Description: Mayor Ray Flynn welcomes a delegation of African diplomats to Boston at a ceremony in City Hall. Irene Smalls (Director of Public Information for Flynn) and Flynn present a book about Boston to each diplomat. Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) addresses the delegation. He reads a proclamation from the Boston City Council, welcoming the diplomats to Boston. City Councilors David Scondras, Bruce Bolling and Maura Hennigan are introduced to the delegation. The ambassador from Gambia thanks Flynn and the city of Boston for receiving their visit. Yancey delivers closing remarks at the ceremony. He thanks the ambassadors. The diplomats and city officials socialize at a reception at City Hall. Flynn circulates among the members of the delegation. Flynn and one of the diplomats raise their glasses in an informal toast. Members of the delegation speak to one another.
1:00:00: Visual: Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) addresses a delegation of African diplomats at City Hall. Flynn speaks into a microphone about the historic heritage of Boston. The African delegation stands and listens. Flynn talks about John F. Kennedy (former US President) and other political leaders from Boston. Shots of the members of the African delegation. Flynn welcomes the delegation to Boston. Shot of Flynn from the back of the room. Shots of the members of the delegation. Flynn presents books to the members of the delegation. Irene Smalls (Director of Public Information for Flynn) reads out the names of the delegation members. Flynn hands gifts of the book "A Book for Boston," to ambassadors and representatives from Benin, Burundi, the Central African Republic, Guinea, the Ivory Coast, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Togo, Uganda, Cameroon, Lesotho, Swaziland, Mali, the Congo, Sierra Leone, Kenya, and Gambia. Smalls has trouble pronoucing some of the ambassadors' names. Flynn shakes hands with each ambassador as he hands him the book. The ambassadors from Chad and Gabon are absent. Shots of the books on a table. Shots of the members of the delegation. 1:06:54: V: Smalls introduces Charles Yancey (Boston City Council). Yancey addresses the delegation. Yancey reads a proclamation from the Boston City Council. The proclamation notes that the delegation has come to visit Boston as part of the African Diplomats' Project, sponsored by the United States Information Agency and the African American Institute of Washington DC. The proclamation talks about the mission of the African Diplomats' Project. The proclamation welcomes the diplomats to Boston. Shots of the members of the delegation; of the proclamation in Yancey's hands. Yancey compliments Flynn on his sensitivity to the interests of all people. Yancey says that he has a copy of the proclamation for each ambassador. The delegation applauds Yancey's speech. 1:09:10: V: Flynn invites City Councillors David Scondras, Bruce Bolling and Maura Hennigan to the front of the room. Scondras, Bolling and Hennigan walk to the front of the room. Bolling shakes hands with the members of the delegation. Chris Ianella (Boston City Council) is announced. The ambassador from Gambia addresses the group. The ambassador thanks Flynn and extends greetings from the people of Africa to the people of Boston. The ambassador says that the group has come to Boston to learn from the city; that the group will return to their countries more able to meet the needs of modern Africa. The ambassador thanks Flynn and the city for giving the delegation a warm welcome. He wishes continued success to the city. The ambassador shakes hands with the councillors. Small invites Yancey to give closing remarks. Yancey notes that the city of Boston is honored to receive the delegation. He says that there are strong ties between Boston and the countries and Africa. Yancey thanks the delegation. The delegation applauds. 1:13:25: The delegation enters a room where refreshments have been set up. The diplomats sip champagne and punch while they socialize. Shot of the ambassador from the Central African Republic talking with another ambassador. An official directs the diplomats to the food table. V: Shots of glasses of champagne arranged on a table. An African American catering worker gives a glasses of punch to the ambassador from Madagascar and another diplomat. Flynn circulates among the members of the delegation. Shots of Flynn and various members of the delegation. Flynn and one of the diplomats raise their glasses in an informal toast. Members of the delegation stand near the food table. Shots of hors d'oevres in warming pans. A member of the media approaches one of the diplomats. A few of the diplomats serve themselves from the food table. Two diplomats confer with one another.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/10/1985
Description: Callie Crossley interviews several students about the student occupation of Ballou Hall at Tufts University. One female student says that the demonstrators have demanded that the university divest completely from South Africa and that the university increase financial aid for low-income and minority students. She criticizes the administration's decision to bar food from Ballou Hall during the student occupation. She remarks that the demonstrations across the nation prove that college students are not apathetic. Members of this protest have been circulating petitions, recently issued a report on institutional racism at Tufts, and received over 2,000 signatures (more than half the student body) on their petitions. A male student, the editor of the school paper, is interviewed as well who argues that while divestment is a complicated issues, this protest is counterproductive and the students are making things confrontational with the administration. He suggests holding a committee forum to discuss the issue further. He is skeptical that the students' demands will be met immediately. He further discusses Tufts' current image and history in social/political activism. A second female student is interviewed about her thoughts on the issue. An administrator is interviewed and asked about the administration's position on the demonstration. He states that they will let the demonstration run it's course and is working on informing the student body of what the university is doing. He also states that Tufts currently has agreed to selective divestment, not total divestment. Reporter compares this protest to activism seen in the 1960s and 1970s.
1:00:09: Visual: Callie Crossley interviews Alysa Rose (Tufts student) on the quadrangle at Tufts University. Crossley asks Rose about the previous evening's events in Ballou Hall. Rose says that 150 to 180 entered Ballou Hall yesterday evening; that the students refused to leave until their demands were met. Rose says that the protesters demanded total divestment from South Africa and increased financial aid for low-income and minority students. Rose says that there is a great feeling of unity inside the building; that students on the outside are trying to spread the protesters' message. The interview is interrupted by a commotion from Ballou Hall. Shots of security guards trying to keep students from throwing food to the protesters. One security guard catches a box of crackers. Crossley continues the interview. Rose says that she left the building in order to circulate a letter to Tufts' professors, encouraging them to show their support for the protesters. Rose talks about the protests which are being held across the nation. Crossley asks if the administration has met with the protesters. Rose says that the deans of the university met last night; that they decided to close down Ballou Hall, which houses the administrative offices of the university. Rose says that the deans are not allowing students or food into the building. Rose condemns Jean Mayer (President of Tufts University) for not allowing food into the building. Rose says that there are some seniors in the building who say they will not come out of the building, even for graduation. Crossley comments that college students today have a reputation of being apathetic. Rose says that these protests prove that today's students are not apathetic. Rose notes that Jesse Jackson (African American leader) is touring campuses; that Jackson tells students not to be materialistic or to become "yuppies"; that she is not sure if she completely agrees with Jackson. Rose says that she hopes that people in South Africa hear about the protests in the US. Rose says that she feels a kinship with protesting students at other colleges. Rose names other universities where protests are being held. The crew takes cutaway shots of Crossley and Rose. Crossley asks Rose if she knew what apartheid was before she came to Tufts. Rose says that she only recently became aware of apartheid. 1:04:51: V: Crossley sets up an interview with Michael Mayo (student, Tufts University). Crossley asks for the Mayo's opinion on the protests. Mayo says that he does not agree with the protesters' confrontational approach to the issue; that divestment is a complicated issue. Mayo says that he supports efforts to draw attention to the issue of apartheid. Mayo says that confrontation is counterproductive and has led to a stalemate between the protesters and the administration. Mayo says that the Tufts administration opted for a policy of selective divestment in 1979; that the university does not invest in companies which refuse to sign the Sullivan Principles. Mayo suggests that a committee of students, faculties and administrators discuss the issue of complete divestment. Mayo says that the student demonstration is disruptive. Mayo says that the students will probably leave the building over the weekend; that finals are coming up for most students. Mayo says that he has heard that the mood inside the building is becoming less enthusiastic. Mayo notes that the protesters begin to chant when the media show up. Mayo says that the protesters have drawn attention to the issue; that he is not sure if the administration will decide to divest as a response to student demonstrations. Crossley asks about student attitudes toward the demonstration. Mayo says that some students disagree with the protesters' methods; that some students view the demonstrators as "leftovers" from the 1960s. Mayo comments that the demonstrators had been circulating petitions protesting "institutional racism" at Tufts; that over 2,000 people signed the petitions. Mayo says that he is not sure if all of the 2,000 signees understood the issues brought up in the petition; that some signees wanted to be part of the 1960s "resurgence." Crossley comments that college students today have a reputation of being apathetic. Mayo says that there is a history of protest demonstrations at Tufts. He talks about specific protests in the 1960s and 1970s. Mayo says that the renewal of activism on campus is "refreshing." The crew takes a cutaway shot of Crossley and Mayo. Mayo talks about his experiences as editor of the campus newspaper. 1:09:16: V: Crossley sets up an interview with Tiffany Wheeler (Tufts student). Crossley asks for Wheeler's opinion on the protests. Wheeler says that the protests are a good thing; that she wishes she could help out more; that she signed petitions and attended the rallies. Wheeler says that she thinks the protest might help change the administration's policy. Crossley comments that college students today have a reputation of being apathetic. Wheeler says that she hopes that these protests signal a renewal of campus activism. Crossley thanks the student. 1:10:10: V: Shot of a protest sign reading, "Invest in students, not in apartheid." The protesters are heard chanting, "We need your support" and "The people united will never be defeated." Shot of a white female protester. Tufts University police officers stand in front of the Ballou Hall. Student protesters sit and stand in the entrance and foyer of the building. Crossley asks a police officer why the administration is not allowing food into the building. The officer tells Crossley to ask the chief of the Tufts police force. The officer directs Crossley to the chief. 1:10:58: V: Thomas Foster (Chief, Tufts University Police Department) stands with another man near the side of Ballou Hall. Crossley asks Foster why food is not being allowed into the building. Foster tells Crossley to speak to Curtis Barnes (Tufts University Communications Department). Crossley asks Foster when the administration decided to keep food out of the building. Foster says that the administration decided at the beginning of the protest to keep food from the building. Foster tells Crossley to ask Curtis Barnes about the university's policy toward the demonstrators. 1:12:03: V: Shot of a typed sheet reading, "What's going on at Ballou?" The typed sheet explains the background of the student demonstration at Ballou Hall. The chants of the demonstrators are audible in the background. 1:12:33: V: Crossley sets up an interview with Barnes. Crossley asks about the administration's position. Barnes says that the administration will let the demonstration continue; that student protests are part of the educational process. Barnes says that the administration's policy at this time is to abide by the Sullivan Principles. Barnes says that he hopes the demonstration will end soon. Crossley asks if it is true that the university has agreed to selective divestment. Barnes talks about the Sullivan Principles. Barnes says that the university has sold its stock in companies which refuse to abide by the Sullivan Principles. Barnes notes that the university holds stock in a company which is currently deciding whether or not to abide by the Sullivan Principles; that the university will sell the stock of that company if the company does not choose to follow the Sullivan Principles. Barnes adds that some people think that total divestment is a bad idea. The official says that stockholders are the people who can influence the policies of major corporations; that stockholders can change the policies of corporations doing business in South Africa. Crossley asks the official if the administration will change it position in response to the demonstration. Barnes says that he is preparing a fact sheet to inform all Tufts students about adminstrative action to combat racism. Barnes notes that the administration has strengthened financial aid packages for incoming minority students. Crossley asks if the administration plans to meet with the students protesters. Barnes notes that the protesters and the administration agree on divestment; that they only disagree on the extent of divestment. Barnes says that the administration will not negotiate with the students under any circumstances; that the administration will provide access to information about its policies; that the administration will not negotiate because they are already in agreement with the students. Crossley asks if the administration is feeling pressure to divest completely from South Africa. Barnes says that the administration and faculty have carefully considered the issue. Barnes notes that student protesters have demanded the addition of a course to the curriculum; that the faculty makes curriculum decisions. Barnes says that he hopes the demonstrations will lead to more discussion. Crossley asks why food has not been allowed into Ballou Hall. Barnes says that a student demonstration is not a "picnic." Barnes says that the students are welcome to eat in the dining hall; that the administration will not bring "food caravans" to the students. Barnes says that the demonstrators have put a stop to the proper functioning of the university; that the administration will not allow the demonstrators to cycle in and out; that the administration would like to focus on the issues and return to normal. Crossley asks if participation in the demonstration will keep hurt students academically or keep seniors from graduating. Barnes says that there is time to bring the protest to an end before commencement; that the protesters need to realize that sitting on the steps of Ballou Hall is not the most productive way to focus on the issue. Barnes says that he hopes to resolve the issue in the next few days. The crew takes cutaway shots of Crossley and the Barnes. Crossley asks why the administration is not allowing the students to take crackers or snacks from other students. Barnes says that the students have the option to leave the building if they are hungry. 1:19:29: V: Crossley stands near Ballou Hall. Crossley reports that the current student demonstrations against apartheid are reminiscent of student protests in the 1960s. Crossley notes that the student demonstrations are part of a national movement against apartheid. Crossley reports that students say that they will not back down from an administration which refuses to hear their demands.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/25/1985
Description: Apartheid protesters gather in front of the South African Consulate at 100 Charles River Plaza in Boston, surrounded by press. Mel King (community activist), Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) and Willard Johnson (Head, TransAfrica) demand to see Richard Blankstein (honorary consul to South Africa). Police officers bar entry to the building. Johnson announces to the media that the protesters will ask for Blankstein's resignation from his post. He adds that they will ask Blankstein's law firm to sever ties with South Africa. Johnson and the others are eventually allowed to enter the building. Several takes of reporter standup. Police, protesters and the media wait outside of the building. Themba Vilakazi (member of African National Congress) is interviewed by the media, announcing the resignation of Blankstein, and noting that Blackstein doesn't want to talk to the media. Johnson, King and Yancey exit the building. Johnson reads a statement of resignation from Blankstein, which says he is not a supporter of apartheid. Johnson announces a victory for the protesters. Johnson, King and Yancey walk over to a group of protesters on the street. Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) leads the protesters in a chant. Johnson announces the resignation of Blankstein. The crowd cheers.
1:04:34: V: Johnson tells the media that the protestors have asked for the right to meet with Blankstein; that they would like to ask Blankstein to resign from his post as honorary consul. Johnson says that the protestors are acting in the best interest of the public. Johnson says that the protestors are willing to meet with Blankstein outside of the building. Johnson says that Blankenstein must resign publicly; that his law firm must sever ties with South Africa. Johnson says that the police officer has gone inside to ask Blankstein to meet with the protestors. Johnson says that the protestors' goal is to force the resignation of Blankstein; that the protestors will focus next on other corporations with ties to South Africa. 1:06:30: V: Four protestors, including Yancey and Johnson, are let into the building. They are accompanied by Themba Vilakazi (member, African National Congress). Police officers stand guard at the entrance to the building. Protestors and the media wait on the sidewalk outside of the entrance. Tug Yourgrau reports from the sidewalk in front of the entrance. The chants of protestors are audible. Yourgrau reports that Blankstein has been honorary counsel to South Africa in Boston for two years; that Blankstein has refused to be interviewed on camera. Yourgrau reports that the protestors have promised to picket Blankstein's offices again of Friday; that a candlelight vigil has been planned on Sunday at the Boston Public Library. Yourgrau does several takes of his comments for the news story. 1:09:13: V: Police officers are lined up in front of the entrance to the building. The sidewalk is crowded with members of the media, protestors and bystanders. 1:10:13: V: Vilakazi talks to the media. Vilakazi reports that Blankenstein has signed a letter of resignation, which he will hand to the protestors. Vilakazi reports that Blankenstein has said that the actions of the protestors influenced his decision to resign. Vilakazi notes that Blankenstein has said that he does not support apartheid. 1:11:20: V: The media and protestors peer curiously into the lobby of the building. Johnson exits the building, accompanied by King and Yancey. Johnson reads a statement of resignation from Blankstein. Blankstein's statement describes his post as honorary consul. The statement denies that Blankstein is a supporter of apartheid. The statement reads that Blankstein does not wish to be made an apologist for the South African government. Johnson shows the letter to the media. Johnson says that Blankenstein's resignation is a victory for the protestors. Johnson says that the protestors will target other corporations with ties to the South African government. 1:14:02: V: Johnson, King and Yancey walk away from the building. The three men walk toward a group of protestors on the street. A large group of protestors is picketing on the sidewalk. The protestors chant, "Blankstein, resign." Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) stands on the bed of a pick-up truck, leading the chant through a bullhorn. Johnson takes the bullhorn from the man and addresses the crowd. Stith starts to cheer. King and Yancey stand on the bed of the pick-up truck with Johnson. Johnson announces Blankstein's resignation and holds up the letter. Johnson reads a portion of the statement from Blankstein. The crowd cheers as Johnson reads the statement. Shots of the crowd of protestors. The crowd chants, "Freedom, yes. Apartheid, no."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/04/1984
Description: A group of apartheid protesters picket the South African Consulate at 100 Charles River Plaza in Boston. Police officers stand at the door to the consulate. Willard Johnson (Head of TransAfrica) speaks to the crowd of picketers through a bullhorn. Themba Vilakazi (member of the African National Congress) addresses the crowd, condemning the South African government and criticizing Ronald Reagan for engaging in a policy of "constructive engagement" with the South African government. City Councilor Charles Yancey addresses the crowd, praising Bishop Desmond Tutu and urging the protesters to engage in acts of civil disobedience to protest apartheid. Community activist Mel King addresses the crowd, calling for the resignation of Richard Blankstein (honorary consul to South Africa). King criticizes the Reagan administration's policies in South Africa and talks about the need for large companies to divest from South Africa. Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) stands beside the speakers. Johnson expresses his support for Nelson Mandela and all those fighting apartheid in South Africa.
1:00:00: Visual: The WGBH camera crew sets up its equipment. A diverse group of anti-apartheid protestors picket the South African Consulate at 100 Charles River Plaza. More than 100 protestors carry signs and chant, "1, 2, 3, 4, let's close the consulate door." Shot of a white protest leader leading the chant with a bullhorn. 1:02:48: V: A police officer stands in front of the entrance to the building. He carries a two-way radio. Another officer stands with him. 1:03:20: V: The protestors continue to picket, chanting "Hey, hey, ho, ho, this consulate has got to go." Willard Johnson (head of TransAfrica) speaks to the crowd of picketers through a bullhorn. He urges them to keep the picket line moving. 1:04:19: V: Themba Vilakazi (member, African National Congress) speaks to the crowd about the struggle of black South Africans. Vilakazi criticizes the policies of the ruling government in South Africa. He says that the South African government in engaged in a brutal repression of the residents of black townships. Vilakazi says that the African National Congress (ANC) welcomes worldwide condemnation of the white regime. Vilakazi criticizes the policy of Ronald Reagan (US President) toward South Africa. Vilakazi condemns the Reagan administration's policy of "constructive engagement" with the ruling government. Vilakazi praises the actions of three US political leaders who encouraged an anti-apartheid sit-in at the South African embassy in Washington DC. Vilakazi encourages anti-apartheid protestors across the world. Shots of the picketers. Vilakazi talks about the ANC struggle for freedom in South Africa. Vilakazi closes his speech by saying, "We will win." The protestors chant, "We will win." 1:07:10: V: Johnson introduces Charles Yancey (Boston City Council). Johnson says that Yancey introduced legislation in the City Council for the divestment of city funds from South Africa. Yancey talks about his "unceasing opposition" to the policies of apartheid. Yancey criticizes the repression of blacks in South Africa. Other protest leaders help Yancey to adjust the bullhorn. Yancey says that the international community cannot tolerate the apartheid policies of the South African government. Yancey talks about the previous day's visit to Boston by Bishop Desmond Tutu (South African anti-apartheid leader). Yancey notes that Tutu has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Yancey calls on all people to join the protest against apartheid. Yancey criticizes the federal government's policy toward South Africa. Yancey talks about the importance of acts of civil disobedience in opposing apartheid in South Africa. The crowd applauds. 1:10:15: V: The crowd applauds as Mel King (political activist) takes the bullhorn. King thanks the protestors for coming out to protest. Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) stands next to King. King challenges Richard Blankstein (honorary consul to South Africa) to come down from the consulate and speak to the protestors. King challenges Blankstein to resign in protest of the South African government's apartheid policies. King accuses the Reagan administration of engaging in racist policies in South Africa. King says that protestors will picket multi-national corporations who do business in South Africa; that large corporations need to divest from South Africa. King accuses these corporations of supporting apartheid. King talks about a South African trade union leader who has been jailed by the South African government. King says that the trade union leader has encouraged US protestors to push for corporate divestiture from South Africa. King calls for an end to Reagan's policies and an end to apartheid. 1:14:16: V: Johnson puts on a hat with a sign pinned to it. The sign reads, "For shame." Johnson addresses the crowd. Johnson quotes Nelson Mandela (ANC leader) as saying that he is prepared to die for a free South Africa. Johnson expresses support for Mandela and the black South Africans who are fighting apartheid.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/04/1984
Description: Callie Crossley interviews Boyce Slayman (Rainbow Coalition) about African American perceptions of US President, Ronald Reagan. Slayman criticizes Reagan's policies and talks about racism in the campaign. Slayman says that the Democratic Party needs to address civil rights issues and other issues important to the African American community. Slayman adds that African Americans will become more politically active at the local level; he says that Reagan cannot afford to ignore the minority population. The tape includes footage of African American and white voters lining up at a polling station to vote. Voters enter and exit voting booths. Slayman and other campaign workers hold campaign signs in front of a polling station; the workers approach voters as they enter the polling station. Crossley interviews an African American man outside of the polling station. The man talks about why he voted for Walter Mondale and Reagan's proposed cutbacks. The man says that Reagan does not care about issues affecting the African American community. Crossley interviews a white woman and a white man. The woman says that she voted for Mondale and Geraldine Ferraro because she is a democrat and a supporter of women's issues. The man says that he voted for Mondale and that Ferraro's presence on the ticket did not affect his decision.
1:00:11: Visual: Callie Crossley interviews Boyce Slayman (Rainbow Coalition) near Washington Street. Crossley asks Slayman about African American perceptions of Ronald Reagan (US President). Slayman says that African Americans have suffered under the Reagan administration; that Reagan has cut programs in education, healthcare, and nutrition programs; that Reagan has rolled back affirmative action programs. Crossley asks Slayman about racism in the campaign. Crossley notes that most African Americans are supporting Mondale; that the majority of white voters are supporting Reagan. Slayman says that racism is a factor in the election. Slayman says that Jesse Jackson (candidate for US President) was treated poorly by the media during the primary elections. Slayman says that the Democratic Party is not speaking to the issues of African American voters; that the Democratic Party needs to address civil rights issues. Crossley asks what African Americans can expect if Reagan wins the election. Slayman says that African Americans can only hope that Reagan will change his policies. Slayman lists the policies that need to be changed under the Reagan administration. Slayman says that the nation will see declines in the areas of employment, civil rights and housing if Reagan does not change his policies. Crossley asks if a continuation of Reagan's policies will lead to unrest or riots. Slayman says that he would not expect riots; that riots would ensue if Jackson were assassinated. Slayman says that people of color will become more politically active at the local level; that African Americans are ignored at the national level of politics; that African Americans cannot be ignored if they take control of their immediate environment. Slayman says that African Americans will not support growth at their expense. Slayman says that an increase in African American political activity grew from African American opposition to Reagan's policies. Slayman says that Reagan cannot afford to ignore minority populations; that these populations need to benefit from the nation's growth and economic recovery. 1:07:23: V: The camera crew takes cutaway shots of Crossley and Slayman. Crossley and Slayman speak informally. Crossley and Slayman discuss whether the Democrats will retain control of Congress. Slayman talks about voting patterns in the South. 1:08:26: V: African American and white voters are lined up to vote in a hallway outside of a polling station. Poll workers sit behind a table. The poll workers flip through voter lists as they check in the voters. Shots of voters entering and exiting voting booths. An African American woman directs voters to the voting booths. Shots of the voting booths with curtains closed; of poll workers checking in voters. Shot of a voting machine with levers inside of a voting booth. 1:12:41: V: An African American man hands out flyers outside of a polling station. Slayman campaigns for a candidate outside of the polling station. Slayman and other African American campaign workers approach voters outside of the polling station. Shots of campaign signs for John Kerry (candidate for US Senate) and Walter Mondale (candidate for US President). The campaign workers continue to campaign outside of the polling station. A pick-up truck passes by, playing music from a loudspeaker. A sign on the truck reads, "Jesse yes. Walter no. Independent is the way to go." Shots of campaign signs. 1:14:51: V: Crossley interviews an African American man and an African American woman. The man says that he voted for Mondale because he is the best candidate. Crossley asks if Reagan has any understanding or caring for the needs of African Americans. The man says that Reagan does not; that Reagan's past performance shows that he does not care. The man fears that Reagan will make more cutbacks if reelected. Crossley asks if the man was influenced by Mondale's choice of Geraldine Ferraro as his running mate. The man says that Mondale sent a positive message by choosing Ferraro; that the ERA (Equal Rights Amendment) is a good thing. Crossley asks the woman about her vote. The woman says that she voted for Mondale. The woman says that she does not want to be interviewed. 1:16:33: V: Crossley interviews a white woman and a white man. The woman says that she voted for the Mondale/Ferraro ticket because she is a Democrat and supports women's issues. The woman says that she would have voted Democratic even if Ferraro had not been on the ticket. The woman says that the ERA must be passed. Crossley asks the man about his vote. The man says that he voted for the Mondale/Ferraro ticket because he is embarrassed to have Reagan as the leader of the country. The man says that he was more influenced by issues than he was by the presence of Ferraro on the ticket.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/06/1984
Description: Dr. Gloria White-Hammond (pediatrician) examines a young Latina child in an examining room. The child cries and White-Hammond comforts her, speaking in English and in Spanish. White-Hammond speaks to the child's mother about treatments for the child. White-Hammond examines the child with a stethoscope. Interview with White-Hammond about a program designed to increase the number of African American physicians across the nation. She says that medical schools lack the financial, academic and other kinds of support necessary to retain some students. She discusses the need for more minority physicians, who bring a "sensitivity" to the treatment of minority patients. Video cuts out and then comes back with stills of infographics on new Boston University medical school program and minority doctors.
1:03:41: V: The camera crew sets up a shot of the doctor examining the child. The child begins to cry. White-Hammond examines the rash on the child's leg. The child grows upset as she sits on the examining table. The child's mother removes her dress. White-Hammond comforts the child in Spanish. White-Hammond examines the child with a stethoscope. White-Hammond tries to comfort the child as she cries. 1:06:32: V: White-Hammond talks to Callie Crossley (WGBH reporter) and the camera crew. Crossley asks White-Hammond her opinion on a program designed to increase the number of African American physicians across the nation. White-Hammond says that she is not very familiar with the program; that the program sounds like a good idea. Crossley explains some of the features of the program. Crossley notes that the program eliminates the MCAT entrance exam for medical school. White-Hammond says that the program has potential; that the structure of the program and the selection process will be important. White-Hammond says that medical schools lack the kind of support system needed to retain some students; that financial, academic and other kinds of support are necesssary for students to do well in medical school. White-Hammond says that the medical field needs more minority doctors; that minority patients request to be treated by minority doctors. White-Hammond says that minority doctors bring a "sensitivity" to the treatment of minority patients; that many minority students have the intellectual capability and the determination to become successful doctors. Crossley closes the interview.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/28/1984
Description: Thomas Saltonstall (Area Director, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) speaks at a press conference to mark the opening of a Boston office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Saltonstall introduces Robert Williams (regional attorney for the EEOC). Saltonstall discusses the EEOC's commitment to the elimination of race discrimination in employment and to equal opportunities for women, older workers and minorities; he announces the initiatives planned by the EEOC to enforce federal anti-discrimination laws. Saltonstall says that the EEOC will focus on voluntary compliance. Saltonstall discusses statistics illustrating the underrepresentation, or "opportunity gap," in the employment of women in management and of minorities in the city's overall work force. Saltonstall presents statistics illustrating the "opportunity gap" for minorities in the printing/publishing industry, the communications industry, investment companies, brokerage firms, and retail stores. Saltonstall talks about the concentration of Boston's minority workers in lower-paying jobs. Tape 1 of 2
1:00:05: Visual: A federal official from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the US Department of Labor stands at a podium speaking to the media at a press conference on the opening of a Boston office of the EEOC. The official commends Thomas Saltonstall (Regional Director, EEOC) and the General Services Administration (GSA) for the design and effective use of space in the new EEOC office. Shot of the EEOC seal on the front of the podium. The official says that the EEOC is committed to equal treatment and access for all citizens; that minorities and women must be given an equal opportunity to advance themselves in the workplace. The official talks about the need for society to renew its commitment to civil rights. The official thanks the audience. Shot of audience members. 1:05:16: V: Saltonstall introduces Robert Williams (regional attorney for the EEOC). Saltonstall talks about the need to redress the employment opportunity gaps which exist for minorities in Boston. Saltonstall says that he will focus on race discrimination in employment; that the EEOC is also committed to equal opportunities for women, older workers and other minorities. Saltonstall announces the initiatives which will be taken by the EEOC to enforce federal anti-discrimination laws. Saltonstall says that the EEOC will promote a program of voluntary compliance with the statutes; that the EEOC will expand its services to the public; that the EEOC will focus on eliminating broad patterns and practices of employment discrimination; that the EEOC will focus on improving the quality and impact of the lawsuits filed. Saltonstall notes that he does not want to preach or embarass anyone. 1:08:23: V: Saltonstall defines the term "opportunity gap." Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the opportunity gap existing in 1980 for women as officials and managers in the Boston area. Saltonstall says that Boston rates among the lowest of six cities in a survey measuring the percentage of women in managerial positions. Saltonstall notes that minorities make up 29% of the labor force in the city of Boston; that minorities make up only 8% of the work force in the metropolitan area; that this disparity is greater in Boston than in any other major city. Saltonstall explains that the metropolitan figure of 8% has been used to calculate opportunity gaps; that the metropolitan figure is low when applied to businesses in the city. Saltonstall defines minorities. Saltonstall explains how the statistics were compiled. 1:13:58: V: Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the opportunity gap for minorities in the business of security/commodity brokerage. Saltonstall explains that individual companies will have performances which are better or worse than the average. Saltonstall notes that an unnamed private company in the Boston area has been targeted for enforcement action by the EEOC; that the unnamed company employs between 500 and 1000 employees; that all of the employees are white and only 3 employees are women. 1:15:28: Visual: Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the underrepresentation in the printing/publishing industry. Saltonstall notes that minorities are underrepresented as office workers and sales workers. Close-up shot of chart indicating statistical representation of minorities in jobs in the printing/publishing industry. Saltonstall says that many employers have claimed that they cannot find qualified minority employees to hire. Saltonstall says that there is not a shortage of qualified minority employees for low-paying clerical and sales positions. Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap widened for minority workers in the communications industry and other industries between 1970 and 1982. Close-up shot of the chart illustrating statistical representation of minority workers in the communications industry. Saltonstall notes that minorities are underrepresented in all white collar job categories in the communications industry except for office/clerical jobs. Saltonstall adds that many major companies in the communications industry failed to report statistics to the EEOC; that private employers are required by law to report statistics to the EEOC. 1:17:13: Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap widened for minority workers in food stores between 1970 and 1982. Saltonstall says that the statistics are "appalling"; that minority workers are underrepresented in all positions except as laborors and sales workers. Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating representation of minority workers in investment companies. Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap for minorities in investment companies widened between 1970 and 1982; that hiring for managerial positions tripled, while the number of minority workers in those positions decreased. Saltonstall notes that minority workers are underrepresented in all white collar jobs except for clerical positions; that all of the laborors working for investment companies are white; that all of the companies represented by the statistics are located within the city of Boston. Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating minority worker representation in general merchandise stores. Saltonstall says that the retail industry should be hiring more minority workers because a significant share of their income comes from minority shoppers. Saltonstall notes that the opportunity gap for minority workers in general merchandise stores widened between 1970 and 1982; that the minority participation rate in the industry has declined since 1970. Saltonstall talks about the concentration of minorities in lower-paying jobs.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/19/1984
Description: Kim Reid , a student at Brighton High School, sits with a group of students in a classroom. The students talk about school activities and look at yearbooks while discussing a movie they saw on television. Another group of students in the classroom also look at yearbooks. This tape also includes footage of Reid exiting Brighton High School and boarding a school bus outside.
1:00:00: Visual: Kim Reid (Brighton High School student) sits with a three white and Hispanic students in a classroom at Brighton High School. They talk about ordering sweatshirts to sell at school. The students talk about scheduling meetings after school. Another student points out that Kim needs to know about meetings in advance because she needs to arrange transportation home. The students talk about choosing a theme for their class night. A female student seated across from Kim looks at a yearbook. A racially diverse group of boys is seated near Kim's group. A white teacher arranges files and papers at her desk. Kim's group continues to talk to one another. Kim's group looks at a yearbook. Close-up shot of Kim. The students talk about the upcoming prom. Shots of a girl turning pages of the yearbook. Kim opens the yearbook in front of her. Kim says that she knows fewer people now than she did in the ninth grade. The group identifies and talks about the people in the yearbook. The group of boys also look at yearbooks. 1:08:24: V: Kim walks over to the teacher's desk. She looks for a book on the teacher's desk. The crew sets up a shot of Kim walking across the room with a book. Kim sits down with her group. Kim and the other students talk about a TV movie. Shots of the two other girls in Kim's group. Shots of the group of boys talking to one another. 1:14:00: V: Shots of the exterior of Brighton High School; of school buses waiting on Warren Street in front of the school. An African American male student jokes around with the camera crew. Kim descends the stairs toward the buses with a group of African American and Asian American students. The students wave and talk to the camera crew as they board the buses. A police officer stands against the fence on the sidewalk. Kim walks toward her bus. The camera crew does a three takes of Kim and other students boarding the buses.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1985
Description: Martin Nolan (Boston Globe) opens a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Nolan talks about the novel. Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) addresses the meeting. Flynn says that the novel is the first piece of journalism to report accurately on the busing crisis. Flynn says that he is pleased that the novel touches on class issues as related to school desegregation in Boston. Flynn talks about the poor institutional leadership that led to the deterioration of the Boston Public School System. He adds that parents were never consulted during the school desegregation process. Mark Roosevelt (Executive Director, John F. Kennedy Library) addresses the audience and compliments Lukas on his book. Lukas addresses the meeting. Lukas mentions the name of each family member portrayed in the novel. He asks them all to stand. He expresses his sadness at the absence of the McGoff family (family portrayed in Common Ground) from the meeting. Lukas notes each family's connection to John F. Kennedy (former US President). Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 1 of 8
0:59:58: Visual: A man addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the book Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author). The man speaks from a podium. Panelists are assembled at tables on either side of the podium. Panelists include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe). The man introduces Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe). Nolan reads from a glowing review of Common Ground, written by Robert B. Parker (author) for the Chicago Tribune. Nolan praises the book. He talks about the book's attention to the people it portrays. Nolan says that the book is not about the "movers and the shakers," but it is about "the moved and the shaken." Nolan jokes that everyone in the audience is a minor character in the book. Nolan introduces Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston). Nolan says that Flynn is always searching for common ground among the residents of Boston. The audience applauds. 1:03:39: V: Flynn says that he is honored to address the audience. Flynn says that Lukas' book is the first piece of journalism to report accurately on the "real Boston." Flynn notes the complexity issues portrayed in the book. Flynn says that the vast majority of Bostonians occupied a "middle ground" during the busing crisis. Flynn says that Lukas listened to the residents of Boston who lived through the busing crisis; that Lukas found the common ground among these people. Flynn says that there are more issues that unite people than there are issues which divide people. Flynn says that people are looking for the same opportunities in education and training. Flynn adds that people in Boston are still struggling under the weight of social and economic injustice. Flynn talks about the need to give "poor people" an opportunity to receive a good education. Flynn says that he is pleased that Lukas's book tackles the issues of class. Flynn says that the deterioration of the school system in Boston was a result of poor institutional leadership. Flynn adds that no one individual or organization was responsible for the lack of leadership; that it reflects poorly on everyone in the city. Flynn says that the institutional responses to problems in education were unsatisfactory to parents and schoolchildren. Flynn adds that the schools needed to be desegregated and reformed. Flynn says that parents of schoolchildren were never consulted during the desegregation process. Flynn says that the busing crisis divided people along class lines; that education became a secondary concern. Flynn adds that "a wall of legal paper clouded the city of Boston." Flynn says that parents were powerless to effect change in the desegregation process. Flynn talks about his respect for the people in the audience and on the panel at the town meeting. Flynn cautions the audience and panelists at the town meeting not to spend the day rehashing the history of the busing crisis. Flynn says that the city of Boston must move forward and continue to find its "common ground." The audience applauds. 1:11:28: V: Nolan runs through the program for the town meeting. Nolan notes that two panelists are missing; that there are audience members in a second theater; that those audience members will be included in the discussion period. Nolan adds that each panelists will speak about Lukas' book. Nolan paraphrases Flynn in urging the panelists to focus on how the city of Boston can reach "common ground." Nolan introduces Mark Roosevelt (Executive Director, John F. Kennedy Library). Roosevelt introduces J. Anthony Lukas. Roosevelt thanks the audience and the panelists. Roosevelt thanks Lukas for his contribution to the city of Boston. Roosevelt says that Lukas's book has helped Boston residents to understand their differences and to see their city more clearly. The audience applauds. 1:14:51: V: Lukas thanks Roosevelt for making the town meeting possible. Lukas talks about his roots in New York City. Lukas says that his "heart is in Massachusetts." Lukas says that many audience members helped him with the book. He thanks those people. Lukas makes special mention of the families portrayed in the book. Lukas says that he sees the families as "collaborators" on the book, not as "subjects." Lukas talks about the candor, generosity and courage of the families who allowed themselves to be portrayed in the book. Lukas mentions each family member by name, and then invites them to stand as one. Lukas expresses his sadness that no member of the McGoff family is present. Lukas mentions the names of Rachel Twymon, Rachel Twymon (daughter), Michael Twymon, Cassandra Twymon, Wayne Twymon, Valerie Twymon, Reverend George Walker, Hasan Sharif, Joan Diver, Colin Diver, Brad Diver, Ned Diver, George McKechnie, Ethleen Diver, Norman McKechnie, Judy McKechnie. The audience applauds for the family members when they stand up. 1:18:44: V: Lukas notes that it is fitting that the town meeting be held at the JFK Library. Lukas adds that all three families were "charter members" of the Kennedy Coalition twenty-five years ago. Lukas says that Alice McGoff can remember seeing John F. Kennedy (former US President) march in the Bunker Hill Day Parade in 1946. Lukas talks about McGoff's enduring allegiance to Kennedy. Lukas says that Rachel Twymon used to listen to Martin Luther King (African American civil rights leader) when he preached at the Twelfth Baptist Church in Roxbury. Lukas talks about Twymon's respect for the connection between King and Kennedy. Lukas notes that Joan Diver attended Kennedy's inauguration in 1960.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts) addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Brown says that Lukas' novel brings perspective to the busing crisis. Brown commends Lukas on his exhaustive research into the history of each family portrayed in the novel. Brown talks briefly about the history of each family. He notes that Lukas's novel depicts the richness and struggle of everyday life. Marie Clark (parent and member of the Home and School Association) addresses the panel. Clark says that she speaks from the perspective of a parent who lived through the busing crisis. Clark says that she supports school integration, but opposed the court order. She adds that the court order was disruptive and too broad in scope. She urges audience members to support the Boston Public School system. She notes that the school system has improved as a result of desegregation. Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist) addresses the meeting. Gillen says that he remains opposed to busing. He adds that the federal court usurped the rights of the parents of Boston's schoolchildren. Gillen notes that the anti-busing movement was committed to protesting by legal and moral means. He says that he is glad to live in a society where protest and opposition to the law is allowed. Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston) addresses the audience. Groden says that the court orders did not allow for genuine input from parents. He says that a parents' movement could have overcome issues of race and class during the busing crisis. Groden talks about the need for grassroots leadership within the city and the need for a network of human connections across the city's neighborhoods. Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Brown, Clarke, Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Groden, Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 3 of 8
1:00:01: Visual: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the release of the book, Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author). Nolan speaks from a podium. Panelists are assembled at tables on either side of the podium. Panelists include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe). Nolan introduces Thomas Brown. Brown says that he is a historian; that many of the other panelists were participants in the busing crisis. Brown says that comments that Lukas focused on the history of the McGoff, Twymon, and Diver families, which were each portrayed in the book. Brown commends Lukas for his exhaustive research into the history of each family. Brown notes that Lukas probably uncovered facts which were previously unknown to each family. Brown talks about the way in whick Lukas shows how past history affects the contemporary events portrayed in the book. Brown says that Lukas's book brings needed perspective to the busing crisis. Brown says that the Diver family emerges from the violence of the colonial struggle in Boston; that the McGoff family is informed by the violent past of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Ireland; that the Twymon family emerges from the violent past of slavery. Brown says that the recent struggles of each family pale in comparison to the hardships and struggles of their past family histories. Brown notes that the trouble endured by the families during the busing crisis has been accompanied by social progress and change. Brown says that previous speakers have suggested that a common ground existed in the coalition which was formed around John F. Kennedy (former US President) in 1960. Brown suggests that Lukas' book is also "common ground." Brown says that Common Ground is a "loving" book which moves readers to tears; that it details the richness and struggles of everyday life. Brown says that readers can take away the love put into the book by Lukas; that the readers of the book can find "common ground." The audience applauds. 1:08:30: V: Nolan introduces Marie Clark. Clark says that she brings the perspective of a parent who lived through the busing crisis. Clark says that she was one among many parents who supported integration, but opposed the plan put forth by Arthur Garrity (federal judge). Clark says that the plan was disruptive and too broad in scope. Clark says that she objected to the disruption of schools which were already integrated; that she objected to African American students being bused to a new school at the start of each year; that she objected to students being denied access to programs because of racial quotas. Clarke says that wrongs were committed by people on both sides of the issue; that Boston has emerged from the busing crisis as a stronger city. Clarke says that the Boston Public Schools have improved as a result of desegregation; that "common ground" can be found in the children of Boston who attend the public schools. Clarke adds that the Boston Public School System needs the support of parents, the business community and suburbanites. Clarke says that the future of the city depends upon a strong school system. The audience applauds. 1:11:42: V: Nolan introduces Moe Gillen. Gillen says that many in the audience are familiar with his opinions on the busing crisis. Gillen says that "common ground" can be found in Lukas' book; that the book brings people together; that the book shows the "common heritage" of Boston residents. Gillen notes that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and Dennis Kearney (Suffolk County Sheriff) are in the audience; that Flynn and Kearney were representatives of the anti-busing movement. Gillen says that many in the anti-busing movement were committed to protesting the court orders in a "legal, moral way." Gillen praises anti-busing mothers for their commitment to their families; that many anti-busing parents set a good example for their children. Gillen says that he remains "adamently opposed to a government that takes and usurps the rights of parents." Gillen says that hindsight shows that the court orders were not successful. Gillen says that the busing crisis showed the strength of US society; that opponents to busing did not resort to "violence and anarchy," even though their "personal values" were at stake. Gillen says that he is thankful to live in the US instead of "some banana republic." Gillen invites audience members to address the issues during the discussion. The audience applauds. 1:16:08: V: Nolan introduces Father Michael Groden. Nolan talks about Groden's work as an advocate for the city's working lobstermen and his work on school issues during the busing crisis. Groden says that he wrote a letter to Garrity as he was completing his first term as director of the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC); that he wrote to Garrity about the "parent movement" withing the city schools. Groden says that he did not think the system allowed for genuine and enduring input from parents. Groden notes that a "common ground" presented itself through the opportunity for parents to come together and effect changes in the schools. Groden says that the opportunity to bring parents together was not fully exploited; that a parents' movement would have overcome issues of race and class. Groden says that a parents' movement needs to be organized in order to build connections in and across the neighborhoods of the city. Groden says that the roles of civic and religious leaders are discussed in Lukas's book. Groden says that the city was focused on "elitist" leadership instead of grassroots leadership. Groden notes that grassroots political and religious leadership is much more effective than "moral imperatives." Groden says that moral courage is born of faith and of a healthy set of relationships with others. Groden adds that Lukas' book benefits from Lukas' ability to communicate effectively with others. Groden says that Ray Flynn (mayor of Boston) has set the right tone for the city since his inauguration; that Flynn has "lived across the lines of color and, to some extent, class." Groden adds that "moral imperatives and gospel mandates" are clear in their message. Groden concludes by saying that "common ground" can only be found in a new "set of human connections." The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Martin Nolan (Boston Globe) organizes a discussion during a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Paul Parks (former Massachusetts Secretary for Education) comments on the lack of effective communication between the two opposing sides during the busing crisis. Parks says that he is saddened to hear a desire for separatism in the remarks of Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist). Jim Conway (Charlestown resident) defends Gillen by saying that Gillen believes in neighborhood schools. Conway advocates school desegregation through school choice; he talks about the need to improve all of the schools across the city. Conway adds that Charlestown does not deserve its reputation as a racist neighborhood. Howard Husock (WGBH reporter) comments that parents are concerned about the education of their children. Husock talks about the benefits of a school choice plan, which could attract middle-class families back to the public schools. Elvira "Pixie" Palladino (former member, Boston School Committee) remarks that there are few members of the anti-busing movement at the meeting. Palladino says that the busing crisis only affected poor people in Boston. She adds that no "common ground" will be found until working-class white people are included in forums such as this one. Palladino asks how many people in the room respect and love her and the people she represents. Wayne Twymon (member of the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground) talks about his experiences as an African American student attending white schools. He says that it was not easy being bused into white schools. Twymon adds that he received a good education and has been successful. Twymon tells Palladino that he loves her. Tom Lindbergh (graduate student, Boston University) asks Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston) if the Archdiocese of Boston will admit to serving as a haven for white families looking to escape forced busing. Lindbergh accuses the Archdiocese of Boston of profiting from school desegregation. Groden responds that the Archdiocese tightened its student transfer policy after the first year of busing. He adds that parochial schools also admit minority students. Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 4 of 8.
1:00:00: Visual: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) pauses for a break during the Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the release of the book Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author) . Nolan speaks from a podium. Panelists are assembled at tables on either side of the podium. Panelists include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriuulum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe). 1:00:07: V: Nolan organizes a discussion between audience members and panelists. Paul Parks (former Massachusetts Secretary for Education) comments that the tragedy of the busing crisis was that people were unable to hear or understand the positions of their opponents; that neither side was communicating effectively with the other side. Parks says that he is sorry that Gillen has departed. Parks says that he heard a desire for "separatism" in Gillen's remarks. Parks says that he hopes that his children will reap the benefits of living in an integrated society. The audience applauds. Jim Conway (Charlestown resident) says that he cannot speak for Gillen; that Gillen was not a "separatist"; that Gillen was an opponent of "forced busing." Conway says that Gillen would not be opposed to achieving desegregation through school choice. Conway adds that Charlestown is unjustly perceived as racist by outsiders; that the first African American justice in the North sat in the Charlestown District Court in 1883. Conway notes that African American students attended Charlestown High School before the busing crisis; that there were no racial incidents at the school before the busing crisis. Conway says that the busing crisis "pitted the poor black against the poor white"; that only "the bigots" among both races were seeking confrontation. Conway says that Gillen was not "talking separatism"; that Gillen was expressing his belief in neighborhood schools. Conway says that he sent his children to private school because they were not going to receive a good education "at the end of the bus line"; that he is not sure if African American children are receiving a good education at Charlestown High School. Conway says that the schools need to be improved; that "liberal whites" are the first to abandon the schools at any sign of trouble. Conway mentions a "liberal" city official who moved out of Charlestown during the busing crisis so that he could send his children to a good school. The audience applauds politely after Conway finishes his remarks. 1:05:52: V: Howard Husock (WBGH reporter) says that he lives in Brookline, where his son can walk to the neighborhood school. Husock says that he would like to speak for those who are "vilified as yuppies." Husock says that he attended a meeting of nursery school parents in West Roxbury last year; that the parents were trying to plot a "strategy" about where to send their children to school; that the parents were looking at the racial quotas at each school; that some parents were considering paying tuition to send their children to public schools in Brookline. Husock says that the parents were only thinking about how to get a good education for their children. Husock asks if the school choice plan can be adapted in order to attract the influx of new middle class families to Boston. Husock says that it would be sad if a "new generation" of residents abandons the schools. Nolan says that the question will be put on hold until Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) can speak. 1:08:19: V: Elvira "Pixie" Palladino (former member, Boston School Committee) takes the microphone. Palladino says that she would like to address Groden's comments about love and "this so-called common ground." Palladino says that there is very little "common ground" in the room; that she only recognizes three people from the anti-busing movement. Palladino says that the anti-busing movement is not represented in the audience; that she does not see any "common ground." Palladino asks the audience, "How many of you are going to love me no matter what color I am?" Palladino refers to an African American man in the audience. She says that the man would not introduce himself to her after addressing her as she passed by him. Palladino says that the man did not show her respect; that there is little evidence of respect among the audience members. Palladino says that she does not see anyone in the audience who would stand up to say, "Pixie, I love you." The audience laughs along with Palladino. An audience member calls out, "Pixie, I'll say it." Pixie acknowledges the audience member. Palladino says that she does not have to read the book because she lived the book. Palladino says that "the common ground" in Boston is found in every parent's love for their children. Palladino says that African American parents supported the court order because they thought it was the right thing for their children; that the members of the anti-busing movement thought that they were doing the right thing; that both sides fought "with their minds and with their hearts." Palladino asks how many audience members make $11,000 per year. Palladino says that there is not one audience member who is as poor as the residents of Charlestown and South Boston. Audience members make noises of disagreement. Palladino says that forced busing only affected the poor; that busing remains a class issue. Palladino says that racism "is a two-way street." Palladino says working class white people need to be included in the audience at the town meeting; that no "common ground" will be found until the interests of working class white people are represented in meetings like this one. Palladino says that "common ground" currently exists only in parents' love for their children. The audience sits silently. Palladino asks why she gets no applause. The audience applauds as Palladino asks how many of them are going to kiss her and shake her hand after the meeting. The audience laughs along with Palladino. 1:12:41: V: Wayne Twymon (member of the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground) starts to speak. He tells Palladino that he loves her. Twymon says that he rode the bus to school for two years before the court orders; that he learned what it was like to be "black in a black neighborhood" and what it was like to be " black in a white neighborhood." Twymon says that he was "running from whites" before the court order; that now he is here talking to whites. Twymon says that he attended the Dearborn School, Brighton High School, East Boston High School and parochial school; that he received a good education at each school. Twymon says that it was not easy for an African American to attend a white school. Twymon notes that his mother bused him to white schools before Arthur Garrity (federal judge) did. The audience laughs and claps for Twymon. Twymon stands with both hands on his hips. Twymon says that he made more than $11,000 last year without "a name or a title." Twymon adds that Lukas' book has created a "common ground" in this room. Twymon says that he has not finished the book yet. Twymon gestures to Colin Diver (member of the Diver family portrayed in Common Ground). Twymon says that he was amazed by Diver; that Diver turned down a high-paying job in order to take a job for the "experience." Twymon tells Palladino that he visited the State House in 11th grade through a school program. Twymon tells Palladino that he had wanted to meet her, but that she did not show up. Palladino protests that she never "shirked her responsibilities" as a public official. Twymon and Palladino both speak at the same time. The moderator steps in. Twymon tells Palladino that he is pleased to meet her today. The audience applauds. 1:16:05: V: Tom Lindbergh (graduate student, Boston University) notes that he is a former high school teacher in Milton. Lindbergh says that he worked as a teacher in the Boston Public Schools for two years; that the Boston Public Schools had a student population of 96,000 in 1974; that the student population was 70% white. Lindbergh notes that the student population now hovers at 58,000; that the student population is 70% non-white. Lindbergh asks Groden if the Archidiocese of Boston will take responsibility for its mostly white parochial school system, which serves as a haven for those who wish to escape busing. Groden says that Lukas writes about the role of the parochial schools in the busing crisis in Common Ground. Lukas says that the parochial schools should have been more stringent in preventing transfers of students from public schools in order to escape busing. Groden notes that the Catholic Church has a right to operate schools to serve their religious beliefs. Groden says that many white students were able to attend parochial schools in neighboring communities; that the church's rules covering student transfers did not apply to those schools during the first year. Groden says that the church corrected the policy during the second year of busing. Groden says that parochial schools in Boston also provide opportunities and programs for minority students; that the parochial schools do contribute to life in minority communities. Lindbergh notes that parochial schools were closing down in 1972 due to a lack of funds; that there are now waiting lists to attend parochial schools. Lindbergh says that there are 115,000 students in parochial schools. He asks how many of those students are African American. Lindbergh says that the church needs to be held accountable for the large numbers of white students in parochial schools.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Thomas Lindbergh (graduate student, Boston University) speaks during a discussion at a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Lindbergh accuses the Archdiocese of Boston of serving as a haven for white students who are trying to escape busing in Boston. Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston) questions the school population statistics, saying that many white students were already enrolled in parochial schools. Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston) addresses the meeting. Kiley reminds the audience that race and class are sensitive issues in school systems across the nation; he adds that court intervention is used as a last resort. Kiley talks about the reforms needed in other areas of society. He says that the people of Boston need to continue to work together to improve their city. Theodore Landsmark (attorney) addresses the audience. Landsmark talks about being the subject of Stanley Forman's Pulitzer prize-winning photographs. He says that he will always be remembered for being the victim of the attack at City Hall Plaza. Landsmark remarks on the absence of African Americans at the forum. He notes that many people of color consider Boston to be a racist city. Landsmark talks about the need for affirmative action programs to provide opportunities for people of color and working-class white people across the city. Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education) addresses the meeting. Lynch talks about the deliberate pattern of segregation in the Boston Public Schools before 1974. She accuses school officials and city officials of abdicating their responsibilities to the minority population of the city. Lynch says that the court had no choice but to intervene. Lynch adds that the people of Boston must take responsibility for electing these racist public officials to office. She notes that many politicians campaigned on deliberately racist platforms. Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Groden, Kiley, Landsmark, Lynch, Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 5 of 8.
1:00:11: Visual: Thomas Lindbergh (graduate student, Boston University) questions Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston) at a Town Meeting on Race and Class in Boston at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of the book Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas. Lindbergh accuses the parochial schools of providing a haven to white students who are trying to escape busing in Boston. Lindbergh says that people are using the schools as an "easy way out." The audience applauds. Groden says that the school population may have been inflated before the busing crisis; that many students were discovered to have already been in parochial schools before the busing crisis. Groden sits on a panel on stage with Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe). 1:00:53: V: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) introduces Robert Kiley. Nolan talks about Kiley's experience with the Central Intelligence Agency and reviews the positions he has held in the city of Boston. Kiley says that he is no longer a resident of Boston; that he lives in New York City now. Kiley talks about the problems in the New York City school system. Kiley says that race and class issues are a problem in New York City as well as Boston. Kiley reminds the audience that the court intervention is a last resort; that courts are forced to intervene when the legislative and executive branches of government fail to act; that lawsuits are affecting the government of cities across the nation. Kiley talks about how school desegregation in Boston became a national story. Kiley says that much remains to be done in order to achieve a just and equal society. Kiley says that court intervention usually occurs in the areas of education and corrections; that children and prisoners are powerless to fight the court intervention. Kiley talks about the need to end discriminatory hiring practices in banks and corporations. Kiley says that our economic institutions need reform; that the poor are ignored by these institutions. Kiley talks about the link between race and class in our society. He says that race and class are used to reinforce each other in our society. Kiley says that Bostonians are "battle-scarred"; that he hopes Bostonians are not "war-weary." Kiley says that people on both sides of the busing issue are now talking to one another and working together to provide leadership; that Bostonians need to keep working together; that the citizens of other cities will look to them as an example. The audience applauds. 1:08:33: V: Nolan introduces Theodore Landsmark. Nolan notes that Landsmark was attacked by white teenagers at City Hall Plaza; that the attack was captured in an award-winning photograph by Stanley Forman (photographer). Landsmark says that he is here due to an "anomaly." Landsmark notes that he will always be thought of in the context of Forman's photograph. Landsmark mentions that he is a photographer himself, but he is known for being the subject of a photograph, not the creator. Landsmark says, "I've won a Pulitzer, as it were, but I wasn't even invited to the awards ceremony." The audience laughs. Landsmark says that he was working on affirmative action issues in the 1970s; that he was not working specifically on school issues. Landsmark notes that there are some remarkable people in the audience; that this meeting provides an opportunity to assess what happened during the busing crisis; that the meeting provides an opportunity to think about the future. Landsmark says that most of the audience is committed to the city of Boston; that "common ground" can be found in this commitment to the city. Landsmark says that Elvira Pixie Palladino (former member, Boston School Commttee) was correct in pointing out the absence of working class white people; that African Americans are also underrepresented in the audience. Landsmark says that the some racist residents of Boston have succeeded in portraying the city as a racist city; that he has encountered people across the nation who consider Boston to be a racist city. Landsmark says that many young professionals will not consider coming to Boston because of its reputation. Landsmark says that people of color stay away from Boston because they do not know if they will have an opportunity to succeed professionally. Landsmark says that people of color are underrepresented as members of boards of directors and in various professions. Landsmark notes that the private sector is slow to change; tha the public sector has been trying to deal with issues of affirmative action. Landsmark says that there is a lack of role models for minority schoolchildren in Boston. Landsmark adds that this meeting is a chance for residents of Boston to stop and think about what changes need to be made in the city. Landsmark stresses the need for the private sector to provide opportunities for people of color and for working class whites. Landsmark adds, "the chances of the kids who attacked me ending up on a major corporate board in Boston are as slim as the chances of any black kid ending up on a board." Landsmark says that opportunities need to be opened for people of all classes in the city of Boston. Landsmark compliments Lukas on his book. The audience claps. 1:16:32: V: Nolan introduces Sandra Lynch. Lynch talks about the inevitability of the court's decision to find the Boston School Committee guilty of willful segregation of the Boston schools. Lynch says that the remedy ordered by Arthur Garrity (federal judge) was also inevitable; that Garrity is a "decent man" who was "vilified" for performing his job. Lynch says that public officials were remiss in not communicating the inevitability of the court order to city residents. Lynch adds that many public officials should have known that there was no way to prevent school desegregation. Lynch talks about "an abdication of responsibility" by school officials and city officials in the years leading up to the busing crisis. Lynch says that there was a deliberate pattern of segregation; that "forced busing" was used as a tool of school segregation before 1974; that schools were built to serve segregated neighborhoods. Lynch says that schools in the African American communities were "disgraceful"; that African American schools were not given adequate resources and facilities. Lynch says that elected public officials were not protecting the rights of the city's minorities; that moderate officials were voted from office when they made efforts to achieve racial peace. Lynch says that the people of Boston must take responsibility for electing these officials to public office. Lynch says that the people of Boston were not all victims of these public officials. Lynch says, "the people of Boston elected people to public office who campaigned on deliberately racist platforms." Lynch notes that class was an issue in the busing crisis; that class issues do not excuse the racism which was evident in the city. Lynch says that voters and public officials need to understand that the courts do not intervene until the elected public officials have failed to carry out their obligations.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education) speaks at a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Lynch says that the irresponsibility of the Boston School Committee led to the busing crisis. She adds that the city's elected officials failed to protect the Consitutional rights of the city's minority population. Lynch says that the court must intervene when public officials neglect their duty. Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools) addresses the meeting. Marshall talks about the challenges faced by urban schools with poor students. Marshall notes that many critics believe that integration by race and social class is necessary for successful schools. He adds that the majority of students in the Boston Public Schools are poor and non-white. Marshall says that some schools in Boston are very successful. He notes that strong leadership, high educational standards and parental involvement are factors in the success of these schools. He adds that the current administration is committed to educating all students. Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) addresses the audience. Stith says that Boston is a better city for having dealt with racial issues during the busing crisis. Stith reminds the audience that class mobility is possible in our society, while race is still a fundamental problem. Stith says that it is important for teachers to love the students they teach in school, regardless of race. Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe) addresses the meeting. Winship predicts that Lukas's book will win a Pulitzer Prize. He compliments Lukas on the novel, and gives him some criticism. Winship says that he has no regrets about the way in which The Boston Globe covered the busing crisis. Winship says that the Boston Public Schools have improved as a result of school desegregation. Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Lynch, Marshall, Stith, and Winship. Tape 6 of 8
1:00:00: Visual: Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education) addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the release of the book Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author). Lynch is on a panel with Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former Editor, The Boston Globe). Lynch talks about the irresponsibility of Boston's elected officials, which led to the busing crisis. Lynch says that the Boston School Committee refused to file a school desegregation plans with the federal court in 1974; that the School Committee preferred to do nothing, and then blame someone else for the result. Lynch notes that elected public officials need to uphold the law; that they need to uphold the Constitutional rights of minorities. Lynch talks about the necessity of court intervention when elected officials neglect their duty. The audience applauds. Shots of the audience; of individual audience members. Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs, Morgan v. Hennigan) is in the audience. 1:02:01: Visual: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) introduces Kim Marshall. Marshall says that Lukas's book is extraordinary; that he has enjoyed reading it. Marshall notes that the Massachusetts Racial Imbalance Law defined a school as imbalanced if the student population was more than 50% African American; that the law did not define an all-white school as imbalanced. Marshall notes that research by Kenneth Clark (social scientist) led the US Supreme Court to rule that all-black schools were "inherently inferior." Marshall notes that the Coleman Report on school desegregation stated that the integration of social class was necessary to "quality education." Marshall quotes Christopher Jencks (author) as saying that schools cannot be improved until poverty is eradicated. Marshall says that the Boston Public Schools now have a majority students who are poor and non-white. Marshall quotes many critics as saying that the Boston Public Schools will not improve until the white and African American middle classes return. Marshall talks about the challenges faced by urban schools with poor students. Shots of audience members. Marshall says that some schools in poor urban areas are succeeding; that these schools share some characteristics: good principals, high standards for all of the students, clear curriculum standards, diagnostic testing, state-of-the-art teaching methods, a safe climate, and an active program which reaches out to parents. Marshall says that Boston schools can be improved using the above model; that Dr. Robert Spillane (former Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) began implementing this model four years ago. Marshall says that Spillane would never have been hired if school desegregation had not taken place. Marshall notes that many of Boston schools are improving under the leadership of new principals. Marshall adds that the school administration and staff does believe that all children can learn. Marshall pledges his support to Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent of Schools). The audience applauds. 1:08:55: V: Nolan introduces Reverend Stith. Nolan reports that Stith was recruited by Jesse Jackson (African American leader) to head his new organization, PUSH (People United to Save Humanity); that Stith refused the job because he did not want to leave Boston. Shots of individual audience members. Stith says that there are heroes and villains who emerge in an epic story like Common Ground; that many heroes could have had their own chapters in the book. Stith says that Arthur Garrity (federal judge) needs to be applauded as a hero; that Garrity forced the city of Boston to deal with the issue of race. Stith says that Boston's leaders avoided dealing with the issues of race before the busing crisis; that Boston is now a better place for having dealt with race issues through the busing crisis. Stith says that he recognizes the importance of class issues in our society. Stith reminds the audience that class mobility is possible in our society. Stith says that race is the "fundamental problem" facing our society. Stith points out that Common Ground tells the story of three families. Stith says that he would like to return to the point that Elvira Pixie Palladino made about love. Stith talks about the need for teachers to love the students that they teach. Stith says that the students need love in order to learn and thrive; that the love of teachers for their students must be colorblind. The audience applauds. 1:14:49: V: Nolan introduces Thomas Winship. Shots of Paul Parks (former State Secretary of Education); of other audience members. Nolan notes that a chapter of Lukas's book is devoted to Winship. Nolan talks about Winship's courage and commitment to the city of Boston, and his stewardship of The Boston Globe. Winship jokes that he likes Nolan's descriptions of him better than Lukas's descriptions of him. The audience laughs. Winship predicts that Lukas' book will win the Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction. Winship tells Lukas that he enjoyed the book immensely. Winship says that he disagrees with Lukas on a few minor points. Winship says that Lukas did not give enough coverage to John Kerrigan (former member, Boston School Committee). Winship says that Kerrigan was a key figure in the struggle against the court order, "post-Louise Day Hicks." Winship calls Kerrigan the "MVP of the street team." Winship says that he wishes Lukas had covered reactions to busing all over the city; that Lukas' coverage was focused on three neighborhoods. Winship says that he did not like the court-ordered busing plan; that Garrity had no choice in ordering busing as a remedy. Winship says that he has no big regrets about the way his newspaper chose to cover the busing crisis. Winship says that The Boston Globe should have tried to influence the court against the pairing of South Boston and Roxbury in the first phase of school desegregation. Winship says that the pairing of the two neighborhoods was a "dirty trick"; that the pairing placed an "unfair burden" on both neighborhoods. Winship admits that the student population in Boston schools has declined, but he adds that the schools have improved since the busing crisis. Winship notes that test scores are on the rise; that more students are attending college; that schools and athletic teams are integrated.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: The Commerce and Labor Committee of the Massachusetts State Legislature holds a hearing on proposed legislation barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Royal Bolling Sr. (State Senator) testifies in favor of the legislation. Bolling says that legislators must guarantee protection and equal rights for all citizens. Suzanne Bumps (State Representative) testifies in favor of legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps defines sexual harassment and talks about the its effect on women in the workplace. John Olver (State Senator) and Thomas Vallely (State Representative) testify in favor of the legislation. Vallely says that legislators must fight one of the last remaining civil rights battles by banning discrimination on the grounds of sexual preference. Vallely talks about a proposed amendment barring religious organizations from some aspects of civil rights law; he says that such an amendment is unnecessary. Peter Morin (State Representative) asks Vallely a question about language used in the legislation. Vallely talks about other exceptions granted under the proposed legislation. John Businger (State Representative) testifies in favor of the legislation. Businger talks about the need to make citizens aware of their civil rights by posting anti-discrimination policy and legislation. George Bachrach (State Senator) testifies in favor of the legislation.
1:00:00: Visual: The Commerce and Labor Committee of the Massachusetts State Legislature sits at the front of a room. The committee prepares to hear testimony on proposed legislation barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. The room is crowded with audience members and members of the press. Audience members stand and seat themselves on the floor. The committee chairman invites Royal Bolling Sr. (State Senator) to testify. 1:00:28: V: Bolling thanks the committee members. Bolling notes that the Senate could not vote on this legislation during the previous year; that the vote was held up until the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled on the constitutionality of the legislation. Bolling talks about discrimination against gays and lesbians. Bolling says that opponents of legislation barring discrimnation on the grounds of sexual orientation have ignored ugly incidents involving discrimination against gays and lesbians. Bolling makes reference to a television show which depicted the absurdity of society's prejudices against gays and lesbians. Bolling notes that gay and lesbians make up 10% of the population. Bolling says that many citizens will be positively affected by the passage of legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Bolling says that gays and lesbians will be denied equal protection under the law unless this legislation is passed; that there cannot be exceptions to the government's guarantee of equal access to all citizens. Bolling says that the legislators must guarantee protection for all citizens, even if legislators disagree with those citizens' way of life. Bolling says that Massachusetts must be a safe haven from discrimination. Bolling says that this legislation reaffirms the dignity and integrity of our democracy; that legislators must be willing to take risks to assure civil rights for all citizens. Bolling says that legislators must speak out against discrimination in all forms. Bolling reaffirms the right of citizens to live free from fear. Bolling says that he hopes the law will be passed this year. 1:11:11: V: The committee chairman thanks Bolling and calls the next speaker. Suzanne Bump (State Representative from Braintree) speaks on behalf of the Massachusetts Caucus of Women Legislators. She notes that the caucus strongly supports legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps defines sexual harassment and talks about the ill effects of sexual harassment on students and female employees. Bump adds that surveys show that 75% to 95% of women have been harassed at some point in their working lives. Bumps says that sexual harassment is a form of sexual discrimination; that sexual harassment is degrading and humiliating to women. Bumps notes that women who quit their jobs because of sexual harassment are unable to collect unemployment benefits. Bumps says that grievance procedures for victims of sexual harassment are non-existant; that victims who complain about sexual harassment often receive little support. Bumps says that sexual harassment is often perpetrated by men in positions of power who go unpunished; that the perpetrators are often the bosses or professors of these women. Bumps notes that federal courts have upheld the use of Title VII of the civil rights act in some sexual harassment cases; that Title VII bars discrimination in the work place; that there are limits to the application of Title VII in sexual harassment cases. Bumps talks about the importance of the current legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps notes that the legislation defines sexual harassment, puts cases of sexual harassment under the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination and establishes a uniform grievance procedure for cases of sexual harassment within state government. Bumps notes that the legislation allows for the prompt resolution of complaints. She urges legislators to support the bill. 1:15:05: V: The committee chairman thanks Bumps and calls the next speaker. John Olver (State Senator) says that he is testifying as a Democratic state senator and on behalf of the Massachusetts State Democratic Party. Olver urges the Massachusetts state legislature to ban discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Olver says that discrimination against gays and lesbians must be ended in housing, employment, public accomodation, and in the consumer marketplace. Olver thanks the Congressional committee. 1:17:06: V: Tom Vallely (State Representative) speaks to the committee about his support for legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Vallely notes that he has been one of the principal sponsors of this legislation in the Massasachusetts House of Representatives. Vallely reviews the history of the legislation. Vallely notes that the legislation allows for the protection of gays and lesbians under the state civil rights law. Vallely says that legislators are not condoning homosexuality by offering protection for gays and lesbians under the civil rights law; that legislators need to allow citizens a form of redress against widespread discrimination. Vallely notes that this legislation has been debated by the legislature for more than a decade. Vallely says that the debate about the "gay lifestyle" is inappropriate; that the lifestyles of gays and lesbians is the same as the lifestyle of straight people. Vallely says that gays and lesbians are looking for equal protection, not "special treatment." Vallely refers to the controversy about Mark Twain's book, Huckleberry Finn. Vallely says that the book is a moving exploration of discrimination in American society; that the book is not racist. Vallely says that discrimination on the grounds of race or sexual preference is not acceptable in our society; that discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation is one of the "last civil rights battles" to be fought. Vallely says that opponents to the legislation will try to add an amendment exempting religious organizations from some aspects of the civil rights law. Vallely says that this amendment is unnecessary because the separation of church and state already exists. Vallely says that religious groups do not need to be exempted from legislation about the ERA (Equal Rights Amendement) or from legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Vallely offers to speak to the members of the committee individually about why special legislation exempting religious groups from the civil rights law would be a "grave error." Vallely says that the legislation is important and worth the fight to get it passed. 1:25:44: V: Peter Morin (State Representative) asks a question about the language used in the legislation. Morin points out that there is an exemption to the discrimination law in the case of "bona fide occupational qualifications." Vallely says that the exemption grants authority to the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD) to consider the qualifications necessary for a certain occupation before deciding a discrimination case. Vallely says that it is important to give the MCAD some leeway in its decisions; that he cannot name a list of these "occupational qualifications." Vallely thanks the Congressional committee. 1:28:11: V: John Businger (State Representative from Brookline) notes that he has co-sponsored legislation in the Massachusetts House of Representatives barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Businger says that government has a role in protecting its citizens from discrimination and harassment. Businger says that sexual harassment and discrimination against gays and lesbians are "unreasonable" and "arbitrary" forms of harassment. Businger talks about the need to make citizens aware of this legislation; that he has sponsored a bill to increase the posting requirements for anti-discrimination legislation; that the people affected by the legislation must be well informed in order to take advantage of it. Businger says that anti-discrimination policy and legislation must be posted on applications for credit, for employment, for services and for membership in organizations. Businger urges the legislators to pass this bill so that people can be made aware of their civil rights. Businger urges the legislators to pass the bills barring sexual harassment and discrimination of the basis of sexual orientation. 1:31:29: V: George Bachrach (State Senator) makes a lighthearted joke. The members of the panel laugh. Bachrach says that he is testifying in support of the Senate bill which bars discrimination against gays and lesbians in housing, employment, and credit. Bachrach says that he is sorry that this legislation has not already been passed into law.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/28/1985
Description: Story on the Drop-a-Dime Program started by Roxbury residents Georgette Watson and Rev. Bruce Wall. Pedestrians on the streets of Roxbury and Roxbury neighborhood in the evening. Watson points out a drug dealer and a building out of which the drug trade operates. Interview with Watson about the drug problem in the city and the effectiveness of the Drop-a-Dime Program. She talks about the role of neighborhood youth in the drug trade. Representatives from the Drop-a-Dime Program were not included in the mayor's newly formed council on drug abuse. Mayor Ray Flynn holds press conference announcing the formation of the council. Ben Thompson, Chairman of the council, says that the council intends to work with anti-crime and drug prevention groups across the city. William Weld, US Attorney for Massachusetts, and Derek Sanderson, former player for the Boston Bruins, stand with the other members of the council at the press conference. Interview with Bruce Wall about how community groups have not been included on the council. He adds that members of community groups understand how the drug trade functions in their neighborhoods. Flynn will go to the Boston City Council to obtain funding to combat drug abuse in the city.
1:00:05: Visual: Shots through the windshield of a traveling car of Boston streets; of Washington Street; of youth gathered in front of a building. Audio of Georgette Watson (Roxbury community leader) talking about drug trafficking in her neighborhood. Watson points out a well-known drug dealer as he walks across the street. Watson talks about the role of neighborhood youth in the drug trade. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Watson is familiar with the drug trade in her neighborhood; that Watson and Reverend Bruce Wall (Roxbury community leader) started the Drop-a-Dime program. Vaillancourt reports that the Drop-a-Dime program encourages residents to phone in tips and information about the drug trade to police; that South Boston and Roxbury police have found the tips to be mostly accurate. V: Shots of Watson and Wall; of a tape recorder. Footage of a hand pressing the play button on the tape recorder. Audiocassette is heard playing in the background of the report. Shots from a traveling car of Washington Street in the evening. Vaillancourt reports that Watson wants to expand Drop-a-Dime program into a city-wide service; that representatives from the program were not included in the mayor's council on drug abuse. V: Footage of Watson saying that Drop-a-Dime deserves more support from the mayor and the city. Vaillancourt reports that the Ray Flynn (Mayor of the City of Boston) held a press conference today to announce his new drug abuse council; that Flynn did not answer questions regarding the absence of Drop-a-Dime representatives from the council. V: Shots of Flynn and his council at a press conference. Footage of Ben Thompson (Chairman of the Council), saying that the council intends to be "inclusive"; that the council intends to work with other anti-crime and drug prevention groups across the city. Footage of Wall saying that community groups need to be included on the mayor's council; that community groups understand how the drug trade functions on the streets of the city. Shots of members of the drug abuse council, including William Weld (US Attorney for Massachusetts) and Derek Sanderson (former player for the Boston Bruins). Footage of Flynn explaining that Sanderson will be paid by the city of Boston; that the rest of the committee is made up of volunteers. Shots of the council preparing to leave the press conference. Vaillancourt notes that the council is made up of local and state officials. Vaillancourt notes that the council will prepare a report on how the city can combat drug abuse; that Flynn will take the report to the Boston City Council in order to obtain funding; that it will be difficult for Flynn to obtain extra funds because of the economic crisis faced by the city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/07/1984
Description: B-roll footage of shoppers and employees at a Family Foodland supermarket. A butcher puts out packages of meat at the meat counter, while shoppers inspect the meat. A female shopper chooses lemons and limes from the fruit display. An employee straightens the magazine rack near the check out counter. Other employees ring up sales and provide customer service to customers. Customers enter and exit the store, move through various aisles as they shop and wait in the check out line. Exteriors of the store.
1:00:07: Visual: A butcher puts out packages of meat at the meat counter of Family Foodland. Shots of packages of meat. An African American shoppers inspect the meat at the counter. An African American female shopper chooses lemons and limes from the fruit display at the supermarket. The camera crew instructs the shopper to choose two lemons at a time. Shots of the shopper's hands as she chooses the fruit. Close-up shot of the shopper's face. 1:03:42: V: The camera crew sets up a shot. An African American worker in a suit and tie neatens the magazine rack near the check-out counter. An African American female employee helps a customer at the customer service desk. An African American female employee rings up the purchases of a shopper. The employee counts the money given by the shopper, and returns change and a receipt. A member of the camera crew helps a worker arrange a display of rice packages. 1:06:30: V: African American shoppers and employees pass through the front aisle of the supermarket. An African American female employee rings up the purchases of an African American male shopper. An African American man and woman shop in the canned foods aisle. An African American employee rings up the purchases of an African American family. Shot of the cash register. The employee rings up the purchases of a young African American woman. 1:10:22: V: A shopper hands money over to an African American female employee who works the cash register. African American shoppers wait in line at the cash registers. Shot of the canned food aisle. Shoppers continue to stand in line at the cash register. African American female shoppers push shopping carts down the canned food aisle. 1:13:01: V: Shot of the exterior of the Family Foodland Supermarket; of the sign on the building. A small number of African American men stand in front of the supermarket. Shoppers enter and exit the supermarket.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1984
Description: A Ten O'Clock News special features an interview with Jesse Jackson (Democratic candidate for US President). Christopher Lydon (WGBH), Dennis Farney (Wall Street Journal), and Ken Bode (NBC News) interview Jackson. Lydon notes that the goal of the interview is to discover how Jackson's character would shape his presidency. Jackson jokes about the psychoanalytic nature of the interview. Jackson talks about growing up in a segregated society and participating in the civil rights movement. He answers questions about his childhood. He talks about his campaign and the support he has received so far. Jackson talks about the challenges faced by young African Americans, and says that young African Americans must work twice as hard as whites in order to succeed. Jackson says that some conservative African Americans may not support his candidacy; he adds that people of all races are finding common ground in his candidacy. Jackson reviews the accomplishments of his political organization and talks about his experiences in shaping political policy during the 1960s and the 1970s. He names the politicians whom he admires. He talks about his relationship to the Democratic Party leadership and about his efforts to open up the Democratic Party to minority voters. Jackson says that he would like to establish better relations between the African American community and the Jewish community. He names the people to whom he turns for advice. Jackson says that he regrets the splintering of the civil rights movement in the 1970s. He talks about the Rainbow Coalition as a means to reunite those groups. Tape 1 of 2.
1:00:37: Visual: WGBH logo. Christopher Lydon introduces an "extended conversation" with Jesse Jackson (candidate for US President). Lydon notes that the half hour show was planned in cooperation with the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Lydon adds that the goal of the interview is to discover how Jackson's character would shape his presidency. Lydon introduces in-studio guests Dennis Farney (Wall Street Journal) and Ken Bode (NBC News). Lydon reviews biographical facts about Jackson including date of birth, education, and his career in the civil rights movement. Lydon asks Jackson which actor he would choose to portray Jesse Jackson in a movie about his life, and what Jackson would tell the actor about his character. Jackson jokes about the psychoanalytic nature of this interview. Jackson talks about growing up in a segregated society. Jackson says that he is sensitive to the needs of the poor and the disenfranchised; that he participated in the civil rights movement and has seen great changes. Jackson says that he has not grown bitter about US society because he has seen such great changes. 1:04:28: V: Farney asks Jackson about his childhood and whether he felt rejected by his father. Jackson talks about feeling a sense of rejection as a child; that he was called a "bastard." Jackson says that his athletic and academic success were his way of fighting back against those who rejected him or laughed at him. Jackson says that he has grown accustomed to adversity and to the "double standard" which exists in society. Bode asks Jackson if the US is ready for an African American president. Bode mentions that Bill Lucy (African American union leader) has said that the US is not ready. Jackson notes that he has been received warmly in New Hampshire. Jackson says that no one will know if the US is ready for an African American president until the nation is given the chance to elect one. Jackson says that an African American candidate may get support from women, Hispanics and American Indians; that many groups in society can identify with his candidacy. Jackson mentions the Rainbow Coalition. Jackson notes that he is running second or third out of eight candidates in New Hampshire. Lydon asks Jackson about his success in life and about his belief in self-reliance. Jackson says that the "triangle" of family, church, and school allowed him to grow up with a sense of confidence; that he was insulated from some of the ill effects of segregation. Jackson mentions the closeness of his family to a particular white family, despite living in a segregated society. 1:11:19: V: Lydon asks Jackson how to foster good support networks for young African Americans growing up today. Jackson says that young African Americans need to work harder than whites to succeed; that their hard work will pay off in the end; that those who work hard to succeed develop an inner strength and character. Bode notes that the Alabama Democratic Conference endorsed Walter Mondale's candidacy for US President. Bode adds that Jackson's political organization said that their endorsement of Mondale was the equivalent of "putting another bullet into the body of Martin Luther King." Jackson denies characterizing the endorsement in that manner. Jackson talks about the reluctance of the African American community to upset the status quo. Jackson says that some of the resistance to the civil rights movement came from conservative African Americans. Bode asks Jackson what percentage of the vote he expects to receive in the Alabama primary. Jackson says that he will not speculate on percentages. Jackson talks about the endorsements and support he has received. Jackson says that he has received support from white voters in the south; that whites, African Americans, and other minorities are finding common ground in his candidacy. 1:15:38: V: Farney asks why Jackson sometimes refers to himself as a "prophet" instead of a "politician." Jackson explains that his role is prophetic in that he tries to change the structure of society. Farney notes that Jackson has been criticized for a lack of administrative experience. Jackson reviews the accomplishments of his political organization. Jackson notes the limited budget under which his campaign operates. Farney asks about Jackson's political legacy. Jackson says that his candidacy has forced the Democratic Party to open up; that his candidacy has forced both political parties to understand the importance of minority voters. Lydon asks about Jackson's spiritual life. Jackson says that he tries to seek common ground between people of different religions; that certain values are held in common by all religions. Jackson says that he is committed to the poor, the elderly and the young. Lydon asks Jackson why Ralph Abernathy (African American leader) said that Jackson could be his president but not his pastor. Jackson says that he does not know why Abernathy said that. Bode comments that Jackson has not held political office, but that he has had a lot of contact with politicians. Jackson notes that he was the first African American delegate to the Democratic Party in 1962. Jackson reviews his leadership experience and his role in shaping public policy in the 1960s and 1970s. 1:20:55: V: Bode asks Jackson which politicians he admires, aside from Martin Luther King. Jackson talks about Hubert Humphrey (US Senator), Ron Dellums (US Representative), and Adam Powell (US Representative). Bode notes that Jackson has criticized Tip O'Neill (Speaker, US House of Representatives) and Lane Kirkland (President, AFL-CIO). Bode asks how Jackson will deal with the Democratic leadership. Jackson says that he will conduct business with these leaders on the basis of "mutual respect." Jackson says that the Democratic Party needs a more articulate spokesman than O'Neill; that he respects O'Neill. Jackson notes that the labor movement needs to commit itself to providing equal access to jobs for African Americans, Hispanics, and women. Lydon asks Jackson about how his candidacy is viewed by American Jews. Jackson says that he would like to establish better relations between African American and Jewish leaders. Jackson says that he regrets the conflicts between African Americans and Jews in the past; that he supports the right of Israel to exist; that he also supports the rights of Palestinians. Jackson talks about his view of the Middle Eastern conflict. Farney notes that Jimmy Carter (former US President) was elected as an "outsider." Farney asks if Jackson would be more successful than Carter in operating in politics as an "outsider." Jackson says that Carter remained on the "outside" as president; that Carter did not use the power of the presidency to its full extent. Jackson says that he disagrees with the critics who call the Carter administration a "failure." Jackson criticizes the foreign policy of Ronald Reagan (US President). 1:26:29: V: Bode asks Jackson about his advisors. Jackson says that he consults with his wife and his children. Jackson names a list of people with whom he consults including Dellums, Marion Barry (mayor of Washington D.C.), Walter Fauntroy (US Congressman), Edward Bennett Williams (attorney), Dr. Al Pitcher (University of Chicago), and Dr. Jack Mendelsohn (minister). Lydon asks Jackson to disclose any major failures or flaws in his character. Jackson says that he does not dwell on his failures, but that he has learned a lot from them. Jackson says that he regrets how the civil rights movement broke up in the 1970s; that he is trying to bring back together the groups involved in the civil rights movement through his coalition. Jackson says that he is concerned with the conflict between African Americans and American Jews. Jackson talks about the importance of communication in resolving conflict. Lydon thanks Jackson, Farney and Bode. End credits roll.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/03/1984
Description: Jim Shannon (Democratic candidate for US Senate) holds a press conference to announce the endorsement of his candidacy by Vietnam veterans' leaders. Charles Harris (veterans' leader) and another man criticize the record of John Kerry (Democratic candidate for US Senate) on veterans' issues. Harris says that Kerry has failed to deliver on his promises of leadership made to veterans and other voters. Harris explains that the veterans' leaders are from an umbrella organization called Vietnam Veterans of Massachusetts Incorporated. Harris and others decline to state their affiliation with other veterans' groups. Charles Bennett interviews Shannon after the press conference. Bennett notes that some observers have accused Shannon of pulling a "stunt." Shannon talks about his strong record on veterans' issues. John Kerry campaigns in an African American neighborhood in Boston. Bennett interviews two members of the Black Political Task Force. The members of the Black Political Task Force talk about their endorsement of Kerry's candidacy. Bennett interviews Kerry. Kerry talks about the Black Political Task Force's endorsement of his candidacy. He says that he will fight for the issues important to the African American community. Bennett asks Kerry about the endorsement by some veterans of Shannon's candidacy. Kerry talks about his record on veterans' issues and his opposition to the Vietnam War. Kerry says that Vietnam veterans are not a "monolithic group." Kerry talks about his relations with veterans' groups and his most recent campaign advertisement, which focuses on his record as a soldier in Vietnam and on his opposition to the war.
1:00:01: Visual: Jim Shannon (candidate for US Senate) holds a press conference with a number of leaders of Massachusetts' Vietnam Veterans groups. The Veterans leaders announce their endorsement of Shannon in the race for US Senate. Shannon and the Veterans leaders stand at the front of a room. The media is gathered around them. A veterans leader says that John Kerry (candidate for US Senate) has not fully addressed veterans' issues. The veterans leader refers to a prepared report on veterans' issues. He says that Francis Doris (State Senator from Revere) deserves all of the credit for taking action on veterans' issues. Charles Harris (veterans leader) talks about the Federal Job Training Partnership Act. Harris notes that Vietnam Veterans are eligible for job training under that act. Harris says that Kerry had promised to release state funds for the program; that Kerry did not release the funds until Shannon wrote a letter in support of the veterans. Close-up shot of Shannon. The moderator addresses the audience. The moderator tells the media to ask Kerry about the questions raised by the veterans' groups. 1:02:43: V: A reporter asks if one of the leaders will identify himself and talk about his group. One of the leaders says that many of the veterans are here on their own to support Shannon; that they are not present as representatives of any group or organization. Harris explains that the Vietnam Veterans of Massachusetts Incorporated is a non-profit umbrella organization representing grassroots veterans organizations from across the state; that the organization is prohibited from endorsing a political candidate. Shots of campaign buttons reading, "Viet Vets for Shannon." Harris says that Kerry has not delivered on promises of leadership made to veterans and other voters. Harris says that many veterans are ashamed to admit that they served in Vietnam. Reporters urge the leaders to identify themselves and their positions. 1:05:20: V: Charles Bennett interviews Shannon. Bennett notes that many observers view Shannon's press conference as a "stunt." Shannon says that he has developed relationships with all of these veterans' leaders during his service as a member of Congress; that he has won their support with his strong record on veterans' issues. Bennett asks Shannon about Kerry's TV commercial focusing on Vietnam. Shannon says that he does not know how voters or veterans will respond to Kerry's commercial. 1:06:56: V: John Kerry campaigns in an African American neighborhood. Kerry stands on the sidewalk of a busy street. Kerry speaks informally to a small group of people. Supporters stand on the sidewalk, holding Kerry campaign signs. Shot of a Kerry campaign sign. Kerry speaks to an African American man while a reporter waits to set up an interview with him. 1:08:09: V: Bennett sets up an interview with two leaders of the Black Political Task Force. Bennett asks them why they have endorsed Kerry. One man says that the Black Political Task Force researches all potential candidates before making an endorsement; that the Task Force has chosen to endorse Kerry for US Senate. The reporter asks if their endorsement will result in more votes for Kerry. The second man says that many African American voters respect the endorsements of the Task Force; that many voters follow their counsel. 1:09:16: V: Kerry joins the interview. Bennett asks why the endorsement is important. Kerry says that he respects the research performed by the Task Force before making an endorsement; that he supports the African American community's struggle for equality and betterment. Kerry says that he is proud to have the endorsement of the Task Force; that he intends to fight for issues important to the African American community as a US Senator. Kerry says that his first priority as a US Senator would be to consult with the African American community on a list of economic and educational priorities; that he wants to address those priorities as US Senator. Bennett asks Kerry about the Vietnam veterans' endorsement of Shannon. Kerry notes that only "some" veterans have endorsed Shannon. Kerry says that the Vietnam veterans are not a "monolithic" group; that some veterans do not support his position on the issues. Kerry talks about his political record on veterans' issues. Kerry talks about his opposition to the war, his support for V.A. hospitals and his support for an extended G.I. bill and for other veterans' issues. Kerry adds that he has always worked hard on behalf of veterans; that he has a great deal of veteran support. Bennett asks Kerry if some veterans resent his opposition to the war. Kerry says that some veterans may resent his opposition to the war; that he will not change his beliefs. Bennett asks Kerry if he regrets his TV commercial focusing on Vietnam. Kerry says that the TV commercial is one of the most important statements of his campaign; that he is asking Americans to remember the lesson of Vietnam. Kerry says that he does not want the US to get involved in "another Vietnam." Bennett quotes one Vietnam veteran as saying, "When you put down the war, you put down the warriors." Kerry says that people have confused the war with the warriors; that he is proud of the Vietnam soldiers. Kerry notes that soldiers were the victims of the war; that he feels a sense of brotherhood with all of the veterans regardless of whether they support him. Bennett thanks Kerry.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1984
Description: W. Arthur Garrity (federal judge) speaks at a meeting of the Citywide Educational Coalition (CWEC). Jane Margulis (CWEC) introduces Garrity. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), Sidney Smith (Headmaster, English High School), and Ellen Guiney (CWEC) sit on stage. Garrity talks about his efforts to wrap up the school desegregation case. He says that there are a few lingering matters to be handled before he withdraws. Garrity thanks the CWEC for providing factual and reliable information about school desegregation. Garrity talks about a "sea of misinformation" surrounding school desegregation. He refutes rumors that he was involved in hiring teachers and buying supplies. Garrity compliments John Coakley (Boston School Department) on his career in the Boston School Department; he mentions Coakley's integrity and dedication to his job. Garrity sums up the challenges facing the Boston Public Schools; he says that school integration is an ongoing process. Reel 1
0:59:59: Visual: Arthur Garrity (federal judge) speaks at English High School at the annual meeting of the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC). Garrity is at the end of his involvement in the Boston school desegregation case. Jane Margulis (CWEC) introduces Garrity. Garrity sits on stage, with a group of officials including Laval Wilson (Superintendent of Boston Public Schools), Sidney Smith (Headmaster, English High School), and Ellen Guiney (CWEC). Margulis tells a few anecdotes as she introduces Garrity. Garrity shakes her hand and kisses her on the cheek as he approaches the podium. 1:02:17: V: Garrity thanks Margulis. Garrity tells a story about how he and Margulis spoke at a seminar about school desegregation in Virginia. Garrity says that members of the audience were so impressed with Margulis that she received a job offer on the spot from a school system in Texas. Garrity says that he has not come to talk about the final court orders that he handed down on September 3. Garrity reads from the canon of judicial conduct, which instructs a judge not to comment publicly on court proceedings. Garrity reminds the audience that the court case is not entirely over; that the Boston Teacher's Union has filed an appeal of the court orders issued on September 3. Garrity says that he has extended the time period in which other appeals may be filed. Garrity adds that there is another court hearing on Friday to discuss support services for the Boston Latin School. Garrity talks about a motion filed by the city of Boston to modify one of the court orders dealing with emergency school repairs. 1:07:57: V: Garrity says that he has come to thank the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC). Garrity commends the CWEC for gathering and disseminating factual information since the beginning of desegregation. Garrity says that there was "a sea of misinformation" during that time period. Garrity cites an article from The New York Times written on September 6. The article says that Garrity was involved in hiring teachers and buying supplies. Garrity says that it is "laughable" to think that he was involved in those areas of the school system. Garrity notes that he was only involved in the hiring of one person; that he helped to hire Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School). Garrity says that he wanted to acknowledge the debt owed to the CWEC by the court. Garrity adds that he wanted to meet Laval Wilson; that Wilson has a good reputation as a school administrator. Garrity says that he wanted to be present to honor John Coakley (Boston School Department). Garrity says that the Boston school desegregation case "is nothing else if not a hundred stories." Garrity talks about referring to one of the school desegregation plans filed in court as "the Coakley plan," because it was written by Coakley. He adds that a friend counseled him to stop calling it the "Coakley plan" so as not to ruin Coakley's future in the Boston School Department. Garrity says that he had recently written a a memo connected to one of the court orders, in which he commended Coakley's conscientious job performance. Garrity talks about Coakley's integrity and dedication to his job. Garrity says that there never would have been a student assignment system without Coakley. 1:12:56: V: Garrity says that school desegregation is an ongoing process. Garrity talks about the many tasks facing the Boston Public School System. Garrity talks about differences between the city of Boston and the state over the budget for facilities and school repair. Garrity talks about the need to determine which schools will get money to improve facilities. Garrity talks about the question of the Latin Schools. Garrity notes that the Boston Globe recently printed a letter from Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) on the subject of the Latin Schools. Garrity denies charges printed in the newspapers that he vetoed a plan to improve the Latin Schools. Garrity adds that no plan has been filed to improve the Latin Schools. Garrity says that critics have misread the court orders; that planning must be undertaken for the Latin Schools. Garrity talks about the challenges involved in plans to improve vocational and occupational education. Garrity notes that the Boston School Committee faces some deadlines in its plans to improve vocational education. Garrity stresses that there is much work remaining to be done in the schools; that "the challenges of the future are greater than the challenges of the past." Garrity commends Rita Walsh-Tomasini (Boston School Committee) for advocating the formation of a committee to work with parents' organizations in the schools.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/23/1985
Description: Digital Corporation sponsors a demonstration of the evolution of voice technology at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. A moderator and a group of speakers answer questions from the audience about voice technology and computing technology. The speakers and audience discuss the importance of access to this technology by the blind and disabled. The moderator introduces musician Stevie Wonder. A short clip of Saturday Night Live is played, featuring Stevie Wonder as a news reporter. Wonder speaks to the audience about the opportunities provided to him through technology. He explains the transition from acoustic technology to a more visual technology in terms of music. Wonder discusses his experiences with technology and explains how he works with a Kurzweil reading machine, a DECtalk computer and a synthesizer to compose music. He explains how technology helps further opportunity. Wonder thanks the creators of this technology. Tape 1 of 2
0:59:59: Visual: A man stands at a podium, talking about the evolution of voice technology at a demonstration of the Kurzweil voice recognition machine at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. The man talks about the applications of voice technology in computer-assisted instruction. He talks about speech synthesis and speech recognition as two components of computer-assisted instruction devices. The man says that computer-assisted instruction devices can help young children learn. 1:01:36: V: The audience applauds. The moderator invites the audience to ask questions of the speakers. The speakers are gathered beside the podium, in front of a large banner for the Digital Corporation. The moderator talks about Digital's commitment to promoting and furthering technology in the interests of the company and the greater community. An audience member asks about the sales of the voice recognition machine. The moderator says that the product is successful; that sales figures are not the focus of this conference. 1:03:26: V: The man who spoke answers a question at the podium. The man talks about silicon technology. He says that the price of silicon chips will continue to decline. He says that his company has an active research and development team; that they are working hard to incorporate the latest technology into their products. The man predicts that the future will bring more powerful devices at lower costs; that companies in the field would like to provide computing devices which are affordable for individuals. Another man says that blind people can benefit from voice recognition machines which are available at their workplaces or through community organizations. He notes that blind people can access the machines in these ways, even if they cannot afford to buy one. The first man quotes a statistic indicating that two-thirds of all blind college students have access to a Kurzweil reading machine through their college campuses. The man notes that the Xerox Corporation donated reading machines to many college campuses. A third man approaches the podium. He says that many corporations are interested in donating machines to appropriate organizations; that corporations want to provide access to the machines. 1:05:33: V: The moderator tells the audience that there will be a question and answer period after the presentation of Stevie Wonder (pop singer). A fourth man talks about Wonder's Kurzweil music synthesizer. The man talks about Wonder's involvement with technology. The man talks about Wonder's accomplishments and his efforts to establish a holiday in honor of Martin Luther King (African American civil rights leader). The man talks about recent awards given to Wonder. 1:07:00: V: The audience applauds as Wonder enters the room. A man guides Wonder to the podium. Wonder introduces a video presentation, which begins to play. The video presentation shows Wonder doing a parody of a music critic on Saturday Night Live (late night TV show). 1:09:09: V: Wonder talks about the opportunities provided to him through technology. Wonder talks about the contributions made to the technology which allows him to communicate more fully. Wonder says that technology is his "little sister, big brother, mother and father. I get inspired by it." He talks about learning and developing along with technology. Wonder says that he was first introduced to technology through learning the Braille language; that the Braille language provided him with a fundamental understanding of technology; that he applies that lesson to the machines he encounters today. Wonder says that technology has become more visual; that blind people need to be able to read or hear visual displays on machines. Wonder thanks the technological community for allowing him to access to technology through voice recognition. Wonder says that he used a Teleprompter for the blind during his appearance on Saturday Night Live. Wonder talks about his portable Braille machine, which allows him to access information on a cassette tape. Wonder talks about the pleasure of reading a book through the Kurzweil reading machine. Wonder talks about the DECtalk machine. Wonder says that the DECtalk machine can read Braille input in English. Wonder talks about the usefulness of the DECtalk machine. Wonder says that he will show the audience how the DECtalk machine can read the visual output of a Kurzweil machine, which allows him to use synthesizers without relying on visuals. Wonder says that he is frustrated that these machines are not more accessible to the blind. Wonder says that this technology must be made available to the handicapped and non-handicapped alike; that demand for the product will lead to greater access. Wonder urges the technology community to apply its skill to create greater access for all people. Wonder thanks the creators of the technology and the audience. The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/29/1985
Description: Stevie Wonder demonstrates a Kurweil Reading Machine with text-to-speech capability, which enables blind people to read printed text. He uses the machine to help him read instructions for his synthesizer, so he can compose a song. He jokes around with the audience. He sings part of "I Just Called to Say I Love You." A Boston politician presents Wonder with a commemorative award of his visit to Boston. Wonder addresses the crowd and talks about how the Reading Machine is making a more "harmonious world." Several takes of reporter stand up. A man demonstrates a computer with a touchscreen and Deck Talk features.
1:00:00: Visual: An audience from the technology industry is gathered in the ballroom of the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. Stevie Wonder (pop singer) is at the front of the room, preparing to demonstrate the Kurzweil reading machine and DECtalk machine, which allow him to fully operate a synthesizer. Wonder stands before the keyboard. Wonder explains that the computer keyboard interfaces with the synthesizer; that he cannot operate the machine because he cannot see the controls. Wonder pushes a knob and a computerized voice says what the button does. Wonder begins to program the keyboard. Wonder program the keyboard to play like a piano. Wonder programs the synthesizer to lay down a drumbeat. Wonder stops the drumbeat. Wonder plays and records the tune to the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." The audience applauds when he finishes. 1:05:57: V: Wonder says that the synthesizer allows him to create the sound of a band. He jokes that he cannot afford a band of his own. Wonder programs the synthesizer to sound like drums. Wonder plays the drum track over the recorded tune to the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." Shots of the audience. The audience applauds when he finishes. Wonder programs the synthesizer to play bass and strings. Wonder has to try a few times before successfully programming the machine. Wonder adds a track with strings to the other tracks of the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." 1:13:48: V: The audience applauds. Wonder sings along to the recorded tracks of the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." He adds a line to the song, singing "What it is, is something true, that technology like this makes it possible for me to do." The audience sings and claps along with Wonder. Wonder sings a line, thanking DEC (Digital Equipment Corporation) and Raymond Kurzweiler (inventor of the reading machine). The audience gives Wonder a standing ovation. Wonder is guided to the podium. 1:17:16: V: Shots of the audience. A speaker presents Wonder with a silver Revere Bowl from Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) commemorating his visit to Boston. The audience applauds. 1:18:15: V: Shot of Wonder from the back of the room. Wonder stands at the podium. He talks about how technology makes communication easier. Shots of audience applauding. Meg Vaillancourt stands at the back of the room. Vaillancourt reports on Wonder's demonstration of new technology. 1:20:08: V: Shots of a computer on display at a vendor's table. Vaillancourt interviews the computer vendor. The computer vendor demonstrates the touch-sensitive screen on his computer. A computerized voice identifies which icon has been pushed. The computer vendor explains that the screen can show either text icons or picture icons. The computer vendor talks about the different voice options on the computer. The computer vendor programs the computer voices to repeat stock phrases for the camera.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/29/1985
Description: Laval Wilson (candidate for Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) prepares for his interview with the Boston School Committee. He arranges several large posterboards around and in front of a table in the School Committee chambers. Eileen Jones interviews Wilson about his upcoming interview with the School Committee. Wilson says that he will try to show the School Committee that he is the best candidate for the job. He adds that posters and visual aids help him to communicate. Wilson says that he hopes to have the support of a broad spectrum of community groups and not just the African American community. Wilson declines to identify himself as "conservative." Wilson begins his interview with the School Committee. Wilson talks about his previous experience and his thorough understanding of school desegregation issues and school curricula. Wilson answers questions about remedial education. A member of the School Committee asks Wilson why two African American members of the School Committee do not support his candidacy. Wilson says that he is not familiar with the politics of individual committee members; he adds that he is an educator who happens to be black. Wilson says that he would like to be superintendent for all students and members of the community. Wilson notes that educational programs are more important than ethnicity. Jones reports on the interview and the School Committee's process in selecting a new superintendent.
1:00:00: Visual: Dr. Laval Wilson (candidate for Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) prepares for his interview with the Boston School Committee for the post of superintendent. He arranges several large posterboards around and in front of a table in the School Committee chambers. The boards display papers, advertisements and articles representing his achievements. Members of the press are gathered in front of the table. Several members of the press take photographs. Eileen Jones (WGBH reporter) comments that Wilson does not look nervous. Wilson says that he is a professional; that he has confidence in his abilities; that he hopes to convince the Boston School Committee to hire him. Crowd noise muffles the audio. Jones asks Wilson about his chances of being hired. Wilson says that he is one of three candidates; that he does not know how the School Committee will respond to his candidacy; that he plans to demonstrate his abilities and to answer the School Committee's questions. Wilson mentions that he will use visual aids in his presentation to the School Committee; that the visual aids document his career; that he plans to discuss ideas. Jones comments that the visual aids seem "showy." Wilson says that visual aids help him to learn and communicate better; that the visual aids document his abilities in several areas including planning, budget development, and partnerships. Jones asks how Wilson feels about African Americans in Boston coming out to support his candidacy. Wilson says that he does not know anything about it; that he is concentrating on his interview with the School Committee; that he hopes the entire community will support his candidacy. Wilson says that he is delighted to have support from the African American community; that he hopes to have support of the entire school system and a broad spectrum of community groups. Jones asks Wilson about his reputation as a tough administrator. Wilson says that descriptions are subjective; that he considers himself a "professional educator." Jones asks Wilson if he considers himself "conservative." Wilson says that he considers himself as a school superintendent, not as a liberal or a conservative. 1:06:10: V: Wilson sits down at the table, which faces the members of the Committee. John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) warns the audience to be silent during the interview and presentation, so as not to distract Wilson. Nucci asks Wilson why he would like to be Superintendent of Boston Public Schools. Wilson arranges the microphones on the table. Wilson describes his previous experiences including his positions as a superintendent in Rochester NY, Berkeley CA, and on Long Island. Wilson says that he has a thorough understanding of school desegregation policies and school curricula. He describes his experiences in working with government agencies and lobbying for school funding. Wilson describes his planning abilities and his commitment to working with parent groups. Shot of the members of the school committee. Kevin McCluskey (Boston School Committee) asks Wilson a question about remedial education. Shot of Wilson. Wilson talks about his experience in and views on remedial education programs. Shots of African American audience members. Wilson talks about the possibility of extending the school day. Committee members ask Wilson questions about a specific remedial education program. Wilson talks about the need to close the gap between low-achievement scores and high-achievement scores. Shots of the audience; of individual audience members. 1:13:03: V: Wilson says that he is not the type of person to brag about his achievements; that he must highlight his achievements in order to be considered for this post; that he considers himself to be one of the most qualified superintendents in the nation. Wilson notes that he was selected as one of the top 100 executive educators in the nation; that he has a strong reputation across the nation. A member of the Committee asks Wilson why African American School Committee members John O'Bryant and Jean McGuire do not support his candidacy. The member says, "What do they know about you that we don't know about you?" Wilson says that he does not know why O'Bryant and McGuire do not support him; that a superintendent needs to make decisions for students of all races; that he is a school educator who happens to be black. Wilson says that he has not read the newspapers; that he is not familiar with the politics of individual Committee members. The same committee member asks Wilson what it means to be an educator "who also happens to be black." The committee member asks Wilson if he will deal with minority students who are not getting an education, or if he will "keep playing a game." Wilson says that the superintendent needs to implement the best educational programs for the school population. Wilson says that he would not like his statements as superintendent to be seen as "the black statement"; that he would not be the superintendent for any particular group; that he would be the superintendent for the whole community. Wilson says that the superintendent cannot afford to be associated with one particular ethnic group; that the superintendent has to work together with all staff, students, parents, and community groups. Wilson says that it is important to consider issues, not skin color. Wilson says that ethnicity can be an issue; that every ethnic group has its own specific concerns; that educational programs are more important than ethnicity. 1:18:55: V: Jones reports that the interviews with candidates are not the end of the selection process; that School Committee members will make site visits to the school districts of each candidate. Jones notes that the School Committee will elect a new superintendent on July 31. Jones does two takes of her closing to the news story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/19/1985
Description: Dr. Laval Wilson and members of the Boston School Committee assemble themselves at a press conference in Wilson's office. The media sets up a shot of Wilson and Nucci signing copies of Wilson's contract. Wilson and Nucci shake hands. Wilson shakes hands with each member of the School Committee. Wilson takes questions from reporters. Wilson talks about his enthusiasm for his new post. He says that his biggest challenge will be to familiarize himself with the issues and problems within the school system. A reporter asks Wilson about the politics of the school system. Wilson says that politics are always involved in public education. Wilson says that he and his family are making themselves at home in the city. Wilson answers reporters' questions about Arthur Garrity (federal judge) and his supervisory role over the Boston Public Schools. Wilson says that the city of Boston owes Garrity a debt of gratitude for his wisdom and leadership in the school desegregation case. Wilson talks about his meeting with Garrity in the courtroom. Wilson says that he is committed to integrated schools. Wilson adds that today's hearing in Garrity's courtroom was the last. He says that Garrity will soon turn over stewardship of the schools to Wilson and the School Committee. Meg Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Grady. Grady talks about the importance of Garrity's final hearings. He says that today is a "historic" day. Grady is optimistic about Wilson's selection as superintendent. Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Nucci. Nucci talks about the significance of Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. He says that the School Committee is ready to take on the responsibility of running the schools. Nucci adds that the School Committee is looking forward to working with Wilson as superintendent.
1:00:01: V: Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) walks over to a desk and lays out two copies of his contract. Microphones are set up on the desk. Shot of papers laid out on the desk. Wilson confers with Boston School Committee members John Nucci, Rita Walsh-Tomasini, John Grady, and Joe Casper. The School Committee members stand to the side of the desk. Wilson examines the papers with Nucci and Walsh-Tomasini. Boston School Committee members Abigail Browne and Jean McGuire walk behind the group with Wilson. Close-up shots of Wilson, Nucci and Walsh-Tomasini. Casper stands on the opposite side of the desk from the group with Wilson. The media sets up a shot of Wilson sitting at the desk with the members of the School Committee, including Kevin McCluskey, standing around him. Wilson takes his suitcoat off and settles into the desk. Wilson and Nucci each sign both copies of the contract. Wilson shakes hands with Nucci and each of the School Committee members. 1:03:12: V: Wilson sits down and takes questions from reporters. The School Committee members remain standing around his desk. A reporter asks Wilson if he has any second thoughts about coming to Boston. Wilson says that he is delighted to be in Boston; that he wishes he could have had more time to prepare for the coming school year. Wilson says that he will work with school staff to get to know the school system; that he will do his best to work with the School Committee and the mayor to benefit the schools. A reporter asks Wilson to name the biggest problem he faces. Wilson says that his biggest problem will be to get to know the system. Wilson says that he must understand the issues and the problems before he can address them. A reporter asks Wilson about the politics involved in the Boston Public School System. Wilson says that politics come with the territory of public education. Shot of the members of the media recording the event. A reporter asks Wilson about the insights given to him by the transition team. Wilson says that he has not yet received a briefing from the transition team. Shot of Grady. Wilson says that he is happy to be in Boston; that his three children will be attending Boston Public Schools; that he is in the process of looking for a home in the city. Wilson again shakes hands with Nucci and the members of the School Committee. 1:07:20: V: Wilson is interviewed by the media. Wilson talks about a conversation he had with Arthur Garrity (federal judge). Wilson says that Garrity told him that the problems in the school system may be exaggerated by the media. Wilson notes that the city of Boston owes Garrity a debt of gratitude for his wisdom and leadership in the school desegregation case. Wilson says that Garrity will soon turn over supervision of the school system to Wilson and the School Committee. A reporter asks Wilson about the challenges he will face in improving the schools. Wilson says that the community must commit itself to integrated schools; that all children must have equal access to the schools. A reporter asks Wilson how he felt while meeting with Garrity. Wilson says that the meeting was, in fact, "historic." Wilson adds that he appreciated the opportunity to talk to Garrity in the courtroom. A reporter asks how Garrity responded to Wilson's requests to meet with him privately. Wilson says that Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) told him that Garrity had decided not to meet privately with any of the superintendents of the Boston Public Schools; that Dentler told Wilson not to feel slighted if Garrity does not meet with him. Wilson adds that he had a productive conversation with Dentler. A reporter asks Wilson if today's hearing was the last in the Boston school desegregation case (Morgan v. Hennigan). Wilson says that Garrity indicated that today's hearing was the last. Wilson says that he will do his best to provide equal access to integrated schools; that another hearing can be avoided if the schools remain integrated. 1:10:45: V: Meg Vaillancourt sets up a meeting with Grady. Vaillancourt asks him if today's hearing was the final hearing. Grady says that Garrity indicated that today's hearing was the last one. Grady notes that it is a "historic" day for the Boston Public School System; that the Boston School Committee and the Boston School Department have worked hard to arrive at this day. Vaillancourt asks Grady about the challenges facing Wilson and the School Committee. Grady says that Wilson will need to move ahead in the same direction; that the schools have "turned the corner." Grady says that there is "an air of optimism" throughout the school system; that Wilson will be a capable superintendent. Vaillancourt thanks Grady. 1:11:57: V: Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Nucci. Vaillancourt asks Nucci about the withdrawal of Garrity. She notes that Garrity told the Boston School Committee to pay heed to the parents and teachers. Nucci says that the School Committee recognizes the contributions of parents and teachers over the past ten years. Nucci says that he is optimistic; that Garrity is confident in the School Committee's commitment to integrated schools; that Garrity is optimistic about the selection of Wilson as superintendent. Nucci says that it is time to close "a chapter in Boston's history." Vaillancourt notes that Dr. Robert Spillane (former Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) left because the School Committee switched to district representation. She asks if Wilson will face a challenge in dealing with the School Committee. Nucci says that Garrity has cited the district-elected School Commitee's commitment to desegregated schools. Nucci adds that the new School Committee has led to Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. Another reporter asks Nucci if any potential problems could prevent Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. Nucci says that there are only minor differences to be resolved. The reporter asks about the significance of Garrity's withdrawal. Nucci says that the judge will set the parameters for desegregation in his final court orders; that the Boston School Committee will be responsible for running the schools. Vaillancourt asks Nucci if a larger School Committee could hinder Wilson's ability to get his programs approved. Nucci quotes Spillane as saying that the size of the committee is less important than the quality of the people who serve on the committee. Nucci says that the School Committee will help Wilson in his new role as superintendent.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/21/1985
Description: This tape includes footage of the aftermath of race riots in Lawrence in August of 1984. Residents stand on the street; some of the buildings are damaged. Two men inspect a burnt-out house. A man repairs a broken window. A group of people stands outside of a liquor store. The sign for the liquor store is damaged; debris is visible on the floor of the liquor store. A group of men move boxes from the store onto a truck. A police cruiser moves down a blockaded street. Police direct traffic in front of the liquor store. Footage from the McNeil-Lehrer Newshour. Robert McNeil reports on race riots in the Tower Hill section of Lawrence. McNeil notes that gangs of Latino youth and gangs of white youth were throwing molotov cocktails and that police were called in to restore order. McNeil’s report includes night footage of the riots in Lawrence.
1:00:04: Visual: Shot of a residential street in Lawrence. Two white men in business suits stand on the lot of a burnt out house. A few people are gathered outside of a house on a residential street in Lawrence. Shot of a liquor store with bars over the windows. Two white women stand outside of a damaged building on a streetcorner. A motorcycle is parked in front of the building. A white man peers out of a broken window in the building. A white man looks out of a window of a house. 1:01:26: V: A group of white adults and kids stand outside of a liquor store in Lawrence. A few people walk up a residential street toward the liquor store. The street is strewn with debris. Shot of the damaged liquor store sign. Shots of a pick-up truck; of a man closing the back of a U-haul moving truck. A man repairs the broken window of a building on a street corner in Lawrence. Close-up shots of other broken windows. The U-haul moving truck pulls up to the front of the liquor store. Shot of the damaged liquor store sign. White men move alcohol from the store into the moving truck. Shot of debris on the floor of the liquor store; of the interior of the moving truck; of the front of the liquor store. 1:03:14: V: Shot of hand-lettered sign reading, "Keep out." A group of white men are gathered in front of a burnt-out house. Shots of the charred remains of the house. A police cruiser travels down a street. The street is blockaded with "Do not enter" signs. The cruiser travels toward the liquor store and moving van. Long shot of the blockaded street with the liquor store. Video cuts out briefly at the end of this segment. Street noise is audible. 1:04:50: V: Two white police officers stand in the middle of a residential street. A crowd of all ages mills about. The crowd includes whites, Hispanics and African Americans. A crowd is gathered near the liquor store. A police officer directs a car as it maneuvers in the crowded street. 1:05:34: News brief from the McNeil-Lehrer Newshour. Robert McNeil reads news headlines. McNeil reports on violence in the Tower Hill section of Lawrence. McNeil reports that gangs of youth threw molotov cocktails; that one gang was Spanish-speaking; that the other gang included French-Canadian, Irish and Italian youth. V: Footage of youth gang members in the dark. The youth carry sticks. Molotov cocktails are thrown by the youth. The molotov cocktails explode on the pavement. McNeil reports that four people were arrested and twenty people were injured; that police used tear gas to restore order at 2:00 am. V: Footage of youth armed with sticks; of police marching among small fires burning on the street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/09/1984
Description: Mel King speaks at a press conference held on behalf of the Massachusetts Rainbow Coalition and the Massachusetts Jesse Jackson Committee. Committee members stand behind King as he reads an open letter from Jesse Jackson. Jackson's letter criticizes Ronald Reagan and urges voters to support Walter Mondale in the upcoming election. Domenic Bozzotto (labor leader) speaks at the press conference. Bozzotto denounces Reagan and says that the labor movement must support Mondale. May Louie (Rainbow Coalition leader) speaks at the press conference. Louie calls on all members of the Rainbow Coalition to support Mondale, even if they are not entirely comfortable with his candidacy. King answers questions from reporters. King talks about efforts by both committees to register new voters. Louie and King talk about the committees' efforts to win over voters in Massachusetts. King says that the Rainbow Coalition can work more successfully with Democratic leaders than with Reagan. King talks about the dissatisfaction of Jackson voters with the Democratic Party. King says that the Democratic Party has ignored Jackson's efforts to push for a more inclusive platform. King says that the Democratic Party needs "serious transformation." King says that the committees are struggling for the minds of the people. He adds that it is "immoral" not to vote against Reagan in the upcoming election. Several takes of reporter standup.
1:00:00: Visual: Mel King (political activist) sits at a table at a press conference. Other leaders of the Massachusetts Jesse Jackson Committee sit at the table with King. Supporters stand behind the table, in front of a banner for the Rainbow Coalition. King tells the media that he is speaking on behalf of the Massachusetts Jesse Jackson Committee and the Massachusetts Rainbow Coalition. King expresses his support for Jackson. King reads an open letter from Jackson about the importance of getting out the vote against Ronald Reagan (US President). Jackson's letter urges people to support Walter Mondale (candidate for US President) against Reagan. The letter denounces Reagan's record as president. Jackson's letter predicts that Reagan can be beat if "the victims of Reaganism" come out to vote for Mondale. Jackson writes that the people can effect change in society through political means. Jackson's letter urges people to help him build the Democratic Party into a Rainbow Coalition. King finishes reading the letter. The supporters applaud. 1:05:10: V: King hands the microphone to Domenic Bozzotto (labor leader). Bozzotto says that the Rainbow Coalition's purpose is to defeat Reagan and Reaganism. Bozzotto denounces Reaganism and its effect on working people and labor unions. Bozzotto says that the labor movement must join the Rainbow Coalition in order to support Mondale and to defeat Reagan. 1:06:12: V: May Louie (Rainbow Coalition leader) calls on all members of the Rainbow Coalition to fight Reagan and Reaganism. Louie admits that some members of the Coalition may not be entirely comfortable with Mondale's candidacy; that it is important to support Mondale in order to defeat Reagan. 1:06:53: V: King invites the reporters to ask questions. Shots of supporters standing behind King. A reporter asks how many votes Jackson received in the Massachusetts primary. Another reporter answers that Jackson received 33,000 votes. A reporter asks how many citizens the group would like to register to vote during its voter registration drive. King says that he does not have a specific numerical goal; that it is "immoral" for people not to vote when faced with the "danger" represented by Reagan's policies. King notes that many people have responded to the group's message by registering to vote. King adds that more than 1,000 people have been registered to vote in the South End during the past month. A reporter asks if King expects Jackson to visit Massachusetts. King says that the group is working to bring Jackson to Massachusetts; that Jackson is campaigning for Mondale in the South. 1:09:08: V: A reporter asks if the Rainbow Coalition expects to win over the voters who supported Gary Hart (US Senator) in the Democratic primary election. King says that the goal of the Coalition is to defeat Reagan; that the members of the Coalition can work with Democratic leaders more successfully than they can work with Reagan. Louie adds that the Massachusetts delegation to the Democratic Convention voted with Jackson supporters on some platform issues; that Massachusetts voters are receptive to the issues put forth by the Coalition. A reporter asks why this announcement was not made immediately after the Democratic convention. King says that the group is working for Jackson; that Jackson wrote the letter recently; that the group is following Jackson's instructions. King notes that the group is working hard to register voters; that the group will work to get out the vote in support of Mondale. King adds that the group will use the media and other strategies to publicize its message. 1:11:28: V: A reporter asks King how they will motivate voters to get to the polls on election day. Shots of the media and the audience. King says that the movement to defeat Reagan is the first of many steps in building up the Rainbow Coalition; that the Coalition will be more successful if Reagan is out of office. Shots of members of the Massachusetts Jesse Jackson Committee; of a sign reading, "For 50 years, we've belonged to the Democratic Party. Now it's time that the Democratic Party belonged to us." A reporter asks King about the committee's slogan about the committee's slogan, "For 50 years, we've belonged to the Democratic Party. Now it's time that the Democratic Party belonged to us." King says that Jackson's goal is to "remake" the Democratic Party into a "rainbow" party of "peace, jobs and justice." King notes that the labor movement has seen the importance of joining with Jackson to defeat Reagan; that Reagan's policies are anti-union. A reporter comments that the slogan expresses a sense of "dissatisfaction" with the Democratic Party. King says that the reporter is right. The committee members applaud. King notes that the Rainbow Coalition is "critical" of Mondale and the Democratic Party; that the Democratic Party has failed to consider Jackson's efforts to push for a more inclusive platform. King adds that he is an independent. King says that Jackson's leadership is important; that Jackson is trying to push the Democratic Party to represent the needs of a broader cross section of people. King says that the Democratic Party "needs serious transformation." King adds that people who have been "locked out" of the Democratic Party need to support Jackson in order to transform the Party. Bozzotto says that Jackson has laid out a blueprint for a Democratic victory in November. Bozzotto adds that Jackson has brought voters back to the Democratic Party. 1:16:13: V: King says that the Jackson Committee is "struggling for people's minds." Jackson says that people in the US and across the world are "dying daily" as a result of Reagan's policies; that it is "immoral" for citizens of the US not to come out to vote against Reagan. King says that the "soul" of the nation is at stake. King talks about the responsibility of citizens to vote in November in order to rid the world of the "menace" posed by the Reagan administration. King closes the press conference. The Jackson Committee members applaud. King and the Committee members rise from their seats. 1:18:06: V: Meg Vaillancourt stands under the banner reading, "For 50 years, we've belonged to the Democratic Party. Now it's time that the Democratic Party belonged to us." Vaillancourt reports that the Massachusetts Women's Political Caucus is trying to convince some Republicans to vote Democratic this year; that some Democrats are talking about their plans to reform the Party from within. Vaillancourt does several takes of her comments for the news story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/01/1984
Description: Reporter Christopher Lydon interviews attendees of the inauguration of Ray Flynn as Mayor of Boston, in the Wang Center. The crowd cheers as Flynn and former mayor Kevin White pass by. Lydon interviews attendees of the inauguration in the lobby of the Wang Center. Interviewees express concerns about unemployment, crime, the restoration of city services and the city budget. Cynthia Silveira (Dorchester resident) says that she appreciates Flynn's commitment to diversity and unity but is suspicious of his past voting record on racial issues. Lydon interviews people outside of the Wang Center. Harry Spence (Boston Housing Authority) says that Flynn delivered a "solid" speech, but will face difficulties in delivering city services and achieving racial harmony. George Keverian (State Representative) says that Flynn is the right person to unite the city. Louise Day Hicks (former member of the Boston City Council) says that Flynn must strike a balance between downtown concerns and neighborhood interests. Hicks says that South Boston is the "center of the city." Hicks speaks to Dapper O'Neil outside of the Wang Center. Felix Arroyo (Latino activist) hopes that Flynn will deliver on his promises; Arroyo believes that it will be difficult for Flynn to integrate the city's neighborhoods. Elma Lewis (African American activist) says that she and others will work with Flynn to improve the city. Lewis adds that she is "always looking for diversity." Claire Crawford (Boston resident) says that Flynn is a "people's mayor." Flynn exits the Wang Center and gets in his station wagon; crowd cheers. Lydon interviews James Kelly (South Boston Information Center). Kelly expresses reservations about Flynn's proposal for District Advisory Councils. Thomas Menino (Boston City Council) compliments Flynn's inaugural speech.
1:00:00: Visual: Christopher Lydon interviews a white male about the inaugural speech of Ray Flynn (Mayor, City of Boston) at the Wang Center for the Performing Arts. The man says that Flynn gave a strong speech; that he is optimistic about Flynn's administration. The man says that Flynn will face challenges in improving the schools. Lydon speaks informally to the man. 1:00:45: V: Uniformed officers march up the stairs in the lobby of the Wang Center. People are gathered in the lobby. The audience cheers as Flynn exits a room and proceeds up the stairs. Flynn's young daughter holds his hand as he walks up the stairs. Flynn stops to greet bystanders as he passes. Kevin White (former Mayor of Boston) and Kathryn White (wife of Kevin White) proceed up the stairs after Flynn. 1:02:12: V: Lydon interviews a white man who is a Dorchester resident. The man says that Flynn is the first mayor since Josiah Quincy to have a "sense of the city"; that Flynn is familiar with the neighborhoods and the downtown. Lydon interviews a white middle-aged man about Flynn's speech. The man says that Flynn's speech was very good; that Flynn understands that the government exists to serve the people. The man says that Flynn will face a challenge in restoring city services during an economic crisis. An older white woman says that Flynn's speech was "wonderful." The woman says that Flynn will face a challenge in reducing unemployment; that Flynn's emphasis on unity was important. Cynthia Silveira (Dorchester resident) says that Flynn's speech was good; that she hesitates to trust Flynn because of his past voting record on racial issues. Silveira says that it will be difficult for Flynn to give his full attention to Boston neighborhoods; that she appreciates his commitment to diversity and unity. An older Irish woman recognizes Lydon from television. Her companions explains that they are from the region of Ireland where Flynn's family is from. The second Irish woman says that the speech was "wonderful." An older white woman says that Flynn will be a good mayor if he delivers what he promised in the speech; that it will be difficult for Flynn to reduce the crime rate. An older white man says that Flynn has the right idea; that Flynn will "economize." 1:06:59: V: A crowd streams out of the doors of the Wang Center. Lydon interviews Harry Spence (Boston Housing Authority). Spence says that Flynn delivered a "solid" speech; that it will be difficult for Flynn to deliver services and to achieve racial harmony. Spence says that Flynn's speech expressed his decency and commitment to the people. The crowd continues to exit the building. Groups of people are gathered outside of the doors. Members of the crowd greet Lydon. George Keverian (Massachusetts House of Representatives) greets Lydon and his two daughters. Keverian says that Flynn delivered a good speech; that Flynn's humanity was in evidence. Keverian says that Flynn is the right person to unite the people of Boston. Keverian continues to speak informally to Lydon and his daughters. 1:12:07: V: Louise Day Hicks greets Lydon. Hicks says that Flynn's speech covered many "interesting" and important topics; that South Boston is the "center" of the city. Hicks says that Flynn will need to strike a balance between the neighborhoods and the downtown interests; that Flynn needs to concentrate on affordable housing and crime reduction. Hicks confers with Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council) on the street outside of the Wang Center. Lydon interviews Felix Arroyo (Latino activist). Arroyo says that the city will be a better place if Flynn can deliver on his promises. Arroyo says that Flynn will face challenges in integrating the neighborhoods; that he appreciates Flynn's commitment to education. Shot of a black car pulled up to the curb in front of the Wang Center. Lydon asks Elma Lewis (African American activist) about Flynn's speech. Lewis say that Flynn put on a good "show"; that inaugural speeches do not mean much; that she and others will work with Flynn to improve the city. Lewis says that she has attended inaugurals for many years; that she would like to have seen "more diversity"; that she is "always looking for more diversity." 1:17:04: V: Claire Crawford (Boston resident) says that Flynn is a "people's mayor." Crawford says that Flynn will face challenges in eliminating racial discrimination. Flynn exits the Wang Center. He greets several groups of bystanders. Photographers crowd around Flynn's station wagon. Flynn clears snow from his windshield. Flynn gets in the car and drives away. The crowd cheers briefly. 1:20:37: V: Lydon interviews Jim Kelly (South Boston Information Center). Kelly says that Flynn gave a good speech; that parts of the speech "concerned" him. Kelly expresses reservations about the District Advisory Councils. Kelly says that Flynn face difficulties in providing services to the city during an economic crisis. Kelly says that the people of South Boston are happy to "have a say" in how the city is run. Lydon begins to interview Thomas Menino (Boston City Council). Menino says that Flynn made an excellent speech.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/02/1984
Description: B-roll of campaign staff work at the local headquarters of the Rainbow Coalition in the South End. The workers speak on the telephone, sort through papers and assemble handouts. Boyce Slayman, a political consultant, speaks to some of the workers. He shows them a newspaper headline about Jackson's top position on the Massachusetts' primary ballot. Shots of Jackson campaign pins, Jackson campaign letterhead and shots of Rainbow Coalition posters. Close up on a photo of Jackson and community activist Mel King. Exteriors of the campaign headquarters. Campaign signs for King's mayoral candidacy remain in the window of the headquarters.
1:00:01: Visual: Shot of a Rainbow Coalition campaign button reading, "Jackson in '84." Campaign workers are working in the local headquarters of the Rainbow Coalition in the South End. An African American male campaign worker rummages through cardboard boxes on the floor. He looks for something in his desk. A white female campaign worker affixes a Rainbow Coalition campaign button to her shirt. The male campaign worker answers the phone, saying "Rainbow Coalition/Mel King's Office." A white female worker sits at a desk, speaking on the telephone. The male campaign worker assembles handouts from papers at his desk. Shot of the campaign workers Rainbow Coalition campaign pin, reading "Jackson '84." Shots of the letterhead on the papers on the campaign worker's desk. The letterhead reads, "Jesse Jackson for President Committee." The male campaign worker continues to assemble handouts. A white female worker sorts through papers while on the telephone. 1:05:20: V: Shot of a black and white photo of Mel King (African American community leader and activist) and Jesse Jackson (candidate for US President). King and Jackson have raise their linked arms in the photo. The white female campaign worker continues to talk on the telephone. She is talking about the Jackson campaign. Shot of the Rainbow Coalition campaign pin worn by the worker. 1:06:31: V: Boyce Slayman (African American community leader and political consultant) stands in the headquarters of the Rainbow Coalition. He speaks to an African American female campaign worker. Shot of a small painting of a rainbow. The caption above the rainbow reads, "I believe in love." Two campaign workers converse in an office. A white female campaign worker sorts paper in the office. Slayman enters the office and picks up a newspaper. The white female campaign worker continues to sort through papers. The crew sets up a shot with the white female campaign worker and an African American female campaign worker in the office. Slayman shows them both an article from the newspaper. Shot of a newspaper article with a headline reading, "Jackson's name to top primary ballot." Shot of the white female campaign worker's campaign button which reads, "Jesse Jackson. Now is the time. 1984." The white female campaign worker and the African American female campaign worker continue to work in the office. 1:10:20: V: Slayman reads the newspaper in the outer office where the male campaign worker and a white female campaign worker sit at desks. The white female campaign worker continues to speak on the telephone. The male campaign worker continues to assemble handouts. The African American female campaign worker confers with Slayman. 1:11:47: V: Shots of the exterior of the headquarters from the street outside. Snow is falling. Campaign signs from King's mayoral campaign hang in the window. A sign for the Rainbow Coalition hangs in the window.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/13/1984
Description: The Boston School Committee holds a meeting in its chambers. Grace Romero (Boston School Committee) accuses School Committee members of playing political games during the process of electing a new superintendent. John Grady (Boston School Committee) reads a statement from Joseph Casper (Boston School Committee). The statement reads that Casper will vote for one of the other candidates because Joseph McDonough (Interim Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) withdrew his name from consideration. Jean McGuire (Boston School Committee) voices her support for one of the candidates. John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) talks about the search process. Edward Winter (Secretary, Boston School Committee) calls the roll. Dr. Laval Wilson wins the election, 9 to 4. Romero objects to a motion to make Wilson's election unanimous. School Committee members prepare to leave the room. Eileen Jones interviews Felix Arroyo (Latino community activist) about the vote. Arroyo says that he will support Wilson as superintendent. Jones interviews Jack E. Robinson (NAACP) about the vote. Robinson says that he is pleased that the three finalists were all minority candidates. Robinson says that Wilson was the right candidate for the job. Jones interviews Romero outside of the School Committee chambers. Romero says that she objected to making the vote unanimous because the record needs to reflect how each member voted. Jones interviews O'Bryant about the vote. O'Bryant says that he had never committed himself to a single candidate before the vote. O'Bryant says that Wilson is a strong candidate. He denies accusations that he switched his vote from another candidate. Jones does several takes of her reportage for the story.
0:59:53: Audio of Boston School Committee proceedings. Visual: The Boston School Committee meets in its chambers. A large crowd has gathered in the audience, including members of the media. Grace Romero (member, Boston School Committee) chastises members of the school committee for playing politics. Romero says that school committee members must conduct themselves better in the future. She briefly mentions relations between School Committee members and Hispanic voters. Joseph Casper (member, Boston School Committee) says that he cannot speak because he has lost his voice. Someone jokes that Casper "lost his voice two weeks too late." The audience applauds. John Grady (member, Boston School Committee) reads a statement from Casper. The statement reads that Joe McDonough (Interim Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) was his first choice to be superintendent; that McDonough has withdrawn his name from consideration. The statement reads that Casper will vote for another candidate this evening. The statement urges school committee members to salute the work of McDonough. Casper speaks softly to the other members after Grady reads the statement. 1:03:38: V: Jean McGuire (member, Boston School Committee) talks about the importance of the post of superintendent of schools. She voices her support for Dr. Peter Negroni (candidate for Superintendent of Boston Public Schools). John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) talks about the value of the search process for the candidates. He urges the committee to select a new superintendent with a significant majority. Nucci says that each of the candidates is qualified for the job. Nucci calls on Edward Winter (Secretary, Boston School Committee) to call the roll. Winter calls the roll of members, and each member indicates his or her choice for superintendent. School Committee members Abigail Browne, William Marcione, Kevin McCluskey and McGuire vote for Negroni. School Committee members Daniel Burke, Casper, Grady, John O'Bryant, Thomas O'Reilly, Shirley Owen-Hicks, Romero, Rita Walsh-Tomasini and Nucci vote for Dr. Laval Wilson (candidate for Superintendent, Boston Public Schools). The audience applauds after the vote has been taken. Marcione moves to make the election of Wilson unanimous. Romero objects to the motion. She explains that she does not want the record to reflect that Negroni received no votes. Shots of Winter; of Romero. Grady makes a reference to the rules pertaining to the motion. 1:08:26: V: Owens Hicks gathers her papers and prepares to leave the chambers. Romero does the same. Members of the audience are rising to leave the chambers. Groups of people stand speaking to one another. McGuire and Nucci stand at the front of the room, preparing to leave the chambers. O'Bryant greets an audience member. Burke and Julio Henriquez (aide to Burke) confer in the chambers. Two white men confer at the front of the chambers. 1:09:00: V: Eileen Jones interviews Felix Arroyo (Latino community activist) about the school committee vote. Arroyo says that the vote gives Wilson a clear mandate; that the city of Boston must work with Wilson to improve the schools. Arroyo says that he was not surprised at Wilson's election to the post. Arroyo says that he would have liked to have seen Negroni win the post; that he will fully support Wilson now that he has been elected. Jones asks for Arroyo's reaction to Romero's remarks. Arroyo says that he did not understand what Romero was trying to say in her remarks; that many Hispanics do not believe that Romero is representative of their community. 1:10:39: V: Jones asks Jack E. Robinson (NAACP) about his reaction to the vote. Robinson says that he is pleased with the result of the vote; that the School Committee made the right choice and acted with maturity in electing Wilson. Robinson says that it is significant that three minority candidates were the finalists for the post. Robinson says that the committee members elected Wilson on the basis of his qualifications. Robinson says that he was not surprised with the results; that the committee members had decided to put politics aside and vote for the best candidate. 1:11:43: V: Jones interviews Romero about the vote. Jones asks Romero why she objected to a unanimous vote for Wilson. Romero says that Negroni was a qualified candidate with support; that she does not want the record to show that he did not get any votes. Romero says that the motion for a unanimous vote is part of "a game" played by some members of the school committee. Jones notes that a unanimous vote would show full support for the winning candidate. Romero says that the committee should have showed unanimous support in the beginning; that the record needs to show how each member voted. Jones asks Romero what she had been trying to say to the Hispanic community in her earlier remarks. Romero says that O'Bryant has not delivered on his promises to the Hispanic community. 1:12:54: V: Jones sets up an interview with O'Bryant. Jones asks O'Bryant if he switched his vote from Negroni to Wilson. O'Bryant says that he never made a commitment to any candidate; that many assumed that he would support Negroni because he supported him in 1981. O'Bryant says that he initiated the search committee process for the Boston School Committee in 1978. O'Bryant emphasizes that he never committed to any candidate. O'Bryant says that he decided to support Wilson after making site visits; that his support for Wilson never wavered. Jones notes that Romero's earlier comments were directed at him. Jones says that Romero accused O'Bryant of making a promise to the Hispanic community that he would vote for Negroni. O'Bryant says that Romero is lying. O'Bryant says that he did not promise anything to any community. Jones asks O'Bryant if he was suprised at the vote. O'Bryant says that he was not surprised because Wilson is a strong candidate. O'Bryant says that the vote might have gone the other way if he had supported Negroni. 1:15:08: V: Jones stands in the Boston School Committee chambers. Jones reports that members of the school committee hope that Wilson visit Boston by the end of the week to work out details of his contract and to meet the community. Jones does two takes to the closing of the news story. Jones records an alternate closing in which she reports on Romero's objection to a motion to make the vote unanimous. Jones does two takes of the alternate closing to the news story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/31/1985
Description: Stevie Wonder speaks at a Harvard Law School Forum at Sanders Theatre. He answers questions from the audience. Wonder discusses his record label and the ups and downs of his career. Wonder talks about his need to be creative and to make music. Asked about apartheid, Wonder says that he will not perform in South Africa; he says that American citizens should make an effort to not support apartheid. Wonder takes his glasses off and pretends to read a letter given to him from an audience member. The audience cheers.
1:00:06: Visual: Stevie Wonder speaks at a Harvard Law School Forum at Sanders Theatre. Wonder talks about his record label. Wonder says that he is always looking for new talent. Wonder elicits laughs from the audience when he tries to imitate the mannerisms of a slick record producer. 1:01:43: V: Tape cuts out during an audience member's question about the ups and downs of Wonder's career. Wonder answers that his faith has helped him a lot. 1:01:58: V: Wonder talks about his desire to be creative and to make music. He talks about the time period when his song "Uptight" became a hit. Two members of a campus singing group present Wonder with a button from their group. One member of the group asks Wonder about his position on boycotts of apartheid South Africa. Wonder says that he will not perform in South Africa; that he understands the feelings of some musicians who do perform there. Wonder says that American citizens have a responsibility to do what they can to not support apartheid; that American citizens understand the ill effects of racism. An audience member talks about how she gave Wonder a necklace in 1973 when she attended one of his private recording sessions. Another audience member asks permission to go up on stage to present Wonder with a letter she wrote for him. The woman gives Wonder a hug on stage and presents him with the letter. 1:08:05: V: Wonder pretends to take off his glasses and read the letter. The audience cheers. Wonder leaves the stage. The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/19/1984
Description: Tufts University officials and students stand on the university quadrangle near Ballou Hall. Ballou Hall is being occupied by student protesters. Meg Vaillancourt interviews Robert Elias (professor, Tufts University) about the student occupation of Ballou Hall. Elias talks about negotiations between student demonstrators and the university administration, which were initiated by the faculty. Elias says that many students are concerned about Tufts' divestment policy; he adds that the demonstration has been an educational experience. Elias says that he does not know how students will react to the administrations' proposals to end the occupation. Students and members of the media are gathered under the portico of Ballou Hall. Protest signs hang at the entrance to the building. A protest sign hanging at the entrance to the hall reads "Biko Hall." Tufts University police officers stand near the students under the portico of the building. Elias and two other people enter the building. Students in the foyer of the building begin to chant and sing. Police officers stand directly in front of the entrance to the building. The protesters are visible as they chant and sing.
1:00:00: Visual: Three men stand on the quadrangle at Tufts University, talking about the student apartheid protest. The noise of a protester speaking into a bullhorn is audible. Shot of a sign reading, "You've made your point. Now get out." The sign is hung from two trees on the quadrangle. Tents are set up across from Ballou Hall, near the sign on the quadrangle. A song by Bob Marley, "Get Up, Stand Up" plays from a radio. Students stand on the quad and in front of Ballou Hall. Ballou Hall has been occupied by students protesting the school's refusal to divest from South Africa. Small groups of students are gathered on the quad. Two white male students talk to one another on the quadrangle. Music by Bob Marley continues to play. An African American male in a red shirt speaks to a white male in a suit and tie. The African American male holds a pen and paper in his hand. Some white male students and another white male in a suit and tie are standing with the two men. 1:04:54: V: Meg Vaillancourt sets up an interview on the quadrangle with Professor Robert Elias (professor, Tufts University). Vaillancourt asks Elias about student support for the protesters. She also asks about the possibility of negotiations with the administration. Elias says that negotiations with the protesters were initiated by a small group of faculty members; that the president of the university approved a proposal put forth by the faculty; that the faculty members presented the proposal to the students. Elias says that the students agreed to give an answer on the proposal by 4:30 pm, if the administration would promise to keep the police out of the building. Elias notes that the faculty and administration are now waiting for the protesters' decision. Elias says that the divestment policy is a widespread concern among students; that the protest has drawn attention to the issue on campus. Elias says that the demonstration has served an educational purpose; that he will be sorry to see it end badly. Vaillancourt asks about the educational value of negotiations. Elias talks about a conflict resolution course which is being taught on campus. Elias says that the protesters had tried to communicate their position to the administration before resorting to the demonstration; that the protesters felt that they were not being heard by the administration. Vaillancourt refers to the the book, Getting To Yes, by Roger Fisher. Elias says that negotiations were necessary; that the administration and the protesters were locked in a stalemate. Vaillancourt asks if both sides "won" in the negotiations. Elias says that he does not know which side "won"; that he does not know how the protesters will react to the proposal by the administration. Vaillancourt closes the interview. 1:09:49: V: Members of the media sit on a low wall in front of Ballou Hall. They read the newspaper and talk to one another. Many have placed their cameras on the ground. 1:10:49: V: A group of people, including Elias and the African American man in the red shirt, is gathered in front of the entrance to Ballou Hall. A sign on the door to Ballou Hall reads, "The poeple united will never be defeated." A sign on one of the columns of the portico reads, "Down with racist pig-dogs." Groups of people standing beneath the portico talk casually to one another. Three Tufts University police officers stand in front of the doors to Ballou Hall. Elias and two other people enter the hall, passing behind the police officers. The crowd of students outside of the hall begins to clap rhythmically. Student protesters who had been inside of the building appear in the foyer of Ballou Hall. They sit down and begin to sing and clap. The police officers continue to block the entrance of the building. Shots of students sitting and standing behind the police officers. The students sing and clap. A sign above the entranceway reads, "The police close the doors if we talk to you." Someone closes the inner doors to the building. The students are behind the doors. 1:15:22: V: Close-up shot of a Tufts University Police Department logo on the uniform of a police officer. Two white male Tufts officials confer in front of the entrance to Ballou Hall. A sign hangs in front of the portico reading, "Biko Hall." The police officers stand casually beneath the portico. Student protesters are visible through the glass windows on the doors to Ballou Hall. The windows also reflect back the scene on the quad. Elias and the African American man in the red shirt exit Ballou Hall. The protesters stand in the foyer of Ballou Hall. They clap their hands and chant, "The people united will never be defeated." The students sit and stand in the entrance to the building, behind the police officers. The students hold hands. 1:18:13: V: The students occupying Ballou Hall are visible behind the police officers who are blocking the entrance. The students stand and clap their hands in unison to music. The students sing along with the song "Free Nelson Mandela." The police officers stand quietly in front of the students. Students and the media stand under the portico, facing the protesters inside the hall. Several students clap and sing along with the protesters inside the hall. The students begin to clap and chant, "The people united will never be defeated." Camera crews tape students inside the building. Students standing under the portico clap and chant. The students begin to chant, "Apartheid kills. Tufts pays the bills." Shots of individual students clapping and chanting." Students chant, "Apartheid no. Financial aid yes."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/26/1985
Description: Student demonstrators occupy Ballou Hall at Tufts University to protest Tufts' refusal to divest completely from South Africa. Students sit and stand under the portico of the building while they chant and sing. Protesters are visible through the windows of the upper floors of the building. Protest signs hang at the door and in the windows of the building. A protest sign hanging at the entrance to the building renames it "Biko Hall." Tufts University police officers stand near the students under the portico of the building. A student hands out copies of a newspaper to passersby. She urges them to support the protesters. Tufts' University officials stand near a tree. One official has taped a sign for Admissions to the tree. David Gow (Tufts University class of 1984) talks to the protesters under the portico at Ballou Hall. He gives them advice about how to deal with university administration. One of the protest leaders condemns the administration's decision not to let food or people into Ballou Hall during the student occupation. A Tufts University police officer intercepts a box of tea that someone has tried to throw to the protesters. Interview with Pierre Laurent, the Director of the International Relations Program about the protest. Laurent says that student protests across the nation have been effective in drawing public attention to the issue of divestment. Laurent says that he does not know how the Tufts administration will respond to the demonstration. Interview with a white male student about the demonstration. The student criticizes Tufts' policy of selective divestment and says that Tufts will eventually come around to the demonstrators' position. The student says that he feels a kinship with other student protesters across the nation.
1:00:29: Visual: Student apartheid protesters occupy Ballou Hall at Tufts University. The students sit in front of the entrance to the building. They sing and clap their hands. Tufts University police officers and bystanders stand in front of the building. A handlettered sign over the building entrance reads, "Biko Hall." A police officer stands in front of the students who are sitting and standing in the entrance to the building. A sign on one of the doors reads, "Steve Biko. We will not forget." A Hispanic male student stands under the portico of the building, facing the students in the entrance. He sings and claps along with the students. Several other students stand under the portico. Shots of two white female students under the portico, singing and clapping with the others. The students finish their song. They begin to chant, "Divest now." Shot of students standing inside the building. The students are crowded in the foyer, facing out. They clap and chant. Shots of Tufts University police officers. Two white female students stand together at the edge of the portico, chanting and clapping. The students begin to chant, "Apartheid kills. Tufts pays the bills." Close-up shots of two students clapping along with the chant of the protestors. Shot of a sign hanging in front of the building. The sign reads, "Stop Tufts' racism. Get our $$ out of apartheid." Student protesters are visible on the upper floor of the building, looking out through a window. Protest signs are posted in the window. Students tap the glass, keeping beat with the chants. The students continue to chant. The police officers stand nonchalantly in front of the building. 1:04:40: V: The students stop chanting. Shot of student protestors looking out of the second floor window. Signs posted in the window read, "This is a peaceful demonstration against racism. Why are our police denying us food?" Another sign reads "Biko Hall." A female protester urges students to stay and support the demonstration. A female protester hands out a newspaper called Young Spartacus. The headline of the newspaper reads, "Smash apartheid." She talks about the newspaper to two female students. Three Tufts officials confer on the Tufts quadrangle. One of the officials tapes a sign reading, "Admissions: Tours and Information" to a tree. The official says that he needed to be creative, so he made the sign for admissions and came outside. 1:06:07: V: Shots of the crowd gathered in front of Ballou Hall. Four Tufts University police officers stand in front of the entrance to the building. David Gow (Tufts University class of 1984) addresses the students. Gow says that the protesters had demanded to meet with the Board of Trustees; that the protesters had demanded that the Trustees make a decision about divestment within six weeks time. Gow points out that the Trustees never made a decision to divest. Gow notes that the administration and Jean Mayer (President, Tufts University) are very shrewd in its dealings with student groups; that the administration knows that the academic year is drawing to a close; that the protests will die down when the students leave. Gow makes reference to a student protest which took place a few years ago. The alumnus tells the protesters to continue their "excellent work." The alumnus wishes the protesters well. The students applaud. 1:07:57: V: A student protest leader tells a story of past protesters who had to break into a meeting of the Board of Trustees. Shots of the campus police officers. The Tufts officials continue to stand near the tree with the admissions sign. The student leader continues to speak. The leader points out that the school administration is not letting people or food into Biko Hall. Shots of individual protesters sitting in the entrance of the building. The student leader says that the Tufts administration is avoiding the real issue of divestment. The protesters pass around leaflets put out by the Tufts administration. The student leader reads from the leaflet. The leaflet states that 185 students have occupied Ballou Hall. The speaker is interrupted by a commotion. The protesters are urging someone to throw food to them. A police officer is shown holding a box of tea which someone tried to throw to the students. The police officer examines the box of tea. 1:09:26: Callie Crossley interviews Pierre Laurent (Director, International Relations Program) about the demonstration on the Tufts quadrangle. Laurent says that this is one demonstration among many which are taking place across the nation; that the protests are forcing many institutions to reconsider their commitment to the Reagan administration's policy of "constructive engagement" with South Africa. Laurent says that the protests appear to be effective in making institutions reconsider their policies toward South Africa. Laurent says that he does not know if the protest will be effective at Tufts. Crossley asks if the student protests are drawing the public's attention to the issue. Laurent says that the students' calls for justice are being noted by university officials; that the protests will be noticed by the wider public. Laurent says that some do not agree with the means used by the protesters; that the protests are effective in drawing attention to the issue. 1:12:09: V: Crossley interviews a white male student wearing a button reading, "Divest now." Crossley asks why the students are occupying Ballou Hall. The student says that the Tufts administration had agreed to divest in 1979; that the administration has not followed through on its promise. The student says that the administration had agreed to divest in companies who refused to sign the "Sullivan Proposal." The student explains that the Sullivan Principles regulate companies doing business in South Africa. The student says that the protesters want to draw attention to the issue of apartheid; that "constructive engagement" is a failing policy. Crossley comments that the administration is not allowing food into the building. She wonders if the Tufts administration is listening to the protesters. The student says that he is glad that the media are covering the protest. The student says that the protest will be a success because the protesters have drawn attention to the university's role in apartheid. Crossley asks the student how the university will respond to the demonstration. The student says that he thinks the university will come around eventually; that the students are trying to move the decision-making process along. The student admits that Jean Mayer (President of Tufts University) is in a difficult position. Crossley asks the student if he feels a kinship with other student protesters across the nation. The student names some other universities where protests are being held. The student says that the protesters are trying to give moral support to the people of South Africa; that the US protests are front page news in South Africa. The crew takes a cutaway shot of Crossley and the student.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/25/1985
Description: End of an interview with South African playwrights and actors Percy Mtwa and Mbongi Ngema at the Spingold Theater at Brandeis University about their play Woza Albert. The two men describe reactions to the play in the South African townships. Each man talks about his future plans. They shoot cutaways. Several takes of reporter standup by the box office of the theater.
0:58:59: Visual: Tug Yourgrau interviews South African actors Percy Mtwa and Mbongeni Ngema at the Spingold Theater at Brandeis University about their play Woza Albert. The first actor says that the play has been well-received in South Africa; that the response has been enthusiastic in the township. The first actor says that people in the township have stood up to sing the national anthem after seeing the play. Yourgrau asks about the actors' future plans. The first actor says that he will write another play. The second actor says that he is writing a screenplay; that he also is involved in music. The second actor says that he has another play which he might bring to the US. Both men say that they have enjoyed touring in the US. The first actor says that he has always dreamed of visiting the US. The first actor says that the play has been well received in the US. The crew takes cutaway shots of Yourgrau and the two actors. 1:02:05: V: Theatergoers purchase tickets at the box office of the Spingold Theater. Yourgrau stands in front of the entrance of the theater. Yourgrau reports that Woza Albert is now playing at the Spingold Theater; that negotiations to bring the play to the Spingold Theater lasted two years. Yourgrau notes that Woza Albert is a satire about life under apartheid; that the play is an international hit. Yourgrau does several takes of his report for the news story. Theatergoers enter the theater.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/08/1984
Description: Tug Yourgrau interviews Zwelakhe Sisulu (South African journalist) about reactions in the South African townships to the play Woza Albert. Sisulu discusses censorship and the facilities in the townships where the play has been staged. Yourgrau and Sisulu talk about why the South African government has failed to ban Woza Albert; they talk about the government's attitude toward Bishop Desmond Tutu (South African anti-apartheid leader). Yourgrau and Sisulu discuss the effect of the Soweto uprising on black political consciousness in South Africa and the related politicization of black theater in South Africa. Yourgrau and Sisulu analyze the relationship of black theater to political rallies in South Africa and to black political culture. Sisulu talks about the multi-lingual, multi-ethnic nature of black South African society. Sisulu discusses the banning of theater groups or theatrical works by the South African government. Sisulu says that black theater portrays the situation in South Africa more accurately than the US media.
0:00:59: Visual: Tug Yourgrau interviews Zwelakhe Sisulu (South African journalist). The two are sitting among shelves of books. Yourgrau asks about the reaction to Woza Albert in the South African townships. Sisulu says that the play has had a good run in the townships; that the actors have enjoyed a good rapport with the audiences in the townships; that the audience becomes part of the play when it is run in the townships. Yourgrau asks where plays are staged in the townships. Sisulu says that the play is run in community halls or church halls in the townships; that there are no theaters in the townships. Sisulu notes that the play must have the approval of the township superintendent in order to be staged in the community hall. Sisulu says that the facilities in the township are inadequate. Sisulu says that the township supervisors are appointees of the South African government; that they are members of the white ruling party. Yourgrau notes that Woza Albert has never been banned. Sisulu notes that Woza Albert has never been staged in a community hall; that community halls were burnt down in 1976. Sisulu says that Woza Albert was staged in church halls or independently owned halls in the black community. Sisulu says that community halls were rebuilt as administrative offices for the government. Yourgrau asks if the government has shown tolerance by not banning the play. Sisulu says that the black community is beginning to exhibit some power in South Africa; that the black community is more militant. Sisulu notes that the government is aware that a ban of the play could provoke a crisis. Yourgrau asks about the government's attitude toward Bishop Desmond Tutu (South African anti-apartheid leader). Sisulu says that the government would like to jail Tutu; that the government cannot act against Tutu because of his standing in the international community. Sisulu says that the government cannot ban Woza Albert because of its international reputation. 1:05:22: V: Yourgrau asks again about the reaction to Woza Albert in the black townships. Sisulu talks about the good rapport between the actors and the audience in the townships. Sisulu says that the audience is seeing their own lives played out on stage. Yourgrau asks about the effect of the Soweto uprising on black consciousness in South Africa. Sisulu asks Yourgrau to define "black consciousness." Yourgrau asks about black political consciousness. Sisulu says that South African blacks began to assert their power in 1976. Sisulu talks about the origins of protest theater and protest poetry in 1969. Sisulu says that contemporary black theater in South African focuses on social issues and apartheid; that earlier black theater focused on entertaining people. Sisulu says that 1976 brought changes in black political consciousness and in black theater. Yourgrau asks how black theater has changed. Sisulu talks about the change in black theater since 1976. Sisulu says that theater has turned away from singing and dancing; that one-man and two-man plays are common since 1976. Sisulu says that contemporary black theater in South Africa is concerned with creating a dialogue about apartheid and South African society. 1:09:59: V: Yourgrau asks if black theater is present at political rallies in South Africa. Sisulu says that a typical political rally in Soweto includes speeches, poetry, and theater. Sisulu notes that speeches are often in English; that the plays are performed in native languages; that theater is used to get the message across to all people. Sisulu says that theater has become a part of black political culture. Yourgrau asks about the multiple languages used in Woza Albert. Sisulu says that black South African culture is multi-lingual. Sisulu says that black South Africans are not divided by language or ethnicity; that residents of Soweto can communicate in several different languages. Yourgrau asks if theater groups have been banned in South Africa. Sisulu says that a theater group was banned along with other organizations in October of 1977. Sisulu says that the government would ban a particular script instead of all works by a particular playwright. Sisulu adds that township managers would refuse to give permission for some plays to be staged. Yourgrau asks if the recent strike by black workers in the Transvaal area is an isolated event. Sisulu says that the US media does not present an accurate depiction of events in South Africa; that the US media portrays the situation in terms of riots and disturbances. Sisulu says that there is a "low-scale civil war" in South Africa. Sisulu says that South African black theater accurately reflects the situation.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/08/1984