Description: Several takes of reporter standup. History of the struggle to develop low income housing on the South End site where the Tent City Corporation is fighting to build. South End environs. Sign for a community garden. Construction workers and equipment starting work at Tent City construction site. Equal Housing Opportunity bulletin. South End apartment buildings. Residents in front of apartments and on balconies. Coffin with "Broke BRA Promises" written on it. Interview with Tent City Corporation representative on their efforts.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/22/1981
Description: Tone at beginning of video. Reception at Harvard Club for prominent Bostonians who appeared on Time magazine covers., in celebration of Boston's 350th anniversary. Closeups on Time cover portraits, including those of Nathan Pusey, D. Brainerd Holmes, Julia Child, Buckminster Fuller, Sarah Caldwell. Several Time's Men of the Year covers. Interview with man about the event. B-roll of guests at the party. Those in attendance include Buckminster Fuller, John Collins, Barney Frank, and Julia Child.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/10/1980
Description: Reception for prominent Bostonians who appeared on Time magazine covers. Interview with Henry Cabot Lodge and his wife Emily Sears Lodge. Interview with Ruth Gordon. Also in attendance are F. Lee Bailey, Kevin and Kathryn White, and Joan Kennedy. Joan Kennedy talks to Ruth Gordon.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/10/1980
Description: Speaker of the House of Representatives Tip O'Neill speaks at 1981 Boston College commencement ceremony. Discusses his graduation from Boston College in 1936; compares environment of the College in the depression. Discusses investing in education of young adults to keep up with economic and governmental demand. Footage of crowd; graduating students; group of students with top hats. O'Neill discusses inflated price of education and cuts to student aid. Crowd applause; faculty in commencement regalia. Closes with clips of reporter Sharon Stevens giving a summary of O'Neill's speech.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/18/1981
Description: Interiors of Boston City Hall. Kevin White holds press conference on the Tregor Bill. Exteriors of Boston City Hall from several angles. Kevin White answers questions from the press. He specifically talks about the role of the fire department union in the Tregor Bill negotiations. Interview with man answering further questions on the legal and staffing issues concerning the Tregor Bill.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/30/1981
Description: Sharon Stevens interviews Willie Sanders (Boston resident), after his acquittal on rape and assault charges. Sanders discusses his bitterness at being wrongly accused and prosecuted for raping a white woman and compares his ordeal to the Scottsboro rape cases in 1932. Sanders says he met Clarence Norris (Scottsboro defendant); says that little has changed since that case; says that African Americans need to get organized to prevent the recurrence of these cases. Sanders describes his ordeal; accuses the police officers in District 14 of engineering the rape accusation; says that the officers involved in his case have been revealed as "devils." Sanders says that he is writing a book about his experience with the legal system and describes what he sees as a double standard within the legal system. Sanders talks about growing up in the South and discusses differences between the racial climates in the North and in the South. Sanders talks about the racism in the North; accuses the district attorney of racism; recounts instances of racism in the courtroom; and discusses inequities in the legal system.
0:00:23: Visual: Sharon Stevens interviews Willie Sanders (Boston resident) in an apartment. Sanders sits on a couch. Stevens asks if Sanders is angry at the system after his ordeal. Sanders says that he has every right to be bitter; that his case is not the first in which an African American man is wrongly convicted for the rape of a white woman. Sanders mentions the Scottsboro rape cases in 1932. Sanders says that African Americans need to get organized to prevent it from happening again. Stevens asks Sanders if he had been aware of the Scottsboro cases and other civil rights cases before the rape trial. Sanders says that he had been working hard to take care of his family before the rape trial. He says that he has met some good people while fighting the rape charge; that he met Clarence Norris (Scottsboro defendant); that little has changed since the Scottsboro cases in 1932. Sanders says that he has been given a lot of support. Sanders says that the police officers in District 14 engineered the rape accusation. Stevens remarks that Sanders has been quoted as referring to the officers involved in his case as "devils." Sanders describes being taken from his home by police officers, who told him he would only be gone for a few minutes. Sanders describes being held at the District 14 police station. He says that William Curry (Boston Police Department) was in charge of the rape investigation. Sanders says that he thought that the rape charge would be dropped. Sanders adds that he became very angry as the case progressed. Sanders says that his faith helped to see him through the ordeal; that the situation began to turn in his favor when he let go of his anger and forgave his persecutors. Sanders says that he began to smile at the trial because he knew his faith would see him through; that the district attorney mistook his smile for one of guilt. Sanders says that the officers involved in his case have been revealed as "devils." 0:09:56: V: Sanders says that he is writing a book about his experience with the legal system; that there is a double standard in the legal system; that the judges in the legal system are covering for the police officers. Sanders says that he and his lawyers raised a lot money for his defense; that the legal system only works for those with money. Sanders says that African Americans pay for their freedom in the US. He describes how difficult it was to find a good lawyer for his case. Stevens asks Sanders again about growing up in the South. Sanders says that African Americans in the South are better off than African Americans in the North; that African Americans in the South are united; that African Americans in the North need to organize themselves. Sanders says that he was not thinking about these issues before the rape trial. Sanders says that white people in the north are racist; that they assume that all African Americans are criminals. Sanders accuses the district attorney of being racist. Sanders recounts instances of racism in the courtroom. Sanders says that the legal system in Boston works against African Americans; that there are not enough African Americans serving jury duty. Sanders says that an African American suspect does not stand a chance when the judge, jurors, and victim are all white. Sanders says that he wants to keep working for civil rights causes. Sanders tells a story about how someone sent him a dollar in the mail to help with his legal expenses; that he knew that the person who sent the dollar was poor and had made a sacrifice for him. Sanders says that he and his family have learned a lot from this experience; that his son did a project in school based upon the experience. Sanders talks about being arrested on rape charges, even though he had an alibi. He says that the victim was not able to identify him as the rapist.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/21/1980
Description: Footage of a hazardous waste dump site in Woburn. Building surrounded by trees, close-up of building door with lock; pans over grassy area around building. Footage of worn down old chemical plant and train tracks running by it; "POISON" sign hanging from corrugated metal building; field and buildings behind chain link fence; freight train with lumber passes by. Piles of barrels behind chain link fence. Barbed wire fence stretches length of railway.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/17/1981
Description: Profile of cellist Yo-Yo Ma. Interview with Ma on his childhood playing. Ma plays a piece in his Cambridge living room. Ma talks about being a cello soloist and the small amount of music written for the cello. Interview with Benjamin Zander on working with Ma. Ma rehearses Brahms Trio and jokes around with violinist Lynn Chang and pianist Richard Kogan. Ma talks about his technique. Ma, Chang and Kogan play at a benefit for Cambodian refugees at Sanders Theater. Christopher Lydon introduces and ends report. He notes that Yo-Yo Ma is having surgery on his spine.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/21/1980