Description: Martin Nolan (Boston Globe) organizes a discussion during a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Paul Parks (former Massachusetts Secretary for Education) comments on the lack of effective communication between the two opposing sides during the busing crisis. Parks says that he is saddened to hear a desire for separatism in the remarks of Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist). Jim Conway (Charlestown resident) defends Gillen by saying that Gillen believes in neighborhood schools. Conway advocates school desegregation through school choice; he talks about the need to improve all of the schools across the city. Conway adds that Charlestown does not deserve its reputation as a racist neighborhood. Howard Husock (WGBH reporter) comments that parents are concerned about the education of their children. Husock talks about the benefits of a school choice plan, which could attract middle-class families back to the public schools. Elvira "Pixie" Palladino (former member, Boston School Committee) remarks that there are few members of the anti-busing movement at the meeting. Palladino says that the busing crisis only affected poor people in Boston. She adds that no "common ground" will be found until working-class white people are included in forums such as this one. Palladino asks how many people in the room respect and love her and the people she represents. Wayne Twymon (member of the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground) talks about his experiences as an African American student attending white schools. He says that it was not easy being bused into white schools. Twymon adds that he received a good education and has been successful. Twymon tells Palladino that he loves her. Tom Lindbergh (graduate student, Boston University) asks Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston) if the Archdiocese of Boston will admit to serving as a haven for white families looking to escape forced busing. Lindbergh accuses the Archdiocese of Boston of profiting from school desegregation. Groden responds that the Archdiocese tightened its student transfer policy after the first year of busing. He adds that parochial schools also admit minority students. Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 4 of 8.
1:00:00: Visual: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) pauses for a break during the Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the release of the book Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author) . Nolan speaks from a podium. Panelists are assembled at tables on either side of the podium. Panelists include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriuulum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe). 1:00:07: V: Nolan organizes a discussion between audience members and panelists. Paul Parks (former Massachusetts Secretary for Education) comments that the tragedy of the busing crisis was that people were unable to hear or understand the positions of their opponents; that neither side was communicating effectively with the other side. Parks says that he is sorry that Gillen has departed. Parks says that he heard a desire for "separatism" in Gillen's remarks. Parks says that he hopes that his children will reap the benefits of living in an integrated society. The audience applauds. Jim Conway (Charlestown resident) says that he cannot speak for Gillen; that Gillen was not a "separatist"; that Gillen was an opponent of "forced busing." Conway says that Gillen would not be opposed to achieving desegregation through school choice. Conway adds that Charlestown is unjustly perceived as racist by outsiders; that the first African American justice in the North sat in the Charlestown District Court in 1883. Conway notes that African American students attended Charlestown High School before the busing crisis; that there were no racial incidents at the school before the busing crisis. Conway says that the busing crisis "pitted the poor black against the poor white"; that only "the bigots" among both races were seeking confrontation. Conway says that Gillen was not "talking separatism"; that Gillen was expressing his belief in neighborhood schools. Conway says that he sent his children to private school because they were not going to receive a good education "at the end of the bus line"; that he is not sure if African American children are receiving a good education at Charlestown High School. Conway says that the schools need to be improved; that "liberal whites" are the first to abandon the schools at any sign of trouble. Conway mentions a "liberal" city official who moved out of Charlestown during the busing crisis so that he could send his children to a good school. The audience applauds politely after Conway finishes his remarks. 1:05:52: V: Howard Husock (WBGH reporter) says that he lives in Brookline, where his son can walk to the neighborhood school. Husock says that he would like to speak for those who are "vilified as yuppies." Husock says that he attended a meeting of nursery school parents in West Roxbury last year; that the parents were trying to plot a "strategy" about where to send their children to school; that the parents were looking at the racial quotas at each school; that some parents were considering paying tuition to send their children to public schools in Brookline. Husock says that the parents were only thinking about how to get a good education for their children. Husock asks if the school choice plan can be adapted in order to attract the influx of new middle class families to Boston. Husock says that it would be sad if a "new generation" of residents abandons the schools. Nolan says that the question will be put on hold until Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) can speak. 1:08:19: V: Elvira "Pixie" Palladino (former member, Boston School Committee) takes the microphone. Palladino says that she would like to address Groden's comments about love and "this so-called common ground." Palladino says that there is very little "common ground" in the room; that she only recognizes three people from the anti-busing movement. Palladino says that the anti-busing movement is not represented in the audience; that she does not see any "common ground." Palladino asks the audience, "How many of you are going to love me no matter what color I am?" Palladino refers to an African American man in the audience. She says that the man would not introduce himself to her after addressing her as she passed by him. Palladino says that the man did not show her respect; that there is little evidence of respect among the audience members. Palladino says that she does not see anyone in the audience who would stand up to say, "Pixie, I love you." The audience laughs along with Palladino. An audience member calls out, "Pixie, I'll say it." Pixie acknowledges the audience member. Palladino says that she does not have to read the book because she lived the book. Palladino says that "the common ground" in Boston is found in every parent's love for their children. Palladino says that African American parents supported the court order because they thought it was the right thing for their children; that the members of the anti-busing movement thought that they were doing the right thing; that both sides fought "with their minds and with their hearts." Palladino asks how many audience members make $11,000 per year. Palladino says that there is not one audience member who is as poor as the residents of Charlestown and South Boston. Audience members make noises of disagreement. Palladino says that forced busing only affected the poor; that busing remains a class issue. Palladino says that racism "is a two-way street." Palladino says working class white people need to be included in the audience at the town meeting; that no "common ground" will be found until the interests of working class white people are represented in meetings like this one. Palladino says that "common ground" currently exists only in parents' love for their children. The audience sits silently. Palladino asks why she gets no applause. The audience applauds as Palladino asks how many of them are going to kiss her and shake her hand after the meeting. The audience laughs along with Palladino. 1:12:41: V: Wayne Twymon (member of the Twymon family portrayed in Common Ground) starts to speak. He tells Palladino that he loves her. Twymon says that he rode the bus to school for two years before the court orders; that he learned what it was like to be "black in a black neighborhood" and what it was like to be " black in a white neighborhood." Twymon says that he was "running from whites" before the court order; that now he is here talking to whites. Twymon says that he attended the Dearborn School, Brighton High School, East Boston High School and parochial school; that he received a good education at each school. Twymon says that it was not easy for an African American to attend a white school. Twymon notes that his mother bused him to white schools before Arthur Garrity (federal judge) did. The audience laughs and claps for Twymon. Twymon stands with both hands on his hips. Twymon says that he made more than $11,000 last year without "a name or a title." Twymon adds that Lukas' book has created a "common ground" in this room. Twymon says that he has not finished the book yet. Twymon gestures to Colin Diver (member of the Diver family portrayed in Common Ground). Twymon says that he was amazed by Diver; that Diver turned down a high-paying job in order to take a job for the "experience." Twymon tells Palladino that he visited the State House in 11th grade through a school program. Twymon tells Palladino that he had wanted to meet her, but that she did not show up. Palladino protests that she never "shirked her responsibilities" as a public official. Twymon and Palladino both speak at the same time. The moderator steps in. Twymon tells Palladino that he is pleased to meet her today. The audience applauds. 1:16:05: V: Tom Lindbergh (graduate student, Boston University) notes that he is a former high school teacher in Milton. Lindbergh says that he worked as a teacher in the Boston Public Schools for two years; that the Boston Public Schools had a student population of 96,000 in 1974; that the student population was 70% white. Lindbergh notes that the student population now hovers at 58,000; that the student population is 70% non-white. Lindbergh asks Groden if the Archidiocese of Boston will take responsibility for its mostly white parochial school system, which serves as a haven for those who wish to escape busing. Groden says that Lukas writes about the role of the parochial schools in the busing crisis in Common Ground. Lukas says that the parochial schools should have been more stringent in preventing transfers of students from public schools in order to escape busing. Groden notes that the Catholic Church has a right to operate schools to serve their religious beliefs. Groden says that many white students were able to attend parochial schools in neighboring communities; that the church's rules covering student transfers did not apply to those schools during the first year. Groden says that the church corrected the policy during the second year of busing. Groden says that parochial schools in Boston also provide opportunities and programs for minority students; that the parochial schools do contribute to life in minority communities. Lindbergh notes that parochial schools were closing down in 1972 due to a lack of funds; that there are now waiting lists to attend parochial schools. Lindbergh says that there are 115,000 students in parochial schools. He asks how many of those students are African American. Lindbergh says that the church needs to be held accountable for the large numbers of white students in parochial schools.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Thomas Lindbergh (graduate student, Boston University) speaks during a discussion at a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Lindbergh accuses the Archdiocese of Boston of serving as a haven for white students who are trying to escape busing in Boston. Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston) questions the school population statistics, saying that many white students were already enrolled in parochial schools. Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston) addresses the meeting. Kiley reminds the audience that race and class are sensitive issues in school systems across the nation; he adds that court intervention is used as a last resort. Kiley talks about the reforms needed in other areas of society. He says that the people of Boston need to continue to work together to improve their city. Theodore Landsmark (attorney) addresses the audience. Landsmark talks about being the subject of Stanley Forman's Pulitzer prize-winning photographs. He says that he will always be remembered for being the victim of the attack at City Hall Plaza. Landsmark remarks on the absence of African Americans at the forum. He notes that many people of color consider Boston to be a racist city. Landsmark talks about the need for affirmative action programs to provide opportunities for people of color and working-class white people across the city. Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education) addresses the meeting. Lynch talks about the deliberate pattern of segregation in the Boston Public Schools before 1974. She accuses school officials and city officials of abdicating their responsibilities to the minority population of the city. Lynch says that the court had no choice but to intervene. Lynch adds that the people of Boston must take responsibility for electing these racist public officials to office. She notes that many politicians campaigned on deliberately racist platforms. Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Groden, Kiley, Landsmark, Lynch, Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 5 of 8.
1:00:11: Visual: Thomas Lindbergh (graduate student, Boston University) questions Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston) at a Town Meeting on Race and Class in Boston at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of the book Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas. Lindbergh accuses the parochial schools of providing a haven to white students who are trying to escape busing in Boston. Lindbergh says that people are using the schools as an "easy way out." The audience applauds. Groden says that the school population may have been inflated before the busing crisis; that many students were discovered to have already been in parochial schools before the busing crisis. Groden sits on a panel on stage with Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe). 1:00:53: V: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) introduces Robert Kiley. Nolan talks about Kiley's experience with the Central Intelligence Agency and reviews the positions he has held in the city of Boston. Kiley says that he is no longer a resident of Boston; that he lives in New York City now. Kiley talks about the problems in the New York City school system. Kiley says that race and class issues are a problem in New York City as well as Boston. Kiley reminds the audience that the court intervention is a last resort; that courts are forced to intervene when the legislative and executive branches of government fail to act; that lawsuits are affecting the government of cities across the nation. Kiley talks about how school desegregation in Boston became a national story. Kiley says that much remains to be done in order to achieve a just and equal society. Kiley says that court intervention usually occurs in the areas of education and corrections; that children and prisoners are powerless to fight the court intervention. Kiley talks about the need to end discriminatory hiring practices in banks and corporations. Kiley says that our economic institutions need reform; that the poor are ignored by these institutions. Kiley talks about the link between race and class in our society. He says that race and class are used to reinforce each other in our society. Kiley says that Bostonians are "battle-scarred"; that he hopes Bostonians are not "war-weary." Kiley says that people on both sides of the busing issue are now talking to one another and working together to provide leadership; that Bostonians need to keep working together; that the citizens of other cities will look to them as an example. The audience applauds. 1:08:33: V: Nolan introduces Theodore Landsmark. Nolan notes that Landsmark was attacked by white teenagers at City Hall Plaza; that the attack was captured in an award-winning photograph by Stanley Forman (photographer). Landsmark says that he is here due to an "anomaly." Landsmark notes that he will always be thought of in the context of Forman's photograph. Landsmark mentions that he is a photographer himself, but he is known for being the subject of a photograph, not the creator. Landsmark says, "I've won a Pulitzer, as it were, but I wasn't even invited to the awards ceremony." The audience laughs. Landsmark says that he was working on affirmative action issues in the 1970s; that he was not working specifically on school issues. Landsmark notes that there are some remarkable people in the audience; that this meeting provides an opportunity to assess what happened during the busing crisis; that the meeting provides an opportunity to think about the future. Landsmark says that most of the audience is committed to the city of Boston; that "common ground" can be found in this commitment to the city. Landsmark says that Elvira Pixie Palladino (former member, Boston School Commttee) was correct in pointing out the absence of working class white people; that African Americans are also underrepresented in the audience. Landsmark says that the some racist residents of Boston have succeeded in portraying the city as a racist city; that he has encountered people across the nation who consider Boston to be a racist city. Landsmark says that many young professionals will not consider coming to Boston because of its reputation. Landsmark says that people of color stay away from Boston because they do not know if they will have an opportunity to succeed professionally. Landsmark says that people of color are underrepresented as members of boards of directors and in various professions. Landsmark notes that the private sector is slow to change; tha the public sector has been trying to deal with issues of affirmative action. Landsmark says that there is a lack of role models for minority schoolchildren in Boston. Landsmark adds that this meeting is a chance for residents of Boston to stop and think about what changes need to be made in the city. Landsmark stresses the need for the private sector to provide opportunities for people of color and for working class whites. Landsmark adds, "the chances of the kids who attacked me ending up on a major corporate board in Boston are as slim as the chances of any black kid ending up on a board." Landsmark says that opportunities need to be opened for people of all classes in the city of Boston. Landsmark compliments Lukas on his book. The audience claps. 1:16:32: V: Nolan introduces Sandra Lynch. Lynch talks about the inevitability of the court's decision to find the Boston School Committee guilty of willful segregation of the Boston schools. Lynch says that the remedy ordered by Arthur Garrity (federal judge) was also inevitable; that Garrity is a "decent man" who was "vilified" for performing his job. Lynch says that public officials were remiss in not communicating the inevitability of the court order to city residents. Lynch adds that many public officials should have known that there was no way to prevent school desegregation. Lynch talks about "an abdication of responsibility" by school officials and city officials in the years leading up to the busing crisis. Lynch says that there was a deliberate pattern of segregation; that "forced busing" was used as a tool of school segregation before 1974; that schools were built to serve segregated neighborhoods. Lynch says that schools in the African American communities were "disgraceful"; that African American schools were not given adequate resources and facilities. Lynch says that elected public officials were not protecting the rights of the city's minorities; that moderate officials were voted from office when they made efforts to achieve racial peace. Lynch says that the people of Boston must take responsibility for electing these officials to public office. Lynch says that the people of Boston were not all victims of these public officials. Lynch says, "the people of Boston elected people to public office who campaigned on deliberately racist platforms." Lynch notes that class was an issue in the busing crisis; that class issues do not excuse the racism which was evident in the city. Lynch says that voters and public officials need to understand that the courts do not intervene until the elected public officials have failed to carry out their obligations.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education) speaks at a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Lynch says that the irresponsibility of the Boston School Committee led to the busing crisis. She adds that the city's elected officials failed to protect the Consitutional rights of the city's minority population. Lynch says that the court must intervene when public officials neglect their duty. Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools) addresses the meeting. Marshall talks about the challenges faced by urban schools with poor students. Marshall notes that many critics believe that integration by race and social class is necessary for successful schools. He adds that the majority of students in the Boston Public Schools are poor and non-white. Marshall says that some schools in Boston are very successful. He notes that strong leadership, high educational standards and parental involvement are factors in the success of these schools. He adds that the current administration is committed to educating all students. Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) addresses the audience. Stith says that Boston is a better city for having dealt with racial issues during the busing crisis. Stith reminds the audience that class mobility is possible in our society, while race is still a fundamental problem. Stith says that it is important for teachers to love the students they teach in school, regardless of race. Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe) addresses the meeting. Winship predicts that Lukas's book will win a Pulitzer Prize. He compliments Lukas on the novel, and gives him some criticism. Winship says that he has no regrets about the way in which The Boston Globe covered the busing crisis. Winship says that the Boston Public Schools have improved as a result of school desegregation. Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Lynch, Marshall, Stith, and Winship. Tape 6 of 8
1:00:00: Visual: Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education) addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the release of the book Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author). Lynch is on a panel with Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former Editor, The Boston Globe). Lynch talks about the irresponsibility of Boston's elected officials, which led to the busing crisis. Lynch says that the Boston School Committee refused to file a school desegregation plans with the federal court in 1974; that the School Committee preferred to do nothing, and then blame someone else for the result. Lynch notes that elected public officials need to uphold the law; that they need to uphold the Constitutional rights of minorities. Lynch talks about the necessity of court intervention when elected officials neglect their duty. The audience applauds. Shots of the audience; of individual audience members. Eric Van Loon (attorney for the plaintiffs, Morgan v. Hennigan) is in the audience. 1:02:01: Visual: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) introduces Kim Marshall. Marshall says that Lukas's book is extraordinary; that he has enjoyed reading it. Marshall notes that the Massachusetts Racial Imbalance Law defined a school as imbalanced if the student population was more than 50% African American; that the law did not define an all-white school as imbalanced. Marshall notes that research by Kenneth Clark (social scientist) led the US Supreme Court to rule that all-black schools were "inherently inferior." Marshall notes that the Coleman Report on school desegregation stated that the integration of social class was necessary to "quality education." Marshall quotes Christopher Jencks (author) as saying that schools cannot be improved until poverty is eradicated. Marshall says that the Boston Public Schools now have a majority students who are poor and non-white. Marshall quotes many critics as saying that the Boston Public Schools will not improve until the white and African American middle classes return. Marshall talks about the challenges faced by urban schools with poor students. Shots of audience members. Marshall says that some schools in poor urban areas are succeeding; that these schools share some characteristics: good principals, high standards for all of the students, clear curriculum standards, diagnostic testing, state-of-the-art teaching methods, a safe climate, and an active program which reaches out to parents. Marshall says that Boston schools can be improved using the above model; that Dr. Robert Spillane (former Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) began implementing this model four years ago. Marshall says that Spillane would never have been hired if school desegregation had not taken place. Marshall notes that many of Boston schools are improving under the leadership of new principals. Marshall adds that the school administration and staff does believe that all children can learn. Marshall pledges his support to Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent of Schools). The audience applauds. 1:08:55: V: Nolan introduces Reverend Stith. Nolan reports that Stith was recruited by Jesse Jackson (African American leader) to head his new organization, PUSH (People United to Save Humanity); that Stith refused the job because he did not want to leave Boston. Shots of individual audience members. Stith says that there are heroes and villains who emerge in an epic story like Common Ground; that many heroes could have had their own chapters in the book. Stith says that Arthur Garrity (federal judge) needs to be applauded as a hero; that Garrity forced the city of Boston to deal with the issue of race. Stith says that Boston's leaders avoided dealing with the issues of race before the busing crisis; that Boston is now a better place for having dealt with race issues through the busing crisis. Stith says that he recognizes the importance of class issues in our society. Stith reminds the audience that class mobility is possible in our society. Stith says that race is the "fundamental problem" facing our society. Stith points out that Common Ground tells the story of three families. Stith says that he would like to return to the point that Elvira Pixie Palladino made about love. Stith talks about the need for teachers to love the students that they teach. Stith says that the students need love in order to learn and thrive; that the love of teachers for their students must be colorblind. The audience applauds. 1:14:49: V: Nolan introduces Thomas Winship. Shots of Paul Parks (former State Secretary of Education); of other audience members. Nolan notes that a chapter of Lukas's book is devoted to Winship. Nolan talks about Winship's courage and commitment to the city of Boston, and his stewardship of The Boston Globe. Winship jokes that he likes Nolan's descriptions of him better than Lukas's descriptions of him. The audience laughs. Winship predicts that Lukas' book will win the Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction. Winship tells Lukas that he enjoyed the book immensely. Winship says that he disagrees with Lukas on a few minor points. Winship says that Lukas did not give enough coverage to John Kerrigan (former member, Boston School Committee). Winship says that Kerrigan was a key figure in the struggle against the court order, "post-Louise Day Hicks." Winship calls Kerrigan the "MVP of the street team." Winship says that he wishes Lukas had covered reactions to busing all over the city; that Lukas' coverage was focused on three neighborhoods. Winship says that he did not like the court-ordered busing plan; that Garrity had no choice in ordering busing as a remedy. Winship says that he has no big regrets about the way his newspaper chose to cover the busing crisis. Winship says that The Boston Globe should have tried to influence the court against the pairing of South Boston and Roxbury in the first phase of school desegregation. Winship says that the pairing of the two neighborhoods was a "dirty trick"; that the pairing placed an "unfair burden" on both neighborhoods. Winship admits that the student population in Boston schools has declined, but he adds that the schools have improved since the busing crisis. Winship notes that test scores are on the rise; that more students are attending college; that schools and athletic teams are integrated.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: The Commerce and Labor Committee of the Massachusetts State Legislature holds a hearing on proposed legislation barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Royal Bolling Sr. (State Senator) testifies in favor of the legislation. Bolling says that legislators must guarantee protection and equal rights for all citizens. Suzanne Bumps (State Representative) testifies in favor of legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps defines sexual harassment and talks about the its effect on women in the workplace. John Olver (State Senator) and Thomas Vallely (State Representative) testify in favor of the legislation. Vallely says that legislators must fight one of the last remaining civil rights battles by banning discrimination on the grounds of sexual preference. Vallely talks about a proposed amendment barring religious organizations from some aspects of civil rights law; he says that such an amendment is unnecessary. Peter Morin (State Representative) asks Vallely a question about language used in the legislation. Vallely talks about other exceptions granted under the proposed legislation. John Businger (State Representative) testifies in favor of the legislation. Businger talks about the need to make citizens aware of their civil rights by posting anti-discrimination policy and legislation. George Bachrach (State Senator) testifies in favor of the legislation.
1:00:00: Visual: The Commerce and Labor Committee of the Massachusetts State Legislature sits at the front of a room. The committee prepares to hear testimony on proposed legislation barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. The room is crowded with audience members and members of the press. Audience members stand and seat themselves on the floor. The committee chairman invites Royal Bolling Sr. (State Senator) to testify. 1:00:28: V: Bolling thanks the committee members. Bolling notes that the Senate could not vote on this legislation during the previous year; that the vote was held up until the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled on the constitutionality of the legislation. Bolling talks about discrimination against gays and lesbians. Bolling says that opponents of legislation barring discrimnation on the grounds of sexual orientation have ignored ugly incidents involving discrimination against gays and lesbians. Bolling makes reference to a television show which depicted the absurdity of society's prejudices against gays and lesbians. Bolling notes that gay and lesbians make up 10% of the population. Bolling says that many citizens will be positively affected by the passage of legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Bolling says that gays and lesbians will be denied equal protection under the law unless this legislation is passed; that there cannot be exceptions to the government's guarantee of equal access to all citizens. Bolling says that the legislators must guarantee protection for all citizens, even if legislators disagree with those citizens' way of life. Bolling says that Massachusetts must be a safe haven from discrimination. Bolling says that this legislation reaffirms the dignity and integrity of our democracy; that legislators must be willing to take risks to assure civil rights for all citizens. Bolling says that legislators must speak out against discrimination in all forms. Bolling reaffirms the right of citizens to live free from fear. Bolling says that he hopes the law will be passed this year. 1:11:11: V: The committee chairman thanks Bolling and calls the next speaker. Suzanne Bump (State Representative from Braintree) speaks on behalf of the Massachusetts Caucus of Women Legislators. She notes that the caucus strongly supports legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps defines sexual harassment and talks about the ill effects of sexual harassment on students and female employees. Bump adds that surveys show that 75% to 95% of women have been harassed at some point in their working lives. Bumps says that sexual harassment is a form of sexual discrimination; that sexual harassment is degrading and humiliating to women. Bumps notes that women who quit their jobs because of sexual harassment are unable to collect unemployment benefits. Bumps says that grievance procedures for victims of sexual harassment are non-existant; that victims who complain about sexual harassment often receive little support. Bumps says that sexual harassment is often perpetrated by men in positions of power who go unpunished; that the perpetrators are often the bosses or professors of these women. Bumps notes that federal courts have upheld the use of Title VII of the civil rights act in some sexual harassment cases; that Title VII bars discrimination in the work place; that there are limits to the application of Title VII in sexual harassment cases. Bumps talks about the importance of the current legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps notes that the legislation defines sexual harassment, puts cases of sexual harassment under the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination and establishes a uniform grievance procedure for cases of sexual harassment within state government. Bumps notes that the legislation allows for the prompt resolution of complaints. She urges legislators to support the bill. 1:15:05: V: The committee chairman thanks Bumps and calls the next speaker. John Olver (State Senator) says that he is testifying as a Democratic state senator and on behalf of the Massachusetts State Democratic Party. Olver urges the Massachusetts state legislature to ban discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Olver says that discrimination against gays and lesbians must be ended in housing, employment, public accomodation, and in the consumer marketplace. Olver thanks the Congressional committee. 1:17:06: V: Tom Vallely (State Representative) speaks to the committee about his support for legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Vallely notes that he has been one of the principal sponsors of this legislation in the Massasachusetts House of Representatives. Vallely reviews the history of the legislation. Vallely notes that the legislation allows for the protection of gays and lesbians under the state civil rights law. Vallely says that legislators are not condoning homosexuality by offering protection for gays and lesbians under the civil rights law; that legislators need to allow citizens a form of redress against widespread discrimination. Vallely notes that this legislation has been debated by the legislature for more than a decade. Vallely says that the debate about the "gay lifestyle" is inappropriate; that the lifestyles of gays and lesbians is the same as the lifestyle of straight people. Vallely says that gays and lesbians are looking for equal protection, not "special treatment." Vallely refers to the controversy about Mark Twain's book, Huckleberry Finn. Vallely says that the book is a moving exploration of discrimination in American society; that the book is not racist. Vallely says that discrimination on the grounds of race or sexual preference is not acceptable in our society; that discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation is one of the "last civil rights battles" to be fought. Vallely says that opponents to the legislation will try to add an amendment exempting religious organizations from some aspects of the civil rights law. Vallely says that this amendment is unnecessary because the separation of church and state already exists. Vallely says that religious groups do not need to be exempted from legislation about the ERA (Equal Rights Amendement) or from legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Vallely offers to speak to the members of the committee individually about why special legislation exempting religious groups from the civil rights law would be a "grave error." Vallely says that the legislation is important and worth the fight to get it passed. 1:25:44: V: Peter Morin (State Representative) asks a question about the language used in the legislation. Morin points out that there is an exemption to the discrimination law in the case of "bona fide occupational qualifications." Vallely says that the exemption grants authority to the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD) to consider the qualifications necessary for a certain occupation before deciding a discrimination case. Vallely says that it is important to give the MCAD some leeway in its decisions; that he cannot name a list of these "occupational qualifications." Vallely thanks the Congressional committee. 1:28:11: V: John Businger (State Representative from Brookline) notes that he has co-sponsored legislation in the Massachusetts House of Representatives barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Businger says that government has a role in protecting its citizens from discrimination and harassment. Businger says that sexual harassment and discrimination against gays and lesbians are "unreasonable" and "arbitrary" forms of harassment. Businger talks about the need to make citizens aware of this legislation; that he has sponsored a bill to increase the posting requirements for anti-discrimination legislation; that the people affected by the legislation must be well informed in order to take advantage of it. Businger says that anti-discrimination policy and legislation must be posted on applications for credit, for employment, for services and for membership in organizations. Businger urges the legislators to pass this bill so that people can be made aware of their civil rights. Businger urges the legislators to pass the bills barring sexual harassment and discrimination of the basis of sexual orientation. 1:31:29: V: George Bachrach (State Senator) makes a lighthearted joke. The members of the panel laugh. Bachrach says that he is testifying in support of the Senate bill which bars discrimination against gays and lesbians in housing, employment, and credit. Bachrach says that he is sorry that this legislation has not already been passed into law.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/28/1985
Description: Story on the Drop-a-Dime Program started by Roxbury residents Georgette Watson and Rev. Bruce Wall. Pedestrians on the streets of Roxbury and Roxbury neighborhood in the evening. Watson points out a drug dealer and a building out of which the drug trade operates. Interview with Watson about the drug problem in the city and the effectiveness of the Drop-a-Dime Program. She talks about the role of neighborhood youth in the drug trade. Representatives from the Drop-a-Dime Program were not included in the mayor's newly formed council on drug abuse. Mayor Ray Flynn holds press conference announcing the formation of the council. Ben Thompson, Chairman of the council, says that the council intends to work with anti-crime and drug prevention groups across the city. William Weld, US Attorney for Massachusetts, and Derek Sanderson, former player for the Boston Bruins, stand with the other members of the council at the press conference. Interview with Bruce Wall about how community groups have not been included on the council. He adds that members of community groups understand how the drug trade functions in their neighborhoods. Flynn will go to the Boston City Council to obtain funding to combat drug abuse in the city.
1:00:05: Visual: Shots through the windshield of a traveling car of Boston streets; of Washington Street; of youth gathered in front of a building. Audio of Georgette Watson (Roxbury community leader) talking about drug trafficking in her neighborhood. Watson points out a well-known drug dealer as he walks across the street. Watson talks about the role of neighborhood youth in the drug trade. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Watson is familiar with the drug trade in her neighborhood; that Watson and Reverend Bruce Wall (Roxbury community leader) started the Drop-a-Dime program. Vaillancourt reports that the Drop-a-Dime program encourages residents to phone in tips and information about the drug trade to police; that South Boston and Roxbury police have found the tips to be mostly accurate. V: Shots of Watson and Wall; of a tape recorder. Footage of a hand pressing the play button on the tape recorder. Audiocassette is heard playing in the background of the report. Shots from a traveling car of Washington Street in the evening. Vaillancourt reports that Watson wants to expand Drop-a-Dime program into a city-wide service; that representatives from the program were not included in the mayor's council on drug abuse. V: Footage of Watson saying that Drop-a-Dime deserves more support from the mayor and the city. Vaillancourt reports that the Ray Flynn (Mayor of the City of Boston) held a press conference today to announce his new drug abuse council; that Flynn did not answer questions regarding the absence of Drop-a-Dime representatives from the council. V: Shots of Flynn and his council at a press conference. Footage of Ben Thompson (Chairman of the Council), saying that the council intends to be "inclusive"; that the council intends to work with other anti-crime and drug prevention groups across the city. Footage of Wall saying that community groups need to be included on the mayor's council; that community groups understand how the drug trade functions on the streets of the city. Shots of members of the drug abuse council, including William Weld (US Attorney for Massachusetts) and Derek Sanderson (former player for the Boston Bruins). Footage of Flynn explaining that Sanderson will be paid by the city of Boston; that the rest of the committee is made up of volunteers. Shots of the council preparing to leave the press conference. Vaillancourt notes that the council is made up of local and state officials. Vaillancourt notes that the council will prepare a report on how the city can combat drug abuse; that Flynn will take the report to the Boston City Council in order to obtain funding; that it will be difficult for Flynn to obtain extra funds because of the economic crisis faced by the city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/07/1984
Description: B-roll footage of shoppers and employees at a Family Foodland supermarket. A butcher puts out packages of meat at the meat counter, while shoppers inspect the meat. A female shopper chooses lemons and limes from the fruit display. An employee straightens the magazine rack near the check out counter. Other employees ring up sales and provide customer service to customers. Customers enter and exit the store, move through various aisles as they shop and wait in the check out line. Exteriors of the store.
1:00:07: Visual: A butcher puts out packages of meat at the meat counter of Family Foodland. Shots of packages of meat. An African American shoppers inspect the meat at the counter. An African American female shopper chooses lemons and limes from the fruit display at the supermarket. The camera crew instructs the shopper to choose two lemons at a time. Shots of the shopper's hands as she chooses the fruit. Close-up shot of the shopper's face. 1:03:42: V: The camera crew sets up a shot. An African American worker in a suit and tie neatens the magazine rack near the check-out counter. An African American female employee helps a customer at the customer service desk. An African American female employee rings up the purchases of a shopper. The employee counts the money given by the shopper, and returns change and a receipt. A member of the camera crew helps a worker arrange a display of rice packages. 1:06:30: V: African American shoppers and employees pass through the front aisle of the supermarket. An African American female employee rings up the purchases of an African American male shopper. An African American man and woman shop in the canned foods aisle. An African American employee rings up the purchases of an African American family. Shot of the cash register. The employee rings up the purchases of a young African American woman. 1:10:22: V: A shopper hands money over to an African American female employee who works the cash register. African American shoppers wait in line at the cash registers. Shot of the canned food aisle. Shoppers continue to stand in line at the cash register. African American female shoppers push shopping carts down the canned food aisle. 1:13:01: V: Shot of the exterior of the Family Foodland Supermarket; of the sign on the building. A small number of African American men stand in front of the supermarket. Shoppers enter and exit the supermarket.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1984
Description: A Ten O'Clock News special features an interview with Jesse Jackson (Democratic candidate for US President). Christopher Lydon (WGBH), Dennis Farney (Wall Street Journal), and Ken Bode (NBC News) interview Jackson. Lydon notes that the goal of the interview is to discover how Jackson's character would shape his presidency. Jackson jokes about the psychoanalytic nature of the interview. Jackson talks about growing up in a segregated society and participating in the civil rights movement. He answers questions about his childhood. He talks about his campaign and the support he has received so far. Jackson talks about the challenges faced by young African Americans, and says that young African Americans must work twice as hard as whites in order to succeed. Jackson says that some conservative African Americans may not support his candidacy; he adds that people of all races are finding common ground in his candidacy. Jackson reviews the accomplishments of his political organization and talks about his experiences in shaping political policy during the 1960s and the 1970s. He names the politicians whom he admires. He talks about his relationship to the Democratic Party leadership and about his efforts to open up the Democratic Party to minority voters. Jackson says that he would like to establish better relations between the African American community and the Jewish community. He names the people to whom he turns for advice. Jackson says that he regrets the splintering of the civil rights movement in the 1970s. He talks about the Rainbow Coalition as a means to reunite those groups. Tape 1 of 2.
1:00:37: Visual: WGBH logo. Christopher Lydon introduces an "extended conversation" with Jesse Jackson (candidate for US President). Lydon notes that the half hour show was planned in cooperation with the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Lydon adds that the goal of the interview is to discover how Jackson's character would shape his presidency. Lydon introduces in-studio guests Dennis Farney (Wall Street Journal) and Ken Bode (NBC News). Lydon reviews biographical facts about Jackson including date of birth, education, and his career in the civil rights movement. Lydon asks Jackson which actor he would choose to portray Jesse Jackson in a movie about his life, and what Jackson would tell the actor about his character. Jackson jokes about the psychoanalytic nature of this interview. Jackson talks about growing up in a segregated society. Jackson says that he is sensitive to the needs of the poor and the disenfranchised; that he participated in the civil rights movement and has seen great changes. Jackson says that he has not grown bitter about US society because he has seen such great changes. 1:04:28: V: Farney asks Jackson about his childhood and whether he felt rejected by his father. Jackson talks about feeling a sense of rejection as a child; that he was called a "bastard." Jackson says that his athletic and academic success were his way of fighting back against those who rejected him or laughed at him. Jackson says that he has grown accustomed to adversity and to the "double standard" which exists in society. Bode asks Jackson if the US is ready for an African American president. Bode mentions that Bill Lucy (African American union leader) has said that the US is not ready. Jackson notes that he has been received warmly in New Hampshire. Jackson says that no one will know if the US is ready for an African American president until the nation is given the chance to elect one. Jackson says that an African American candidate may get support from women, Hispanics and American Indians; that many groups in society can identify with his candidacy. Jackson mentions the Rainbow Coalition. Jackson notes that he is running second or third out of eight candidates in New Hampshire. Lydon asks Jackson about his success in life and about his belief in self-reliance. Jackson says that the "triangle" of family, church, and school allowed him to grow up with a sense of confidence; that he was insulated from some of the ill effects of segregation. Jackson mentions the closeness of his family to a particular white family, despite living in a segregated society. 1:11:19: V: Lydon asks Jackson how to foster good support networks for young African Americans growing up today. Jackson says that young African Americans need to work harder than whites to succeed; that their hard work will pay off in the end; that those who work hard to succeed develop an inner strength and character. Bode notes that the Alabama Democratic Conference endorsed Walter Mondale's candidacy for US President. Bode adds that Jackson's political organization said that their endorsement of Mondale was the equivalent of "putting another bullet into the body of Martin Luther King." Jackson denies characterizing the endorsement in that manner. Jackson talks about the reluctance of the African American community to upset the status quo. Jackson says that some of the resistance to the civil rights movement came from conservative African Americans. Bode asks Jackson what percentage of the vote he expects to receive in the Alabama primary. Jackson says that he will not speculate on percentages. Jackson talks about the endorsements and support he has received. Jackson says that he has received support from white voters in the south; that whites, African Americans, and other minorities are finding common ground in his candidacy. 1:15:38: V: Farney asks why Jackson sometimes refers to himself as a "prophet" instead of a "politician." Jackson explains that his role is prophetic in that he tries to change the structure of society. Farney notes that Jackson has been criticized for a lack of administrative experience. Jackson reviews the accomplishments of his political organization. Jackson notes the limited budget under which his campaign operates. Farney asks about Jackson's political legacy. Jackson says that his candidacy has forced the Democratic Party to open up; that his candidacy has forced both political parties to understand the importance of minority voters. Lydon asks about Jackson's spiritual life. Jackson says that he tries to seek common ground between people of different religions; that certain values are held in common by all religions. Jackson says that he is committed to the poor, the elderly and the young. Lydon asks Jackson why Ralph Abernathy (African American leader) said that Jackson could be his president but not his pastor. Jackson says that he does not know why Abernathy said that. Bode comments that Jackson has not held political office, but that he has had a lot of contact with politicians. Jackson notes that he was the first African American delegate to the Democratic Party in 1962. Jackson reviews his leadership experience and his role in shaping public policy in the 1960s and 1970s. 1:20:55: V: Bode asks Jackson which politicians he admires, aside from Martin Luther King. Jackson talks about Hubert Humphrey (US Senator), Ron Dellums (US Representative), and Adam Powell (US Representative). Bode notes that Jackson has criticized Tip O'Neill (Speaker, US House of Representatives) and Lane Kirkland (President, AFL-CIO). Bode asks how Jackson will deal with the Democratic leadership. Jackson says that he will conduct business with these leaders on the basis of "mutual respect." Jackson says that the Democratic Party needs a more articulate spokesman than O'Neill; that he respects O'Neill. Jackson notes that the labor movement needs to commit itself to providing equal access to jobs for African Americans, Hispanics, and women. Lydon asks Jackson about how his candidacy is viewed by American Jews. Jackson says that he would like to establish better relations between African American and Jewish leaders. Jackson says that he regrets the conflicts between African Americans and Jews in the past; that he supports the right of Israel to exist; that he also supports the rights of Palestinians. Jackson talks about his view of the Middle Eastern conflict. Farney notes that Jimmy Carter (former US President) was elected as an "outsider." Farney asks if Jackson would be more successful than Carter in operating in politics as an "outsider." Jackson says that Carter remained on the "outside" as president; that Carter did not use the power of the presidency to its full extent. Jackson says that he disagrees with the critics who call the Carter administration a "failure." Jackson criticizes the foreign policy of Ronald Reagan (US President). 1:26:29: V: Bode asks Jackson about his advisors. Jackson says that he consults with his wife and his children. Jackson names a list of people with whom he consults including Dellums, Marion Barry (mayor of Washington D.C.), Walter Fauntroy (US Congressman), Edward Bennett Williams (attorney), Dr. Al Pitcher (University of Chicago), and Dr. Jack Mendelsohn (minister). Lydon asks Jackson to disclose any major failures or flaws in his character. Jackson says that he does not dwell on his failures, but that he has learned a lot from them. Jackson says that he regrets how the civil rights movement broke up in the 1970s; that he is trying to bring back together the groups involved in the civil rights movement through his coalition. Jackson says that he is concerned with the conflict between African Americans and American Jews. Jackson talks about the importance of communication in resolving conflict. Lydon thanks Jackson, Farney and Bode. End credits roll.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/03/1984
Description: Jim Shannon (Democratic candidate for US Senate) holds a press conference to announce the endorsement of his candidacy by Vietnam veterans' leaders. Charles Harris (veterans' leader) and another man criticize the record of John Kerry (Democratic candidate for US Senate) on veterans' issues. Harris says that Kerry has failed to deliver on his promises of leadership made to veterans and other voters. Harris explains that the veterans' leaders are from an umbrella organization called Vietnam Veterans of Massachusetts Incorporated. Harris and others decline to state their affiliation with other veterans' groups. Charles Bennett interviews Shannon after the press conference. Bennett notes that some observers have accused Shannon of pulling a "stunt." Shannon talks about his strong record on veterans' issues. John Kerry campaigns in an African American neighborhood in Boston. Bennett interviews two members of the Black Political Task Force. The members of the Black Political Task Force talk about their endorsement of Kerry's candidacy. Bennett interviews Kerry. Kerry talks about the Black Political Task Force's endorsement of his candidacy. He says that he will fight for the issues important to the African American community. Bennett asks Kerry about the endorsement by some veterans of Shannon's candidacy. Kerry talks about his record on veterans' issues and his opposition to the Vietnam War. Kerry says that Vietnam veterans are not a "monolithic group." Kerry talks about his relations with veterans' groups and his most recent campaign advertisement, which focuses on his record as a soldier in Vietnam and on his opposition to the war.
1:00:01: Visual: Jim Shannon (candidate for US Senate) holds a press conference with a number of leaders of Massachusetts' Vietnam Veterans groups. The Veterans leaders announce their endorsement of Shannon in the race for US Senate. Shannon and the Veterans leaders stand at the front of a room. The media is gathered around them. A veterans leader says that John Kerry (candidate for US Senate) has not fully addressed veterans' issues. The veterans leader refers to a prepared report on veterans' issues. He says that Francis Doris (State Senator from Revere) deserves all of the credit for taking action on veterans' issues. Charles Harris (veterans leader) talks about the Federal Job Training Partnership Act. Harris notes that Vietnam Veterans are eligible for job training under that act. Harris says that Kerry had promised to release state funds for the program; that Kerry did not release the funds until Shannon wrote a letter in support of the veterans. Close-up shot of Shannon. The moderator addresses the audience. The moderator tells the media to ask Kerry about the questions raised by the veterans' groups. 1:02:43: V: A reporter asks if one of the leaders will identify himself and talk about his group. One of the leaders says that many of the veterans are here on their own to support Shannon; that they are not present as representatives of any group or organization. Harris explains that the Vietnam Veterans of Massachusetts Incorporated is a non-profit umbrella organization representing grassroots veterans organizations from across the state; that the organization is prohibited from endorsing a political candidate. Shots of campaign buttons reading, "Viet Vets for Shannon." Harris says that Kerry has not delivered on promises of leadership made to veterans and other voters. Harris says that many veterans are ashamed to admit that they served in Vietnam. Reporters urge the leaders to identify themselves and their positions. 1:05:20: V: Charles Bennett interviews Shannon. Bennett notes that many observers view Shannon's press conference as a "stunt." Shannon says that he has developed relationships with all of these veterans' leaders during his service as a member of Congress; that he has won their support with his strong record on veterans' issues. Bennett asks Shannon about Kerry's TV commercial focusing on Vietnam. Shannon says that he does not know how voters or veterans will respond to Kerry's commercial. 1:06:56: V: John Kerry campaigns in an African American neighborhood. Kerry stands on the sidewalk of a busy street. Kerry speaks informally to a small group of people. Supporters stand on the sidewalk, holding Kerry campaign signs. Shot of a Kerry campaign sign. Kerry speaks to an African American man while a reporter waits to set up an interview with him. 1:08:09: V: Bennett sets up an interview with two leaders of the Black Political Task Force. Bennett asks them why they have endorsed Kerry. One man says that the Black Political Task Force researches all potential candidates before making an endorsement; that the Task Force has chosen to endorse Kerry for US Senate. The reporter asks if their endorsement will result in more votes for Kerry. The second man says that many African American voters respect the endorsements of the Task Force; that many voters follow their counsel. 1:09:16: V: Kerry joins the interview. Bennett asks why the endorsement is important. Kerry says that he respects the research performed by the Task Force before making an endorsement; that he supports the African American community's struggle for equality and betterment. Kerry says that he is proud to have the endorsement of the Task Force; that he intends to fight for issues important to the African American community as a US Senator. Kerry says that his first priority as a US Senator would be to consult with the African American community on a list of economic and educational priorities; that he wants to address those priorities as US Senator. Bennett asks Kerry about the Vietnam veterans' endorsement of Shannon. Kerry notes that only "some" veterans have endorsed Shannon. Kerry says that the Vietnam veterans are not a "monolithic" group; that some veterans do not support his position on the issues. Kerry talks about his political record on veterans' issues. Kerry talks about his opposition to the war, his support for V.A. hospitals and his support for an extended G.I. bill and for other veterans' issues. Kerry adds that he has always worked hard on behalf of veterans; that he has a great deal of veteran support. Bennett asks Kerry if some veterans resent his opposition to the war. Kerry says that some veterans may resent his opposition to the war; that he will not change his beliefs. Bennett asks Kerry if he regrets his TV commercial focusing on Vietnam. Kerry says that the TV commercial is one of the most important statements of his campaign; that he is asking Americans to remember the lesson of Vietnam. Kerry says that he does not want the US to get involved in "another Vietnam." Bennett quotes one Vietnam veteran as saying, "When you put down the war, you put down the warriors." Kerry says that people have confused the war with the warriors; that he is proud of the Vietnam soldiers. Kerry notes that soldiers were the victims of the war; that he feels a sense of brotherhood with all of the veterans regardless of whether they support him. Bennett thanks Kerry.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1984
Description: W. Arthur Garrity (federal judge) speaks at a meeting of the Citywide Educational Coalition (CWEC). Jane Margulis (CWEC) introduces Garrity. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), Sidney Smith (Headmaster, English High School), and Ellen Guiney (CWEC) sit on stage. Garrity talks about his efforts to wrap up the school desegregation case. He says that there are a few lingering matters to be handled before he withdraws. Garrity thanks the CWEC for providing factual and reliable information about school desegregation. Garrity talks about a "sea of misinformation" surrounding school desegregation. He refutes rumors that he was involved in hiring teachers and buying supplies. Garrity compliments John Coakley (Boston School Department) on his career in the Boston School Department; he mentions Coakley's integrity and dedication to his job. Garrity sums up the challenges facing the Boston Public Schools; he says that school integration is an ongoing process. Reel 1
0:59:59: Visual: Arthur Garrity (federal judge) speaks at English High School at the annual meeting of the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC). Garrity is at the end of his involvement in the Boston school desegregation case. Jane Margulis (CWEC) introduces Garrity. Garrity sits on stage, with a group of officials including Laval Wilson (Superintendent of Boston Public Schools), Sidney Smith (Headmaster, English High School), and Ellen Guiney (CWEC). Margulis tells a few anecdotes as she introduces Garrity. Garrity shakes her hand and kisses her on the cheek as he approaches the podium. 1:02:17: V: Garrity thanks Margulis. Garrity tells a story about how he and Margulis spoke at a seminar about school desegregation in Virginia. Garrity says that members of the audience were so impressed with Margulis that she received a job offer on the spot from a school system in Texas. Garrity says that he has not come to talk about the final court orders that he handed down on September 3. Garrity reads from the canon of judicial conduct, which instructs a judge not to comment publicly on court proceedings. Garrity reminds the audience that the court case is not entirely over; that the Boston Teacher's Union has filed an appeal of the court orders issued on September 3. Garrity says that he has extended the time period in which other appeals may be filed. Garrity adds that there is another court hearing on Friday to discuss support services for the Boston Latin School. Garrity talks about a motion filed by the city of Boston to modify one of the court orders dealing with emergency school repairs. 1:07:57: V: Garrity says that he has come to thank the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC). Garrity commends the CWEC for gathering and disseminating factual information since the beginning of desegregation. Garrity says that there was "a sea of misinformation" during that time period. Garrity cites an article from The New York Times written on September 6. The article says that Garrity was involved in hiring teachers and buying supplies. Garrity says that it is "laughable" to think that he was involved in those areas of the school system. Garrity notes that he was only involved in the hiring of one person; that he helped to hire Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School). Garrity says that he wanted to acknowledge the debt owed to the CWEC by the court. Garrity adds that he wanted to meet Laval Wilson; that Wilson has a good reputation as a school administrator. Garrity says that he wanted to be present to honor John Coakley (Boston School Department). Garrity says that the Boston school desegregation case "is nothing else if not a hundred stories." Garrity talks about referring to one of the school desegregation plans filed in court as "the Coakley plan," because it was written by Coakley. He adds that a friend counseled him to stop calling it the "Coakley plan" so as not to ruin Coakley's future in the Boston School Department. Garrity says that he had recently written a a memo connected to one of the court orders, in which he commended Coakley's conscientious job performance. Garrity talks about Coakley's integrity and dedication to his job. Garrity says that there never would have been a student assignment system without Coakley. 1:12:56: V: Garrity says that school desegregation is an ongoing process. Garrity talks about the many tasks facing the Boston Public School System. Garrity talks about differences between the city of Boston and the state over the budget for facilities and school repair. Garrity talks about the need to determine which schools will get money to improve facilities. Garrity talks about the question of the Latin Schools. Garrity notes that the Boston Globe recently printed a letter from Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) on the subject of the Latin Schools. Garrity denies charges printed in the newspapers that he vetoed a plan to improve the Latin Schools. Garrity adds that no plan has been filed to improve the Latin Schools. Garrity says that critics have misread the court orders; that planning must be undertaken for the Latin Schools. Garrity talks about the challenges involved in plans to improve vocational and occupational education. Garrity notes that the Boston School Committee faces some deadlines in its plans to improve vocational education. Garrity stresses that there is much work remaining to be done in the schools; that "the challenges of the future are greater than the challenges of the past." Garrity commends Rita Walsh-Tomasini (Boston School Committee) for advocating the formation of a committee to work with parents' organizations in the schools.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/23/1985
Description: Digital Corporation sponsors a demonstration of the evolution of voice technology at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. A moderator and a group of speakers answer questions from the audience about voice technology and computing technology. The speakers and audience discuss the importance of access to this technology by the blind and disabled. The moderator introduces musician Stevie Wonder. A short clip of Saturday Night Live is played, featuring Stevie Wonder as a news reporter. Wonder speaks to the audience about the opportunities provided to him through technology. He explains the transition from acoustic technology to a more visual technology in terms of music. Wonder discusses his experiences with technology and explains how he works with a Kurzweil reading machine, a DECtalk computer and a synthesizer to compose music. He explains how technology helps further opportunity. Wonder thanks the creators of this technology. Tape 1 of 2
0:59:59: Visual: A man stands at a podium, talking about the evolution of voice technology at a demonstration of the Kurzweil voice recognition machine at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. The man talks about the applications of voice technology in computer-assisted instruction. He talks about speech synthesis and speech recognition as two components of computer-assisted instruction devices. The man says that computer-assisted instruction devices can help young children learn. 1:01:36: V: The audience applauds. The moderator invites the audience to ask questions of the speakers. The speakers are gathered beside the podium, in front of a large banner for the Digital Corporation. The moderator talks about Digital's commitment to promoting and furthering technology in the interests of the company and the greater community. An audience member asks about the sales of the voice recognition machine. The moderator says that the product is successful; that sales figures are not the focus of this conference. 1:03:26: V: The man who spoke answers a question at the podium. The man talks about silicon technology. He says that the price of silicon chips will continue to decline. He says that his company has an active research and development team; that they are working hard to incorporate the latest technology into their products. The man predicts that the future will bring more powerful devices at lower costs; that companies in the field would like to provide computing devices which are affordable for individuals. Another man says that blind people can benefit from voice recognition machines which are available at their workplaces or through community organizations. He notes that blind people can access the machines in these ways, even if they cannot afford to buy one. The first man quotes a statistic indicating that two-thirds of all blind college students have access to a Kurzweil reading machine through their college campuses. The man notes that the Xerox Corporation donated reading machines to many college campuses. A third man approaches the podium. He says that many corporations are interested in donating machines to appropriate organizations; that corporations want to provide access to the machines. 1:05:33: V: The moderator tells the audience that there will be a question and answer period after the presentation of Stevie Wonder (pop singer). A fourth man talks about Wonder's Kurzweil music synthesizer. The man talks about Wonder's involvement with technology. The man talks about Wonder's accomplishments and his efforts to establish a holiday in honor of Martin Luther King (African American civil rights leader). The man talks about recent awards given to Wonder. 1:07:00: V: The audience applauds as Wonder enters the room. A man guides Wonder to the podium. Wonder introduces a video presentation, which begins to play. The video presentation shows Wonder doing a parody of a music critic on Saturday Night Live (late night TV show). 1:09:09: V: Wonder talks about the opportunities provided to him through technology. Wonder talks about the contributions made to the technology which allows him to communicate more fully. Wonder says that technology is his "little sister, big brother, mother and father. I get inspired by it." He talks about learning and developing along with technology. Wonder says that he was first introduced to technology through learning the Braille language; that the Braille language provided him with a fundamental understanding of technology; that he applies that lesson to the machines he encounters today. Wonder says that technology has become more visual; that blind people need to be able to read or hear visual displays on machines. Wonder thanks the technological community for allowing him to access to technology through voice recognition. Wonder says that he used a Teleprompter for the blind during his appearance on Saturday Night Live. Wonder talks about his portable Braille machine, which allows him to access information on a cassette tape. Wonder talks about the pleasure of reading a book through the Kurzweil reading machine. Wonder talks about the DECtalk machine. Wonder says that the DECtalk machine can read Braille input in English. Wonder talks about the usefulness of the DECtalk machine. Wonder says that he will show the audience how the DECtalk machine can read the visual output of a Kurzweil machine, which allows him to use synthesizers without relying on visuals. Wonder says that he is frustrated that these machines are not more accessible to the blind. Wonder says that this technology must be made available to the handicapped and non-handicapped alike; that demand for the product will lead to greater access. Wonder urges the technology community to apply its skill to create greater access for all people. Wonder thanks the creators of the technology and the audience. The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/29/1985