Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) has undertaken extensive renovations and repairs on the Mission Extension Housing Project and the Bromley Heath Housing Project. Mayor Ray Flynn and City Councilor Bruce Bolling attend a groundbreaking for the construction projects. Five buildings in the Mission Hill Housing Project have lain empty for a year, and the tenants have be relocated. Interview with Doris Bunte of the BRA., who talks about the need to renovate the buildings. Bunte notes that there is a waiting list for public housing. Interview with public housing tenants Lance Ross, Anna Cole, Matilda Drayton, and Shirleen Steed about the conditions at the project and about the renovations. Following the edited story is additional b-roll footage of the housing projects.
1:00:09: Visual: Footage of city officials, including Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and Bruce Bolling (President, Boston City Council) at a groundbreaking ceremony for renovations on the Bromley Heath and Mission Hill housing projects. Shots of the projects; of a sign on a building reading, "Mission Hill Health Project." Meg Vaillancourt reports that construction work will not start on the housing projects until next month; that the buildings will be renovated and repaired; that tenants will be able to move into the projects by 1990. V: Footage of Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) saying that it is scandalous to have units boarded up while there is a waiting list for housing. Shots of people walking among the empty project buildings. Vaillancourt reports that five buildings in the Mission Hill Housing Project have stood empty for almost one year; that 14,000 families are on the waiting list for public housing. Vaillancourt notes that the Mission Hill Extension Projects were built in 1952; that plumbing, lighting, and security problems caused many tenants to move out. V: Shot of a project building with a broken street lamp. Footage of Vaillancourt interviewing a group of African American project tenants. Footage of Lance Ross (19-year resident of the Mission Hill Housing Project) talking about the "deplorable" conditions in the project. Ross says that the area was not safe for children. Shots of the empty project buildings. Vaillancourt walks among the project buildings. Vaillancourt reports that the tenants talked about a sense of community in the project; that the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) relocated tenants to projects across the city when redevelopment began. V: Footage of Ross saying that some tenants were forced to move three or four times; that the community has been broken up. Shot from a moving car of the project buildings. Vaillancourt reports that Ross and several other former tenants attended the groundbreaking celebration; that the renovations will cost $35 million. Vaillancourt notes that the renovations include trees and play areas for children. V: Shots of the project buildings; of the area near the housing project; of a child walking near a dumpster in the paved area around a project building. Footage of Ross and the former tenants talking about the renovations as they walk through the project. Vaillancourt reports that 300 families will move into Bromley Heath and the Mission Hill Extension within eighteen months. V: Footage of the former tenants talking about the renovation project. Anna Cole (Mission Hill Extension tenant) says that she had been afraid of being forced out of the neighborhood. Matilda Drayton (Mission Hill Extension tenant) says that she hopes to have a good home in the Mission Hill Extension one day. Shirleen Steed (Mission Hill Extension tenant) says that the project is her home. Shot of a young African American girl walking among the empty project buildings.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/15/1987
Description: Christopher Lydon reports on a controversy over the distribution of contraception in schools. Lydon notes that the Adolescent Issues Task Force of the Boston School Department has recommended that birth control be distributed to students as part of a comprehensive adolescent health program in the city's middle schools and high schools. Lydon's report includes footage of an NAACP press conference with Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP), Joseph Casper (member, Boston School Committee), and Grace Romero (NAACP board member). Robinson and Casper condemn the proposal as racist. Robinson says that the initiative targets African American students. Lydon's report includes footage from interviews with Hubie Jones (member, Adolescent Issues Task Force), Dr. Howard Spivak (member Adolescent Issues Task Force) and Dr. Deborah Prothrow-Stith (Chairwoman, Adolescent Issues Task Force). Jones, Spivak and Prothrow-Stith defend the proposal. Spivak and Prothrow-Stith discuss statistics relating to teen pregnancy. Lydon's report also features interviews with students about teen pregnancy and footage of students in schools.
1:00:11: Visual: Footage of an African American woman saying that she knows "what is going on" with teenagers from listening to them talk. Christopher Lydon reports that teenagers are starting to have sex at an early age. V: Footage of Dr. Howard Spivak (member, Adolescent Issues Task Force) saying that he is alarmed at the numbers of teenagers who are having sex. Spivack says that 25% of teenage girls are sexually active before the age of 15. Footage of Dr. Deborah Prothow-Stith (Chairwoman, Adolescent Issues Task Force) saying that one million girls under the age of nineteen become pregnant each year; that 600,000 of those girls give birth. Prothow-Stith says that teenage pregnancy has become an epidemic. Footage of Spivak quoting a statistic which predicts that 40% of fourteen-year olds will become pregnant before their twentieth birthday. Shot of teenage girls descending a staircase at a school. Lydon reports that the Boston School Department's Adolescent Issues Task Force is recommending the distribution of birth control as part of a comprehensive adolescent health program at Boston's middle schools and high schools. V: Shot of a collection of diaphragms in a health clinic. Shot of a clinic worker and a teenage girl at a school health clinic. Lydon reports that the proposal has been heavily criticized. V: Shot of the street outside of the Boston NAACP office. Footage of Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP) at a press conference. Robinson says that the NAACP is opposed to the distribution of birth control in school health clinics. Joseph Casper (member, Boston School Committee) and Grace Romero (former member, Boston School Committee and NAACP board member) stand beside Robinson at the press conference. Lydon points out that Casper and Romero are unlikely allies for Robinson. V: Footage of Robinson saying that the plan introduces sexual devices into the schools under the guise of a health initiative. Robinson says that African American schools and school districts are the targets of these plans; that the plans are a form of "social engineering." Lydon notes that Robinson believes the proposal to be "insidiously racist." V: Footage of Hubie Jones (member, Adolescent Issues Task Force) saying that the proposal has nothing to do with race. Footage of Casper saying that the proposal targets inner city students; that there are no proposals to distribute birth control among white suburban students. Casper says that "something is afoot." Footage of Jones saying that it is genocidal to allow large numbers of African American teenage girls to become pregnant. Lydon reports that Jones sees the proposal as a "regrettable necessity," needed to combat the incidence of pregnancy in young girls. V: Shots of teenage students in a study hall. Footage of Prothow-Stith saying that the Task Force is concerned about the increase of pregnancies among girls aged ten to fourteen. Footage of a young African American male student saying that a lot of teenage girls are pregnant; of a young Hispanic male student saying that he knows a girl in ninth-grade with a child. Footage of another African American male student saying that he knows a thirteen-year old girl who became pregnant; that the girl has dropped out of school. Footage of a white female student saying that she knows eighth grade girls who are pregnant; that it is wrong for young girls to be pregnant. Shots of students outside of a school. Lydon says that everyone seems to agree that young girls should not be pregnant.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/08/1986
Description: Christopher Lydon reports on the release of the film Cry Freedom, based on the life of Steve Biko (martyred black South African leader). Lydon notes that the film is told from the perspective of Donald Woods (white newspaper editor). Lydon interviews Woods about apartheid and his relationship with Biko. Woods says that the black opposition in South Africa was forced to become violent in response to the brutal tactics of the white regime. Woods talks about his early opposition to Biko and the black movement; he says that he changed his opinion when he realized that Biko's positive message of black self-reliance was not anti-white. Lydon notes that Biko was killed in prison while Woods was exiled from South Africa. Lydon's report is accompanied by footage from the film and from the trailer of the film Cry Freedom. Editor's note: Additional footage from the film and the trailer of the film Cry Freedom, were edited out of the end of the tape.
1:00:00: Visual: Footage from the trailer for the 1987 film, Cry Freedom starring Kevin Kline and Denzel Washington. Christopher Lydon reports that the film Cry Freedom is a the story of Steve Biko (martyred black South African leader) told through the eyes of a white newspaper editor. V: Footage from the film, Cry Freedom. Lydon notes that the film Cry Freedom takes up where the 1982 film Gandhi left off. Lydon notes that Mahatma Gandhi (Indian leader) was born in South Africa. V: Footage of Donald Woods (South African journalist) being interviewed. Woods says that he has always considered Gandhi more of a South African than an Indian. Woods says that Gandhi was involved in the first attempts at non-violent protest in South Africa. Woods says that non-violent protest does not work very well in South Africa because the government forces are not afraid to use their guns. Woods says that the African National Congress (ANC) was forced to take up arms after fifty years of non-violent struggle. Woods says that the South African government does not respond to non-violent protests; that the South African government has forced the opposition to become violent. Woods says that black South Africans are not allowed to vote; that black South Africans are not allowed to campaign against anything. Woods notes that the South African government refuses to allow free speech or passive protests. Lydon remarks that the irony of the film Cry Freedom is that a white editor tells the story of a black victim. Lydon notes the same irony exists in his interviews with Woods. Lydon reports that Woods never wanted to equate the price he paid with the price paid by Biko. Lydon reports that Woods was exiled and banned from South Africa; that Biko was killed in prison. V: Footage from the film, Cry Freedom. Shot of Woods being interviewed. Footage of Woods being interviewed by Lydon. Lydon asks if Woods was converted by Biko. Woods says that Biko did not set out to convert him; that Biko set out to neutralize the activities and writings of Woods. Woods says that he had been writing editorials condemning black consciousness. Woods says that he mistakenly considered black consciousness to be racism in reverse at the time. Woods says that he began to realize that Biko's message was a positive message of black self-reliance. Woods says that black racism is not and never has been a factor in black politics in South Africa. Woods notes that the ANC was formed in 1912; that no credible black leader or organization in South Africa has ever been anti-white. V: Footage from the film, Cry Freedom.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/06/1987
Description: David Boeri reports that the US Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that the Boston Public School System is desegregated. Boeri reports that the Marshall Elementary School is less racially integrated now than it was before court-ordered desegregation began in 1974. He notes that the school population was 50% white when the school opened in the 1970s; he adds that the school population is now 8% white. Boeri interviews Jack Wyatt (Teacher, Marshall Elementary School), Elaine Rundle (teacher, Marshall Elementary School) and Lou Tobaski (Principal, Marshall Elementary School) about school desegregation at the Marshall Elementary School. Boeri notes that there are no educational problems at the school. He adds that the school faculty has been successfully integrated. Boeri interviews Jane Bowden (parent). Bowden says that the school is excellent. Boeri notes that the school is not racially balanced but that it is in compliance with the court order. Boeri's report is accompanied by footage of students and teachers in classrooms at the Marshall Elementary School. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Marcus Jones reports on integration at the Lee Elementary School Lee School is a successful integrated school
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of a white teacher singing a song with elementary school students in a classroom at the John Marshall Elementary School. Most of the students in the class are African American. Shot of a white male student in the classroom. David Boeri reports that the Marshall Elementary School opened 17 years ago as a neighborhood school; that 50% of the students were African American and 50% of the students were white when the school opened. Boeri notes that 8% of the school population is white in 1987. Boeri adds that the US Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that the Marshall School is desegregated. V: Footage of Jack Wyatt (teacher, Marshall Elementary School) saying that the school is not racially balanced; that the school was racially balanced when it opened. Shot of a white male student standing at the front of the classroom. Footage of Elaine Rundle (teacher, Marshall Elementary School) saying that many of the bright African American students are bused to the suburbs through METCO (Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity). Shots of an African American teacher teaching to a classroom of African American students. Boeri reports that two buses transport children to and from the school; that one of the buses brings African American students to the school; that African Americans comprise 61% of the school's enrollment. V: Footage of Rundle saying that she does not know why African American students are bused to the school. Shot of African American students walking away from the school. Boeri says that there do not seem to be educational problems at the school. V: Footage of Boeri interviewing Jane Bowden (Marshall School parent). Bowden says that she did opposed busing at first; that she refused the opportunity to put her children in a different school. Bowden notes that the Marshall School is "excellent." Shot of Bowden's children getting into her car. Footage of Boeri interviewing Lou Tobaski (Principal, Marshall Elementary School). Tobaski says that the school has been able to convince the white parents to keep their children in the school; that the children are receiving a good education. Tobaski says that the school is mostly African American because the surrounding neighborhood has mostly African American residents. Boeri notes that African American and Hispanic residents have moved into the neighborhood surrounding the school. V: Footage of an African American teacher in a classroom with mostly African American students. Shots of individual students. Boeri notes that the school has received more money from the School Department because of desegregation; that the staff at the Marshall School is integrated. Boeri adds that the school is not racially balanced; that the school is in compliance with the court order. V: Footage of Tobaski saying that the Boston School Committee has done its best to integrate the public schools; that not much more can be done.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/29/1987
Description: Hope Kelly reports on school desegregation in Lowell. Kelly notes that the minority student population in the Lowell Public Schools has doubled over the past ten years. She adds that Lowell has become a magnet for immigrants from Southeast Asia. Kelly interviews students in the Lowell public schools about school desegregation. Kelly interviews Jane Mullen (guidance counselor) about the diversity of the school population. Kelly notes that students are currently bused in order to achieve racial balance in the schools. She reports that opponents of school desegregation are fighting for neighborhood schools. Kelly reviews the racial breakdown of the student population at the Bartlett School in Lowell. Kelly's report is accompanied by footage of ethnically diverse students in a classroom and school cafeteria. Kelly's report also includes footage of a bilingual class and footage of the Merrimac River. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Marcus Jones reports on school desegregation in Lynn, Massachusetts
1:00:07: Visual: Shots of industrial machinery in operation; of children playing at a playground; of industrial buildings; of two women sitting on a park bench; of historic buildings in Lowell; of a child looking out from a window of an apartment building; of the Merrimac River running through Lowell. Hope Kelly reports that tension in the city of Lowell stems from school desegregation. V: Shots of a bird on the shore of the Merrimac River; of an old brick building; of the water of the Merrimac River. Footage of a white female student saying that adults want students to be able to choose which schools to attend. Footage of a white male student sitting with an Asian American female student. The white male student says that adults are arguing about politics and where kids of different races should go to school. Shots of a students getting lunch in a school cafeteria. Footage of a Latino male student saying that it is good for students to meet different people from different backgrounds. Shots of students boarding a school bus. Kelly reports that opponents of school desegregation in Lowell are arguing for neighborhood schools. V: Shots of an African American female student in the cafeteria; of Asian American students in the school cafeteria. Footage of students in a classroom in the Bartlett School in Lowell. Shots of individual students. Most of the students are Asian American. Kelly reports that the student population of the Bartlett School in Lowell is 20% Latino and 25% Asian American. Kelly notes that the minority population in Lowell Public Schools has doubled in the past ten years; that the schools enroll 450 new bilingual students each year; that 100 new Southeast Asian immigrants come to Lowell every week. V: Shot of an Asian teacher in a third- and fourth-grade Cambodian bilingual classroom. The teacher teaches a lesson to the students. Footage of Mary Jane Mullen (guidance counselor) giving Kelly a tour of the school. Mullen says that there was a large Latino population in the school ten years ago; that there is still a significant Latino population; that there were many Greek-speaking students at the school ten years ago; that there are no longer many Greek-speaking students at the school. Footage of an Asian male student named Paul, who says that he is not very good at reading books; that homework is hard. Kelly reports that Paul is one of 160 Southeast Asian students at the Bartlett School. Footage of Kelly interviewing a group of students sitting at a table. A white male student talks about how people used to come to Lowell to work in the mills. Shots of a mill building with broken windows; of a renovated mill building. Kelly reports that Lowell has always had a significant immigrant population; that buses bring children to schools across the city in order to achieve a racial balance. Shots of students standing outside of a school building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/23/1987
Description: Marcus Jones reports on school desegregation in Lynn, Massachusetts. Jones notes that an influx of immigrants and a change in housing patterns have tipped the racial balance in the public schools. Jones adds that Lynn made an attempt at school desegregation in the early 1980s by designating certain schools as magnet schools. Jones reviews that racial breakdown of the student population in Lynn Public Schools and in specific schools in the city. Jones interviews Clarence Jones (President, Lynn chapter of the NAACP), Albert DiVirgilio (Mayor of Lynn), Alexander Tennant (candidate for mayor of Lynn), James Leonard (Principal, Washington Community School), Robert Gerardi (Superintendent, Lynn Public Schools), and Michael Alves (Massachusetts Board of Education) about school desegregation in Lynn. Jones notes that there is some opposition from parents who want their children to attend neighborhood schools. Jones interviews parents Kathleen Sherkanowski and Rose McCusker. Jones reports that the State Board of Education has ordered the Lynn School Committee to implement a plan without delay. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Hope Kelly reports on school desegregation in Lowell
1:00:03: Visual: Shots of downtown Lynn; of shoppers in downtown Lynn; of traffic in downtown Lynn. Marcus Jones reports that Lynn has a population of 78,000; that housing patterns and an influx of immigrants have tipped the racial balance in public schools; that school desegregation has become an issue in the city. V: Shots of Boston Harbor; of Harvard Square; of students in Lowell; of a condominium building; of children boarding a school bus. Footage of Kathleen Sherkanowski (Lynn parent) saying that she wants her son to attend his neighborhood school. Footage of Clarence Jones (President, Lynn chapter of the NAACP) saying that the courts will need to take over the school system if the city of Lynn does not desegregate its schools. Footage of Alexander Tennant (candidate for mayor of Lynn) saying that Lynn is "one step away from receivership." Footage of Jones interviewing Albert DiVirgilio (Mayor of Lynn). DiVirgilio says that he will not let the desegregation issue tear apart the community; that he will work closely with all members of the community. Jones reports that DiVirgilio serves as Mayor of Lynn and as Chairman of the Lynn School Committee; that DiVirgilio taught in the Lynn School System for fourteen years. Jones notes that DiVirgilio was his student government advisor during Jones' own high school years. V: Shots of African American students exiting a bus in front of South Boston High School. Jones stands among a group of schoolchildren in the schoolyard of the Washington Community School. Jones notes that he was a student at the Washington Community School; that there were more white students than African American students when he attended the school. Jones adds that the student population at the Washington Community School in 1987 is 51% non-white; that the school has been classified as "racially isolated." V: Shots of students in a classroom at the Washington Community School. Jones reports that the Washington Community School has been racially imbalanced for almost ten years. Jones notes that James Leonard (Principal, Washington Community School) helped to coordinate Lynn's first attempt at school desegregation in the early 1980s. Jones adds that the Washington Community School was made into a magnet school in the early 1980s; that white students were to be bused voluntarily to the school. V: Shots of Tony Marino (former Mayor of Lynn) addressing a crowd; of the exterior of the Washington Community School. Footage of Jones interviewing Leonard. Leonard says that it is important to improve the quality of education in Lynn Public Schools. Footage of Marcus Jones interviewing Clarence Jones. Clarence Jones says that many minority parents are sending their children to private schools. Clarence Jones says that the Washington Community School is underfunded; that the school is a "disaster." Marcus Jones notes that Clarence Jones is his father. V: Shot of children playing outside of a school in Lynn. Jones notes that minority enrollment in Lynn Public Schools has doubled since 1981; that the population of Lynn Public Schools is currently 26% non-white. Jones notes that white enrollment has declined by 3,000 students. V: Shots of minority students in a classroom; of the exterior of the Washington Community School; of the exterior of the Ingalls Elementary School; of the exterior of the Connery Elementary School; of the exterior of the Harrington Elementary School. Jones notes that minority enrollment is over 50% in four elementary schools; that minority enrollment is 57% at the Harrington Elementary School. V: Shots of the exterior of Cobbet Elementary School; of the exterior of Eastern Junior High School; of students outside of Lynn Classical High School. Jones notes that Cobbet Elementary School, Eastern Junior High School and Lynn Classical High School have student populations which nearly qualify as racially imbalanced. Jones notes that a minority population above 36% classifies a school as racially imbalanced. Jones reports that eight of the city's schools are "majority isolated"; that the Sisson Elementary School had a 3% minority population last year; that the school has a minority population of 8% this year. V: Shots of mostly white students in a classroom at the Sisson Elementary School; of the students listening to a record on a turntable. Footage of Robert Gerardi (Superintendent, Lynn Public Schools) saying that most Lynn parents do not have a problem with school desegregation; that the parents want to maintain neighborhood schools. Footage of Rose McCusker (Lynn parent) saying that she does not want her children bused from their neighborhood. Shots of a racially integrated classroom in Lynn. Jones reports that the Lynn School Committee has issued its second desegregation plan in two years; that the State Board of Education has ordered the city of Lynn to implement its plan without delay. V: Shots of a white teacher in a Lynn classroom; of students in a school hallway; of students exiting a schoolbus. Footage of Michael Alves (Massachusetts Board of Education) saying that school desegregation should be resolved on the local level; that Boston spent fifteen years dealing with federal court orders on school desegregation. Footage of Clarence Jones saying that quality education is more important than racial confrontation.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/23/1987
Description: Marcus Jones reports that the Boston School Department has called the Lee Elementary School a model of a successfully integrated elementary school. Jones notes that test scores are improving at the school. He adds that there is a good relationship between school faculty and parents. Jones reviews the racial breakdown of the student population. Jones interviews Arthur Foster (Acting Principal, Lee School) and Jack Flynn (Lee School official) about the success at the school. Jones' report includes footage of students in racially integrated classrooms at the school. Jones interviews students and teachers at the school about school desegregation. Jones reports that the US Circuit Court of Appeals has declared that school integration is complete in Boston. He adds that the Lee School is an exception and that some schools have not been successfully integrated. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: David Boeri reports on integration at the Marshall Elementary School Marshall Elementary School is still segregated
1:00:06: Visual: Footage of a white teacher doing a lesson with a racially integrated class at the Joseph Lee School in Dorchester. Shots of individual students in the classroom. Marcus Jones reports that the Boston School Department calls the Lee School a "model" of how school desegregation should work. Jones notes that the US Circuit Court of Appeals has declared yesterday that school integration is complete in Boston. Jones notes that the population of the Lee School is 60% African American, 28% white and 12% other minorities. V: Shots of an African American female student; of a white male student; of an African American male student; of a white teacher at the chalkboard. Footage of Jones asking a white male student if he knows what desegregation is. The student says no. Footage of an African American female student saying she does not really know why some students are bused in from other parts of the city. Footage of Arthur Foster (Acting Principal, Joseph Lee School) saying that the students are learning and that the students get along well. Footage of a white teacher teaching to a racially integrated class. Jones reports that test scores are improving at the school; that there is a good relationship between the faculty and parents; that white parents are eager to send their children to the Lee School. V: Footage of a white male student saying that he likes the school; that there are students of all races in the school. Footage of Jack Flynn (Lee School official) saying that white parents are willing to have their children bused to the Lee School. Jones notes that school officials hope that yesterday's court decision will not bring changes for the school. V: Footage of a white female teacher saying that she hopes the city has matured; that she hopes the city can move beyond the court order. Footage of Flynn saying that the Lee School is an exception; that the School Department needs to make desegregation work better across the city. Jones notes that the court decided that the Boston Public Schools were as desegrated as possible; that some schools are more segregated now than they were before the court order. V: Shots of a classroom at the Lee School.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/29/1987
Description: David Boeri reports on drug traffic in the Franklin Development Project. William Sommers, the Boston Inspectional Services Commissioner tours a condemned building on Homestead Street. Interviews with Sommers and Pat Farreta about the problems in the building. Ferrata talks about drug dealers who sell drugs from their apartments. Boeri talks to a tenant, who refuses to comment on the drug traffic in the building. Boeri reports on a plan for increased police presence in the community to combat drug and footage of police making a drug arrest. Interview with Roxbury community leader Don Muhammad about how to solve the drug problem in the community. Following the edited story is b-roll of the Roxbury neighborhood around the Franklin Development Project. Also, additional footage from the tour of condemned buildings with Commissioner Sommers and Pat Ferrata. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Ray Flynn proposes to increase the number of Boston residents working in Boston jobs
1:00:08: Visual: Footage William Sommers (Inspectional Services Commissioner, Boston) touring a condemned building on 157 Homestead Street in Roxbury. Shots of a rotted stairway; of a the structural beams showing through a wall. Footage of Sommers pointing to a rotted ceiling in an apartment. Shots of Sommers standing in the stairwell of the building. David Boeri reports that Sommers condemned the building at 157 Homestead Street on the previous day; that the tenants will be relocated while the building is repaired. V: Footage of Sommers saying that he has written up thousands of housing violations for the Franklin Development Project. Footage of African American tenants moving furniture from the decrepit building. Boeri reports that Sommers blames the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for neglecting this building and others. V: Shot of a cockroach crawling along a dirty wall. Shots of African American tenants in the lobby of the building. The lobby walls are covered with graffiti. Footage of Sommers saying that there needs to be continuous support for urban housing; that he does not want to repair this building only to see it fall apart again. Boeri stands in front of the building on Homestead Street. Boeri reports that the city will have to fight the drug pushers in the building. V: Footage of Pat Farreta (Housing Inspector) saying that drug buyers will smash down the front doors of buildings in order to reach the apartment of a drug dealer. Shot of a door covered in graffiti. Shots of an African American man removing cabinet doors from the building on Homestead Street. Boeri reports that tenants of these buildings are terrorized by drug dealers. V: Footage of Ferreta saying that tenants report that drugs are being dealt through a hole in the door of one of the apartments. Shot of Boeri, Sommers and Ferreta standing together. Ferreta says that drugs will be dealt in the building that evening if he does have the building secured. Boeri reports that Mrs. Walker (tenant) will be moved to a hotel or shelter while her apartment is fixed. V: Footage of Mrs. Walker looking away from the camera. She says that she does not want to talk about it. Boeri stands in front of the building on Homestead Street. Boeri reports that tenants are afraid of reprisals if they talk about the drug problem; that tenants have told him off-camera that drug dealing occurs day and night in the building. V: Footage of a handcuffed woman getting into a police cruiser. A white police officer closes the cruiser door. Shots of police officers standing on the sidewalks in Roxbury. Boeri reports that the court-appointed trustee for the Franklin Development Project used $300,000 of federal money to hire Boston Police officers to remove drug dealers. Boeri notes that Boston Police officers will be continually present on the streets of Roxbury for 30 days. V: Shot from a moving vehicle of police officers standing on a sidewalk. Boeri reports that community activists disagree about whether the police presence is a good thing. V: Shot of Boeri walking on a street with Don Muhammad (Roxbury community leader}. Footage of Muhammad saying that the community needs leadership more than it needs police; that absentee landlords and irresponsible tenants are part of the problem. Muhammad says that residents would drive out the drug pushers if they owned the buildings. Muhammad urges the courts to punish drug dealers to the full extent of the law. Muhammad compares a drug pusher to "someone who is driving an automobile at 150 mph in a 30 mph zone when children are crossing the street."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/24/1986
Description: Christy George reports that a Los Angeles Times poll shows Michael Dukakis leading the field of candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination. Jesse Jackson is also a strong contender in the wake of candidate Gary Hart's withdrawal from the race. Speaking to the media, Dukakis dismisses the importance of polls. Interview with Bruce Bolling, the co-chair of Jackson's Massachusetts campaign, who says that the Jackson campaign will challenge the notion that a person of color cannot be president. George's report is accompanied by footage of Jackson campaigning, by footage of Dukakis campaigning and by footage of the Dukakis campaign staff at work.
1:00:02: Visual: Shots of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) campaigning on a street corner. Shots of Dukakis shaking hands with voters at a political gathering. Christy George reports that Dukakis was named as the leading candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination in a poll by The Los Angeles Times newspaper. George reports that Dukakis does not want to become the "new Gary Hart." George notes that the extra visibility is good for Dukakis' campaign nationwide. V: Footage of Robert Farmer (fundraiser for Dukakis' presidential campaign) in Dukakis's State House offices. George reports that a good showing in the polls can help a candidate's fundraising operation. V: Footage of a smiling Dukakis saying that there are no frontrunners in the race for the Democratic nomination. Shots of Dukakis campaign workers making telephone calls; of campaign signs reading, "Dukakis for president." Shots of campaign workers organizing paperwork and typing; of two men standing in the offices of the Dukakis campaign. George reports that Dukakis takes nothing for granted after losing the 1978 gubernatorial race to Ed King (former governor of Massachusetts) in an upset. V: Shots of campaign workers assembling folders with Dukakis campaign information; of Dukakis walking up the stairs inside the State House. George reports that Dukakis is fourth in a Time magazine poll; that Dukakis is second to Jesse Jackson (candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination) in a Newsweek poll; that Dukakis leads in the poll by the LA Times. V: Footage of Dukakis in his offices, saying that "undecided is number one in the LA Times poll." George notes that Jackson is a strong contender for the nomination. V: Shot of Jackson at a campaign rally. Footage of Bruce Bolling (Co-chair of Jackson's Massachusetts campaign) saying that Dukakis appeals to voters who liked Gary Hart (US Senator); that Jackson could also appeal to those voters. George notes that Bolling is upset that Jackson has not been named as Hart's successor. V: Shot of Jackson campaigning. Footage of Bolling saying that race will be a significant issue for the Jackson campaign; that some voters will not consider voting for a woman or a person of color to be president. Bolling says that the Jackson campaign needs to challenge the notion that a person of color cannot be president; that the media can help change those perceptions. Footage of Dukakis saying that he will not speculate on Jackson's chances of winning the nomination; that there is no frontrunner in the race; that polls are "absurd." George stands in front of the State House. George reports that the news media gave more attention last week to the Hart scandal than to the Iran-contra testimony. George notes that Dukakis probably hopes that this week's testimony will be given more attention than his standing in the polls.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/11/1987
Description: Marcus Jones reports on the civil rights documentary series, Eyes on the Prize. Jones notes that Eyes on the Prize is a six-part series documenting the first decade of the civil rights movement, using historical footage and first-hand accounts to tell the story. Jones interviews Henry Hampton (documentary filmmaker). Jones notes that Hampton's production company, Blackside Incorporated, produced the series. Hampton says that the civil rights movement is often overshadowed by the memory of Martin Luther King, Jr. Hampton says that Eyes on the Prize attempts to tell the stories of lesser-known civil rights activists. Hampton adds that the series is a testament to the power of ordinary people to effect great changes. Jones's report is accompanied by footage from Eyes on the Prize.
1:00:12: Visual: Black and white footage of A. Philip Randolph (civil rights leader) introducing Martin Luther King (civil rights leader) at the March on Washington in 1963. Shots of the crowd on the National Mall; of King standing before the crowd. Black and white footage of King being arrested by police; of King in prison with another African American civil rights protester. Shot of white people standing in the bed of a pickup truck. The Confederate flag is draped over the side of the truck; of two white boys making racist comments while waving a small Confederate flag. Marcus Jones talks about the legacy of King. Jones notes that King was a martyr for civil rights; that he was taunted by white racists. V: Black and white footage of John Patterson (Governor of Alabama) saying that King should leave Alabama because he is a "menace." Shot of King marching peacefully with other protesters. Jones reports that King was mocked by Black Power advocates; that student leaders second guessed his plans. V: Footage of H. Rap Brown (Black Power advocate) saying that the civil rights movement is dead. Footage of Stokely Carmichael (black student leader) saying that white leaders do not know what is good for black America. Footage of King preaching against violence. Audio of a gunshot. Jones reports that King embodies the civil rights movement for many; that King's memory sometimes overshadows the civil rights movement. V: Shot of King lying in his casket. Footage of King and civil rights supporters in January, 1956. King talks about the right of African Americans to protest. Footage of Henry Hampton (documentary filmmaker) saying that King would want to be seen as a small part of the civil rights movement; that Martin Luther King Day should be a testament to King as well as the accomplishments of the civil rights movement. Jones says that Hampton wants to set the record straight about the civil rights movement; that the civil rights movement was America's "second revolution;" that the civil rights movement is most often recounted through the life of King. V: Footage of civil rights demonstrators marching. One of the black demonstrators is being interviewed by a white journalist. Shots of the feet of the marching demonstrators. Jones notes that the experiences of the lesser-known demonstrators are important. V: Footage of the animated opening to the Eyes on the Prize series. Footage of Hampton saying that the series is a testament to the power of ordinary people to effect great changes. Excerpt from Eyes on the Prize, showing civil rights supporters picketing lunch counters in the South. Jones reports that Eyes on the Prize was produced by Hampton's company, Blackside Incorporated; that Eyes on the Prize recalls the first decade of the civil rights movement. Jones notes that the series is comprised of six parts; that the series will air on PBS. V: Shots of signs for "colored lunch counters" and "colored waiting rooms." Shots of King; of Lyndon B. Johnson (US President) signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Footage from Eyes on the Prize of African American students entering Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. Melba Pattillo Beals (Central High School Junior) talks about her experiences as an African American student integrating the school. Jones says that the series uses first-hand accounts and historical footage to tell the story of the civil rights movement. V: Footage of a group of white men pushing an African American man down a street; of King reciting the "I have a dream" speech. Audio of Hampton saying that King was only a small part of a very large civil rights movement. Footage of Reverend C.T. Vivian (civil rights leader) confronting Sheriff Jim Clark in Selma, Alabama. Footage of Hampton saying that the stories of lesser-known civil rights activists have not been told. Hampton talks about the efforts of Diane Nash (civil rights acitivist) in Nashville. Shots of civil rights demonstrators in Nashville. Footage of Nash saying that she asked the Ben West (Mayor of Nashville) if segregation was wrong. Footage of West saying that Nash made him realize that segregation was morally wrong. Shots of Nash; of King. Jones says that many Americans remember the civil rights movements through the memory of King; that the civil rights movement was made up of many dreamers like King. V: Footage of King at the March on Washington. Shots of marchers at the March on Washington; of civil rights demonstrators being arrested by police; of civil rights demonstrators chanting and clapping.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/19/1987