Description: Stevie Wonder demonstrates a Kurweil Reading Machine with text-to-speech capability, which enables blind people to read printed text. He uses the machine to help him read instructions for his synthesizer, so he can compose a song. He jokes around with the audience. He sings part of "I Just Called to Say I Love You." A Boston politician presents Wonder with a commemorative award of his visit to Boston. Wonder addresses the crowd and talks about how the Reading Machine is making a more "harmonious world." Several takes of reporter stand up. A man demonstrates a computer with a touchscreen and Deck Talk features.
1:00:00: Visual: An audience from the technology industry is gathered in the ballroom of the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. Stevie Wonder (pop singer) is at the front of the room, preparing to demonstrate the Kurzweil reading machine and DECtalk machine, which allow him to fully operate a synthesizer. Wonder stands before the keyboard. Wonder explains that the computer keyboard interfaces with the synthesizer; that he cannot operate the machine because he cannot see the controls. Wonder pushes a knob and a computerized voice says what the button does. Wonder begins to program the keyboard. Wonder program the keyboard to play like a piano. Wonder programs the synthesizer to lay down a drumbeat. Wonder stops the drumbeat. Wonder plays and records the tune to the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." The audience applauds when he finishes. 1:05:57: V: Wonder says that the synthesizer allows him to create the sound of a band. He jokes that he cannot afford a band of his own. Wonder programs the synthesizer to sound like drums. Wonder plays the drum track over the recorded tune to the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." Shots of the audience. The audience applauds when he finishes. Wonder programs the synthesizer to play bass and strings. Wonder has to try a few times before successfully programming the machine. Wonder adds a track with strings to the other tracks of the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." 1:13:48: V: The audience applauds. Wonder sings along to the recorded tracks of the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." He adds a line to the song, singing "What it is, is something true, that technology like this makes it possible for me to do." The audience sings and claps along with Wonder. Wonder sings a line, thanking DEC (Digital Equipment Corporation) and Raymond Kurzweiler (inventor of the reading machine). The audience gives Wonder a standing ovation. Wonder is guided to the podium. 1:17:16: V: Shots of the audience. A speaker presents Wonder with a silver Revere Bowl from Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) commemorating his visit to Boston. The audience applauds. 1:18:15: V: Shot of Wonder from the back of the room. Wonder stands at the podium. He talks about how technology makes communication easier. Shots of audience applauding. Meg Vaillancourt stands at the back of the room. Vaillancourt reports on Wonder's demonstration of new technology. 1:20:08: V: Shots of a computer on display at a vendor's table. Vaillancourt interviews the computer vendor. The computer vendor demonstrates the touch-sensitive screen on his computer. A computerized voice identifies which icon has been pushed. The computer vendor explains that the screen can show either text icons or picture icons. The computer vendor talks about the different voice options on the computer. The computer vendor programs the computer voices to repeat stock phrases for the camera.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/29/1985
Description: Laval Wilson (candidate for Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) prepares for his interview with the Boston School Committee. He arranges several large posterboards around and in front of a table in the School Committee chambers. Eileen Jones interviews Wilson about his upcoming interview with the School Committee. Wilson says that he will try to show the School Committee that he is the best candidate for the job. He adds that posters and visual aids help him to communicate. Wilson says that he hopes to have the support of a broad spectrum of community groups and not just the African American community. Wilson declines to identify himself as "conservative." Wilson begins his interview with the School Committee. Wilson talks about his previous experience and his thorough understanding of school desegregation issues and school curricula. Wilson answers questions about remedial education. A member of the School Committee asks Wilson why two African American members of the School Committee do not support his candidacy. Wilson says that he is not familiar with the politics of individual committee members; he adds that he is an educator who happens to be black. Wilson says that he would like to be superintendent for all students and members of the community. Wilson notes that educational programs are more important than ethnicity. Jones reports on the interview and the School Committee's process in selecting a new superintendent.
1:00:00: Visual: Dr. Laval Wilson (candidate for Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) prepares for his interview with the Boston School Committee for the post of superintendent. He arranges several large posterboards around and in front of a table in the School Committee chambers. The boards display papers, advertisements and articles representing his achievements. Members of the press are gathered in front of the table. Several members of the press take photographs. Eileen Jones (WGBH reporter) comments that Wilson does not look nervous. Wilson says that he is a professional; that he has confidence in his abilities; that he hopes to convince the Boston School Committee to hire him. Crowd noise muffles the audio. Jones asks Wilson about his chances of being hired. Wilson says that he is one of three candidates; that he does not know how the School Committee will respond to his candidacy; that he plans to demonstrate his abilities and to answer the School Committee's questions. Wilson mentions that he will use visual aids in his presentation to the School Committee; that the visual aids document his career; that he plans to discuss ideas. Jones comments that the visual aids seem "showy." Wilson says that visual aids help him to learn and communicate better; that the visual aids document his abilities in several areas including planning, budget development, and partnerships. Jones asks how Wilson feels about African Americans in Boston coming out to support his candidacy. Wilson says that he does not know anything about it; that he is concentrating on his interview with the School Committee; that he hopes the entire community will support his candidacy. Wilson says that he is delighted to have support from the African American community; that he hopes to have support of the entire school system and a broad spectrum of community groups. Jones asks Wilson about his reputation as a tough administrator. Wilson says that descriptions are subjective; that he considers himself a "professional educator." Jones asks Wilson if he considers himself "conservative." Wilson says that he considers himself as a school superintendent, not as a liberal or a conservative. 1:06:10: V: Wilson sits down at the table, which faces the members of the Committee. John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) warns the audience to be silent during the interview and presentation, so as not to distract Wilson. Nucci asks Wilson why he would like to be Superintendent of Boston Public Schools. Wilson arranges the microphones on the table. Wilson describes his previous experiences including his positions as a superintendent in Rochester NY, Berkeley CA, and on Long Island. Wilson says that he has a thorough understanding of school desegregation policies and school curricula. He describes his experiences in working with government agencies and lobbying for school funding. Wilson describes his planning abilities and his commitment to working with parent groups. Shot of the members of the school committee. Kevin McCluskey (Boston School Committee) asks Wilson a question about remedial education. Shot of Wilson. Wilson talks about his experience in and views on remedial education programs. Shots of African American audience members. Wilson talks about the possibility of extending the school day. Committee members ask Wilson questions about a specific remedial education program. Wilson talks about the need to close the gap between low-achievement scores and high-achievement scores. Shots of the audience; of individual audience members. 1:13:03: V: Wilson says that he is not the type of person to brag about his achievements; that he must highlight his achievements in order to be considered for this post; that he considers himself to be one of the most qualified superintendents in the nation. Wilson notes that he was selected as one of the top 100 executive educators in the nation; that he has a strong reputation across the nation. A member of the Committee asks Wilson why African American School Committee members John O'Bryant and Jean McGuire do not support his candidacy. The member says, "What do they know about you that we don't know about you?" Wilson says that he does not know why O'Bryant and McGuire do not support him; that a superintendent needs to make decisions for students of all races; that he is a school educator who happens to be black. Wilson says that he has not read the newspapers; that he is not familiar with the politics of individual Committee members. The same committee member asks Wilson what it means to be an educator "who also happens to be black." The committee member asks Wilson if he will deal with minority students who are not getting an education, or if he will "keep playing a game." Wilson says that the superintendent needs to implement the best educational programs for the school population. Wilson says that he would not like his statements as superintendent to be seen as "the black statement"; that he would not be the superintendent for any particular group; that he would be the superintendent for the whole community. Wilson says that the superintendent cannot afford to be associated with one particular ethnic group; that the superintendent has to work together with all staff, students, parents, and community groups. Wilson says that it is important to consider issues, not skin color. Wilson says that ethnicity can be an issue; that every ethnic group has its own specific concerns; that educational programs are more important than ethnicity. 1:18:55: V: Jones reports that the interviews with candidates are not the end of the selection process; that School Committee members will make site visits to the school districts of each candidate. Jones notes that the School Committee will elect a new superintendent on July 31. Jones does two takes of her closing to the news story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/19/1985
Description: Dr. Laval Wilson and members of the Boston School Committee assemble themselves at a press conference in Wilson's office. The media sets up a shot of Wilson and Nucci signing copies of Wilson's contract. Wilson and Nucci shake hands. Wilson shakes hands with each member of the School Committee. Wilson takes questions from reporters. Wilson talks about his enthusiasm for his new post. He says that his biggest challenge will be to familiarize himself with the issues and problems within the school system. A reporter asks Wilson about the politics of the school system. Wilson says that politics are always involved in public education. Wilson says that he and his family are making themselves at home in the city. Wilson answers reporters' questions about Arthur Garrity (federal judge) and his supervisory role over the Boston Public Schools. Wilson says that the city of Boston owes Garrity a debt of gratitude for his wisdom and leadership in the school desegregation case. Wilson talks about his meeting with Garrity in the courtroom. Wilson says that he is committed to integrated schools. Wilson adds that today's hearing in Garrity's courtroom was the last. He says that Garrity will soon turn over stewardship of the schools to Wilson and the School Committee. Meg Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Grady. Grady talks about the importance of Garrity's final hearings. He says that today is a "historic" day. Grady is optimistic about Wilson's selection as superintendent. Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Nucci. Nucci talks about the significance of Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. He says that the School Committee is ready to take on the responsibility of running the schools. Nucci adds that the School Committee is looking forward to working with Wilson as superintendent.
1:00:01: V: Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) walks over to a desk and lays out two copies of his contract. Microphones are set up on the desk. Shot of papers laid out on the desk. Wilson confers with Boston School Committee members John Nucci, Rita Walsh-Tomasini, John Grady, and Joe Casper. The School Committee members stand to the side of the desk. Wilson examines the papers with Nucci and Walsh-Tomasini. Boston School Committee members Abigail Browne and Jean McGuire walk behind the group with Wilson. Close-up shots of Wilson, Nucci and Walsh-Tomasini. Casper stands on the opposite side of the desk from the group with Wilson. The media sets up a shot of Wilson sitting at the desk with the members of the School Committee, including Kevin McCluskey, standing around him. Wilson takes his suitcoat off and settles into the desk. Wilson and Nucci each sign both copies of the contract. Wilson shakes hands with Nucci and each of the School Committee members. 1:03:12: V: Wilson sits down and takes questions from reporters. The School Committee members remain standing around his desk. A reporter asks Wilson if he has any second thoughts about coming to Boston. Wilson says that he is delighted to be in Boston; that he wishes he could have had more time to prepare for the coming school year. Wilson says that he will work with school staff to get to know the school system; that he will do his best to work with the School Committee and the mayor to benefit the schools. A reporter asks Wilson to name the biggest problem he faces. Wilson says that his biggest problem will be to get to know the system. Wilson says that he must understand the issues and the problems before he can address them. A reporter asks Wilson about the politics involved in the Boston Public School System. Wilson says that politics come with the territory of public education. Shot of the members of the media recording the event. A reporter asks Wilson about the insights given to him by the transition team. Wilson says that he has not yet received a briefing from the transition team. Shot of Grady. Wilson says that he is happy to be in Boston; that his three children will be attending Boston Public Schools; that he is in the process of looking for a home in the city. Wilson again shakes hands with Nucci and the members of the School Committee. 1:07:20: V: Wilson is interviewed by the media. Wilson talks about a conversation he had with Arthur Garrity (federal judge). Wilson says that Garrity told him that the problems in the school system may be exaggerated by the media. Wilson notes that the city of Boston owes Garrity a debt of gratitude for his wisdom and leadership in the school desegregation case. Wilson says that Garrity will soon turn over supervision of the school system to Wilson and the School Committee. A reporter asks Wilson about the challenges he will face in improving the schools. Wilson says that the community must commit itself to integrated schools; that all children must have equal access to the schools. A reporter asks Wilson how he felt while meeting with Garrity. Wilson says that the meeting was, in fact, "historic." Wilson adds that he appreciated the opportunity to talk to Garrity in the courtroom. A reporter asks how Garrity responded to Wilson's requests to meet with him privately. Wilson says that Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) told him that Garrity had decided not to meet privately with any of the superintendents of the Boston Public Schools; that Dentler told Wilson not to feel slighted if Garrity does not meet with him. Wilson adds that he had a productive conversation with Dentler. A reporter asks Wilson if today's hearing was the last in the Boston school desegregation case (Morgan v. Hennigan). Wilson says that Garrity indicated that today's hearing was the last. Wilson says that he will do his best to provide equal access to integrated schools; that another hearing can be avoided if the schools remain integrated. 1:10:45: V: Meg Vaillancourt sets up a meeting with Grady. Vaillancourt asks him if today's hearing was the final hearing. Grady says that Garrity indicated that today's hearing was the last one. Grady notes that it is a "historic" day for the Boston Public School System; that the Boston School Committee and the Boston School Department have worked hard to arrive at this day. Vaillancourt asks Grady about the challenges facing Wilson and the School Committee. Grady says that Wilson will need to move ahead in the same direction; that the schools have "turned the corner." Grady says that there is "an air of optimism" throughout the school system; that Wilson will be a capable superintendent. Vaillancourt thanks Grady. 1:11:57: V: Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Nucci. Vaillancourt asks Nucci about the withdrawal of Garrity. She notes that Garrity told the Boston School Committee to pay heed to the parents and teachers. Nucci says that the School Committee recognizes the contributions of parents and teachers over the past ten years. Nucci says that he is optimistic; that Garrity is confident in the School Committee's commitment to integrated schools; that Garrity is optimistic about the selection of Wilson as superintendent. Nucci says that it is time to close "a chapter in Boston's history." Vaillancourt notes that Dr. Robert Spillane (former Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) left because the School Committee switched to district representation. She asks if Wilson will face a challenge in dealing with the School Committee. Nucci says that Garrity has cited the district-elected School Commitee's commitment to desegregated schools. Nucci adds that the new School Committee has led to Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. Another reporter asks Nucci if any potential problems could prevent Garrity's withdrawal from the schools. Nucci says that there are only minor differences to be resolved. The reporter asks about the significance of Garrity's withdrawal. Nucci says that the judge will set the parameters for desegregation in his final court orders; that the Boston School Committee will be responsible for running the schools. Vaillancourt asks Nucci if a larger School Committee could hinder Wilson's ability to get his programs approved. Nucci quotes Spillane as saying that the size of the committee is less important than the quality of the people who serve on the committee. Nucci says that the School Committee will help Wilson in his new role as superintendent.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/21/1985
Description: This tape includes footage of the aftermath of race riots in Lawrence in August of 1984. Residents stand on the street; some of the buildings are damaged. Two men inspect a burnt-out house. A man repairs a broken window. A group of people stands outside of a liquor store. The sign for the liquor store is damaged; debris is visible on the floor of the liquor store. A group of men move boxes from the store onto a truck. A police cruiser moves down a blockaded street. Police direct traffic in front of the liquor store. Footage from the McNeil-Lehrer Newshour. Robert McNeil reports on race riots in the Tower Hill section of Lawrence. McNeil notes that gangs of Latino youth and gangs of white youth were throwing molotov cocktails and that police were called in to restore order. McNeil’s report includes night footage of the riots in Lawrence.
1:00:04: Visual: Shot of a residential street in Lawrence. Two white men in business suits stand on the lot of a burnt out house. A few people are gathered outside of a house on a residential street in Lawrence. Shot of a liquor store with bars over the windows. Two white women stand outside of a damaged building on a streetcorner. A motorcycle is parked in front of the building. A white man peers out of a broken window in the building. A white man looks out of a window of a house. 1:01:26: V: A group of white adults and kids stand outside of a liquor store in Lawrence. A few people walk up a residential street toward the liquor store. The street is strewn with debris. Shot of the damaged liquor store sign. Shots of a pick-up truck; of a man closing the back of a U-haul moving truck. A man repairs the broken window of a building on a street corner in Lawrence. Close-up shots of other broken windows. The U-haul moving truck pulls up to the front of the liquor store. Shot of the damaged liquor store sign. White men move alcohol from the store into the moving truck. Shot of debris on the floor of the liquor store; of the interior of the moving truck; of the front of the liquor store. 1:03:14: V: Shot of hand-lettered sign reading, "Keep out." A group of white men are gathered in front of a burnt-out house. Shots of the charred remains of the house. A police cruiser travels down a street. The street is blockaded with "Do not enter" signs. The cruiser travels toward the liquor store and moving van. Long shot of the blockaded street with the liquor store. Video cuts out briefly at the end of this segment. Street noise is audible. 1:04:50: V: Two white police officers stand in the middle of a residential street. A crowd of all ages mills about. The crowd includes whites, Hispanics and African Americans. A crowd is gathered near the liquor store. A police officer directs a car as it maneuvers in the crowded street. 1:05:34: News brief from the McNeil-Lehrer Newshour. Robert McNeil reads news headlines. McNeil reports on violence in the Tower Hill section of Lawrence. McNeil reports that gangs of youth threw molotov cocktails; that one gang was Spanish-speaking; that the other gang included French-Canadian, Irish and Italian youth. V: Footage of youth gang members in the dark. The youth carry sticks. Molotov cocktails are thrown by the youth. The molotov cocktails explode on the pavement. McNeil reports that four people were arrested and twenty people were injured; that police used tear gas to restore order at 2:00 am. V: Footage of youth armed with sticks; of police marching among small fires burning on the street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/09/1984
Description: Mel King speaks at a press conference held on behalf of the Massachusetts Rainbow Coalition and the Massachusetts Jesse Jackson Committee. Committee members stand behind King as he reads an open letter from Jesse Jackson. Jackson's letter criticizes Ronald Reagan and urges voters to support Walter Mondale in the upcoming election. Domenic Bozzotto (labor leader) speaks at the press conference. Bozzotto denounces Reagan and says that the labor movement must support Mondale. May Louie (Rainbow Coalition leader) speaks at the press conference. Louie calls on all members of the Rainbow Coalition to support Mondale, even if they are not entirely comfortable with his candidacy. King answers questions from reporters. King talks about efforts by both committees to register new voters. Louie and King talk about the committees' efforts to win over voters in Massachusetts. King says that the Rainbow Coalition can work more successfully with Democratic leaders than with Reagan. King talks about the dissatisfaction of Jackson voters with the Democratic Party. King says that the Democratic Party has ignored Jackson's efforts to push for a more inclusive platform. King says that the Democratic Party needs "serious transformation." King says that the committees are struggling for the minds of the people. He adds that it is "immoral" not to vote against Reagan in the upcoming election. Several takes of reporter standup.
1:00:00: Visual: Mel King (political activist) sits at a table at a press conference. Other leaders of the Massachusetts Jesse Jackson Committee sit at the table with King. Supporters stand behind the table, in front of a banner for the Rainbow Coalition. King tells the media that he is speaking on behalf of the Massachusetts Jesse Jackson Committee and the Massachusetts Rainbow Coalition. King expresses his support for Jackson. King reads an open letter from Jackson about the importance of getting out the vote against Ronald Reagan (US President). Jackson's letter urges people to support Walter Mondale (candidate for US President) against Reagan. The letter denounces Reagan's record as president. Jackson's letter predicts that Reagan can be beat if "the victims of Reaganism" come out to vote for Mondale. Jackson writes that the people can effect change in society through political means. Jackson's letter urges people to help him build the Democratic Party into a Rainbow Coalition. King finishes reading the letter. The supporters applaud. 1:05:10: V: King hands the microphone to Domenic Bozzotto (labor leader). Bozzotto says that the Rainbow Coalition's purpose is to defeat Reagan and Reaganism. Bozzotto denounces Reaganism and its effect on working people and labor unions. Bozzotto says that the labor movement must join the Rainbow Coalition in order to support Mondale and to defeat Reagan. 1:06:12: V: May Louie (Rainbow Coalition leader) calls on all members of the Rainbow Coalition to fight Reagan and Reaganism. Louie admits that some members of the Coalition may not be entirely comfortable with Mondale's candidacy; that it is important to support Mondale in order to defeat Reagan. 1:06:53: V: King invites the reporters to ask questions. Shots of supporters standing behind King. A reporter asks how many votes Jackson received in the Massachusetts primary. Another reporter answers that Jackson received 33,000 votes. A reporter asks how many citizens the group would like to register to vote during its voter registration drive. King says that he does not have a specific numerical goal; that it is "immoral" for people not to vote when faced with the "danger" represented by Reagan's policies. King notes that many people have responded to the group's message by registering to vote. King adds that more than 1,000 people have been registered to vote in the South End during the past month. A reporter asks if King expects Jackson to visit Massachusetts. King says that the group is working to bring Jackson to Massachusetts; that Jackson is campaigning for Mondale in the South. 1:09:08: V: A reporter asks if the Rainbow Coalition expects to win over the voters who supported Gary Hart (US Senator) in the Democratic primary election. King says that the goal of the Coalition is to defeat Reagan; that the members of the Coalition can work with Democratic leaders more successfully than they can work with Reagan. Louie adds that the Massachusetts delegation to the Democratic Convention voted with Jackson supporters on some platform issues; that Massachusetts voters are receptive to the issues put forth by the Coalition. A reporter asks why this announcement was not made immediately after the Democratic convention. King says that the group is working for Jackson; that Jackson wrote the letter recently; that the group is following Jackson's instructions. King notes that the group is working hard to register voters; that the group will work to get out the vote in support of Mondale. King adds that the group will use the media and other strategies to publicize its message. 1:11:28: V: A reporter asks King how they will motivate voters to get to the polls on election day. Shots of the media and the audience. King says that the movement to defeat Reagan is the first of many steps in building up the Rainbow Coalition; that the Coalition will be more successful if Reagan is out of office. Shots of members of the Massachusetts Jesse Jackson Committee; of a sign reading, "For 50 years, we've belonged to the Democratic Party. Now it's time that the Democratic Party belonged to us." A reporter asks King about the committee's slogan about the committee's slogan, "For 50 years, we've belonged to the Democratic Party. Now it's time that the Democratic Party belonged to us." King says that Jackson's goal is to "remake" the Democratic Party into a "rainbow" party of "peace, jobs and justice." King notes that the labor movement has seen the importance of joining with Jackson to defeat Reagan; that Reagan's policies are anti-union. A reporter comments that the slogan expresses a sense of "dissatisfaction" with the Democratic Party. King says that the reporter is right. The committee members applaud. King notes that the Rainbow Coalition is "critical" of Mondale and the Democratic Party; that the Democratic Party has failed to consider Jackson's efforts to push for a more inclusive platform. King adds that he is an independent. King says that Jackson's leadership is important; that Jackson is trying to push the Democratic Party to represent the needs of a broader cross section of people. King says that the Democratic Party "needs serious transformation." King adds that people who have been "locked out" of the Democratic Party need to support Jackson in order to transform the Party. Bozzotto says that Jackson has laid out a blueprint for a Democratic victory in November. Bozzotto adds that Jackson has brought voters back to the Democratic Party. 1:16:13: V: King says that the Jackson Committee is "struggling for people's minds." Jackson says that people in the US and across the world are "dying daily" as a result of Reagan's policies; that it is "immoral" for citizens of the US not to come out to vote against Reagan. King says that the "soul" of the nation is at stake. King talks about the responsibility of citizens to vote in November in order to rid the world of the "menace" posed by the Reagan administration. King closes the press conference. The Jackson Committee members applaud. King and the Committee members rise from their seats. 1:18:06: V: Meg Vaillancourt stands under the banner reading, "For 50 years, we've belonged to the Democratic Party. Now it's time that the Democratic Party belonged to us." Vaillancourt reports that the Massachusetts Women's Political Caucus is trying to convince some Republicans to vote Democratic this year; that some Democrats are talking about their plans to reform the Party from within. Vaillancourt does several takes of her comments for the news story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/01/1984
Description: Reporter Christopher Lydon interviews attendees of the inauguration of Ray Flynn as Mayor of Boston, in the Wang Center. The crowd cheers as Flynn and former mayor Kevin White pass by. Lydon interviews attendees of the inauguration in the lobby of the Wang Center. Interviewees express concerns about unemployment, crime, the restoration of city services and the city budget. Cynthia Silveira (Dorchester resident) says that she appreciates Flynn's commitment to diversity and unity but is suspicious of his past voting record on racial issues. Lydon interviews people outside of the Wang Center. Harry Spence (Boston Housing Authority) says that Flynn delivered a "solid" speech, but will face difficulties in delivering city services and achieving racial harmony. George Keverian (State Representative) says that Flynn is the right person to unite the city. Louise Day Hicks (former member of the Boston City Council) says that Flynn must strike a balance between downtown concerns and neighborhood interests. Hicks says that South Boston is the "center of the city." Hicks speaks to Dapper O'Neil outside of the Wang Center. Felix Arroyo (Latino activist) hopes that Flynn will deliver on his promises; Arroyo believes that it will be difficult for Flynn to integrate the city's neighborhoods. Elma Lewis (African American activist) says that she and others will work with Flynn to improve the city. Lewis adds that she is "always looking for diversity." Claire Crawford (Boston resident) says that Flynn is a "people's mayor." Flynn exits the Wang Center and gets in his station wagon; crowd cheers. Lydon interviews James Kelly (South Boston Information Center). Kelly expresses reservations about Flynn's proposal for District Advisory Councils. Thomas Menino (Boston City Council) compliments Flynn's inaugural speech.
1:00:00: Visual: Christopher Lydon interviews a white male about the inaugural speech of Ray Flynn (Mayor, City of Boston) at the Wang Center for the Performing Arts. The man says that Flynn gave a strong speech; that he is optimistic about Flynn's administration. The man says that Flynn will face challenges in improving the schools. Lydon speaks informally to the man. 1:00:45: V: Uniformed officers march up the stairs in the lobby of the Wang Center. People are gathered in the lobby. The audience cheers as Flynn exits a room and proceeds up the stairs. Flynn's young daughter holds his hand as he walks up the stairs. Flynn stops to greet bystanders as he passes. Kevin White (former Mayor of Boston) and Kathryn White (wife of Kevin White) proceed up the stairs after Flynn. 1:02:12: V: Lydon interviews a white man who is a Dorchester resident. The man says that Flynn is the first mayor since Josiah Quincy to have a "sense of the city"; that Flynn is familiar with the neighborhoods and the downtown. Lydon interviews a white middle-aged man about Flynn's speech. The man says that Flynn's speech was very good; that Flynn understands that the government exists to serve the people. The man says that Flynn will face a challenge in restoring city services during an economic crisis. An older white woman says that Flynn's speech was "wonderful." The woman says that Flynn will face a challenge in reducing unemployment; that Flynn's emphasis on unity was important. Cynthia Silveira (Dorchester resident) says that Flynn's speech was good; that she hesitates to trust Flynn because of his past voting record on racial issues. Silveira says that it will be difficult for Flynn to give his full attention to Boston neighborhoods; that she appreciates his commitment to diversity and unity. An older Irish woman recognizes Lydon from television. Her companions explains that they are from the region of Ireland where Flynn's family is from. The second Irish woman says that the speech was "wonderful." An older white woman says that Flynn will be a good mayor if he delivers what he promised in the speech; that it will be difficult for Flynn to reduce the crime rate. An older white man says that Flynn has the right idea; that Flynn will "economize." 1:06:59: V: A crowd streams out of the doors of the Wang Center. Lydon interviews Harry Spence (Boston Housing Authority). Spence says that Flynn delivered a "solid" speech; that it will be difficult for Flynn to deliver services and to achieve racial harmony. Spence says that Flynn's speech expressed his decency and commitment to the people. The crowd continues to exit the building. Groups of people are gathered outside of the doors. Members of the crowd greet Lydon. George Keverian (Massachusetts House of Representatives) greets Lydon and his two daughters. Keverian says that Flynn delivered a good speech; that Flynn's humanity was in evidence. Keverian says that Flynn is the right person to unite the people of Boston. Keverian continues to speak informally to Lydon and his daughters. 1:12:07: V: Louise Day Hicks greets Lydon. Hicks says that Flynn's speech covered many "interesting" and important topics; that South Boston is the "center" of the city. Hicks says that Flynn will need to strike a balance between the neighborhoods and the downtown interests; that Flynn needs to concentrate on affordable housing and crime reduction. Hicks confers with Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council) on the street outside of the Wang Center. Lydon interviews Felix Arroyo (Latino activist). Arroyo says that the city will be a better place if Flynn can deliver on his promises. Arroyo says that Flynn will face challenges in integrating the neighborhoods; that he appreciates Flynn's commitment to education. Shot of a black car pulled up to the curb in front of the Wang Center. Lydon asks Elma Lewis (African American activist) about Flynn's speech. Lewis say that Flynn put on a good "show"; that inaugural speeches do not mean much; that she and others will work with Flynn to improve the city. Lewis says that she has attended inaugurals for many years; that she would like to have seen "more diversity"; that she is "always looking for more diversity." 1:17:04: V: Claire Crawford (Boston resident) says that Flynn is a "people's mayor." Crawford says that Flynn will face challenges in eliminating racial discrimination. Flynn exits the Wang Center. He greets several groups of bystanders. Photographers crowd around Flynn's station wagon. Flynn clears snow from his windshield. Flynn gets in the car and drives away. The crowd cheers briefly. 1:20:37: V: Lydon interviews Jim Kelly (South Boston Information Center). Kelly says that Flynn gave a good speech; that parts of the speech "concerned" him. Kelly expresses reservations about the District Advisory Councils. Kelly says that Flynn face difficulties in providing services to the city during an economic crisis. Kelly says that the people of South Boston are happy to "have a say" in how the city is run. Lydon begins to interview Thomas Menino (Boston City Council). Menino says that Flynn made an excellent speech.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/02/1984
Description: B-roll of campaign staff work at the local headquarters of the Rainbow Coalition in the South End. The workers speak on the telephone, sort through papers and assemble handouts. Boyce Slayman, a political consultant, speaks to some of the workers. He shows them a newspaper headline about Jackson's top position on the Massachusetts' primary ballot. Shots of Jackson campaign pins, Jackson campaign letterhead and shots of Rainbow Coalition posters. Close up on a photo of Jackson and community activist Mel King. Exteriors of the campaign headquarters. Campaign signs for King's mayoral candidacy remain in the window of the headquarters.
1:00:01: Visual: Shot of a Rainbow Coalition campaign button reading, "Jackson in '84." Campaign workers are working in the local headquarters of the Rainbow Coalition in the South End. An African American male campaign worker rummages through cardboard boxes on the floor. He looks for something in his desk. A white female campaign worker affixes a Rainbow Coalition campaign button to her shirt. The male campaign worker answers the phone, saying "Rainbow Coalition/Mel King's Office." A white female worker sits at a desk, speaking on the telephone. The male campaign worker assembles handouts from papers at his desk. Shot of the campaign workers Rainbow Coalition campaign pin, reading "Jackson '84." Shots of the letterhead on the papers on the campaign worker's desk. The letterhead reads, "Jesse Jackson for President Committee." The male campaign worker continues to assemble handouts. A white female worker sorts through papers while on the telephone. 1:05:20: V: Shot of a black and white photo of Mel King (African American community leader and activist) and Jesse Jackson (candidate for US President). King and Jackson have raise their linked arms in the photo. The white female campaign worker continues to talk on the telephone. She is talking about the Jackson campaign. Shot of the Rainbow Coalition campaign pin worn by the worker. 1:06:31: V: Boyce Slayman (African American community leader and political consultant) stands in the headquarters of the Rainbow Coalition. He speaks to an African American female campaign worker. Shot of a small painting of a rainbow. The caption above the rainbow reads, "I believe in love." Two campaign workers converse in an office. A white female campaign worker sorts paper in the office. Slayman enters the office and picks up a newspaper. The white female campaign worker continues to sort through papers. The crew sets up a shot with the white female campaign worker and an African American female campaign worker in the office. Slayman shows them both an article from the newspaper. Shot of a newspaper article with a headline reading, "Jackson's name to top primary ballot." Shot of the white female campaign worker's campaign button which reads, "Jesse Jackson. Now is the time. 1984." The white female campaign worker and the African American female campaign worker continue to work in the office. 1:10:20: V: Slayman reads the newspaper in the outer office where the male campaign worker and a white female campaign worker sit at desks. The white female campaign worker continues to speak on the telephone. The male campaign worker continues to assemble handouts. The African American female campaign worker confers with Slayman. 1:11:47: V: Shots of the exterior of the headquarters from the street outside. Snow is falling. Campaign signs from King's mayoral campaign hang in the window. A sign for the Rainbow Coalition hangs in the window.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/13/1984
Description: The Boston School Committee holds a meeting in its chambers. Grace Romero (Boston School Committee) accuses School Committee members of playing political games during the process of electing a new superintendent. John Grady (Boston School Committee) reads a statement from Joseph Casper (Boston School Committee). The statement reads that Casper will vote for one of the other candidates because Joseph McDonough (Interim Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) withdrew his name from consideration. Jean McGuire (Boston School Committee) voices her support for one of the candidates. John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) talks about the search process. Edward Winter (Secretary, Boston School Committee) calls the roll. Dr. Laval Wilson wins the election, 9 to 4. Romero objects to a motion to make Wilson's election unanimous. School Committee members prepare to leave the room. Eileen Jones interviews Felix Arroyo (Latino community activist) about the vote. Arroyo says that he will support Wilson as superintendent. Jones interviews Jack E. Robinson (NAACP) about the vote. Robinson says that he is pleased that the three finalists were all minority candidates. Robinson says that Wilson was the right candidate for the job. Jones interviews Romero outside of the School Committee chambers. Romero says that she objected to making the vote unanimous because the record needs to reflect how each member voted. Jones interviews O'Bryant about the vote. O'Bryant says that he had never committed himself to a single candidate before the vote. O'Bryant says that Wilson is a strong candidate. He denies accusations that he switched his vote from another candidate. Jones does several takes of her reportage for the story.
0:59:53: Audio of Boston School Committee proceedings. Visual: The Boston School Committee meets in its chambers. A large crowd has gathered in the audience, including members of the media. Grace Romero (member, Boston School Committee) chastises members of the school committee for playing politics. Romero says that school committee members must conduct themselves better in the future. She briefly mentions relations between School Committee members and Hispanic voters. Joseph Casper (member, Boston School Committee) says that he cannot speak because he has lost his voice. Someone jokes that Casper "lost his voice two weeks too late." The audience applauds. John Grady (member, Boston School Committee) reads a statement from Casper. The statement reads that Joe McDonough (Interim Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) was his first choice to be superintendent; that McDonough has withdrawn his name from consideration. The statement reads that Casper will vote for another candidate this evening. The statement urges school committee members to salute the work of McDonough. Casper speaks softly to the other members after Grady reads the statement. 1:03:38: V: Jean McGuire (member, Boston School Committee) talks about the importance of the post of superintendent of schools. She voices her support for Dr. Peter Negroni (candidate for Superintendent of Boston Public Schools). John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) talks about the value of the search process for the candidates. He urges the committee to select a new superintendent with a significant majority. Nucci says that each of the candidates is qualified for the job. Nucci calls on Edward Winter (Secretary, Boston School Committee) to call the roll. Winter calls the roll of members, and each member indicates his or her choice for superintendent. School Committee members Abigail Browne, William Marcione, Kevin McCluskey and McGuire vote for Negroni. School Committee members Daniel Burke, Casper, Grady, John O'Bryant, Thomas O'Reilly, Shirley Owen-Hicks, Romero, Rita Walsh-Tomasini and Nucci vote for Dr. Laval Wilson (candidate for Superintendent, Boston Public Schools). The audience applauds after the vote has been taken. Marcione moves to make the election of Wilson unanimous. Romero objects to the motion. She explains that she does not want the record to reflect that Negroni received no votes. Shots of Winter; of Romero. Grady makes a reference to the rules pertaining to the motion. 1:08:26: V: Owens Hicks gathers her papers and prepares to leave the chambers. Romero does the same. Members of the audience are rising to leave the chambers. Groups of people stand speaking to one another. McGuire and Nucci stand at the front of the room, preparing to leave the chambers. O'Bryant greets an audience member. Burke and Julio Henriquez (aide to Burke) confer in the chambers. Two white men confer at the front of the chambers. 1:09:00: V: Eileen Jones interviews Felix Arroyo (Latino community activist) about the school committee vote. Arroyo says that the vote gives Wilson a clear mandate; that the city of Boston must work with Wilson to improve the schools. Arroyo says that he was not surprised at Wilson's election to the post. Arroyo says that he would have liked to have seen Negroni win the post; that he will fully support Wilson now that he has been elected. Jones asks for Arroyo's reaction to Romero's remarks. Arroyo says that he did not understand what Romero was trying to say in her remarks; that many Hispanics do not believe that Romero is representative of their community. 1:10:39: V: Jones asks Jack E. Robinson (NAACP) about his reaction to the vote. Robinson says that he is pleased with the result of the vote; that the School Committee made the right choice and acted with maturity in electing Wilson. Robinson says that it is significant that three minority candidates were the finalists for the post. Robinson says that the committee members elected Wilson on the basis of his qualifications. Robinson says that he was not surprised with the results; that the committee members had decided to put politics aside and vote for the best candidate. 1:11:43: V: Jones interviews Romero about the vote. Jones asks Romero why she objected to a unanimous vote for Wilson. Romero says that Negroni was a qualified candidate with support; that she does not want the record to show that he did not get any votes. Romero says that the motion for a unanimous vote is part of "a game" played by some members of the school committee. Jones notes that a unanimous vote would show full support for the winning candidate. Romero says that the committee should have showed unanimous support in the beginning; that the record needs to show how each member voted. Jones asks Romero what she had been trying to say to the Hispanic community in her earlier remarks. Romero says that O'Bryant has not delivered on his promises to the Hispanic community. 1:12:54: V: Jones sets up an interview with O'Bryant. Jones asks O'Bryant if he switched his vote from Negroni to Wilson. O'Bryant says that he never made a commitment to any candidate; that many assumed that he would support Negroni because he supported him in 1981. O'Bryant says that he initiated the search committee process for the Boston School Committee in 1978. O'Bryant emphasizes that he never committed to any candidate. O'Bryant says that he decided to support Wilson after making site visits; that his support for Wilson never wavered. Jones notes that Romero's earlier comments were directed at him. Jones says that Romero accused O'Bryant of making a promise to the Hispanic community that he would vote for Negroni. O'Bryant says that Romero is lying. O'Bryant says that he did not promise anything to any community. Jones asks O'Bryant if he was suprised at the vote. O'Bryant says that he was not surprised because Wilson is a strong candidate. O'Bryant says that the vote might have gone the other way if he had supported Negroni. 1:15:08: V: Jones stands in the Boston School Committee chambers. Jones reports that members of the school committee hope that Wilson visit Boston by the end of the week to work out details of his contract and to meet the community. Jones does two takes to the closing of the news story. Jones records an alternate closing in which she reports on Romero's objection to a motion to make the vote unanimous. Jones does two takes of the alternate closing to the news story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/31/1985
Description: Stevie Wonder speaks at a Harvard Law School Forum at Sanders Theatre. He answers questions from the audience. Wonder discusses his record label and the ups and downs of his career. Wonder talks about his need to be creative and to make music. Asked about apartheid, Wonder says that he will not perform in South Africa; he says that American citizens should make an effort to not support apartheid. Wonder takes his glasses off and pretends to read a letter given to him from an audience member. The audience cheers.
1:00:06: Visual: Stevie Wonder speaks at a Harvard Law School Forum at Sanders Theatre. Wonder talks about his record label. Wonder says that he is always looking for new talent. Wonder elicits laughs from the audience when he tries to imitate the mannerisms of a slick record producer. 1:01:43: V: Tape cuts out during an audience member's question about the ups and downs of Wonder's career. Wonder answers that his faith has helped him a lot. 1:01:58: V: Wonder talks about his desire to be creative and to make music. He talks about the time period when his song "Uptight" became a hit. Two members of a campus singing group present Wonder with a button from their group. One member of the group asks Wonder about his position on boycotts of apartheid South Africa. Wonder says that he will not perform in South Africa; that he understands the feelings of some musicians who do perform there. Wonder says that American citizens have a responsibility to do what they can to not support apartheid; that American citizens understand the ill effects of racism. An audience member talks about how she gave Wonder a necklace in 1973 when she attended one of his private recording sessions. Another audience member asks permission to go up on stage to present Wonder with a letter she wrote for him. The woman gives Wonder a hug on stage and presents him with the letter. 1:08:05: V: Wonder pretends to take off his glasses and read the letter. The audience cheers. Wonder leaves the stage. The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/19/1984
Description: Tufts University officials and students stand on the university quadrangle near Ballou Hall. Ballou Hall is being occupied by student protesters. Meg Vaillancourt interviews Robert Elias (professor, Tufts University) about the student occupation of Ballou Hall. Elias talks about negotiations between student demonstrators and the university administration, which were initiated by the faculty. Elias says that many students are concerned about Tufts' divestment policy; he adds that the demonstration has been an educational experience. Elias says that he does not know how students will react to the administrations' proposals to end the occupation. Students and members of the media are gathered under the portico of Ballou Hall. Protest signs hang at the entrance to the building. A protest sign hanging at the entrance to the hall reads "Biko Hall." Tufts University police officers stand near the students under the portico of the building. Elias and two other people enter the building. Students in the foyer of the building begin to chant and sing. Police officers stand directly in front of the entrance to the building. The protesters are visible as they chant and sing.
1:00:00: Visual: Three men stand on the quadrangle at Tufts University, talking about the student apartheid protest. The noise of a protester speaking into a bullhorn is audible. Shot of a sign reading, "You've made your point. Now get out." The sign is hung from two trees on the quadrangle. Tents are set up across from Ballou Hall, near the sign on the quadrangle. A song by Bob Marley, "Get Up, Stand Up" plays from a radio. Students stand on the quad and in front of Ballou Hall. Ballou Hall has been occupied by students protesting the school's refusal to divest from South Africa. Small groups of students are gathered on the quad. Two white male students talk to one another on the quadrangle. Music by Bob Marley continues to play. An African American male in a red shirt speaks to a white male in a suit and tie. The African American male holds a pen and paper in his hand. Some white male students and another white male in a suit and tie are standing with the two men. 1:04:54: V: Meg Vaillancourt sets up an interview on the quadrangle with Professor Robert Elias (professor, Tufts University). Vaillancourt asks Elias about student support for the protesters. She also asks about the possibility of negotiations with the administration. Elias says that negotiations with the protesters were initiated by a small group of faculty members; that the president of the university approved a proposal put forth by the faculty; that the faculty members presented the proposal to the students. Elias says that the students agreed to give an answer on the proposal by 4:30 pm, if the administration would promise to keep the police out of the building. Elias notes that the faculty and administration are now waiting for the protesters' decision. Elias says that the divestment policy is a widespread concern among students; that the protest has drawn attention to the issue on campus. Elias says that the demonstration has served an educational purpose; that he will be sorry to see it end badly. Vaillancourt asks about the educational value of negotiations. Elias talks about a conflict resolution course which is being taught on campus. Elias says that the protesters had tried to communicate their position to the administration before resorting to the demonstration; that the protesters felt that they were not being heard by the administration. Vaillancourt refers to the the book, Getting To Yes, by Roger Fisher. Elias says that negotiations were necessary; that the administration and the protesters were locked in a stalemate. Vaillancourt asks if both sides "won" in the negotiations. Elias says that he does not know which side "won"; that he does not know how the protesters will react to the proposal by the administration. Vaillancourt closes the interview. 1:09:49: V: Members of the media sit on a low wall in front of Ballou Hall. They read the newspaper and talk to one another. Many have placed their cameras on the ground. 1:10:49: V: A group of people, including Elias and the African American man in the red shirt, is gathered in front of the entrance to Ballou Hall. A sign on the door to Ballou Hall reads, "The poeple united will never be defeated." A sign on one of the columns of the portico reads, "Down with racist pig-dogs." Groups of people standing beneath the portico talk casually to one another. Three Tufts University police officers stand in front of the doors to Ballou Hall. Elias and two other people enter the hall, passing behind the police officers. The crowd of students outside of the hall begins to clap rhythmically. Student protesters who had been inside of the building appear in the foyer of Ballou Hall. They sit down and begin to sing and clap. The police officers continue to block the entrance of the building. Shots of students sitting and standing behind the police officers. The students sing and clap. A sign above the entranceway reads, "The police close the doors if we talk to you." Someone closes the inner doors to the building. The students are behind the doors. 1:15:22: V: Close-up shot of a Tufts University Police Department logo on the uniform of a police officer. Two white male Tufts officials confer in front of the entrance to Ballou Hall. A sign hangs in front of the portico reading, "Biko Hall." The police officers stand casually beneath the portico. Student protesters are visible through the glass windows on the doors to Ballou Hall. The windows also reflect back the scene on the quad. Elias and the African American man in the red shirt exit Ballou Hall. The protesters stand in the foyer of Ballou Hall. They clap their hands and chant, "The people united will never be defeated." The students sit and stand in the entrance to the building, behind the police officers. The students hold hands. 1:18:13: V: The students occupying Ballou Hall are visible behind the police officers who are blocking the entrance. The students stand and clap their hands in unison to music. The students sing along with the song "Free Nelson Mandela." The police officers stand quietly in front of the students. Students and the media stand under the portico, facing the protesters inside the hall. Several students clap and sing along with the protesters inside the hall. The students begin to clap and chant, "The people united will never be defeated." Camera crews tape students inside the building. Students standing under the portico clap and chant. The students begin to chant, "Apartheid kills. Tufts pays the bills." Shots of individual students clapping and chanting." Students chant, "Apartheid no. Financial aid yes."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/26/1985