social unrest in the 1960s and government efforts to fight poverty. Footage of students passing through a hallway and using escalators at English High School. Exteriors of English High School. Several takes of reporter standup on a new code of discipline that Judge Arthur Garrity has called for in the Boston City Schools. School suspension guidelines have been called into question because minority students are given suspensions more frequently than white students.
1:00:01: Visual: African American and white students work in the pottery studio at English High School. Students mold clay, work on the pottery wheel and paint their finished projects. Students work on a large art project on a table. Shots of projects, including ceramic block letters. 1:04:16: V: An African American teacher teaches a history class at English High School. The students are seated at small tables, facing the blackboard. The class discusses social unrest in the 1960s and government efforts to fight poverty. Shots of African American and white students in the class. 1:09:09: V: African American and white students pass through a hallway at English High School. Students use the escalators to move in between floors. Shots of students and teachers riding escalator. Students move through the hallway. 1:11:39: V: Shots of the exterior of English High School on Avenue Louis Pasteur; of the courtyard outside of the school; of the multi-story building. Sharon Stevens reports on a new code of discipline for Boston Public School students, called for by Judge Arthur Garrity (federal court judge). Stevens reports that school suspension guidelines have been called into question; that minority students were given suspensions more frequently than white students. Stevens reports that the Boston School Committee is scheduled to vote next week on the new code of discipline. Stevens does several takes of the introduction and ending to her report. Shots of the exterior of English High School; of student baseball players standing in the courtyard of the school; of a group of African American students exiting the school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/18/1980
Description: No sound at the beginning of the video. Tape jumps and sound cuts out in the middle. Kevin White gives State of the City address in Boston City Council chamber. He touches on the priorities the city worked to achieve in the past year and will continue to strive for, including fighting racism and discrimination. In audience Kathryn White, Larry DiCara, Dapper O'Neil, Ray Flynn, Maura Hennigan, McDonough, Jane Edmonds, Bruce Bolling, Joseph Jordan, and Robert Ryan. Sergeant at arms with top hat and city seal. Wide shot of chamber from gallery.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/05/1981
Description: Speaker of the House of Representatives Tip O'Neill speaks at 1981 Boston College commencement ceremony. Discusses his graduation from Boston College in 1936; compares environment of the College in the depression. Discusses investing in education of young adults to keep up with economic and governmental demand. Footage of crowd; graduating students; group of students with top hats. O'Neill discusses inflated price of education and cuts to student aid. Crowd applause; faculty in commencement regalia. Closes with clips of reporter Sharon Stevens giving a summary of O'Neill's speech.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/18/1981
Description: Compilation of Christopher Lydon stories. Christopher Lydon interviews Bill Lee (pitcher, Montreal Expos) at Fenway Park. Lee discusses the possibility of a baseball strike. Lee talks about unions and his feelings about baseball. Lee says that he is no longer "addicted" to baseball. Three essays by Robert J. Lurtsema about the coming of summer, the coming of fall and barnacles. Lydon reports on the upcoming preliminary elections for the Boston City Council. Lydon analyzes voting patterns in various districts and the political networks of some candidates. Lydon notes that there has been little voter interest in the campaign. The report includes interviews with and profiles of candidates Maureen Craven Slade, Craig Lankhorst, and Stephen Michaels. Lydon reports from the Boston Celtics' practice court in Brookline. Lydon interviews Ernie DiGregorio (basketball player) and Nate "Tiny" Archibald for the report. Lydon's second report on the upcoming preliminary elections for Boston City Council includes footage from interviews with several candidates including Maura Hennigan, James Kelly, David Scondras, Charles Yancey, Ed McNamara, and Michael McCormack. The candidates talk about voter anger and apathy, the city's fiscal crisis, the need for better city services and the policies of Kevin White (Mayor of Boston). Lydon interviews Donald Woods (South African journalist) about South Africa. Woods criticizes the US veto of the United Nations condemnation of the South African invasion of Angola. Woods says that the white minority in South Africa must negotiate with the black majority in order to avoid a civil war. Woods compares the political situations in South Africa to that of Northern Ireland.
1:00:04: Christopher Lydon interviews Bill Lee (pitcher, Montreal Expos) at Fenway Park. Lee says that he is happy to come back to Fenway Park to play a game. V: Shots of Montreal Expos practicing at Fenway Park. Lee says that he is disappointed to see changes at Fenway Park. He criticizes the disappearance of the bleacher seats, the installation of plastic seats and the increase in advertising at the park. Lydon asks Lee about the baseball strike. Lee says that the players had to strike to maintain the status quo; that unions in the US are being pushed out of existance by a "conservative" government; that he fears the advent of an Orwellian future in this country. Lee says that the issue of uncompensated free agency was not important to him; that he does not believe in free agency. Lee talks about the concept of free agency. He says that the baseball system is destined to fail because it is based on a "false foundation." Lee digresses, talking about the fact that Fenway Park is built on a landfill. Lee says that he is no longer "addicted" to baseball; that he does not need to play at the professional level; that he is playing professional baseball because his "old lady" wants him to. Lee says that the season has been exciting so far. He digresses again, talking about raising fish on an Indian reservation in Bellingham. Lee says that the US needs to give land back to Native Americans. Lydon and Lee shake hands as the interview ends. 1:04:27: Robert J. Lurtsema's essay on beach plums and the coming of summer. Segment is accompanied by shots of beach plums; of trees; of a deserted dirt road lined with bushes and trees. 1:06:59: Robert J. Lurtsema's essay on the coming of fall and the need to adapt a slower tempo as the year draws to a close. Segment is accompanied by shots of trees and the landscape in a small park. 1:09:51: Robert J. Lurtsema's essay on barnacles, which cover the rocks along the coast. Segment is accompanied by shots of barnacles-covered rocks along the ocean shore; of a marsh at sunset. 1:13:02: Christopher Lydon stands outside of Boston City Hall. Lydon reports that the preliminary elections for City Council seats are ignored by voters in non-mayoral election years; that six out of seven residents did not vote in the preliminary City Council elections four years ago. Lydon reports that City Council candidates represent areas of the city with a politically active electorate. V: Shot of a map of Boston. South Boston, Dorchester, and West Roxbury are highlighted in red. Lydon reports that some sections of South Boston, Dorchester, and West Roxbury had voter turnouts as high as 30% four years ago. V: Shot of the same map of Boston. Areas around South Boston, Dorchester, Hyde Park, and West Roxbury are highlighted in yellow. Lydon reports that neighborhoods with high percentages of white families and homeowners have higher voter turnouts; that these voters have often supported candidates like Louise Day Hicks (former Boston City Councilwoman) and Joseph Timilty (former mayoral candidate). Lydon reports that East Boston, the Back Bay, Allston/Brighton, the South End, Mattapan, and Roxbury usually have low voter turnouts. Lydon reports that City Councillors Rosemarie Sansone, John Sears, and Lawrence DiCara will not seek reelection this year; that the three councillors are popular with younger, progressive voters. Lydon reports that the young, progressive voters tend to live along the waterfront and in the West End, Chinatown, Beacon Hill and the Back Bay. V: Shots of DiCara, Sansone and Sears. Shot of the highlighted map of Boston with the waterfront, the West End, Chinatown, Beacon Hill, and a few other neighborhoods highlighted in green. Lydon says that progressive voters like a polished candidate. Lydon reports that there has been little interest in the campaign; that there have been few advertisements and little media attention. Lydon says that a good political organization is crucial to the candidates. V: Shots of candidates meeting with voters. Lydon says that "house party politics" is at the heart of the campaign; that Kevin White (mayor, City of Boston) has the best organized political network in the city; that his support will help the "Kevin seven" candidates. Lydon reports that police officers have a network which may help Ed McNamara (City Council candidate); that fire fighters may organize to help Joe Maher (City Council candidate). Lydon says that roots in a politically active neighborhood, a good political network, a polished image, and a recognized name are all assets in the race for a City Council seat. V: Shot of signs for City Council candidates Brian Hickey, Frederick Langone, and Ray Flynn. Lydon reports that Maureen Craven Slade (candidate, Boston City Council) was not endorsed by The Boston Globe or by White; that she has a very well-connected family. Lydon reports that Craven Slade uses her maiden name. Lydon reviews the political careers of her father, mother, brother and cousin. Lydon notes that her mother was a legendary City Councilwoman in the 1960s. V: Footage of Lydon interviewing Craven Slade. Craven Slade says that she has 60 first cousins in her political organization. Footage of Craven Slade saying that many voters remember her mother; that many of her mother's former supporters have formed a political network promoting her candidacy. Lydon reports that Craig Lankhorst (candidate, Boston City Council) is a progressive candidate who has been endorsed by the Boston Globe; that his support is strong in "non-voting" neighborhoods. V: Footage of Lankhorst saying that he is campaigning city-wide; that he has connections in Brighton and in African American neighborhoods. Lankhorst says that he is also concentrating on Ward 16 and West Roxbury; that he needs all of his supporters in the "non-voting" neighborhoods to get out to the polls. Lydon reports that Stephen Michaels (candidate, Boston City Council) has roots in West Roxbury, a polished image and support from White. V: Footage of Lydon interviewing Michaels. Michaels says that he was a community activist in West Roxbury; that he has family and friends in Dorchester and South Boston; that he has an endorsement in the Beacon Hill District. Michaels says that it is impossible to campaign city-wide in the primary. Lydon reports that Michaels's surname has been shortened from a longer Polish name; that the Polish clubs all know about his Polish background. 1:20:41: Lydon reports on Press Day at the Boston Celtics' practice court in Brookline. V: Shots of Celtics' players shooting baskets while the press stands around the court; of Robert Parish (player, Boston Celtics). Footage of Ernie DiGregorio (basketball player) talking to Lydon about Channel 2. Shot of Larry Bird (player, Boston Celtics) talking to a reporter. Lydon reports that DiGregorio was a star at Providence College; that DiGregorio is trying out for a spot on the Celtics' team. V: Footage of DiGregorio saying that he will make the team if he is good enough; that he feels no pressure. Footage of Nate "Tiny" Archibald (player, Boston Celtics) saying that DiGregorio will have to learn how to run the plays out on the court. Lydon reports that DiGregorio will have to compete with Archibald for playing time. Lydon jokes about being taller than Archibald. He humorously speculates about his potential for a career in basketball. 1:22:28: Lydon reports that eighteen candidates are running for nine seats on the Boston City Council; that the candidates have been campaigning across the city. V: Shots of Raymond Flynn (candidate, Boston City Council) walking to church with his family; of Lydon interviewing Maura Hennigan (candidate, Boston City Council) in front of the Park Plaza Hotel; of a campaign sign for Charles Yancey; of Lydon interviewing James Kelly (candidate, Boston City Council) in South Boston. Lydon says that the candidates have reported apathy and anger among the voters. V: Footage of Craig Lankhorst (Boston City Council candidate) saying that city residents who have been affected by cuts in the city budget and city services are upset; that residents who have been unaffected by cuts seem to be cynical and apathetic. Footage of Hennigan saying that voters talk about wanting change, but vote for the same candidates over and over. Footage of Kelly saying that voters feel like the City Council has no influence; that Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) holds all of the power. Footage of David Scondras (Boston City Council candidate) saying that voters are frustrated; that they do not understand where the city's money is going. Lydon says that the City Council elections have been overshadowed by controversy between the White and the state over the Tregor Bill. V: Footage of Charles Yancey (Boston City Council candidate) with campaign signs; of a Boston Fire Department station. Lydon says that City Council candidates have ignored the mayor's warning of a money crisis; that the candidates are campaigning for better services to city residents. V: Footage of Scondras saying that the city has not collected $60 million in back taxes; that the Tregor Bill exists to pay off a few wealthy interests who can be put off; that the city has not been managed efficiently. Scondras says that emergency money marked for city services must be used for those services. Footage of Kelly saying that White has a history of hiding the true financial figures; that he is not sure if there is a fiscal crisis. Footage of Hennigan saying that the voters have confused the Tregor Bill and Proposition 2 1/2; that the city is facing a fiscal crisis. Footage of Yancey saying that the city is facing a budget crunch due to Proposition 2 1/2; that some of the cuts in services were not necessary; that there is excess spending elsewhere in the administration. Lydon reports that Ed McNamara (candidate, Boston City Council) is a former FBI employee and former police commissioner. V: Footage of McNamara campaigning outside of a Roche Brothers' supermarket. He says that the city is faced by a cash shortage; that the city is not faced with a fiscal crisis. Lydon reports that none of the six incumbent City Councillors support White; that City Council resistance to White's policies will continue no matter who is elected. V: Shots of City Council members in the City Council chambers. Footage of McNamara saying that the voters' mandate is "anti-administration." Footage of Hennigan saying that voters want police officers and fire fighters back on the street; that voters want the City Council to make Proposition 2 1/2 work; that voters want the council to stand up to the mayor on issues instead of politics. Footage of Michael McCormack (candidate, Boston City Council) saying that voters want city services restored; that voters want the council to control the mayor's spending. Footage of Kelly saying that voters want the City Council to work with the mayor when he is right and oppose the mayor when he is wrong. Kelly notes that the mayor is rarely right. 1:27:25: Christopher Lydon interviews Donald Woods (South African anti-apartheid activist). Woods talks about the US veto of the United Nations condemnation the South African invasion of Angola. Woods says that the US veto encourages the white minority to believe that the US condones their actions; that the US veto allows the Soviet Union to pose as a friend of the black South Africans. Woods says that it is possible to avoid a civil war in South Africa only if western governments put pressure on the white minority. Woods says that the white minority must negotiate with black South Africans to allow the drafting of a democratic constitution. Lydon asks Woods about parallels between South Africa and Northern Ireland. Woods says that Northern Ireland and South Africa are similar in the tactics used by the minority to control the majority. Woods says that there will be no peace in Ireland until the British pull out of the country. Lydon comments that the minority in both countries are well armed and resistant to pressure. Woods says that there are "myths" surrounding the minorities in both countries; that Ian Paisley (leader of the Democratic Unionist Party of Ireland) may be full of "hot air;" that the Protestants in Northern Ireland must realize that they are Irish and must learn to live in Ireland; that South African whites must realize that they live on a black continent.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/01/1981
Description: Interiors of Boston City Hall. Kevin White holds press conference on the Tregor Bill. Exteriors of Boston City Hall from several angles. Kevin White answers questions from the press. He specifically talks about the role of the fire department union in the Tregor Bill negotiations. Interview with man answering further questions on the legal and staffing issues concerning the Tregor Bill.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/30/1981
Description: Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) speaks to an audience in the chambers of the Boston School Committee. He is introduced by Jean Sullivan McKeigue (President, Boston School Committee), who notes that the School Committee will vote on March 5 about whether to keep Spillane in the post of Superintendent. Spillane addresses the issues of school desegregation and school violence. Spillane says past students in Boston Public Schools had been denied a good education due to segregated schools and cynicism among educators. Spillane talks about the continued involvement of Arthur Garrity (federal judge) in the supervision of the Boston Public Schools. Spillane says that the Boston School Department must begin to take responsibility for school desegregation. Spillane reminds the audience that racial discrimination will not be tolerated in the Boston Public School system; that the climate in the schools must be improved. Spillane stresses the importance of faculty integration. Spillane talks about school discipline and the fair implementation of the disciplinary code. Spillane says that a monitoring process will assure that minority students are no longer singled out for disciplinary action. Spillane promises to establish a task force to investigate school violence. Spillane says that school desegregation will have been a failure if quality education cannot be assured. Spillane also talks about additional programs for students, teacher training, teacher evaluation and community involvement in the schools. John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) is interviewed by the media after the speech. O'Bryant says that Spillane has addressed school desegregation in a courageous manner; that he will vote for Spillane on March 5.
1:00:04: Press and members of the community are gathered in the Boston School Committee chambers. Jean Sullivan McKeigue (President, Boston School Committee) enters the room and announces that the vote on the office of school superintendent will take place on March 5. McKeigue introduces Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools). Spillane enters the room and sits down. Spillane thanks McKeigue. He acknowledges the fact that the School Committee will be voting on whether to continue his superintendency. Spillane addresses the need for community involvement in Boston schools. Spillane says that he started as superintendent seven months ago; that he was aware of the social, fiscal and educational problems faced by Boston schools; that he has tried to provide constructive leadership. Spillane says that the schools are working with reduced resources; that he is trying to address the educational and social needs of nearly 60,000 students. Spillane refers to school desegregation across the nation. He says that Boston public school students had been denied a good education due to segregated schools and a cynicism among educators. Spillane says that he would like to address two problems today: school desegregation and school violence. Spillane talks about Judge Arthur Garrity's efforts to produce agreement among the parties in the Boston school desegregation case (Morgan v. Hennigan). He says that these agreements aim to secure the advances made by eight years of school desegregation; that these agreements would form the basis of a final set of court orders; that Garrity would cease to supervise the schools after these consent decrees were put in place. Spillane says that the consent decrees provide an opportunity to assess the progress made in school desegregation. Spillane reviews the state of the Boston Public School System before desegregation. Spillane says that he would like to eliminate racial inequality while improving educational quality. Spillane says that he would like to institute a long-range plan for the schools; that the plan would be presented to Garrity through the consent decree process. Spillane says that Boston schools must take responsibility for school desegregation; that equal educational opportunities must exist for all students; that the staff must be integrated as well as the students. Spillane says that the schools require strong leadership, a clear curriculum, conscientious teaching and a safe school climate. Spillane says that students must be prepared for higher education or the job market; that schools must work with parents to improve education. Spillane says that racial discrimination cannot be tolerated in and out of school; that he will not tolerate those who say that some children cannot learn. Spillane says that teachers must work hard to educate all children. Spillane says that he supports the integration of school faculty; that school staff must represent a cross-section of American society; that minority staff have been denied access to jobs in the past. Spillane says that African Americans and other minorities will be represented in key positions in the school administration. 1:10:44: Spillane says that youth violence is a problem in Boston's schools and neighborhoods. Spillane says that order must be kept in the schools; that alternative programs must be provided for all students in need of them. Spillane says that violence can stem from a lack of success in school; that school staff must help students to learn and achieve as best they can. Spillane says that fair and equitable disciplinary action must be assured; that minority students may have been singled out for disciplinary action in the past. Spillane says that he will set up a process to monitor disciplinary action and insure fair implementation of the disciplinary code. Spillane says that he will establish a task force to investigate school violence; that the task force can make recommendations on how to counter school violence. Spillane notes that students who are not taught to read and write are victims of another kind of violence; that some students are not encouraged to learn; that all students must be prepared to function as active and contributing members of society. Spillane says that desegregation will be rendered ineffective if quality education is not assured; that urban schools can make a difference in the lives of their students. Visual: Shot of a young African American boy who is fidgeting in the back of the room. Spillane says that teacher training is important. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane talks about alternative programs for students with special needs. V: Jump cut in videotape. Shots of audience from Spillane's perspective. Spillane says that a fair process of teacher evaluation will be implemented; that assistance and training must be given to teachers; that superior performance should be recognized and inferior performance should be addressed. V: Shot from the back of the room of Spillane addressing the audience. Spillane talks about the need for high academic standards. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane says that he will continue to work with the business community on employment and training programs for students. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane talks about the need for good vocational education programs. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane addresses the need for strong bilingual education programs. Spillane says that the programs must be assessed to assure that they are meeting the needs of the students. V: Jump cut in videotape. Spillane says that education must be a priority in the city; that civic leaders, parents and school administrators must work together to improve the schools; that all groups concerned about the schools must be listened to. V: Jump cut in videotape. The audience claps for Spillane. V: Jump cut in videotape. John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) is interviewed by the media. He says that he is impressed with Spillane's growth since his stormy meeting with the school committee on February 8; that he will vote for Spillane. O'Bryant says that Spillane addressed school desegregation in a courageous manner; that very few high-profile officials talk about the beneficial effects of school desegregation in Boston; that few people give Garrity credit for instituting desegregation in Boston schools. O'Bryant says that he is optimistic about Spillane's ability to do the job. The media continues to question O'Bryant.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/02/1982
Description: Interview with South End based artist Allan Rohan Crite. He tells a story about selling paintings in the 1940s, tracking them down, and recently finding them. He talks about his paintings, inspired by different parts of African American lives, including religion. He also talks about the poetry and essays he's been working on recently. They focus on his version of the African American experience. They shoot cutaways with no sound.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/04/1982
Description: The Boston School Committee holds a meeting in the School Committee chambers. Members of the School Committee discuss school business. John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) reports on the need for school repairs; Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) reports on staffing issues. Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) interviews Kathleen Kelly (President, Boston Teachers Union) about a proposed school choice plan. Kelly says that many parents support a school choice plan because the current system allows little flexibility. Kelly says that the school choice plan must be considered carefully to prevent a return to segregated schools. Stevens interviews O'Bryant about the proposed school choice plan. O'Bryant says that the plan promotes greater access to schools across the city; that the current system is archaic and inflexible. Stevens interviews Barbara Gray (parent) about the proposed school choice plan. Gray says that parents should be allowed to choose a school with programs suited to the needs of their children. Gray says that the schools need to be improved; that the Boston Public Schools are not truly integrated because there are few white students. Stevens has extended conversations with interviewees while cutaways are shot. Takes of Stevens doing standup about supporters of the school choice plan working on an official proposal for the end of the month. The audio quality on this tape is uneven.
1:00:12: Visual: A Boston School Committee meeting is held in the chambers of the Boston School Committee. School committee members Jean McGuire, John O'Bryant, Jean Sullivan McKeigue, Kevin McCluskey, and Rita Walsh Tomasini are seated at the front of the room. Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) sits at the front with the members of the School Committee. Community members and the press are seated in the audience. O'Bryant talks about the need for $40 million to make school repairs. He says that the mayor, the Boston City Council, and the community must be made aware of the money needed for repairs. Shots of the various committee members. McKeigue agrees that school repairs are needed. A vote is taken on approving a draft of a letter to the mayor and the Boston City Council. O'Bryant thanks Spillane for his report. O'Bryant asks Spillane a question about staffing. Spillane says that more staff is needed before instituting a certain program. Audio is muffled. Shots of Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter); of members of the audience; of the stenographer; of the committee; of the audience. The committee members discuss school business. Audio remains muffled. Shot of the committee members from the perspective of the audience. 1:05:10: Visual: Spillane talks about setting objectives for the school Social Studies programs. Shots of the committee members; of the audience. Audio is muffled. The committee members take a vote. Committee members discuss school contract issues. Shot of Stevens; of Kathleen Kelly (President, Boston Teachers Union) speaking to another audience member; of audience members. 1:08:15: V: Stevens sets up an interview with Kelly. Stevens asks Kelly about a "freedom of choice" proposal supported by some African American parents. Kelly says that she has not yet seen the proposal; that many African American and white parents support a "freedom of choice" plan because the geocode system allows little flexibility; that parents are more interested in good education than racial statistics. Kelly says that a control mechanism must be put in place to prevent a return to segregated schools; that the plan must be given careful thought. Kelly says that the choice of educational programs is more important than the choice of school location. Stevens asks Kelly if busing is "almost dead." Kelly says that busing is no longer the only remedy for Boston schools; that busing can serve as a tool to further the goals of desegregation and educational quality. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and Kelly. Stevens and Kelly speak informally. 1:12:36: V: Stevens sets up an interview with O'Bryant. Stevens asks for O'Bryant's opinion of the "freedom of choice" proposal. O'Bryant says that parents are trying to reform the rigid geocode system; that students have been denied access to schools because of the geocode system. O'Bryant mentions students who have been denied access to the Trotter School. O'Bryant says that the parents are asking for more accessibility to the schools; that the "freedom of choice" proposal has been made into a bigger issue than it should be. O'Bryant says that the geocode system assigns students to schools based upon their residence; that the geocode system is archaic and inflexible; that the geocode system must be addressed in the consent decrees put forth by the court; that leaving the geocode system in place would have "disastrous" consequences. Stevens asks O'Bryant about NAACP intervention in the court case, and NAACP opposition to the "freedom of choice" plan. O'Bryant says that there is a lack of communication between the NAACP and supporters of the plan; that supporters of the plan want greater access to the schools. Stevens asks if the "freedom of choice" plan could result in a return to segregated schools. O'Bryant says that schools in Boston are already segregated because white parents refuse to send their children to most schools located in African American communities; that African American parents want greater access to quality schools all over the city. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and O'Bryant. O'Bryant says again that the "freedom of choice" plan does not represent a return to segregated schools. 1:16:13: V: Stevens sets up an interview with Barbara Gray (parent), who supports the "freedom of choice" plan. Gray says that the supporters of the plan want greater access to all of the schools; that supporters of the plan want an end to the rigid geocode system. Gray explains that the geocode system assigns children to schools according to address and race. Gray says that all of Boston schools need to have high standards; that the each of the schools should have different programs designed to suit specific needs; that students should be able to choose a school whose programs suit their needs. Gray says that education needs to be improved so that all of the schools are equally competitive and able to provide a good education. Stevens asks if the "freedom of choice" plan could result in a return to segregated schools. Gray says that she does not want to go back to segregated schools; that true integration does not exist in Boston because there are not enough white students in the school system; that white students might return to the system if the schools are reformed. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and Gray. Gray says that parents want more control over the education of their children. 1:19:59: V: Stevens records the closing segment of the story from outside of the headquarters of the Boston School Committee. She reports that the supporters of the "freedom of choice" plan are working on an official proposal for the end of the month; that the Massachusetts State Board of Education will propose an end to court intervention in the Boston School System. Stevens does two more takes of the closing segment.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/08/1982
Description: Interview with jazz pianist and band leader Count Basie at the Berklee Performance Center. He talks about his long career and current musicians.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/25/1982
Description: Charles Bennett interviews a longtime fisherman on the state of the fishing industry and the change in quota regulations. Boat docked at Fish Pier in snow flurries. Boston Fish Market Corporation building on pier. Seagulls hover over water in the Boston Harbor. Assorted catch offloaded by the bucketful and sorted by hand into wooden bins. Fishermen in yellow and orange rain gear. Tracking hauls wooden bins of fish. Men inside booth listening to the radio.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/06/1982
Description: Final stretch and finish line of the Boston Marathon. Wheelchair competitors crossing finish line. Blimps in above the crowd. Announcer makes comments on how closer the leading runners are to each other. Runners cross finish line. Alberto Salazar and Dick Beardsley finish very close together, running the marathon faster than anyone had in the history of the race. Kevin White awards winner Alberto Salazar with medal and laurel wreath. Third place runner, John Lodwick, crosses finish line. Fourth place runner, Bill Rodgers, crosses finish line. Other runner cross finish line. Charlotte Teske, winner of the women's race of the Boston Marathon, awarded medal and laurel wreath. Women's second place runner, Jacqueline Gareau, crosses finish line. Glenda Manzi does several takes of reporter standup. Interview with Charlotte Teske.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/19/1982
Description: Long Wharf Marriott. Chart House restaurant. New England Aquarium. Pedestrians. Parked taxi. View from Waterfront Park to expressway, Government Center skyline in background. Many shots inside Deer Island sewage treatment plant. Temperature and pressure gauges. Screen splits (top half of image appears on the bottom have of the screen) in the middle of the video.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/26/1982
Description: Exteriors of Hynes Auditorium, Prudential Center, and Boylston Street. Traffic and fire truck. Man roller skating in the road. Pedestrians and bicyclists.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/07/1982
Description: Interview with the Crown Prince of Jordan at the Ritz-Carlton. He talks about his optimism for negotiations in the Middle East. He talks about relations between individual Middle Eastern countries, specifically Jordan, Israel, and Palestine. He adds his advice to the US administration in working with the Middle Eastern countries. They have an informal discussion while getting a wide shot. Lydon reasks questions for cutaways.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/18/1982
Description: Audio goes in and out. Some video deterioration. MBTA southwest corridor construction site for orange line relocation. Urban Mass Transportation Project sign. Gov. Edward King gets out of car, shakes hands with bystanders. Secretary of Transportation James Carlin introduces King who talks about economic vitality created by largest construction project in Boston history. Signs bill transferring land from MDC. Governor King responds to question on extending Logan runways, and the actions of the board of the Massachusetts Port Authority and the executive director of Logan International Airport.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/13/1982