Description: A compilation of three Evening Compass shows from 1974-75. Evening Compass newscast from September 12, 1974. Paul deGive reports on the first day of school at the Rochambeau Elementary School. He reports that some parents, including Barbara King (local resident), are keeping their children out of school for fear of violence. Judy Stoia reports on the peaceful opening of the Martin Luther King School. Greg Pilkington and Diane Dumanoski report on their experiences riding buses with students to and from South Boston High School and Hyde Park High School. The bus Pilkington rode on was stoned in South Boston. Pilkington and Dumanoski report on the reactions of students. Joe Klein reports on the first day of school for a Hyde Park student, bused to the Lewenberg School in Mattapan. Klein reports that the student says that he will return to school tomorrow. Evening Compass newscast from December 12, 1974. Stoia reports on a violent mob gathered outside South Boston High School after the stabbing of a white student by an African American student. Stoia reports on clashes between the crowd and police. Pilkington reports from the Bayside Mall, where African American students arrived on buses after being trapped for several hours in South Boston High School. The students and their parents are angry and frightened. Peggy Murrell reports on the reactions of Thomas Atkins (President, NAACP) and Mel King (State Representative) to the violence at South Boston High School. Murrell reports that Atkins and King say that schools should be shut down if the safety of African American students cannot be guaranteed. Pam Bullard reports that the plaintiffs in the Boston school desegregation case (Morgan v. Hennigan) will demand that the federal court increase safety measures for African American students in South Boston. She also reports on a pending deadline for the Boston School Committee to file a school desegregation plan for 1975. Bullard notes that the School Committee risks being held in contempt of court if it does not file a plan. Evening Compass special from March 14, 1975. Pam Bullard reviews the major events concerning the desegregation of Boston schools in 1974. Her report includes footage and still photos of key figures and events in the busing crisis. Judy Stoia reports on an alternative school in Hyde Park, created by white parents to avoid busing, and on an alternative school for African American students. White parents at the alternative school in Hyde Park say that African American students are welcome to attend their school. Baumeister reports on Raymond Flynn, the only mayoral candidate to campaign on an antibusing platform. Baumeister also analyzes busing coverage by The Boston Globe and The Boston Herald American. Bullard reports on the school desegregation plan for the 1975-76 school year. Her report includes comments by Peter Ingeneri (Area Superintendent, Dearborn District) and Isaac Graves (Manager, Roxbury Little City Hall. She reports on segregation among Boston school faculty and administrators, and on plans to integrate school faculty in 1975. End credits reflect personnel working on all Evening Compass shows for the weeks of December 12, 1974 and March 14, 1975. Produced and directed by Charles C. Stuart.
0:00:15: Ed Baumeister introduces Paul deGive's report on the first day of school at the Rochambeau Elementary School in Dorchester. DeGive reports that the opening was peaceful; that a rumored white boycott failed to materialize; that buses were empty; that the absentee rate was 50% for both white and African American students. Degive comments that many parents were present at the opening. DeGive reports on an interview with Barbara King (local resident) who was present to observe the opening but did not send her daughter to the school for fear of violence. The nearby Murphy school also opened without incident. The attendance rate at the Murphy was estimated at two-thirds. 0:02:50: Baumeister introduces Judy Stoia's report on the Martin Luther King School. Stoia reports on the peaceful opening of the Martin Luther King School, which had been an African American school the previous year: the attendance rate was 50%; 130 white students attended, out of a possible 634; many parents kept their children at home because the King school was expected to be a trouble spot. 0:04:25: Baumeister talks to reporters Greg Pilkington and Diane Dumanoski. Pilkington spent the day with African American students who were bused into South Boston. Pilkington describes the students' reactions to their arrival at South Boston High School and their departure on buses which were stoned by an angry crowd. Diane Dumanoski describes a peaceful bus ride to Hyde Park High School with just one white student on the bus. Pilkington remarks on the low attendance at South Boston High School and describes the teachers as tense and ambivalent about busing. Dumanoski describes hostility from some white students at Hyde Park High School. 0:11:46: Baumeister reports on statistics: 47,000 students out of possible 70,000 attended Boston schools; police made 6 arrests; buses made 450 runs. Joe Klein reports on the first day of school for Jimmy Glavin, a Hyde Park student bused to the Lewenberg school in Mattapan. Visual: Report is a montage of still photographs. Shots of a photo of Claire O'Malley (bus monitor); of Glavin waiting for the bus; of Glavin on the bus. Klein reports that Glavin was the only student at the first stop; that the bus made several stops; that some parents refused to put their children on the bus. Klein reports that children of non-local parents in Coast Guard housing attended school. V: Shots of photographs of students and parents at various bus stops. Shots of photographs of students boarding the bus. Klein reports that the Lewenberg school was quiet; that the nearby Thompson School was quiet; that there were few white students in attendance at the Thompson School. Klein reports that the white students left the Lewenberg School on buses in the afternoon. Klein notes that Glavin says that he will return to school the next day. V: Shots of photographs of students in classrooms. Shots of photographs of students exiting the school and boarding buses; of Glavin exiting the bus. Baumeister ends the show. 0:16:17: Baumeister introduces the show. (Opening credits are cut.) Judy Stoia reports on violence at South Boston High School, where an African American student stabbed a white student. Stoia reports that an angry crowd of 1500 people had assembled outside of the high school by 1:00pm. Stoia reports that Louise Day Hicks (Boston City Council) tried to calm the crowd. V: Shots of photographs of huge crowds assembled on G Street, in front of the school; of helmeted police officers keeping the crowd at bay. Shot of a photograph of Hicks. Footage of Hicks assuring the crowd that the assault will be investigated. William Bulger (State Senator) stands beside Hicks. Hicks pleads with the crowd to let African American students return home safely. The crowd boos Hicks. Stoia reports that the crowd was hostile to police; that police units from the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF), the MDC Police Department and the Massachusetts State Police Department were outnumbered by the crowd; that the crowd threw bricks and bottles at police. Stoia reports that the crowd angrily stoned school buses headed toward the school. V: Shots of photographs of the huge crowd; of a TPF unit; of an MDC police officer on a motorcycle; of mounted police on the street. Shots of photographs of a police car with a broken window; of arrests being made. Shots of photographs of the crowd; of stoned school buses. Stoia reports that the buses were decoys and that African American students had escaped through a side door and were bused to safety. V: Shots of photographs of a side entrance of South Boston High School. 0:21:06: Pilkington reports on atmosphere at the Bayside Mall, where buses arrived with African American students who had been trapped in South Boston High School. Pilkington reports that students and parents were frightened and angry. V: Footage of buses and police officers in the mall parking lot. Angry groups of African American students speak directly to the camera about their experiences in South Boston. One student comments on the angry and violent parents in the South Boston crowd. An angry African American woman says that white children go to school peacefully at the McCormack school in her neighborhood, but that African American students cannot go safely to South Boston. She says that Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) is not doing his job. A man shouts into a bullhorn that there is no school on Thursday or Friday. Pilkington reports that the anger of the African American community seems to be directed at the city, the police, and the Boston School Committee for not controlling the situation in South Boston. 0:22:55: Peggy Murrell reports on the reaction of Thomas Atkins (President, NAACP) and Mel King (State Representative) to the violence at South Boston High School. She says that both leaders are determined to continue with school desegregation; that both are concerned for the safety of African American students in the schools. She quotes Atkins as saying that schools should be shut down and students should be reassigned if the safety of African American students cannot be guaranteed. Murrell reports that King agrees with Atkins about shutting down the schools if safety cannot be assured; that King says African American students will continue to attend school despite the violence. V: Shots of photographs of Atkins and of King. Murrell quotes King's condemnation of the violence at South Boston High School. Murell reports that Atkins charged the South Boston Home and School Association with holding a racist rally inside the high school and with encouraging a school boycott by white students. Murell says that Virginia Sheehy (South Boston Home and School Association) denies the charges. Murell reports that Sheehy says that white students should be able to hold meetings in school just like African American students do. State Senator William Owens (Chairman of the Emergency Committee Against Racism in Education) agrees that schools should be shut down if a peaceful solution cannot be found, and says that a march against racism planned for Saturday will proceed. 0:26:52: Pam Bullard reports on a special hearing before Judge Garrity planned for the next day: the African American plaintiffs in the desegregation case (Morgan v. Hennigan) have called the hearing to demand the following: the presence of state police and the national guard in South Boston; a ban on parents in schools; a ban on gatherings of more than five people in South Boston; a ban on the use of all racial epithets. Bullard reports that Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs) says that South Boston will not escape desegregation. Bullard notes that the Boston School Committee is under court order to file a second phase desegregation plan on the following Monday; that the new plan will desegregate schools city-wide and will allow parents to choose between flexible and traditional educational programs. V: Footage of John Coakley (Boston School Department) talking about the differences between the traditional and flexible program choices under the new plan. Coakley says that the new plan allows parents to choose programs, but not specific schools. Bullard reports that the Boston School Committee has repeatedly refused to endorse any form of desegregation; that the committee risks being held in contempt of court if they do not approve a plan to submit to the court. Bullard reports on speculation that William Leary (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) will submit the plan without the approval of the School Committee, to avoid being held in contempt of court. 0:31:56: Baumeister comments on the silence of both Mayor Kevin White and Governor Frank Sargent regarding the violence in South Boston. V: Footage of White on September 12, 1974, condemning violence and promising that it would not be tolerated. Credits roll. 0:34:14: Evening Compass special: The Compass Weekly: A Delicate Balance. Pam Bullard's report sums up the events concerning the desegregation of schools in Boston during the 1974 school year. V: Report includes footage of antibusing demonstrations at City Hall Plaza in August and September of 1974; of William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School) reporting low attendance figures on September 13, 1974; of white students and black students discussing forced busing outside of Hyde Park High School; of a car on the street with two KKK signs displayed; of Kevin White addressing the busing issue on October 8, 1974; of Gerald Ford stating his opposition to forced busing on October 9, 1974; of national guardsmen on October 16, 1974; of students discussing their feelings about busing; of William Leary (Superintendent, Boston School Department) announcing the reopening of South Boston High School on January 7, 1974. Report also includes footage of children in classrooms, antibusing protests, school buses escorted by police, police in South Boston, and still photos of important figures in the busing controversy. 0:45:27: Stoia reports on alternative schools set up in Hyde Park by parents opposed to forced busing. Stoia reports that some teachers are accredited and are paid from the students' fees; that the curriculum is similar to public school curriculum and classes are smaller. V: Footage of a teacher and students in an alternative classroom. Footage of Henry Lodge (Hyde Park parent) being interviewed by Stoia. Lodge talks about the good education provided by the alternative schools; about parents' need to escape from forced busing and inferior public schools. Stoia reports that 125 white students attend alternative schools in Hyde Park and South Boston; that organizers plan to open Hyde Park Academy, which will have its own building to accommodate 500 students; that these schools are open to African Americans, but are mostly white. Stoia reports on an alternative school for African American students. V: Footage of African American teacher and students in an alternative classroom. Stoia reports that African American parents do not want to send their children into a hostile environment. Stoia remarks that parents are looking for "quality education," which is a term often heard in the desegregation debate. V: Footage of Thomas Atkins (President of the NAACP) calling on leaders to stop politicizing the school desegregation process. 0:49:22: Baumeister comments that many Boston residents are opposed to busing but that Raymond Flynn is the only mayoral candidate opposed to busing. Baumeister reports that Flynn campaigns on the busing issue and is the only antibusing politician to run for mayor. V: Shots of still photographs of candidates White, Thomas Eisenstadt, and Flynn. Shots of photographs of busing opponents Louise Day Hicks, William Bulger (State Senator), Avi Nelson (radio talk show host). Baumeister reports on media coverage of busing by The Boston Globe and The Boston Herald American. Baumeister reports that both papers urged compliance with the court order and played down any violence resulting from desegregation; that the Globe is especially distrusted by the antibusing movement; that antibusing leaders have set up their own information centers; that television stations have largely escaped the anti-media feeling of the anti-busers; that a large media presence will exacerbate the tense situation. V: Shots of front-page busing coverage in The Boston Globe and The Boston Herald American. Footage of William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School) on September 15, 1974. Reid tells the media to stop filming and photographing his students. 0:54:15: Bullard reports on the peaceful integration of some schools and on the next phase of school desegregation in Boston, which will include schools in Charlestown, East Boston, and Roxbury. V: Footage of Peter Ingeneri (Area Superintendent, Dearborn District) on November 21, 1974. Ingeneri talks about larger social problems which will make school desegregation difficult in Roxbury. Footage of Isaac Graves (Manager, Roxbury Little City Hall) on January 9, 1975. Graves talks about African American commitment to better schools and integration. Footage of Chris Mitchell (student) on January 9, 1975. Mitchell talks about how important it is to graduate from high school. Report also includes footage of students boarding buses; of students in integrated classrooms; of African American schoolchildren; of buses transporting schoolchildren. Bullard reports on a Supreme Court ruling which dealt a blow to the antibusing movement's plan to include the suburbs in desegregation. Bullard reads statistics regarding the segregation of Boston school teachers and administrators. She reports on the plan to integrate teachers and administrators and to hire more African Americans in the school system. Bullard reports on the budget for police and security required to desegregate Boston's schools; on expectations for more resistance to busing in the next school year; on efforts to reverse or stop the court order. V: Credits roll over footage of African American students boarding buses.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/12/1974
Description: Evening Compass special. Press conference at Boston City Hall during the second week of Phase I desegregation of Boston schools. Frank Tivnan (Director of Communications for Mayor Kevin White) introduces the speakers at the press conference. John Coakley (Boston School Department) gives school attendance figures and analyzes trends in attendance. Robert Kiley (Deputy Mayor, City of Boston) reports that sixteen people were arrested in South Boston and Roslindale today. Kiley voices his concern about the number of young people involved in violent incidents. Joseph Jordan (Superintendent, Boston School Department) and Charles Barry (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department) report that a bus was stoned while passing the Old Colony Housing Project in South Boston. Jordan and Barry report that 200 people were gathered outside of the housing project in the afternoon. Jordan is optimistic that the tension in South Boston will abate. The officials take questions from reporters about school attendance, police tactics in South Boston and the safety of bus routes.
3:02:56: Visual: Ed Baumeister reports live from Boston City Hall, at a briefing by Mayor Kevin White's office and the Boston School Department, after a day of violence and arrests stemming from court-ordered busing in Boston. Reporters include Walt Sanders and John Henning. 3:03:25: V: Frank Tivnan (Director of Communications for Mayor Kevin White) thanks the media for the opportunity to keep the public informed, then outlines the agenda and introduces the speakers: John Coakley (Boston School Department); Robert Kiley (Deputy Mayor, City of Boston); Joseph Jordan (Superintendent, Boston Police Department); Charles Barry (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department). 3:04:24: V: Coakley reports that 54,000 students (67.4% of projected enrollment) attended classes in grades 1 - 12. Shots of reporters looking at handout sheets and taking notes. Coakley notes that attendance decreased in South Boston High School, Roxbury High School, Gavin and McCormack middle schools and South Boston elementary schools but increased at other schools. Coakley gives further analysis of attendance numbers and notes some logistical issues to be resolved in the schools. 3:06:51: V: Kiley gives an overview of the day's events: 16 arrests in South Boston and Roslindale, and 2 injuries requiring hospital treatment. Shots of reporters taking notes. Kiley notes an upswing in calls from parents reporting bruises and minor injuries to their children in the schools. He says that the city is working hard to control and deter incidents of violence and is concerned at the number of young adolescents (aged 12-13) involved in violent incidents. 3:09:45: V: Superintendent Jordan reports on arrests in South Boston; he notes a slight reduction in tension among citizens. He voices the police commitment to the safety of students, calls the violence "deplorable" and is optimistic that the situation will abate. 3:12:00: V: Deputy Superintendent Barry reports that one student was injured by a projectile thrown at a bus in an incident in front of the Old Colony Project in South Boston; that the fine weather attracted many people to the streets, including 200 people outside of the project. Shots of reporters in audience. Jordan takes the microphone and reports that 2 youths were arrested in Roslindale. 3:13:56: V: The panelists take question from reporters. Kiley responds to questions about a possible NAACP motion for US Marshals to come to Boston. Barry responds to questions about the presence of police or US Marshals on buses. Coakley responds to questions about the accuracy of the school attendance figures. Kiley and Tivnan respond to questions about a communication lag between the site of the incidents in South Boston and the communications center at City Hall. Jordan responds to questions about the reaction of South Boston residents to a police rule banning assembly of large groups of people; about the incident outside the Old Colony Project; about security along bus routes; about new police tactics in the coming weeks; about maintaining personnel on the streets and the possibility of changing the bus routes. 3:22:35: V: The panelists take more questions from reporters. Coakley responds to questions about changes in school enrollment percentages from the day before. Kiley responds to questions about whether African American students are really safe in South Boston; about communication between the city government and community leaders in the Old Colony Project; about whether authorities learned about the incident at the Old Colony Project from MDC police. Barry responds to questions about a possible increased police presence at the Old Colony Project. Jordan responds to questions about whether the increased police presence in South Boston will keep South Boston parents from sending their children to school. Coakley responds to questions about the accuracy of attendance figures at South Boston High School; about whether it is possible to educate students in the environment at South Boston High School. 3:31:30: V: Tivnan closes by asking, "any other questions, gentlemen?" Reporters rise to leave. Kiley comments to Tivnan that there is a woman in the audience. Recording ends.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/13/1974
Description: No audio at the beginning. The first day of school at South Boston High School during Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Helmeted members of the Tactical Patrol Force and US Marshals are present in the school yard and on the street. Exteriors of the South Boston High School building. Headmaster William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School), Charles Barry (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department), Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) and others confer on the street outside of the school. White students approach on foot. Buses carrying African American students arrive with a police motorcycle escort. Two groups of press photographers are cordoned off behind ropes in front of the school. African American students exit buses. A police helicopter circles the area.
0:00:37: Visual: Two police officers stand on a street corner in South Boston. 0:01:17: V: Helmeted police officers from the Tactical Patrol Force line up in front of South Boston High School. Police radios are audible. Shots of South Boston High School. Media and onlookers are gathered on sidewalk. US Marshals and small groups of officials are in the schoolyard and on G Street in front of the high school. Police question a student as he enters schoolyard. 0:04:04: V: A group of police officers walk into the street and continue down the hill on East 6th Street. Three African American students exit a police car and walk into the schoolyard. William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School), Peter Meade (Mayor's Office), Charles Barry (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department), and others converse in the street in front of the school. Two white students enter the schoolyard. Police are stationed at entrance of school; students enter. 0:06:06: V: Police line the streets. A group of three white students enters the schoolyard. 0:06:46: Helicopter noise is audible. V: Schoolbuses with police motorcycle escort are visible down East 6th Street, making their way toward the school. A station wagon arrives; three women and a police officer help a student out of the wagon. Four school buses with a police escort pull up in front of the school. Shots of the news media cordoned off behind a rope on either side of the entrance to the schoolyard. Several African American students enter schoolyard. A group of students exit a bus prematurely. The students are told to get back on the bus by an official. Shots of buses lined up; of helicopters overhead. Officials converse on street. African American students exit buses and enter schoolyard. Shot through a crowd of the front entrance of the school.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/08/1975
Description: Press conference at the Boston Schools Information Center on day two of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Footage is silent until 00:01:37. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) takes questions about the arrests of 74 members of the Committee Against Racism, and how the police and judiciary process mass arrests in South Boston. DiGrazia also answers questions about police restraint and police response to violence in the streets. Ed Baumeister (WGBH reporter) notes that there are many arrests for minor infractions and few arrests for major incidents. Greg Pilkington (WGBH reporter) questions the police policy of restraint. DiGrazia says that there is a difference between low visibility and restraint; that police are making arrests. J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant US Attorney General) discusses the presence of federal marshals in Boston and the ongoing federal investigations into violations of the federal court order. Pottinger says that antibusing activity at night can be considered a violation of the court order. DiGrazia says that police are making great efforts to crack down on violence and vandalism during the evening hours. Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) reports on public safety teams in Charlestown. Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) reports on school attendance and atmosphere. She gives information on registration for students without school assignments. Reporters ask Pottinger questions about the federal investigations of antibusing activity. Reporters ask Fahey questions about school attendance and low attendance among white students. Fahey says that attendance will improve as parents and students realize that the schools are running smoothly. This tape has visible time code burned in at the bottom of the screen.
0:01:27: Visual: Press conference at the Boston Schools Information Center. Panelists assemble at a table with microphones. Reporters include Ed Baumeister (WGBH), John Henning, Greg Pilkington (WGBH), and Walt Sanders. Ron Brinn (Information Coordinator for Mayor Kevin White) begins to speak. Audio cuts in and out. 0:03:04: V: A reporter asks about the arrests of 74 members of the Committee Against Racism in South Boston, and a related confrontation with a hostile crowd at the South Boston courthouse. Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) says he has spoken to the parties involved and that the problems at the South Boston courthouse were due to a lack of communication; that Chief Justice Flaschner will work with police and local courts to expedite the booking of arrestees; that he had previously met with Flaschner and others to discuss the expeditious booking of mass arrests; that there was confusion in South Boston on the day in question. A reporter asks if there was a firm agreement with all involved in the meeting to hold court in a venue other than the courthouse if necessary. DiGrazia says there was discussion and plans to implement action if necessary. 0:06:34: V: Baumeister points out that many arrests are made for minor infractions and few arrests are made for more serious acts of violence. DiGrazia responds that there have been quite a few arrests for acts of violence; that members of the Committee Against Racism needed to be moved in order to avoid a major confrontation along a bus route; that the police are trying to neutralize a dangerous situation; that police are showing great restraint. Pilkington points out that restraint by police was not effective during the previous year. DiGrazia interrupts him by saying that there is a difference between low visibility and restraint; that police are actively making arrests this year, but are showing restraint. Reporter asks if there is discussion of calling in the National Guard to aid police at night. DiGrazia says that police are working long hours but performing well; that there are no plans at present to call in the National Guard. 0:09:38: V: A reporter asks about the possibility of federal charges being brought against some arrestees. J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant U.S. Attorney General) responds that charges are being investigated; that federal and state charges may be lodged; that he is personally involved with five investigations. A reporter asks how federal marshals can aid police in the evening if their mandate is to enforce the federal court order. Pottinger says that certain actions outside of school hours could be handled by the federal marshals as violations of the federal court order; that federal marshals are there to assist police; that federal marshals are working long hours. Pottinger confirms that the Justice Department is investigating an incident at the JFK Home and a Molotov cocktail incident; that they are investigating reports of direct intimidation of individuals trying to comply with the court order; that they are investigating some arrests for the assault of police officers. 0:12:38: V: Pilkington asks if the violence committed by youth gangs in Charlestown constitutes a violation of federal law. Pottinger says that the violence may be a violation, especially if the violence involves an assault on a police officer or a fire official. Reporter asks what will be done about nighttime violence and vandalism. DiGrazia says that he will increase police numbers in Charlestown and South Boston; that police will be assisted by federal marshals; that federal marshals will investigate assaults on police officers. A reporter asks Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) to clarify a statement indicating that he has complaints against the media. Meade says that it was a humorous statement directed at a reporter whom he knows well; that he would like to clarify a his answer to a question from yesterday about police presence in Charlestown. 0:15:31: V: A reporter asks Meade what public safety teams are doing to prevent violence and vandalism in Charlestown. Meade says that several people are on the streets trying to calm the situation; that Roberta Delaney (Manager, Charlestown Little City Hall) will hold a meeting that afternoon with a public safety team; that antibusing leaders in Charlestown have made it clear that they do not support violence. A reporter asks DiGrazia to compare today's violence in Charlestown to that of the previous day. DiGrazia says that police did a good job in defusing a difficult situation today. A reporter asks if federal marshals will be on duty for the evening. Pottinger says that the federal marshals will not be on patrol; that they will be available upon request from police. 0:18:09: V: Brinn introduces Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools). Fahey thanks the public safety officials. Fahey says that attendance is up for both African Americans and whites; that there has been one suspension and no arrests; that the climate in the schools is good; that extracurricular activities are proceeding. Commissioner DiGrazia excuses himself and leaves. A reporter asks Fahey about low white attendance in West Roxbury. Fahey responds that they are watching the situation and will contact students who are absent. Reporter comments that attendance in elementary schools is primarily African American. Fahey says that some white parents may be waiting to assess the climate at the schools before sending their children; that she is confident that white attendance will go up. 0:21:37: V: A reporter asks Pottinger if there are some individuals under investigation who have not been arrested. Pottinger says yes, but that he will not give details. A reporter asks Fahey about students who have not yet been assigned to school. Fahey gives information on two sites where student registration will be held on the following day. Fahey asks the media to disseminate the information. Fahey says that 800 students were processed in last week's preregistration; that 400 students were processed today; that she has no way of knowing how many students still need school assignments. Fahey tells a reporter that she has no information on the suspension of an African American male student today. A reporter asks Fahey about plans to assess student achievement in the desegregated schools. Fahey says that she is working with consultants on assessing math and reading; that attendance is another indication of school performance. 0:25:21: V: Brinn interrupts to clarify Pottinger's title as he prepares to make a statement. Pottinger explains that he will be absent for a few days for personal reasons; that Robert Murphy (Civil Rights Division, US Justice Department) will be in charge in his absence. Brinn checks with Meade to see if he has a statement, then invites more questions. A reporter asks Pottinger for more detail on investigations of people who have not been arrested. Pottinger says that the investigations are centered on intimidations and threats to those trying to comply with the court order; that the FBI is investigating allegations; that it is possible to move quickly toward indictment if the evidence is sufficient; that he cannot predict when or if an indictment will occur. A reporter asks Pottinger about the five investigations he is involved with personally, and whether they concern people who have not been arrested. Pottinger says that he is familiar with five investigations concerning threats and intimidation as well as arrests made by the state; that there may be other investigations; that there are sitting grand juries available to hear these cases; that he does not think it will be necessary to empanel a grand jury. 0:28:49: V: A reporter asks Fahey where the 25,000 absentee students are. Fahey responds that she does not know. A reporter asks for a summary of the attendance figures. Robert Donahue (Boston School Department) says that the attendance has increased; that some parents have kept children out of school; that attendance will increase as it becomes clear to parents that schools are functioning normally. Fahey gives a rundown of attendance figures for the first and second days of school: that attendance was 60.3% and 64.1% at the high schools; that attendance was 60.1% and 65.8% at the middle schools; that attendance was 58.1% and 64.9% at the elementary schools. 0:30:44: V: Brinn thanks the panelists and closes the press conference. Baumeister gives a summary of the conference. Reporters mill around the room.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/09/1975
Description: Press conference at Boston Schools Information Center to sum up week one of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Ed Baumeister introduces the Boston School Report with a summary of the day's events. Ron Brinn (Information Coordinator, Mayor's Office) introduces the participants. Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) comments on a successful opening of schools. Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) gives a report on school suspensions and comments that the atmosphere in the schools is good. William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School) comments on the opening week at South Boston High School. Pat Brady (Detective, Boston Police Department) reads a police report detailing arrests and injuries. Brady reports that there were no major incidents today and that extra police will continue to be deployed. Dr. Louis Perullo (Boston School Department) analyzes school attendance statistics. Perullo compares attendance statistics from the 1975-76 school year to attendance statistics from the 1974-1975 school year. Reporters ask Reid about an altercation at South Boston High School and the effect of community demonstrations on the atmosphere in the schools. Reid says that outside disturbances have a negative effect on the atmosphere inside the schools. Fahey says that she has no control over demonstrations outside of the school. Fahey reports on increased attendance at the city's magnet schools. Reporters ask Fahey and Perullo about school attendance and the possibility of a non-white majority in the Boston school population. Fahey says that she is not yet ready to predict a non-white majority. Robert Murphy (Civil Rights Division, US Justice Department) reports on the activity of federal marshals in Boston and the ongoing federal investigations into violations of the federal court order. Ann Foley (administrative assistant to Fahey) announces a change in operating hours for the Boston Schools Information Center. This tape has audible time code on track 2 and visible time code burned in at the top of the picture.
17:00:00: Visual: Opening credits read Boston School Report. Press conference at Boston Schools Information Center sums up events during week one of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. Ed Baumeister gives a summary of the day's events: school attendance dropped to 68.4% from 69.1% on the previous day; six African American students were sent home after a scuffle with white students at South Boston High School; no suspensions at South Boston High School; three peaceful protest marches were held. Reporters at the press conference include Baumeister and Walt Sanders. 17:00:51: V: Ron Brinn (Information Coordinator, Mayor's Office) opens the press conference, reminding all that it is day five of Phase II desegregation of Boston schools. He introduces the panel: Marion Fahey (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), William Reid (Headmaster, South Boston High School), Ann Foley (administrative assistant to Fahey), Robert Murphy (Civil Rights Division, US Justice Department), Peter Meade (Mayor's Office). 17:01:52: V: Meade says that the school personnel deserve a lot of credit for their efforts; that students and parents deserve credit for behaving responsibly during the first week of Phase II desegregation. Meade says that the opening of schools was a success; that many doubted it would go as well as it did; that the city's problems are not over. 17:03:08: V: Fahey says that she is pleased with the progress made in the schools; that she would like to thank the staff of the school system; that ten African American males, 16 white males, five African American females and three white females were suspended over the past week. She introduces Dr. Louis Perullo (Boston School Department), who analyzes attendance statistics for the school system. She says that there were no arrests in the schools all week; that the atmosphere in the schools is good. 17:05:13: V: Brinn introduces Reid. Reid says that he prefers not to compare Phase I desegregation to Phase II; that they are more prepared this year; that he would like to see higher attendance figures; that the past week at South Boston High School was adequate. 17:06:38: V: Brinn stalls as he waits for Pat Brady (Detective, Boston Police Department). Brady reads a statement from Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston). The statement reads that there were no major incidents today; that no students were injured in incidents related to school desegregation during the week; that the peaceful opening of schools was due to increased police presence and effective leadership by community leaders; that 112 arrests were made during the week; that 16 police officers were injured; that DiGrazia is pleased with the events of the past week; that extra police will continue to be deployed. 17:09:00: V: Perullo talks about statistics he has compiled. He compares attendance statistics from a Thursday and Friday during the first week of Phase I busing with statistics from a Thursday and Friday during the first week of Phase II. Attendance was down significantly on Friday at all levels during Phase I. Attendance was down slightly on Friday at the high schools and middle schools during Phase II; the elementary schools experienced a slight increase. Perullo says that school attendance usually drops on Fridays. Perullo introduces a table with total attendance by area and level of schooling. He finds that attendance did not change significantly from yesterday to today in any of the areas except high schools; that attendance at Jamaica Plain High School decreased 5.5%; that attendance at Hyde Park High School decreased 6.9%; that attendance at Dorchester High School decreased 5.0%; that attendance at South Boston High School and East Boston High School decreased 4.4% and 5.3% respectively; that attendance at the magnet high schools declined only slightly; that elementary schools in Roslindale saw an increase in attendance of 3.5%. Perullo says that high school attendance increased from 60.3% on Monday to 68% on Thursday; that high school attendance today was down 2.6% from Thursday; that middle schools increased from 60% on Monday to 70.3% on Wednesday; that middle school attendance was down ).7% from Wednesday; that elementary school attendance increased from 58.1% on Monday to 69.8% today. Perullo says that white attendance increased from 56.9% on Monday to 64% on Wednesday; that white attendance was down 1.8% from Wednesday; that African American attendance increased from 62.5% to a high of 75% on Thursday; that today's African American attendance was down 0.6%; that the attendance of other minorities increased from 55% on Monday to 75.9% on Friday. 17:14:52: V: Brinn invites questions from the media. Reporter asks Perullo if he can verify that white students comprise 46% of the school system while African Americans and other minorities comprise 54%. Perullo says he has not yet analyzed those numbers and cannot verify the statistic. Baumeister asks Fahey if she has investigated claims by Frank Power (Headmaster, Charlestown High School), that the projected enrollment numbers are high. Fahey says that she has no answer. Reid says that it is normal to plan for the attendance of every student who might attend, even those whose attendance is doubtful; that students drop out or move away over the summer; that it is difficult to compare actual enrollment to projected enrollment during the first week of school; that actual enrollment is usually less than projected enrollment. 17:17:41: V: A reporter asks Reid about the atmosphere at South Boston High School, as compared to the previous year. Reid says that he does not remember the climate last year; that he has had a good first week of school; that the students were restless today due to a prayer march and rumors of a walkout. A reporter asks Reid about a disturbance resulting in a request for state troopers at South Boston High School today. Reid says that he works closely with Major Gilligan (Massachusetts State Police Department); that Gilligan places troopers where he thinks they will be effective; that decisions concerning the number of troopers are made by him, Gilligan, and the officer in charge of the building; that an altercation at South Boston High School began with an African American student who said he was punched; that three African American students were brought to the office to file reports; that another altercation involving one of these three students occurred after lunch; that he is investigating the situation. 17:20:39: V: A reporter asks Reid if he finds prayer marches and demonstrations outside of the building disruptive. Reid says that any actions taken by the outside community create tension in the school. A reporter reminds Fahey that she had told him that demonstrations outside Charlestown High School had no negative effects on the African American students inside the building. Fahey says that she does not dispute Reid's analysis of the atmosphere in his school; that normal school activity is taking place despite marches in South Boston, Charlestown and Hyde Park; that it is not up to her to restrict parade permits for these marches. A reporter says that Headmaster Power had complained that the number of non-school personnel present at Charlestown High School made it difficult to operate the school. Reid says that he shares Power's concern; that the court order allows 12 community persons to be in the school; that two persons are sufficient to monitor activity and report on the atmosphere. 17:22:54: V: A reporter asks Fahey for observations on the performance of the magnet schools so far. Fahey says that attendance has increased at the magnet schools; that programs in conjunction with area universities will be implemented; that programs are currently under review include a program between English High School and University of Massachusetts as well as an open education program involving the Martin Luther King School and Antioch University. Baumeister asks Murphy if any charges have been filed in cases involving Molotov cocktails. Murphy says that no charges have been filed; that charges may be filed at the end of next week. Baumeister reminds Murphy that the local US attorney has already filed civil charges in one case. Murphy says his office is working together with the local US attorney. Baumeister asks if federal marshals have made any arrests on their own in the past week. Murphy says that they have made no arrests. Baumeister asks if they have been instructed to use restraint. Murphy says that they have been instructed to be professional. 17:24:38: V: A reporter asks Meade if he can share any Police Department intelligence. Meade replies that he does not attend the police intelligence briefings and if he did, he would not share the information. A reporter asks Meade if the mayor will continue to request that two battalions of the National Guard be on call for the city at the expense of $37,000 per day. Meade responds that the decision will be made jointly by the mayor and the governor; that the expense had not been discussed; that a reduction of troops in the public safety plan must be submitted to the court. A reporter asks Fahey if she knows the racial breakdown of the kindergarten population. Fahey says that the school department is making efforts to gather that data. A reporter asks Fahey about the possibility of white students becoming the minority in Boston schools. Fahey says that she is not yet ready to predict a non-white majority; that the school system is engaged in a recruitment program for students of all races; that white attendance has gone up in Roslindale elementary schools; that recruitment is going on in West Roxbury, Jamaica Plain and Brighton; that it is too soon to make predictions. 17:29:26: V: A reporter comments on the fact that white students are staying away from schools in African American communities. Fahey says that this is true; that white parents may be keeping children out until they are sure the schools are safe; that the safety of the schools has been demonstrated over the past week. A reporter asks Fahey how long she thinks parents will wait before sending their children. Fahey says that the decision is up to individual parents. Baumeister asks if Fahey has seen results from the campaign to attract students back to the schools. Fahey says she has not had feedback from teachers; that over the past week teachers have been calling the parents of absentee students; that over the next two weeks teachers will write letters to the parents; that teachers will make personal visits to parents if they get no response from the letters or phone calls. A reporter comments that many classes will be racially imbalanced if white students do not return to schools in the next few weeks. Fahey says that she will refer the matter to the court. A reporter asks if it will be easier for parents to transfer students to a new school if classes are deemed to be racially imbalanced. Fahey reviews the transfer procedure and says that a transfer might be accepted if it does not upset the racial balance in either school. 17:35:01: V: Brinn invites other questions. Brady says that two arrests have been reported since his last report. An African American juvenile male was arrested at the Barton Rogers School for disorderly conduct and an African American juvenile female was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon relating to an incident on September 9th at the temporary Madison Park High School. Brady confirms 112 arrests for the week. Reporter asks if the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF) will be pulled out of South Boston. Brady responds that the TPF is stationed where it is needed. 17:36:46: V: Brinn invites Murphy to make a statement about the past week's events. Murphy says that he is happy that the federal marshals have made no arrests; that few arrests indicate that the situation is not so bad; that the marshals will continue to be stationed at the schools; that his office is investigating a dozen cases; that he does not expect a dozen indictments; that he is working on these cases with the state district attorney's office, the US attorney's office, the FBI, and the Bureau of Tobacco and Firearms. 17:38:28: V: Foley announces a change in operating hours for the Boston Schools Information Center. Foley says that the phone lines will be open until 5:30pm; that the center has received very few calls during the evenings. Fahey thanks the media and mentions that she will no longer attend press conferences on a regular basis; that she will be working hard to improve programs in the schools; that Boston is dealing with the same problems that many urban schools are facing. Fahey excuses herself. Brinn thanks the participants and the media, then closes the press conference. Baumeister gives a summary of the press conference.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/12/1975
Description: South Boston High School exterior. Background comments of pedestrians talking to camera operator and reporter. Pam Bullard interviews headmaster Jerome Wynegar on what programs his school will offer, including core curriculum and vocational education. Wynegar says racial problems have been aggravated by outside agitators. He adds that the school is enrolled to capacity, and cannot accommodate students who wish to return after dropping out. He says that the school should make sure to listen to the suggestions of the students, and those students who dropped out, to try to improve the school. He commends the faculty. Additional comments from Wynegar as they shoot cutaways. Shots of graffiti painted on pavement, which reads “Stop Forced Busing.” Several takes of reporter voice over and standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/17/1976
Description: Exterior of South Boston High School. Headmaster Jerome Wynegar in front of school. Students enter school. South Boston environs. Crowd of South Boston residents gathered on the street. Rolling shots taken from news van driving down the streets of South Boston. Anti- busing and racist graffiti: “Stop Forced Busing” “White Power” “Never Nigger”
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: Exteriors of South Boston High School. South Boston environs. Large graffiti in crosswalk “Winegar [sic] we don't want you.” Black students stream off bus, walk toward front entrance. Jerome Wynegar stands by. Plainclothes US marshals with armbands and walkie-talkies. Police keep press photographers behind line.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1976
Description: State and Boston police and US marshals outside South Boston High School. Black students get off buses. Headmaster Jerome Wynegar. Girls in parochial school uniforms walk by. More black students get off buses, walk up to school. Police on motorcycles escort empty buses away from school. Mass of white students wait at iron fence. TV cameramen and news photographers stand by. Girl wearing Southie sweatshirt. White students are allowed to enter school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/13/1976
Description: Commissioner Robert DiGrazia, Boston police and US marshals stationed outside South Boston High. Black students exit school, get on bus. Buses slowly come and go. Many officials mill about on sidewalk. Headmaster Jerome Wynegar talks to Joseph Jordan. Later, white students flow out of school en masse. Comments, some racist, from the crowd waiting outside the school can be overheard.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/14/1976
Description: South Boston teens on street. Police on motorcycles. Exterior South Boston High School with broken windows. Hill Stop Deli. “White Power” graffiti painted on street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/25/1976
Description: White students exit South Boston High. About 25 Massachusetts uniformed state troopers board Massachusetts State Police bus. Massachusetts State Police Cruiser exits school parking lot. Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) stands in the school yard and talks to students.
1:00:08: Visual: White students exit South Boston High School in small groups. Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) stands in front of the school, talking to passersby. The students walk down G Street, away from the school . Snow blankets the ground. A Massachusetts State Police bus is parked in front of the school. About 25 state police officers file onto the bus. A state police car pulls out from the front of the school, into the street. Small groups of students, police, and officials remain in front of the school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/15/1977
Description: The sound goes in and out at the beginning of this video. Exteriors of South Boston High School and South Boston environs. African American students board buses at South Boston High School. Boston Police officers are stationed near the school. Police cruisers escort buses to and from the school. Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) stands in the school yard. White students exit the school after the buses depart. A passerby tells the camera crew that their presence causes a disturbance.
1:00:09: Visual: Exterior of South Boston High School. A Boston Police cruiser is parked in the courtyard of the school, to the right of the steps. Shots of exterior of the school. A Massachusetts State Police cruiser is parked to left of the steps. A group of three white students exits the school. Shots of G Street; of rowhouses in front of the school on G Street; of the high school; of a "Wallace for President" sticker on a street sign. Two white students exit the school. 1:06:14: V: Shot of East 6th Street. The street is snowy. A Boston Police station wagon is parked in front of the high school. An officer exits the station wagon and walks toward the school. A small green and white bus maneuvers in the courtyard of the school. Shot of students walking down G Street, away from the school. A student closes the window on the second floor of the school. Shot of the exterior of the school. The green and white bus is idling in front of the school entrance. Shot of house on the corner of G Street and Thomas Park. A Boston Police station wagon pulls away from the school. A Boston Police cruiser pulls into the school yard. Two officers exit the car. Shot of one of the Boston Police cruisers in school yard; the cruiser is labeled "Tactical Patrol Force." 1:10:02: V: A police cruiser with flashing lights escorts a line of yellow school buses up G Street. The school buses pull up in front of the school. A few police officers station themselves along G Street. Small groups of minority students exit the school. One student stops to wave at the camera. African American students make their way toward the buses. There are a few Hispanic students among those boarding the buses. Audio of students talking to the camera crew. Students peer out of the windows of the buses. The buses pull away in single file. The small green and white bus pulls out of the school yard, into the street. One remaining school bus pulls away, followed by a Boston Police station wagon with its lights flashing. 1:17:34: V: Pan of houses on G Street. A lone African American male student waits in front of the school. White students slowly exit the school. Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School) stands in the school yard, talking to officials and passersby. A few police officers remain in the school yard. Students file out of the school yard. An African American teacher confers with Wynegar. Audio of a voice speaking to the camera crew, "Do you realize that you're being here creates more of a disturbance than when you're not here?" A crew member responds. Bits of an ensuing conversation can be heard. A few white students linger on the steps of the school. Wynegar remains in the school yard. Students continue to exit the building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/15/1977
Description: South Boston environs. Graffiti written in large white letters on G Street reads, "Go home, Jerome. You failed." (Graffiti refers to South Boston High School Headmaster Jerome Wynegar.) African American and white members of a girls' softball team stand on the steps outside of South Boston High School. A few school officials, police officers and others, including Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs, Morgan v. Hennigan), are gathered on the steps of the school. Police are stationed along G Street as school buses pull up in front of the school. African American students exit the school and board the buses. The softball team boards a bus parked in front of the steps to the school. The buses depart.
0:00:31: Visual: Shots of East 6th Street in South Boston. Boston harbor is visible in the distance. Boston Police Department trucks are parked on G Street in front of South Boston High School. Graffiti in large white letters on the pavement of G Street reads, "Go home Jerome. You failed." (Graffiti refers to South Boston High School Headmaster Jerome Wynegar.) Police are gathered in groups along G Street. 0:02:28: V: A police cruiser with flashing lights leads two yellow school buses up East 6th Street. The buses head toward the high school, directed by a police officer. African American and white members of a girls softball team are gathered on the steps of the high school. Police officers, other students and school officials are also on the steps. Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs, Morgan v. Hennigan) stands on the steps, talking to an African American woman and two African American men. 0:04:01: V: A bus is parked in front of the steps of the high school. The softball players board the bus. A group of African American students exit the school and walk toward the school buses parked in front of the school. Two police officers seated on their motorcycles observe the scene. African American students continue to board the buses. A few white students are gathered on the steps of the high school. Police officers direct the school buses in front of the school to depart. The buses travel down G Street, followed by a police motorcycle. Members of the media record the departure of the buses. The bus carrying the softball team departs. The girls wave goodbye. 0:07:01: V: Two police officers confer in the school yard of the high school. Massachusetts State Police officers board a Massachusetts State Police bus in the school yard.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/12/1977
Description: Police officers and members of the media are gathered on G Street in front of South Boston High School. Graffiti written in large white letters on the pavement of G Street reads, "Go home, Jerome. You failed." (Graffiti refers to South Boston High School headmaster Jerome Wynegar.) Police are stationed along G Street. A small crowd on the steps of a house jeers at police. News crews with ENG cameras and microphones approach. The crowd refuses to disperse. Police officers in riot helmets assemble in front of the house. Four women and two men are put into police vans. Two of the women struggle with the police, and one man is dragged into the van. The crowd retreats into the house on G Street. James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) talks to a woman about the conflict between the crowd and police. Joseph Jordan (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) confers with police officials outside of South Boston High School.
0:00:24: Visual: Exterior of South Boston High School. Shots of the front of the building; of the school name carved into the stone at the top of the building. Police officers and media are gathered on the sidewalk in front of the school. A fading green shamrock is painted on the pavement of the school yard. Police officers confer about logistics. Boston Police Department vehicles are parked in the school yard. A Boston Police Department truck pulls in front of the of the high school. 0:02:23: V: Police officers are stationed along G Street. Close-up shot of the Boston Police Department insignia on a police officer's uniform. A crowd of white residents is gathered on the on the steps of a house on G Street, not far from the school. White teenagers are gathered outside of the Hill Stop Delicatessen on G Street, near the school. A police officer directs traffic along G Street. A group of police officers are gathered on G Street, near the crowd on the steps of the house. A police officer exits a car parked in the school yard of the high school. A Boston Police Department truck passes by the high school with its lights flashing. The truck pulls to the side of G Street, near the house where the crowd has gathered. Members of the media follow the truck down the street. A police officer gestures to the truck to pull up closer. A woman sits on the hood of a car, surrounded by police officers. 0:05:15: V: The crowd gathered on the steps of the house yells and makes gestures at the police officers. The woman sitting on the car speaks angrily to the police officers. She refuses to move from the car and says that she is not creating a scene. Police officers try to disperse the crowd of media gathered on the street. The crowd on the steps of the house is heard jeering at police. Graffiti written in large white letters on the pavement in the middle of G Street reads, "Go home Jerome. You failed." (Graffiti refers to South Boston High School Headmaster, Jerome Wynegar.) A crowd of onlookers gathers outside of the delicatessen, across the street from the crowd. Police and the media remain in the street. The crowd on the steps of the house begins to sing. 0:06:48: V: A second Boston Police Department truck exits the school yard of South Boston High School and pulls up behind the first truck on G Street. A group of helmeted police officers walks down G Street from the school. The police officers spread out across the street as they walk toward the house where the crowd has gathered. The police instruct onlookers to move down the street, away from the scene. Police officers and officials watch as the helmeted officers disperse the crowd of onlookers. Police officers stand in front of the small crowd assembled on the steps of the house. The police put the woman who had been sitting on the hood of the car into the police truck. The crowd cheers for the woman. One man yells, "Where is the civil rights commission?" A woman runs from the crowd to stop police from putting a second woman into the police truck. Police force both women into the truck, and hold the doors closed. The women inside the truck beat on the doors from the inside. The crowd jeers at police. A young man yells, "Three girls!" 0:10:11: V: A police officer walks down G Street from the high school. Other police officers remain in front of the crowd on the steps of the house. The crowd and the police exchange remarks. The crowd refuses to go indoors. A man is led by police into the second police truck. Police drag a second man from the crowd into the police truck. A police officer pushes the crowd from the steps into the house as another woman is led to the truck by police officers. The woman says, "This is a violation of civil rights." 0:12:11: V: Most of the crowd on the steps has disappeared into the house on G Street. Members of the crowd look out of the window at the action on the street. James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) stands on the steps of the house, listening to a woman describe the conflict between the crowd and the police. The police truck drives slowly down G Street. Police line the sides of the street. A group of police officers confers in the middle of G Street. The media observes the police and the dwindling crowd from the sidewalks. There are still a few people gathered on the steps of the house on G Street. Shot of a quiet side street. Residents sit outside of their houses, enjoying the sun. 0:14:19: V: Joseph Jordan (Police Commissioner, City of Boston) confers with officers outside of South Boston High School. Shot of the exterior of South Boston High School. A few youth are gathered on the steps.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/12/1977
Description: Interview with James Kelly, director of South Boston Information Center, about a demonstration at Carson Beach. He describes it as a visit by armed black militants from Columbia Point. Then he expounds on his strident views on busing and affirmative action. SBIC storefront and sign “Welcome to Boston. The city is occupied. A boycott exists. A tyrant reigns. Law is by decree. People are oppressed. The spirit of freedom still lives.” Kelly on the street, talking to a pedestrian. Kelly sitting at desk in back room answering phone.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/02/1977
Description: African American beachgoers are escorted onto Carson Beach in South Boston by Metropolitan District Commission (MDC) police officers. Officers are posted on the beach, forming a ring around the African American beachgoers. Police officers station themselves at the edge of the water as children play. Police officers line up near the recreation building, observing the action on the beach. Three MDC police boats patrol the water. Three white males are escorted from the beach. White beachgoers stand around, observing the scene.
0:00:26: Visual: Four Metropolitan District Commission (MDC) police officers escort a small group of African American youth on to Carson Beach in South Boston. There are white swimmers and sunbathers on the beach. The Boston skyline is visible in the distance. A group of older white men sit under a shelter near the road. Cars pass by slowly on the road. Groups of white people sit under the shelters or sunbathe on the sand. 0:01:50: V: A larger group of African Americans walk on to the beach, accompanied by police officers. The group of African Americans ranges in age from young kids to adults. The group walks along the beach, heading toward the recreation building. Young African American children play in the water along the shore. Police officers stand casually on the beach as the African American beachgoers get settled . An older white man greets some of the African American youth. White beachgoers are seated near the African American beachgoers. Many whites stare at the African Americans. MDC police officers are lined up near the recreation building, observing the scene on the beach. 0:06:25: V: White residents and beachgoers are standing up, watching the African American beachgoers and the police on the beach. Police officers walk among the crowd. A police officer escorts a white man from the beach. A large line of MDC police officers circles approaches the recreation building to join the other group of officers. Approximately 50 police officers stand in front of the recreation building. Two helmeted police officers escort another white man from the beach. Another group of police officers walks toward the beach. A group of 20 more African Americans are escorted onto the beach by a police officer. 0:09:31: V: An older white man with a walkie talkie walks down the beach toward the crowd. Police officers stand at the edge of the water while African American children play. A few white beachgoers mill about near the police officers. Most white beachgoers sit separately from the African American beachgoers. Other white beachgoers observe the scene from further up the beach. A group of police officers stands in front of the recreation building. A group of five African American adults walk down the beach toward the African American beachgoers. They are followed by a police officer. 0:12:05: V: African American beachgoers are seated in small groups on the beach. A line of police officers forms a ring around them. A group of white beachgoers stands nearby. Shot of a young white boy sitting by himself on the beach. African American children play in the water. MDC police officers stand at the edge of the water. White beachgoers stand near the police officers, watching the African American children. The African American beachgoers enjoy themselves. Police stand by. The media record the scene. White beachgoers stand around in groups. Two MDC Police boats patrol the water. 0:15:33: V: A line of MDC police officers with riot helmets stands in front of the recreation building. MDC police officers observe the action on the beach from the MDC boats in the water. A line of police cordons off the African American beachgoers from the white beachgoers. Members of the media and white bystanders stand near the African American beachgoers. White beachgoers sit and stand apart from the African American beachgoers. Two police officers escort a young white man from the beach. A group of African American beachgoers heads toward the recreation building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/03/1977
Description: Exterior South Boston High, first day of school on staggered opening schedule. Police on steps. Tilt up facade. White students walk up to school. Jerome Wynegar out front. Boston Police bus pulls up. Wynegar comments on insufficient buses to bring black students from distant neighborhoods because of contract dispute and the disruption of the staggered opening schedule. Press photographers. Person on the street interview with white mother, Evelyn Gorhan, who waited with daughter for bus that never came. Black mother, Edna Calhoun from Roxbury says she will not send her son to school until buses are available. Calhoun and another black woman, Frankie MacDonald, report rocks and expletives hurled at them. Shots of the children. “Nigers suck” graffiti on brick housing project.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1977
Description: Outside South Boston High School. Buses arrive. Mostly black students exit school and board buses. Police cruisers and motorcycles stationed in front of school. Interview with headmaster Jerome Wynegar who says despite some trouble and a severe lack of students, classes will go on, and faculty will try to keep up morale. He says “…kids come here to learn, believe it or not.” Several takes of reporter standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/18/1979
Description: Chinatown environs with reporter voice over. Reporter talks about the apolitical nature of Chinatown. She reports that although there aren't many active residents, those who do care about politics are outraged at the redistricting which groups Chinatown with South Boston. Interview with Chinatown resident, Mr. Chang, on the divergent interests and concerns of Chinatown and South Boston. City Council chambers.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/25/1982
Description: Christopher Lydon introduces a report on "the five Bostons," which includes analysis of voter turnout and voting habits in the various neighborhoods of Boston. The neighborhoods include Italian Boston, black Boston, liberal Boston, Irish East and Irish West. The report analyzes voter support for mayoral candidates in each neighborhood and includes interviews with voters in each neighborhood. Lydon notes that Italian Boston includes East Boston and the North End. Lydon talks about the remote location of East Boston. His report includes interviews with Anna De Fronzo (East Boston community activist) and George DiLorenzo (former State Representative). Lydon reports that Kevin White (Mayor of Boston) has a lot of support in East Boston; that Dennis Kearney (candidate for mayor of Boston) is a favorite in the neighborhood. Lydon explains that liberal Boston is a mix of wealthy residents, students, blue-collar families and young professionals; that voter turnout is often low. Lydon interviews John Winthrop Sears (former candidate for governor of Massachusetts), Thomas Vallely (State Representative) and Veronica Smith (Allston community activist). Lydon notes that the support of voters in liberal Boston is split among a several candidates. Lydon reports on a renewal of political activity in black Boston, and notes that there is a high percentage of newly registered voters in the African American neighborhoods. The report includes interviews with Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) and Kay Gibbs (South End political activist). Stith and Gibbs talk about the candidacy of Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) as well as opposition to King's candidacy, led by Mel Miller (publisher, The Bay State Banner). Lydon reports that Irish East has the highest voter turnout in the city. He interviews Thomas Driscoll (South Boston political consultant) and Paul White (State Representative) for the report. Lydon notes that the support of voters in Irish East is split between Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston) and David Finnegan (candidate for mayor of Boston). Lydon reports that Irish West is a residential neighborhood with many middle-class residents. The report includes interviews with Richard Sinnott (Hyde Park Tribune), Joseph Timilty (State Senator), and Maura Hennigan (Boston City Council). Lydon notes that the support of Irish West voters is split between Flynn and Finnegan; that King may receive the votes of Latino residents. Lydon reports that White is a West Roxbury native, but never had the full support of neighborhood residents.
1:00:09: The logos of The Ten O'Clock News underwriters New England Telephone and Shawmut Brokerage Services are displayed. Opening credits for The Ten O'Clock News. Christopher Lydon introduces a report on "The Five Bostons." 1:00:58: Anna De Fronzo (East Boston community activist) compares East Boston's remote location to that of Siberia. Visual: Shot of a map of Boston with East Boston highlighted in yellow. Lydon reports that the Italian population of Boston lives in the North End and East Boston. V: Shots of three older men sitting near a wall; of a yard with a Virgin Mary statue in East Boston; of the Boston skyline viewed from a street in East Boston. Lydon reports that "Italian" Boston has 8% of the city's registered voters; that "Italian" Boston has good voting habits and could account for 10% of the votes in the mayoral race. Lydon reports that there is no political issue to rally the residents of East Boston this year; that controversy over school desegregation and airport expansion have died down. V: Shots of older women in East Boston; of Logan airport as viewed from East Boston; of streets in East Boston. Lydon reports that Italian American candidates have always found favor in East Boston; that Dennis Kearney (candidate for mayor of Boston) is a resident of Eagle Hill and has a lot of support in East Boston. V: Shot of Kearney campaign sign. Footage of East Boston residents voicing their support for Kearney. Lydon reports that there are residents of ethnicities other than Italian; that many East Boston residents will vote for one of their own. Lydon reports that Eloise Linger (Socialist candidate for mayor of Boston) has more supporters in East Boston than Lawrence DiCara (candidate for mayor of Boston); that Linger lives in East Boston while DiCara lives in Dorchester. V: Footage of De Fronzo saying that Italian Americans are apt to vote for candidates of other nationalities. Lydon stands on an East Boston street with the Boston skyline visible. He reports that Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) gained support in East Boston when he supported action by the anti-airport movement; that East Boston received attention from the White administration in return for their support of White. V: Traveling shot of an East Boston street. Footage of George DiLorenzo (Former State Representative from East Boston) talking about the great number of jobs given to East Boston residents by White. DiLorenzo says that White appointed three city commissioners from East Boston; that other mayors did not give key positions to East Bostonians. DiLorenzo says that the White political organization in East Boston was the strongest political organization that he has ever seen; that John "Dee Dee" Coviello (East Boston political organizer) is responsible for uniting the community behind White. Footage of De Fronzo saying that she does not think any of the candidates will garner the kind of support that White had in East Boston; that some of the candidates will ignore East Boston if elected mayor. 1:05:57: V: Footage of Lydon interviewing John Winthrop Sears (former Republican candidate for governor of Massachusetts). Sears says that his part of Boston is progressive and not afraid of change. Shot of a map of Boston with "liberal" Boston highlighted in blue. Shots of a street in the Back Bay; of Kenmore Square; of an upscale apartment building. Lydon says that "liberal" Boston stretches from Chinatown through Beacon Hill and the Back Bay to Kenmore Square and Cleveland Circle. Lydon reports that "liberal" Boston is multi-ethnic; with many single residents including students and the elderly. Lydon stands on a leafy street lined with brownstones. He reports that "liberal" Boston is made up of white precincts which do not vote according to racial lines; that "liberal" Boston never supported Louise Day Hicks (former Boston City Councilwoman). Lydon reports that "liberal" Boston usually has a large population with a poor voter turnout. V: Footage of Lydon interviewing residents about their voting habits. Most residents do not vote or have not yet registered to vote. Footage of Sears talking about residents of "liberal" Boston who vote in other states. Sears says that the inheritance laws in Massachusetts have driven wealthy voters to declare a primary residence elsewhere. Footage of Thomas Vallely (State Representative from the Back Bay) saying that the Back Bay community is made up of wealthy residents; that his constituents voted for Proposition 2 1/2; that the Back Bay has a vibrant gay community; that his constituents seem more concerned with national politics than local politics. Shot of a resident at DeLuca's Market in Beacon Hill. Lydon stands on the corner of Commonwealth and Harvard Avenues in Allston. Lydon reports that there are blue-collar families, students and the elderly in Allston; that young professionals are moving into the area. Lydon reports that Thomas Gallagher (State Representative) came to Allston as an out-of-state student; that he beat a local politician for the office of state representative. V: Footage of Veronica Smith (Allston community activist) saying that Gallagher is popular with the students and young professionals. Smith says that she cannot predict which mayoral candidate is the most popular in Allston. Footage of Sears saying that DiCara is popular among many voters now that Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston) has dropped out of the race. Footage of Vallely analyzing his constituents response to the candidacies of Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston), Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston), and David Finnegan (candidate for mayor of Boston). Lydon reports that "liberal" Boston will lose a mayor when White leaves office. V: Footage of White walking his dog in the Boston Public Gardens. Footage of Vallely saying that White was a "friend" to the community. Footage of Sears saying that White's presence in the neighborhood will be missed; that White is tired after a long political career. 1:12:46: V: Footage of Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) talking about a renewal in African American political activity in Boston and around the nation. Shot of a map of Boston with "black" Boston colored in pink. Lydon reports that "black" Boston comprises 20% of the city; that "black" Boston has spread from Mission Hill to Mattapan and Dorchester. V: Shots of a train on elevated tracks along Washington Street; of White campaigning in African American neighborhoods. Lydon says that "black" Boston had been a cornerstone of White's coalition during his four mayoral campaigns. Lydon reports from a street corner in "black" Boston. A train passes by on the elevated tracks behind him. Lydon reports that "black" Boston usually has a low voter turnout; that "black" Boston has high percentage of newly registered voters this year. Lydon says that the percentage of African American registered voters is now slightly higher than the percentage of white registered voters. V: Footage of African American residents voicing their support for Mel King. Shots of African American residents getting on an MBTA bus; of a Bay State Banner editorial endorsing David Finnegan. Lydon reports that Bruce Wall (African American minister) and Mel Miller (publisher, The Bay State Banner) have not supported King's candidacy. V: Footage of Stith talking about Miller's endorsement of Finnegan. Stith says that most voters are supporting King. Footage of Kay Gibbs (South End political activist) saying that African American voters believe in King's candidacy; that African American mayors have been elected in city's across the nation; that Miller has been discredited because he is a Finnegan supporter who has never supported an African American candidate for any city office. Lydon reports that King is not well rooted in African American church life; that many African Americans were turned off by his wardrobe. V: Shots of King; of a religious service in an African American church; of African American churchgoers outside of a church. Footage of Gibbs saying that middle-class African Americans had reservations about King at first; that all African American voters are now confident in King's ability to represent the African American community. Gibbs says that King does not think like a middle-class candidate; that he sees himself as a "champion of the underdog." Lydon reports that the African American community has undergone a change in its thinking about political candidates. V: Footage of Stith saying that increased voter turnout and political participation establishes the African American community as a political entity; that the African American community benefits from King's campaign even if he loses. 1:19:01: V: Footage of "Irish East" voters voicing their support for Flynn and Finnegan. Lydon reports that "Irish East" includes Charlestown, South Boston and parts of Dorchester. V: Shots of streets in South Boston and Dorchester. Lydon reports that "Irish East" has the highest voter turnout in the city; that "Irish East" has 1/8th of the city's population and 1/5th of the city's registered voters; that it will account for 1/4th of the voter turnout in the mayoral primary. V: Traveling shot of the Boston skyline. Lydon reports from a street in South Boston. Boston Harbor is visible behind him. Lydon reviews the voting patterns of "Irish East" in recent presidential and gubernatorial elections. Lydon says that "Irish East" often votes for losing candidates like George McGovern (presidential candidate in 1972), Gerald Ford (presidential candidate in 1976) and Ed King (Massachusetts gubernatorial candidate in 1982). Lydon reports that "Irish East" has voted for unsuccessful mayoral candidates like Joe Powers, Louise Day Hicks and Joseph Timilty. Lydon reports that "Irish East" has two of their own as candidates for mayor this year. V: Footage of "Irish East" voters voicing support for Flynn and Finnegan. Footage of Thomas Driscoll (South Boston political consultant) saying that there might be confusion between the "old" Flynn and the "new" Flynn; that Flynn is now a progressive candidate; that the "old" Flynn was an anti-busing, anti-abortion candidate. Footage of Paul White (State Representative from Dorchester) saying that Finnegan has a lot of support in the Dorchester community. White talks about Finnegan's connections to St. Ann's parish. Shots of South Boston. Footage of Driscoll talking about strong neighborhood connections in South Boston. Driscoll predicts that Flynn will get 60% - 75% of the vote in South Boston. Lydon reports from the corner of Adams Street and Gallivan Boulevard in Dorchester. Lydon says that "Irish East" has been out of political favor for a long time; that they now have two strong mayoral candidates. V: Footage of White talking about how Dorchester would benefit from having a Dorchester native as mayor of Boston. White says that Dorchester would claim Finnegan as a native son, even though he now lives in West Roxbury. 1:25:08: V: Footage of Richard Sinnott (Hyde Park Tribune) talking about the neighborhoods of Roslindale and West Roxbury. Shot of a map of Boston with "Irish West" colored in green. Lydon reports that the "Irish West" neighborhoods include the"city suburbs" west of the orange line; that a majority of the residents are Irish American; that there are also Polish, Greek and Lebanese residents. V: Shot of Casa Beirut restaurant. Traveling shot of a residential street in "Irish West." Lydon reports that most residents own their own homes in "Irish West"; that Brighton is included in "Irish West." Lydon notes that "Irish West" traditionally has a very high voter turnout. V: Shots of residents boarding an MBTA bus; of residents walking on a street. Lydon reports that many "Irish West" voters are civil servants, police officers, and teachers; that politics are important to these voters. V: Footage of Sinnott saying that the community benefits from good city services; that "Irish West" voters are not concerned with "linkage"; that displacement and housing for the elderly are important issues in the community. Footage of Joseph Timilty (State Senator) saying that property values declined during the busing crisis; that property values have risen again. Lydon reports that the Forest Hills area has some Latino voters and "new gentry"; that some of these voters may vote for Mel King. V: Shots of urban streets; of Latino children playing on a sidewalk. Lydon reports from a street in front of a church in "Irish West." Lydon notes that most "Irish West" voters support either Ray Flynn or David Finnegan; that Finnegan seems to be the favorite in "Irish West." Lydon notes that Finnegan moved from Dorchester to West Roxbury to raise his family; that Finnegan has connections in "Irish East" and "Irish West." Lydon notes that most of Boston's Irish mayors have come from "Irish West." Lydon mentions former Boston mayors White, John Collins, Maurice Tobin and James Michael Curley. V: Footage of Maura Hennigan (Boston City Council) saying that Curley's legacy lives on in Jamaica Plain. Footage of "Irish West" voters voicing support for Finnegan and Flynn. A few voters voice support for Mel King and Dennis Kearney. Footage of Sinnott saying that White never had the full support of the "Irish West" community; that White was a good mayor. Lydon reports from a park. A football team practices on a field behind him. Lydon says that White was a West Roxbury native; that White always had to fight for votes in "Irish West"; that residents have mixed feelings about White. V: Footage of Timilty saying that White will be remembered fondly with the passage of time. Footage of Sinnott saying that White was "a working mayor as well as a dancing mayor." 1:30:29: V: Footage of city residents voicing support for the candidate of their choice. Closing credits roll. The logos of The Ten O'Clock News underwriters New England Telephone ,and Shawmut Brokerage Services are displayed.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/10/1983
Description: Christy George reports that the city of Lowell has chosen a central enrollment plan to accomplish school desegregation in its public schools. George notes that central enrollment plans are implemented through magnet schools; she adds that students choose schools according to the programs they offer instead of by location. George interviews Robert Kennedy (Mayor of Lowell). Kennedy says that the Lowell School Committee opted for a central enrollment plan in order to avoid court-ordered desegregation of the schools. George reports that the city of Cambridge uses a central enrollment plan and has become a national model for school desegregation. George interviews Peter Colleary (Director of Student Assignments, Cambridge Public Schools) about central enrollment in Cambridge Public Schools. George's report includes footage of a meeting between Colleary and school officials from Rochester, NY. The officials from Rochester ask questions about central enrollment in Cambridge. George notes that opponents to school desegregation in Lowell believe that central enrollment is a form of mandatory desegregation. George interviews George Kouloheras (Lowell School Committee) about his opposition to the central enrollment plan. George notes that Cambridge had a successful school system even before the adoption of the central enrollment plan. She adds that the Cambridge model may not work in every city. George's report includes footage of buses in front of schools in Lowell, footage of a girls' soccer game in Cambridge, footage of school children in classrooms, and footage of buses arriving at South Boston High School in 1976. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Marcus Jones reports on tension over school desegregation in Lynn
1:00:05: Visual: Shots from a moving vehicle of students in front of South Boston High School in 1976; of buses with police escort travelling up G Street to South Boston High School; of African American students exiting buses in front of South Boston High School. Christy George reports that the city of Lowell wants to avoid court-ordered school desegregation and forced busing. George reports that Lowell is opting for a voluntary school enrollment plan; that students choose three schools which they would like to attend; that students will be bused to one of those schools. V: Shots of elementary school students in a school cafeteria; of a bus pulling up to an elementary school. Footage of Robert Kennedy (Mayor of Lowell) saying that the Lowell School Committee acted responsibly; that the School Committee wanted to avoid court intervention in Lowell schools. Shots of a white teacher teaching in a racially integrated elementary school classroom in Lowell. Shots of students in the classroom. George reports that the central enrollment plan is implemented through magnet schools; that the magnet schools offer diverse programs; that students can choose the school which offers programs which appeal to them. George notes that racial balance can result from the magnet school system; that the system has worked well in the city of Cambridge. V: Footage of Peter Colleary (Director of Student Assignments, Cambridge Public Schools) saying that school choice has been successful for Cambridge Public Schools. George notes that Colleary matches Cambridge students with their schools; that some schools have increased minority enrollment from 9% in 1981 to 43% in 1987; that students are willing to choose schools outside of their neighborhoods. V: Shots of the Cambridge High School girls' soccer team playing a soccer game. Footage of Colleary saying that 65% of Cambridge Public School students do not attend schools in their districts. Shots of the exterior of Cambridge Rindge and Latin School. George notes that the city of Cambridge owns many of its own buses; that half of the bus drivers work for the city. dShots of a school bus; of the exterior of Cambridge Rindge and Latin School. George notes that the Cambridge Public School System has become a national model for desegregation. V: Shots of Colleary talking to a delegation from the public school system of Rochester, NY. Members of the delegation ask Colleary questions about the Cambridge Public School System. George notes that critics in Lowell see the Cambridge model as another form of mandatory desegregation. V: Shot of a school bus pulling away from an elementary school in Lowell. Footage of George Kouloheras (Lowell School Committee) saying that central enrollment plans "are a euphemism for forced busing." Kouloheras says that central enrollment does not improve the education in the schools. Footage of Colleary saying that 35% of Cambridge students are bused; that the students have chosen to attend schools outside of their districts. Colleary calls it "busing by choice." George stands in front of a school at dusk. George reports that Cambridge was providing good education in its schools before the implementation of the voluntary desegregation plan. George notes that the Cambridge model may not work in every city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/26/1987
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Mayor Ray Flynn has pledged to integrate public housing projects in South Boston by next year. Currently there are no African American families among the 2400 families living in the Old Colony Housing Project in South Boston. Interviews with South Boston housing project residents talking about their opposition to integration. Residents say that the quality of life will decline if African American families move into the project. Other residents say that violence will erupt if the projects are integrated. Interview with Flynn, who says that the housing projects will be integrated in a responsible manner. He talks about integration of public housing projects in Charlestown. Civil rights advocates accuse the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) of ignoring non-white families on the waiting list for apartments in South Boston projects. Interview with Alex Rodriguez of the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination, who says that the BHA's housing policies are illegal. Rodriguez threatens to take action against the city. Vaillancourt reports that the pace of integration in the housing projects has been slow. Interview with an African American laborer who says that he would not mind moving into a housing project in South Boston. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Hope Kelly reviews the history of public housing in Boston
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of a white male South Boston resident saying that violence resulted from forced busing and "forced beaching." Footage of a white female South Boston resident speaking from the window of her project apartment. She says that she would prefer the neighborhood to remain white; that a racial war may erupt if non-whites move in. Shots of the Old Colony Housing Project in South Boston; of a sign reading, "Old Colony Public Housing Development." Meg Vaillancourt reports that there are close to 2400 families living in the Old Colony Housing Project; that 39 families are Latino, Asian or Native American; that there are no African American families in the project. George reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has said that there are African American families on the waiting list for public housing; that the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) will place those families in the Old Colony Project next year. V: Shot of Flynn speaking to a reporter. Footage of a white female South Boston resident saying that the Mission Hill Housing Project was once a nice place to live; that housing projects decline when African American families move in. Footage of a white female resident saying that there will be fights and riots if African American families move into the projects; of another white female resident saying that the neighborhood will decline if it is integrated. Footage of Flynn being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Flynn says that the integration of the housing project will take place in a responsible and professional manner; that there will be no community disruption; that housing projects were integrated in Charlestown. Flynn says that members of the community must participate in the planning for integration. Vaillancourt reports that 900 families live in the housing projects in Charlestown; that 45 of those families are non-white. V: Shot of the exterior of the Boston Housing Authority building in Charlestown. Vaillancourt notes that civil rights advocates say that the BHA and the mayor have done little to promote integration of the projects in South Boston. V: Footage of Alex Rodriguez (Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Rodriguez says that he will recommend that the city receive no money unless desegregatory action is taken within 30 or 40 days. Rodriguez says that the city stands to lose millions of dollars. Vaillancourt reports that the pace of integration in the South Boston projects has been slow. V: Shots of the housing projects in South Boston. Vaillancourt notes that a spokesperson for the BHA says that there were more white families on the waiting lists for the South Boston projects. Vaillancourt reports that critics accuse the BHA of ignoring non-white families on the waiting list for the South Boston projects. V: Footage of Rodriguez saying that the BHA is denying entrance to the projects for non-white families. Rodriguez says that the BHA policy is illegal. Footage of a white female South Boston resident saying that she does not understand why African American families would want to move into the housing project. Vaillancourt notes that an African American man was working at the Old Colony Housing Project this afternoon. V: Footage of the African American worker saying that he would have no problem living in this project. Footage of a white male resident saying that Flynn will lose votes if he pushes for integration of the South Boston housing projects. Shot of a white woman and her children in front of a project building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/29/1987
Description: Hope Kelly reviews the history of public housing in Boston. The first public housing project was built in South Boston in the 1930s. The tenants were all white. The public housing projects in South Boston remained white even as the non-white tenant population grew in the rest of the city. Shots of photographs of white and African American public housing tenants in the 1940s and 1960s. Kelly reviews statistics concerning the numbers of white and non-white families on the waiting list for public housing. The waiting list for public housing in Boston is currently 80% non-white. The waiting list for white families is shrinking while the waiting list for non-white families is growing. There are no African American families living in the housing projects in South Boston in 1987. The Boston Housing Authority (BHA) went into receivership in 1979 due to mismanagement. Mayor Ray Flynn was named receiver of the BHA in 1984. Flynn must integrate the housing projects, but is likely to meet opposition from South Boston residents. Kelly's report is accompanied by footage of Flynn from the 1983 mayoral campaign and by footage of African American and white public housing tenants. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Ray Flynn has pledged to integrate public housing projects in South Boston by next year
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) at the D Street Housing Project in South Boston in 1983. Flynn talks to project residents. Hope Kelly reports that Flynn announced his candidacy for mayor at a South Boston Housing Project in 1983; that there were no African American families in any South Boston housing projects in 1983; that there are still no African American families in South Boston projects in 1987. V: Shots of a white woman standing at the entrance to a project building; of a white woman looking out of the window of a project apartment. Aerial shot of a housing project in South Boston; of an African American children outside of a housing project building. Shot of a white child scrambling under a fence near a housing project. Kelly notes that the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) is responsible for 69 housing projects in Boston; that 10% of the city's population lives in the projects. Kelly notes that many projects have been integrated for years; that South Boston has not been integrated. Kelly notes that William Bulger (President, Massachusetts Senate) grew up in the Mary Ellen McCormack Housing Project in South Boston. V: Shots of Bulger speaking to a reporter; of a sign for the Mary Ellen McCormack Development; of white women and children sitting on a park bench. Kelly notes that the McCormack Development was the first housing project in all of New England; that the project tenants were white when the project was built in the 1930s. V: Shots of black and white photos of white families and children; of white families in apartments. Kelly notes that people of color began to move into the city; that they became tenants of public housing. V: Shot of a black and white photo of an African American student among white students at the Bromley Heath Housing Project in the 1940s; of a black and white photo of a racially diverse group of children outside of the Cathedral Project in the South End in the 1960s. Kelly notes that the minority population in Boston's public housing doubled in the 1960s. V: Shots of African American students walking home from school; of an African American woman walking her dog on a sidewalk. Kelly notes that the housing projects in South Boston remained white through the 1960s and 1970s; that the BHA waiting list for public housing is 80% minority. V: Shots of a white residents at the entrance to a project building; of an African American girl outside of a housing project. On-screen text lists statistics about the BHA waiting list for public housing. Kelly notes that the BHA waiting list for public housing had 1,455 white families and 9,633 minority families in September of 1987; that the BHA waiting list had 1,688 white families and 9,408 minority families in September of 1986. Kelly notes that there are fewer white families on the waiting list in 1987; that there are more minority families on the waiting list. V: Shots of African American adults and children outside of a housing project. On-screen text lists statistics from the BHA waiting list for public housing. The statistics show the numbers of white, African American, Latino and Asian families on the BHA waiting list. Kelly notes that the numbers of non-white families waiting for public housing have increased dramatically; that the numbers of white families waiting for public housing have increased by less than 100 families. V: Shots of African American children playing outside of a housing project. WCVB-TV footage of Flynn on election night in November of 1983. Flynn says that the city has overcome its racial divisions. Kelly notes that BHA went into receivership in 1979 due to gross mismanagement and poor conditions. V: Shots of a courtroom hearing; of trash accumulated around and inside of public housing project buildings. Kelly reports that racial segregation remains an issue for public housing in Boston; that Flynn was named as receiver of the BHA in 1984. V: Shot of an African American girl looking out of a window of a project apartment. Footage of Flynn saying that people cannot be told where to live or where not to live. Shots of an elderly white woman on a park bench; of a white man wearing a Southie sweatshirt, sitting outside of a housing project. Kelly notes that South Boston residents are being asked to integrate the housing projects one week before the mayoral elections.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/29/1987
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on the slow pace of public housing integration in South Boston. Footage of Doris Bunte, the director of the BHA talking about housing integration in 1986. The waiting list for public housing is 80% minority, but that there are no African American families living in the three public housing projects in South Boston. One resident talks about her opposition to housing integration. The Boston Housing Authority (BHA) says that white families were first on the waiting lists for South Boston Projects. Interview with William Wright of the BHA, who denies any discriminatory practices on the part of the BHA. Vaillancourt notes that the BHA says that the safety of African American families in all-white housing projects cannot be assured. Interview with with Alex Rodriguez of the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination. Rodriguez accuses the BHA of practicing segregation in their housing policies. Kathy Gannett a former employee of the Department of Housing and Urban Development has also accused the BHA of practicing discrimination. Interview with Gannett. Vaillancourt reports that neither Bunte nor Mayor Ray Flynn will comment on the slow pace of desegregation.
1:00:02: Visual: Footage of Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) from 1986. Bunte says that separate facilities are unequal facilities. Meg Vaillancourt reports that little has been done to desegregate public housing in Boston. V: Shot of a white woman and white children standing outside of a housing project building in South Boston. Footage of a white woman talking to a reporter from the window of her project apartment. The woman says that she would like the neighborhood to remain white. Shots of white project residents standing at the entrance to a project building; of white girl reading on the stoop of an apartment; of a white boy scrambling under a fence near a housing projects; of white children in the area surrounding the project buildings. Vaillancourt reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) hired Doris Bunte to run the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) four years ago; that Bunte is a former project resident. Vaillancourt notes that there are still no African American families living in the three public housing projects in South Boston. Vaillancourt adds that African American families are on the waiting list for public housing. V: Shots of white residents sitting on park benches outside of a project; of parochial school students walking home from school. Vaillancourt reports that the BHA says that families are placed on a first come, first served basis; that the BHA says that white families were first on the waiting list for the South Boston projects. V: Shot of an African American girl looking out of the window of a project apartment. Footage of William Wright (BHA) saying that African American families have not been passed over on the waiting list for the South Boston projects. Vaillancourt notes that non-whites comprise 80% of the BHA waiting list. V: Shots of African American children and adults outside of a housing project building. Footage of Kathy Gannett (former employee, Department of Housing and Urban Development) saying that African American families were passed over on the waiting list for apartments in South Boston public housing projects; that the BHA is denying access to public housing projects on the basis of skin color. Vaillancourt reports that Gannett has been fired from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD); that Gannett says that Bunte complained about her aggressive investigation of the BHA's desegregation efforts. V: Footage of Bunte from 1986. Shot of Wright sitting behind a desk. Vaillancourt notes that the BHA has denied Gannett's accusations. V: Shots of a child being held by a woman standing in the window of a project apartment; of a woman feeding a child dinner in an apartment; of the exterior of project buildings in South Boston; of a sign reading, "Old Colony Public Housing Development." Vaillancourt reports that the BHA has an emergency list; that families on the emergency list must be placed in the first available apartment. V: Footage of Wright being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks if an African American family on the emergency list would be placed in an available South Boston apartment. Wright says that the BHA is not housing people from the emergency lists in South Boston projects at this time. Wright adds that the families did not request apartments in South Boston; that the BHA is not discriminating against those families. Wright says that the turnover rate in South Boston public housing projects is very low. Wright says that he does not know if African American families on the emergency list were turned away from South Boston apartments. Vaillancourt reports that the BHA says that the safety of African American families in the all-white South Boston projects cannot be assured. V: Shot of white residents outside of a project building. Footage of Alex Rodriguez (Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination) saying that families are being denied access to public housing on the basis of race; that the housing authority has engaged in "social engineering" by continuing segregation in public housing projects. Rodriguez says that the BHA must abide by the law. Vaillancourt says that neither Bunte nor Flynn will comment on the situation. V: Shot of Bunte speaking to someone at a social function; of Flynn; of a white woman and white children sitting on the steps of a housing project; of a white child running around in front of a South Boston project building; of an African American man raking leaves in front of a project building. Vaillancourt notes that Flynn has said that the South Boston public housing projects will be desegregated by 1988; that Flynn will not comment on why desegregation has taken so long.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/05/1987
Description: Christopher Lydon reports that Mayor Ray Flynn attended a community meeting in South Boston to discuss public housing integration. Lydon notes that the audience was hostile in their opposition to the issue. Lydon's report includes footage from the meeting. City Councilor James Kelly speaks out against public housing integration. The crowd cheers. The crowd jeers at Flynn as he makes the case for a fair and equitable housing policy. Lydon notes that Kelly linked the housing integration issue to memories of school desegregation in the 1970s.
1:00:15: Visual: Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) approaching the stage at a community meeting in South Boston. A noisy crowd yells and boos. The audience is seated at long tables. Footage of Leo Tierney (South Boston resident) saying that apartments in Roxbury should go to Roxbury residents. Tierney says, "Leave us the hell alone. Leave the blacks alone. Leave us to live in peace." The crowd cheers. Members of the crowd rise to their feet to cheer. Christopher Lydon reports that James Kelly (Boston City Council) addressed the crowd of South Boston residents at a community meeting; that Kelly stirred the emotions of the crowd by linking public housing integration to the memories of school desegregation in the 1970s. V: Footage of Kelly saying that "misguided" youth and adults will engage in violence if the public housing projects are integrated; that some South Boston residents will serve time for civil rights violations. Kelly says that Flynn and Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) should be "hauled into court" if the city has refused to grant African American families access to their choice of housing projects; that Flynn and Bunte are more guilty of discrimination than South Boston residents. The crowd cheers for Kelly. Footage of Flynn addressing the crowd. Flynn says that he is here to tell the truth, not to campaign for votes. Flynn says that the city of Boston must provide fair and equitable housing for all.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/12/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Mayor Ray Flynn has promised to integrate public housing projects in South Boston and to put a stop to discriminatory practices by the Boston Housing Authority (BHA). African American families have been passed over on the waiting list for apartments in South Boston housing projects. Flynn's plans to integrate public housing have angered his constituents in South Boston, who refer to housing integration as "forced housing." Vaillancourt's report is accompanied by footage of white residents of a South Boston housing project and by footage of South Boston residents during the busing crisis in 1974. Vaillancourt reports that Flynn and Doris Bunte of the BHA attended a community meeting in South Boston to talk about housing integration with South Boston residents. Flynn defends himself against the hostile comments of South Boston residents. City Councilor James Kelly addresses the meeting, denouncing housing integration. Interview with Neil Sullivan, policy advisor to Flynn who talks about public housing integration and Flynn's relationship with South Boston residents.
1:00:02: Visual: Shot of a white woman standing at the entrance to a housing project building in South Boston. Audio of Neil Sullivan (Policy Advisor to Mayor Ray Flynn) saying that the people of South Boston understand discrimination. Meg Vaillancourt reports that residents of South Boston may understand discrimination; that some residents of South Boston also practice discrimination. Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) discriminates against African American families; that no African American families live in any of the three public housing projects in South Boston. V: Shots of a white woman looking out of a window of an apartment in a housing project; of the Old Colony Housing Project in South Boston; of a sign reading, "Old Colony Public Housing Development." Shots of white project residents outside of a project building. Vaillancourt reports that African American families were passed over on the waiting list for project apartments in South Boston; that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has promised to integrate the public housing projects in South Boston. Vaillancourt notes that Flynn met with angry South Boston residents at a community meeting yesterday evening. V: Footage of Flynn addressing the crowd at the community meeting. South Boston residents are crowded into the room, seated at long tables. Doris Bunte (BHA) is on stage with Flynn. Flynn says that the issue is fair and equal access to public housing. Shot of a bumper sticker reading, "Stop 'forced' housing." Vaillancourt reports that the slogan, "Stop forced housing" evokes memories of the anti-busing protests in South Boston in the 1970s. V: Footage of school buses pulling up to South Boston High School in September of 1973. Angry South Boston residents yell and jeer at the buses. Vaillancourt reports that South Boston residents are angry about the integration of the area's three public housing projects. V: Shot of a white woman in the audience making an angry remark. Footage of James Kelly (Boston City Council) addressing the crowd. Kelly says that South Boston residents are going to be denied the right to live in public housing in their own neighborhood. Members of the crowd stand and cheer. Meg Vaillancourt reports that the controversy surrounding the integration of public housing projects creates an identity crisis for Flynn; that Flynn is in disagreement with his South Boston neighbors. V: Shot of Flynn walking to the stage at the community meeting. The crowd yells and boos Flynn. Vaillancourt notes that an audience member asked Flynn when he was moving to Roxbury. V: Shots of white female audience member standing to address Flynn; of another audience member raising her hand. Footage of Flynn saying that he and his family were born and raised in South Boston. The audience jeers. Footage of Sullivan saying that Flynn was probably hurt by the attitude of South Boston residents last night; that Flynn has never ducked this sort of confrontation. Sullivan says that Flynn could have refused to go to the meeting. Vaillancourt reports that Sullivan said that the public housing projects in South Boston could begin to be integrated by April. Vaillancourt notes that no whites will be forced to move out of the projects in order to achieve integration. V: Shot of an African American man raking leaves outside of a project building; of a white female project resident speaking to a reporter. Shots of a public housing project in South Boston; of Flynn at the community meeting; of Bunte addressing the community meeting. Footage of Flynn saying that no person will be displaced to serve the purposes of integration. Footage of Sullivan being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Sullivan says that the average Boston housing development has a turnover rate of 10% each year; that 10% is a higher turnover rate than most neighborhoods. Sullivan says that the goal of the Flynn administration is to sustain a good quality of life in the public housing projects. Shots of a white woman and white children in front of a project building; of a young white boy running around outside of a project building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/13/1988
Description: David Boeri reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and the Boston City Council will work together to create a public housing policy that ensures equal access while providing some element of choice. Boeri notes that the city must comply with the policy of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) if they wish to continue receiving federal funds. Boeri's report includes footage of Flynn, Charles Yancey (Boston City Council), and Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) at a press conference about fair housing policy. Boeri's report also features footage from an interview with James Kelly (Boston City Council). Kelly says that free choice is more important than racial diversity. Boeri reviews the current housing policy and the policy requirements of HUD. Boeri's report also includes footage of white and African American tenants of public housing and by footage of Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council). This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Sonia Sanchez
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) speaking to the press. Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) stands beside him. Flynn says that Boston's housing policy will guarantee equal access to housing for all. David Boeri reports that Flynn met with the Boston City Council about public housing issues; that Yancey said that the meeting was productive. Boeri reports that Flynn and the Council agreed that equal access to public housing must be guaranteed. V: Footage of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) saying that no families will be displaced from public housing in order to achieve integration. Boeri reports that Flynn and the Council agreed to work together constructively on the issue. Boeri notes that Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council) was not present at the meeting; that James Kelly (Boston City Council) did not join Flynn and the other councillors for the press conference after the meeting. V: Shot of O'Neil at a meeting in the City Council chambers. Footage of Kelly in his office. Kelly says that people should be able to choose where they want to live; that the new policy will create "forced housing" instead of "fair housing." Boeri notes that the current housing selection process allows each applicant to select choose three public housing projects where he or she would like to live. Boeri reports that South Boston residents usually list the three housing projects in South Boston; that the three housing projects are all white. V: Shots of Flynn and the councillors speaking to the press; of a white woman looking out of a window of an apartment in a project building; of a white woman and white children in front of a project building; of a sign for the Old Colony Housing Project in South Boston. Shot of a housing project in South Boston. Shots from a moving vehicle of a housing project in Mission Hill. Shot of an African American boy near a dumpster outside of a public housing project. Boeri notes that the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has called Boston's housing policy discriminatory; that the three-choice system has been rejected in other cities. Boeri reports that HUD has recommended a city-wide list, where applicants take the first available apartment. V: Shots of white residents outside of a public housing project in South Boston. Footage of Kelly saying that there is nothing wrong with giving tenants a choice about where they want to live. Kelly says that free choice may result in housing developments which are not racially diverse; that free choice is more important than racial diversity. Shot of Bolling. Boeri reports that Bolling would also like to protect the three-choice system. Boeri notes that HUD provides 70% of Boston's public housing funds; that Boston stands to lose $75 million if they do not comply with HUD policy. V: Shot from a moving vehicle of a manicured lawn in front of a public housing development; of a public housing project on Fidelis Way. Footage of Bolling saying that the city will try to negotiate with HUD to develop an application process with some degree of choice for tenants. Boeri notes that the HUD policy will make tenants choose between living in public housing and living in the neighborhood of choice. Boeri notes that there are 14,500 families on the waiting list for public housing in Boston. V: Shots of public housing projects in Boston; of a racially diverse group of children playing outside of a project building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/14/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on discriminatory practices by the Boston Housing Authority (BHA). African American families are passed over on the waiting list for apartments in South Boston housing projects. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has ordered the BHA to stop this policy. Interview with Doris Bunte, director of the BHA. Bunte says that the BHA is not intentionally engaged in discrimination. Bunte adds that she concentrated on maintenance and repair of units when she took office and has now turned her attention to the fair housing issue. Bunte notes that she is concerned about the safety of non-white families in South Boston housing projects. Vaillancourt reviews previous efforts to desegregate public housing projects in Charlestown. She notes that the BHA must change its policy despite public resistance in South Boston.
1:00:11: Visual: Footage of Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) in her office. Bunte says that separate facilities are unequal facilities. Meg Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) has practiced discrimination against African American families; that white families are given preference over African American families for apartments in South Boston. V: Shot of a white woman and white children outside of a housing project building in South Boston; of a white woman speaking to a reporter from a window of a project apartment in South Boston. Footage of Bunte being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Bunte says that a conscious decision was made "at some point" not to send minority families to projects in South Boston. Vaillancourt asks why Bunte did not change the BHA policy. Bunte says that the BHA is moving slowly to change the policy; that the safety of non-white families in South Boston is a concern. Bunte says that the BHA has been involved in outreach and meetings to move the policy along. Vaillancourt reports that the same argument was used by Bunte's predecessors at the BHA; that white families still have more housing options than African American families in South Boston. V: Shots of a housing project; of white residents sitting outside of a housing project in South Boston; of parochial school students walking toward a housing project; of a white boy scrambling under a fence near a housing project. Vaillancourt reports that some white families in South Boston are living in apartments which are too large for their family size; that African American families in other parts of the city are living in apartments which are too small; that the BHA did not offer available apartments in white housing developments to African American families. V: Shots of an African American girl standing outside of a housing project building; of African American children playing outside of a housing project. Vaillancourt reports that the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has called the BHA policy discriminatory; that the BHA must change its policy. V: Footage of Bunte saying that the BHA does not plan to discriminate against anyone; that the BHA will not steer anyone to a particular project. Vaillancourt reports that HUD has ordered the BHA to stop discriminating against non-white families; that the BHA has not been asked to integrate its housing projects. V: Shots of a white woman and children outside of a housing project building; of a young white boy running around outside of a housing project; of a group of African American schoolchildren walking on a sidewalk. Vaillancourt reports that HUD has ordered the BHA to offer available apartments in South Boston to African American families. V: Footage of a white female resident of a South Boston project. The woman saying that public housing projects decline when African American families move in. Footage of a white female project resident saying that gang fights will erupt if African American families move into the South Boston projects. Shot of a white woman walking in the snow with two white children in Charlestown. Shots of a public housing project in Charlestown. Vaillancourt reports that African American families were integrated into an all-white public housing project in Charlestown; that Harry Spence (former BHA director) organized the integration of the Charlestown projects. Vaillancourt notes that Spence carefully selected the families to move into the Charlestown projects; that the families did not include teenage boys who were likely to become involved in turf wars with other residents. V: Shots of Spence talking to a reporter; of racially diverse residents outside of a project in Charlestown. Shot of a white woman and child looking out of a window of a project apartment. Vaillancourt reports that HUD will not allow the kind of selection engaged in by Spence. V: Footage of Bunte saying that it is discriminatory to pass over families with teenagers when filling apartment in white housing projects. Vaillancourt notes that Bunte has not moved any African American families into public housing projects in South Boston. V: Footage of Bunte saying that she concentrated on making repairs to vacant units when she took over the BHA; that families are now living in units which were vacant. Bunte says that she also concentrated on maintenance; that only 20% of units were in compliance with the sanitary code in 1984. Bunte adds that 88% of units are now in compliance. Bunte says that the BHA did not turn its attention to the fair housing issue until 1986. Bunte says that the BHA should have considered integrating South Boston before Charlestown. Shots of vacant apartments strewn with trash; of a broken door in the hallway of a public housing apartment building; of the exterior of a public housing project building; of the snowy grounds surrounding a public housing project. Vaillancourt reports that Spence had planned to integrate the public housing projects in Charlestown, and then to move on to the rest of the city. Vaillancourt notes that Bunte did not follow up on Spence's plan until 1986; that the federal government found a pattern of discrimination before the BHA could remedy its policies. V: Shot of Spence; of a white project resident climbing over a pile of snow outside of a public housing project building; of African American men standing outside of a public housing project building; of children playing in the snow outside of a public housing project building. Vaillancourt notes that the BHA must change its policy in the face of public resistance in South Boston. V: Footage of Bunte saying that fair housing is an important issue; that the BHA will implement a fair policy for all residents.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1988
Description: Christy George reports that City Councilor James Kelly objects to an interfaith, interracial prayer service to be held in South Boston because he fears that the meeting could be seen as an endorsement of the city's plan to integrate South Boston housing projects. Kelly has called for the meeting to be moved to another location. Interview with Father Thomas McDonnell of St. Augustine's Church in South Boston and Reverend John Borders of the Morningstar Baptist Church. McDonnell and Borders say that South Boston is not a racist neighborhood. Interview with Jim Kelly. George quotes Kelly as saying that he opposes forced busing, racial quotas, and forced housing. Community leaders have met with Mayor Ray Flynn to discuss the peaceful integration of public housing projects, and hold a press conference. Doris Bunte of the Boston Housing Authority, Charles Stith of the Union United Methodist Church, John O'Bryant of the Boston School Committee, and Don Muhammad of the Nation of Islam, Roxbury speak at the press conference. George reports that Bernard Cardinal Law (Archdiocese of Boston) endorses the meeting. George notes that Flynn is pushing for housing integration over the objections of South Boston residents. Footage of Flynn at a community meeting in South Boston and footage of anti-busing activity in South Boston in 1977.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of Father Thomas McDonnell (St. Augustine's Church in South Boston) and Reverend John M. Borders, III (Morningstar Baptist Church in Mattapan) sitting together for an interview in South Boston. McDonnell says that both men believe in the power of prayer. Christy George reports that religious leaders want to hold an interfaith, interracial prayer meeting at St. Monica's Church in South Boston; that James Kelly (Boston City Council) has taken out a half-page advertisement in the South Boston Tribune; that the ad calls on the Catholic Church to move the prayer meeting to another location. George reports that Kelly fears that the prayer meeting could be seen as an endorsement of the city's plan to desegregate public housing projects in South Boston. V: Shot of the exterior of St. Monica's Church; of Kelly's advertisement in the South Boston Tribune; of a statue in front of the church. Footage of McDonnell saying that racism is a moral issue. Borders says that prayer is a means to change the people's hearts. Footage of police arresting two women on G Street in South Boston on May 12, 1977. Shots of police cruisers escorting school buses along a city street; of a housing project in South Boston. Shots of a sign for the Old Colony Housing Project; of a white woman and children in front of a housing project building. George notes that South Boston became a battleground during school desegregation. George reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has announced that the public housing projects in South Boston will be integrated; that Flynn alienated many South Boston voters by pushing for public housing integration. V: Shot of Flynn approaching the stage at a community meeting in South Boston on January 12, 1988. The crowd jeers and boos as Flynn walks on to the stage. Shot of audience members seated at long tables. Footage of Kelly at the community meeting. Kelly says that South Boston residents will serve time for civil rights violations if the public housing projects are integrated. The crowd applauds Kelly. George reports that community leaders met with Flynn today to talk about peaceful desegregation of the projects; that attendees at the meeting expressed thinly disguised scorn for Kelly. V: Shot of Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) speaking at a press conference. Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) and two other African American community leaders stand behind her. Footage of John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) at a press conference. A reporter asks him if Kelly's name was mentioned in the meeting with Flynn. O'Bryant replies, "Who's he?" George reports that Kelly believes that affirmative action is reverse racism. George quotes Kelly as saying that "assigning the needy to public housing based on race is morally and legally wrong." V: Shot of Kelly at his desk. A quote from Kelly is written out in text on-screen. Footage of Kelly saying that supporters of equal opportunity must oppose forced busing, racial quotas, and forced housing. Footage of Stith saying that there are some elected officials who insist on keeping the city divided; that religious leaders are making an effort to unite the city. Footage of Minister Don Muhammad (Nation of Islam, Roxbury) saying that not all Irish residents are racist; that African Americans in Roxbury are not all drug addicts. George reports that Bernard Cardinal Law (Archdiocese of Boston) endorsed the prayer meeting. George quotes Law as saying that publicity "could lead to the erroneous impression that racial discrimination is a problem of geography, which it is not. . . . Racial discrimination is a problem of the human heart." V: Shot of Law addressing an audience. A quote from Law is written out in text on-screen. George reports that one of the goals of the prayer meeting is to debunk the myth of South Boston as a racist neighborhood. V: Shot of a white family walking in front of St. Monica's Church. Footage of Borders saying that Kelly does not represent the views of all South Bostonians. Borders says that he had no problems in South Boston when he drove to today's interview at the church. George reports that religious leaders say that the prayer meeting is not about politics; that the controversy surrounding the meeting has become political despite the efforts of religious leaders.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/20/1988
Description: David Boeri reports from a press conference with Mayor Ray Flynn, Doris Bunte, of the Boston Housing Authority, Neil Sullivan, the Policy Advisor to Flynn, and Robert Laplante, from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The officials attempt to explain the new rules for the Boston Housing Authority's revised public housing tenant selection policy. The policy is intended to end discrimination in the selection process, but will not result in the removal of current tenants from their apartments. Boeri reports that the explanation of the policy is very confusing, but two tenants in attendance are able to do understand the policy. Interviews with public housing tenants Jean Deaver and Marcia Langford. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Reporter Meg Vaillancourt at the Old Colony housing project
1:00:15: Visual: Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) entering a press conference. Flynn approaches the podium and addresses the audience. Shots of the audience. Flynn says that he is asking for the goodwill and help of city residents. Shot of Bunte. David Boeri reports that Flynn has alienated some city residents on the issue of integration of public housing; that some white residents oppose integration; that some African American residents have been the victims of discrimination. V: Footage of Flynn addressing the audience. Flynn says that tenants will not be asked to vacate apartments in order to achieve housing integration. Shot of an African American woman in the audience. Boeri notes that Bunte and Flynn has some problems explaining the rules of the new public housing policy. V: Footage of Flynn at the press conference. Flynn shuffles through papers at the podium. Neil Sullivan (Policy Advisor to Flynn) approaches the podium to help Flynn. Sullivan addresses the audience. Sullivan tries to explain how tenants will be placed under the new policy. Shots of Flynn; of reporters at the press conference. Boeri notes that Sullivan's explanation was not very clear; that reporters at the press conference looked bored. V: Footage of Robert LaPlante (Department of Housing and Urban Development) addressing the audience. Laplante talks about the fine points of the new housing agreement. Shots of Flynn slipping out of the press conference; of Bunte. Sullivan looks for the mayor. Footage of Boeri at the press conference looking at a video monitor showing a speech by Flynn. Boeri looks at the camera and says, "I still don't understand this." Shots of audience members at the press conference. Boeri reports that several housing project tenants were at the conference; that the tenants were able to make sense of the rules of the new policy. V: Footage of Jean Deaver (tenant) saying that potential tenants will be put on one waiting list; that potential tenants will now be given equal treatment. Footage of Marcia Langford (tenant) saying that the rules are being put in place to assure South Boston white residents that they will not be moved out of their apartments for the purposes of integration.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/16/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that South Boston residents are opposed to the city's plans to integrate public housing projects. Residents are hostile to Mayor Ray Flynn when he attends a community meeting in South Boston to discuss plans for integration, with Doris Bunte of the Boston Housing Authority. Vaillancourt notes that South Boston residents have not changed their attitudes in the face of evidence that the BHA practices discrimination against African American tenants of public housing. Interviews with South Boston public housing residents about public housing integration. Many residents are opposed to integration. Some fear that the quality of life in the projects will decline after the housing projects are integrated. Others say that racial violence will be a result of integration. A few residents are not bothered by the prospect of integration. Vaillancourt notes that the controversy over public housing integration evokes memories of the busing crisis in the 1970s. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Officials attempt to explain the new rules for the Boston Housing Authority's revised public housing tenant selection policy.
1:00:02: Visual: Footage of a white female South Boston resident looking out of the window of a housing project apartment. The woman says that she would like her neighborhood to remain white. Meg Vaillancourt reports that South Boston residents remain hostile to the idea of integration of public housing projects. V: Shots of white residents outside of a housing project in South Boston. Footage of a white female resident saying that South Boston should stay white; that there will be trouble if the housing projects are integrated. Footage of another white female South Boston resident saying that white residents have not received fair warning about the placement of African American families in white housing projects. Shots of white children playing with a hose outside of a housing project in South Boston. Vaillancourt reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) announced plans to integrate South Boston housing projects in October; that Flynn tried to explain the policy at a community meeting in South Boston in January. V: Footage of Flynn and Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) the community meeting in January of 1988. Flynn addresses the crowd. A white woman shouts out a comment. Footage of Flynn approaching the stage as the crowd jeers at him. Vaillancourt notes that the audience at the community meeting was hostile to Flynn. Vaillancourt stands in front of a housing project building in South Boston. Vaillancourt reports that there is mounting evidence of discrimination against African American families requesting apartments in public housing projects. Vaillancourt notes that the mounting evidence has not changed the attitudes of white South Boston residents. V: Footage of Vaillancourt interviewing a white male South Boston resident. The man says that there will be trouble if African Americans move into the South Boston housing projects. Footage of another white male South Boston resident saying that the residents want their neighborhood to remain as it is. Footage of a white female South Boston resident saying that she will not be bothered if an African American family moves into her building. She says that African American families need housing as much as white families do. The woman says that some people do not feel the same way as she does; that she hopes no one will bother the African American families who move into the project. Shots of white residents outside of a project building; of a white baby playing in a wading pool outside of a project building. Vaillancourt reports that the city's housing policy has kept the housing projects segregated for fifty years; that the city is now changing its policy. Vaillancourt reports that some residents feel that the new policy will be biased. V: Footage of a white female South Boston resident sitting in a wading pool. The woman says that the city should not make tenants identify their race; that the city should place tenants in an apartment without knowing their race. Shots of the woman and two children in the wading pool. Vaillancourt notes that talk of integration in South Boston raises memories of the busing crisis in the 1970s. V: Footage of a white male South Boston resident saying that school desegregation caused the decline of the Boston School System; that most South Boston residents send their children to private schools. The man says that he will move out of public housing if African American families move in to the projects. Shots of female parochial school students walking toward a housing project building. Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) has not announced when the first African American family will move into the projects.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/16/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports that two African American families moved into a South Boston housing project today; he notes that the families are the first African Americans to live in the project in ten years. Jones reports that the two families were on the emergency placement list and had no other housing alternatives. Jones notes that there is increasing opposition to the mayor's housing desegregation plan by both African Americans and whites. He adds that the NAACP has filed suit to block the plan, contending that it unfairly ignores families discriminated against prior to 1983. Jones reports that the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) claims to have lost records for applicants before 1983, but will try to investigate claims of discrimination prior to that date. Jones interviews Carl Haith (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP) about the NAACP lawsuit. Haith says that the city needs to identify residents who were discriminated against prior to 1983. Jones' report includes footage of African American movers at a South Boston housing project and footage of white residents outside of the Mary Ellen McCormack Housing Development. Jones interviews one of the African American movers, who says that he has encountered no problems at the housing development. This tape includes additional footage of movers at the McCormack Housing Development. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: cThe campaigns of Jesse Jackson and Michael Dukakis have different agendas for the upcoming Democratic convention
1:00:03: Visual: Footage of an African American man moving a large box from a moving truck into a housing project building in South Boston. Marcus Jones reports that two African American families moved into a South Boston housing project today. V: Shots of white residents outside of the McCormack Housing Development; of a sign for the Mary Ellen McCormack Housing Development. Jones reports that an African American family last lived in the development ten years ago; that the family left because they claim to have been harassed by white residents. V: Shots of a moving truck outside of a project building. Police and movers stand near the truck. Jones reports that police officers in uniform and in plain clothes were present at the housing project today. V: Footage of an African American mover saying that he has had no trouble at the housing project today; that white residents have offered him refreshments while he did his work. Shots of the movers moving a couch from the moving truck into the project building. Two green shamrocks are posted above the entrance. Jones reports that the two African American families were on the emergency placement list; that they were placed at the project because they had no other place to go. Jones notes that opposition to the mayor's desegregation plan for public housing is growing among whites and African Americans. V: Shot of Jones and Carl Haith (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP) entering an office from a dark hallway. Footage of Haith saying that the city should not have to identify African Americans to enter an-all white housing project. Shot of the exterior of the NAACP offices in Roxbury. Jones reports that the NAACP has filed a lawsuit to block the city's desegregation plan. Jones notes that the NAACP believes the plan to be unfair because it ignores groups which may have been discriminated against before 1983. V: Shots of NAACP employees and volunteers in the NAACP offices. Footage of Haith saying that the city claims to be unable to identify victims of discrimination before 1983. Haith says that the city should try to identify those victims and compensate them. Jones reports that the Boston Housing Authority claims that many applications filed before 1983 were lost when the city switched to a new computer system. V: Shots of white residents standing at the entrance to a housing project building in South Boston; of a white woman looking out of the window of a project apartment; of a housing project in South Boston. Jones reports that the BHA says that it will investigate the claims of those who claim to have been discriminated against before 1983. V: Shots of African American movers at the McCormack Housing development. Jones stands in front of the NAACP offices in Roxbury. Jones reports that the NAACP led the fight to desegregate public schools in Boston; that the city had probably expected the NAACP to support its plan to desegregate public housing. Jones reports that the NAACP does not think the city's plan does enough.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/11/1988
Description: David Boeri reports that E.W. Jackson is the manager of WLVG radio station in Cambridge and the pastor of the New Corner Baptist Church in Roxbury. Jackson addressed a community meeting in South Boston last night about the city's public housing desegregation plan. He attacked atheism, school busing, and seat belt laws in his speech, and called the city's housing desegregation plan a form of "social engineering." Interview with Jackson in the studios of WLVG. He discusses public housing integration and says that "freedom of choice" is more important than integrated developments. Boeri reports that Boston City Councilors James Kelly and Dapper O'Neil are leading the fight against the desegregation plan, but that interest in the issue is waning among South Boston residents. Interview with Neil Sullivan, policy advisor to mayor Ray Flynn, who helped develop the housing desegregation plan. Sullivan says that elements of choice have been preserved in the city's new public housing policy.
1:00:13: Visual: Shots of a light outside of the studio door at WLVG radio station; of a record by Amy Grant spinning on a turntable inside of the studio. Music plays on the soundtrack. David Boeri reports that E.W. Jackson is the manager of WLVG, a gospel radio station in Cambridge. V: Shots of Jackson in the offices of WLVG. Shots of a record spinning on a turntable; of the WLVG logo on a piece of paper. Audio of Jackson talking to a disc jockey about the playlist. Shot of Jackson in the studio. Boeri reports that Jackson is also the pastor of the New Corner Baptist Church in Roxbury; that Jackson visited a community meeting in South Boston last night; that 350 white residents attended the meeting. V: Shot of Jackson addressing a community meeting in South Boston on July 12, 1988. Members of the audience stand to applaud for him. Footage of Jackson ad dressing the meeting. Jackson says that South Boston residents have been "dumped on" by city leaders. Footage of Jackson sitting behind a desk, being interviewed by Boeri. Jackson chuckles when Boeri asks him if he had ever imagined bringing an audience of South Boston residents to their feet. Shots of Jackson addressing the community meeting. Boeri reports that Jackson attacked atheism, school busing, and seat belt laws in his speech at the meeting in South Boston. Boeri says that Jackson called the city's plan to desegregate public housing is an example of "social engineering." V: Shots of audience members at the community meeting. Footage of Jackson addressing the meeting. Jackson says that he can understand why the people of South Boston do not want bureaucrats telling them how to live their lives. The audience applauds. Boeri reports that James Kelly (Boston City Council) and Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council) are leading the fight against the city's desegregation plan for public housing; that interest in the struggle may be waning among South Boston residents. V: Shot of Jackson addressing the meeting. O'Neil sits beside the podium. Kelly is visible behind Jackson. Shot of empty seats at the back of the room. Footage of Boeri asking Jackson if he thinks he might have been "used" by Kelly and O'Neil. Jackson quotes the Bible as saying that it is good to be used for a good cause. Footage of Neil Sullivan (Policy Advisor to Mayor Ray Flynn) being interviewed by Boeri. Sullivan says that the attending the community meeting is a good way to get on television. Boeri reports that Sullivan says that Jackson has confused the issues. V: Footage of Jackson saying that tenants must be able to choose where they want to live; that freedom of choice is more important than integrated developments. Footage of Sullivan saying that the city's plan tries to preserve elements of choice in the new housing plan. Footage of Jackson saying that affordable and adequate housing is needed in every neighborhood. Footage of Sullivan saying that the city of Boston is working harder than any other major city on the issue of affordable housing. Footage of Jackson leaving the stage at the community meeting. Jackson shakes hands with several attendees of the meeting. Boeri reports that Jackson may have forged a new alliance with South Boston residents.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/13/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on negotiations in court between the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) and the NAACP over compensation for minority families who were victims of the BHA's discriminatory housing policies. Vaillancourt notes that the BHA and the NAACP disagree on the number of families to be compensated and the amount of compensation due to them. Vaillancourt interviews Dianne Wilkerson (NAACP) and Albert Willis (Attorney, City of Boston) about the negotiation. Vaillancourt adds that negotiations will continue until the next court date. Vaillancourt reports that the first African American families moved into a South Boston housing project last month as part of the court-ordered plan to integrate public housing. Vaillancourt's report is accompanied by footage of African American movers at the Mary Ellen McCormack Housing Development and by footage of white residents of South Boston housing projects.
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of white children outside of a housing project building in South Boston. The children are keeping cool with a garden hose and a wading pool. Shots of two white women outside of the housing project building; of a baby playing in a wading pool. Meg Vaillancourt reports on the court case concerning the Boston Housing Authority's public housing placement policy. Vaillancourt reports that federal authorities have charged the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) with discriminatory practices; that the BHA has agreed to reorganize its policy of assigning tenants to public housing. Vaillancourt reports that the first African American families moved into a South Boston Housing Project last month; that the BHA has not decided how to compensate African American families who had been passed over in favor of whites on the waiting list. V: Shots of African American movers moving furniture and boxes from a moving truck into the McCormack Housing Development in South Boston. Vaillancourt reports that the city calls the African American families "disadvantaged." Vaillancourt notes that the city estimates that about 100 families have been "disadvantaged" by the policy. V: Shots of African American adults and children outside of a public housing project building. Vaillancourt reports that the NAACP has estimated that more than 2,000 African American families were passed over on the BHA waiting list; that the NAACP has brought a lawsuit against the city to gain compensation for those families. V: Footage of Dianne Wilkerson (attorney for the NAACP) speaking to reporters. Wilkerson says that the NAACP has always believed that the number of victims is approximately 2,000 families; that the BHA will end up finding that the NAACP's estimate is correct. Footage of Albert Willis (Attorney, City of Boston) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Willis says that he does not know where the NAACP has gotten its numbers. Willis says that the BHA will discuss compensation beyond 100 families if the NAACP can provide evidence to back up its estimate. Shots of African American children playing outside of a public housing project. Vaillancourt reports that the NAACP and the city of Boston disagree on the amount of compensation for the "disadvantaged" families. V: Shot of a Boston Globe newspaper article with a headline reading, "1,200 said to be victims of BHA racial practices." Vaillancourt notes that the Boston Globe newspaper reported that the BHA would pay $750 to each family. Vaillancourt adds that the NAACP wants each family to receive between $3,000 and $5,000. V: Shots of the exterior of the NAACP offices in Roxbury; of NAACP employees and volunteers in the NAACP offices. Footage of Willis saying that the money issue has been discusses by the city and the NAACP; that the discussions were productive. Vaillancourt reports that both sides said that the negotiations were productive. Vaillancourt notes that no issues were actually resolved; that the negotiations will continue until the next court date on Wednesday. Vaillancourt adds that the court will decide if the integration plan can continue if the two sides fail to reach an agreement.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/09/1988
Description: Carmen Fields interviews Dr. Kenneth Clark (psychologist). Fields reports that Clark and his Mamie Phipps Clark (psychologist) performed studies using dolls to gauge ego and self-esteem in young African American children. Fields notes that the Clarks' research influenced the Supreme Court's 1953 landmark decision on school desegregation. Clark talks about his research, saying that African American children rejected the brown dolls because they had internalized society's negative stereotypes of African Americans. Clark discusses the use of the study by NAACP lawyers in the 1953 school desegregation case. Clark talks about the importance of school desegregation and the need for white and African American children to grow up with self-respect and respect for others. He says that children must be taught to act humanely toward others. Fields' report includes footage from the 1959 film Imitation of Life and footage from Eyes on the Prize. Fields' report also includes footage of school desegregation in South Boston and shots of dolls. Sound cuts out at the very end of the video.
1:00:10: Visual: Shot of a display of dolls and toys. Carmen Fields reports that Dr. Kenneth Clark (psychologist) and the late Mamie Phipps Clark (psychologist) used dolls in a 1939 psychological experiment; that the Clarks used dolls to gauge ego and self esteem in young African American children. Fields notes that the results of the experiments shocked the nation. V: Shots of Kenneth Clark being interviewed by Fields. Shots of a white doll; of an African American doll. Footage of Clark talking about how African American children internalize society's negative stereotypes of African Americans. Clark says that two out of three African American children rejected the brown dolls. Footage from the 1959 film, Imitation of Life. Footage of Clark saying that the children were forced to identify with the brown dolls they had rejected. Fields reports that the Supreme Court's 1953 decision on school desegregation was influenced by the Clarks' research. V: Shot of the exterior of the Supreme Court Building in Washington D.C. Footage of Clark saying that NAACP lawyers were interested in the study; that NAACP found parallels between the results of the study and the effects of segregated schools on African American chiildren. Fields reports that school desegregation has been accomplished in both southern and northern cities. V: Black and white footage from Eyes On the Prize. Shots of an African American girl being accompanied into a school; of the National Guard running in formation; of African American students entering a school; of an African American female student in a classroom; of an African American man walking with two white men. Shots of school buses pulling up to the front of South Boston High School in 1974; of South Boston residents jeering at the buses. Shots of police officers lined up on a streeet outside of a Charlestown Housing Project. Fields notes that Clark blames low self-esteem for many of today's educational problems including high drop-out rates and violence. V: Footage of Clark being interviewed by Fields. Clark says that society's problems cannot be solved by laws and court cases; that churches have not influenced people to act more humanely toward others. Clark says that children must be educated to act in a humane manner. Fields asks Clark how he responds to people who believe that desegregation did not work. Clark says that desegregation has never really been tried; that schools are still organized along racial lines. Clark says that schools are not set up to teach children to respect others. Fields asks if the doll study is still relevant today. Clark says that both white African American children need help in developing positive self-images in today's society. Shots of students in an integrated classroom; of white students in the classroom. Footage of Clark saying that racism is indicative of a lack of self-respect. Clark says that dolls can be used to communicate a sense of humanity and decency. Shots of white and African American dolls. Footage of Clark saying that some African American children in his doll study had good role models; that those children did not reject the brown dolls. Clark says that children can be taught to respect themselves and others.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/18/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on controversy over a new student assignment plan for the Boston Public Schools, which minority members of the Boston School Committee spoke out against at a breakfast commemorating the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.. School Committee members John O'Bryant, Juanita Wade, Jean McGuire, and Gerald Anderson speak to the media. They do not believe that the plan will provide equitable education for all. The plan was proposed by mayor Ray Flynn. It will allow parents to choose which schools their children will attend. Interview with Flynn, who defends the proposal, saying that it's supported by parents. He adds that School Committee members have been asked for input on the plan. Vaillancourt also reports that Flynn has proposed the decentralization of the Boston School Department and selling off the headquarters of the Boston School Department. Vaillancourt reports that minority members of the School Committee may rescind their support for superintendent Laval Wilson if he supports Flynn's school choice proposal. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Elma Lewis in Marsh Chapel at Boston University on Martin Luther King Day and Carmen Fields interviews Robert Nemiroff about the playwright Lorraine Hansberry
1:00:26: Visual: Footage of city and state leaders including Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), Bernard Cardinal Law (Archidiocese of Boston), and Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) singing together at celebration in honor of the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights leader). Meg Vaillancourt reports that local leaders gathered over breakfast today to celebrate Martin Luther King's birthday. Vaillancourt notes that there was controversy at the breakfast over a new assignment plan for students in Boston Public Schools. V: Footage of Juanita Wade (Boston School Committee) speaking to the media. School Committee members John O'Bryant and Jean McGuire sit beside Wade. Wade calls the new plan "segregation redux." Wade says that the Boston Public Schools need to provide choice, equity, and a quality education right now. Footage of Flynn speaking to the media. Flynn says that the plan has the support of the citizens of Boston; that parents are looking for this kind of reform. Vaillancourt reports that the new plan would allow parents to choose which schools their children will attend; that parents have not been able to choose schools since school desegregation began in 1974. V: Shots of buses pulling up to the front of South Boston High School in 1974; of South Boston residents jeering at the buses. Shots of buses parked in front of South Boston High School; of African American students walking among the buses. Vaillancourt notes that the population of white students in Boston Public Schools has declined since 1974; that non-white students make up 70% of the student population in Boston Public Schools. Vaillancourt adds that the School System has been criticized for not providing students with a quality education. V: Shots of non-white students in a classroom; of an African American male student sitting in a classroom. Shot of Flynn. Vaillancourt reports that Flynn and two consultants have proposed a plan to improve the schools and to increase parental choice. V: Footage of School Committee members O'Bryant, Wade, McGuire, and Gerald Anderson sitting on a couch. African American community leaders, including Charles Yancey (Boston City Council), Eugene Rivers (African Peoples Pentecostal Church) and Louis Elisa (Boston chapter of the NAACP), stand behind them. Anderson addresses the media. Anderson says that the Boston School System needs to provide a quality education to all before it can claim to be equitable. Anderson says that the mayor needs to provide more funding to the schools. Shots of O'Bryant and other community leaders. Footage of Flynn being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks Flynn if he is surprised by the attitude of the African American community leaders. Flynn says that he has been working on the proposal for several months; that community leaders have had many opportunities to review and give input on the proposal. Footage of Anderson saying that he is offended by Flynn's attitude. Anderson notes that Flynn has said that the statements of the African American leaders are "bogus." Anderson says that the community leaders are standing up for their constituents; that Flynn's statements are "bogus." Footage of Flynn saying that the members of the School Committee have had input on the proposal; that the members of the School Committee voted twelve-to-one in favor of the plan. Flynn says that the School Committee members were told that they would have further opportunities to give input on the proposal. Footage of McGuire saying that Flynn's proposal will cost more money. McGuire says that the School Committee has not been given additional money to fund Flynn's proposal. Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Public School System spends more money per student than any other public school system in the nation. V: Shot of an African American teacher and student at the front of a classroom; of a white male student seated in a classroom; of an African American female student seated in a classroom. Vaillancourt notes that Flynn has come up with another controversial proposal to fund neighborhood schools; that Flynn has suggested the decentralization of the Boston School Department. Vaillancourt adds that the proposal would sell off the downtown headquarters of the Boston School Department on Court Street. V: Shots of the exterior of the Boston School Department headquarters. Footage of Flynn saying that the downtown headquarters of the School Department should be sold; that the money should be put into neighborhood schools. Footage of O'Bryant saying that the School System is going to end up back in court if it does not receive support from the city. Vaillancourt reports that Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) has supported Flynn's school choice plan; that Wilson's contract ends in June. V: Shots of a meeting in the chambers of the Boston School Committee; of Wilson speaking at a School Committee meeting. Vaillancourt reports that the African American members have voted to extend Wilson's contract in the past. Vaillancourt notes that Wilson's future support among the Committee's African American members may depend on his position on Flynn's school choice plan.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/16/1989