Description: Hope Kelly reports that Superintendent Laval Wilson proposed a set of reforms to improve the Boston Public Schools in the beginning of his tenure as superintendent. Kelly reviews Wilson's proposals for school reforms and notes that the programs were backed by the Boston School Committee. Kelly's report includes footage of Wilson in 1985 and footage of Wilson announcing his school reform package. The Boston School Committee has recently cut Wilson's budget by $8.5 million. Kelly reviews the budget cuts. Interviews with John Nucci (Boston School Committee), Sam Tyler (Boston Municipal Research Bureau), and Ellen Guiney (Educational Advisor to Mayor Flynn) about the budget cuts. Kelly reviews the budget figures for municipal spending on education from 1984 to 1989 and budget figures for overall city spending from 1986 to 1988. Kelly notes that the city's spending on education has greatly increased from 1984. She notes that critics believe that the School Department is not spending its money wisely. Kelly reports that the city will need to curb its spending in the next few years due to the absence of budget surpluses. Kelly's report is accompanied by footage of students in the Boston Public Schools.
1:00:19: Visual: Footage of Dr. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) being interviewed by the Boston School Committee for the position of superintendent of schools on July 19, 1985. Wilson says that his goal is to convince the members of the Boston School Committee that he is the best candidate for the position. Hope Kelly reports that Wilson took over the Boston Public School System at a time when the average graduating senior reads at a seventh-grade level. Kelly notes that the average drop-out rate is 43%. V: Shots of high school students outside of a high school; of students descending a stairs in a school building. Kelly notes that Wilson approached the job with determination. V: Footage of Wilson saying that his goal is to lift the educational level of the students coming out of the Boston public school system. On-screen text and visuals detail the specifics of Wilson's proposed educational programs. Kelly reports that Wilson proposed a set of reforms called the Boston Education Plan. Kelly notes that Wilson proposed a $3.1 million dollar program for after-school remedial reading; that Wilson proposed a $1.3 million program to standardize remedial reading programs city-wide. Kelly notes that the School Committee backed Wilson's programs when he arrived. Kelly reports that the School Committee cut Wilson's budget by $8.5 million on Wednesday. V: On-screen text detail the specifics of the budget cuts. Kelly reports that Wilson proposed a budget of $364.6 million; that the School Committee cut his budget to $355.9 million; that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has refused to spend more than $350.0 million on the school budget. V: Shot of Flynn talking to reporters. Footage of John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) saying that the city administration does not understand the impact of its cuts to the school budget. Kelly reports that Sam Tyler (Boston Municipal Research Bureau) runs an agency which monitors city spending. V: Footage of Tyler being interviewed by Kelly. Tyler says that city officials were thinking about the future when they asked the School Department to keep its spending to within $350 million. Tyler says that the superintendent cannot introduce new programs and expect them all to be funded. Footage of Ellen Guiney (Flynn's Education Advisor) being interviewed by Kelly. Guiney says that $350 million is what the city can afford to spend on education. On-screen text and visuals detail the city of Boston's spending on education from 1984 to 1989. Kelly reports that the city has increased its spending on schools from $245 million in 1984 to $341.1 million in 1989. V: Footage of Guiney says that some city officials in other departments think that the School Department already receives too much money. Kelly reports that some critics wonder if the School Department is spending its money wisely. V: Shot of two elementary-school students in front of a computer terminal. Footage of Tyler saying that the school system has improved. Kelly reports that Nucci points to a 1% decrease in the drop-out rate. Kelly notes that Guiney points to improved teacher salaries and more teachers; that Guiney admits that there have been few actual performance gains by students. V: Shot of Nucci; of Guiney; of a white male teacher in a classroom. Footage of Guiney saying that she would have liked to have seen greater improvements in the last five years. Shot of an African American girl coloring a picture in a classroom. Kelly reports that spending by the city has risen overall in the past five years. V: On-screen text compares the rise in city spending to the rise in school spending from 1986 to 1988. Kelly reports that city spending has risen 34% since 1986; that school spending has risen 23% since 1986. Kelly stands in front of the offices of the Boston School Committee. Kelly reports that the city had surpluses from 1986 to 1988; that it is less certain that surpluses will exist in future city budgets. V: Footage of Tyler saying that the city needs to put a brake on its spending. Shot of elementary school students entering a classroom.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/06/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jesse Jackson has challenged Michael Dukakis to come out with a budget for his proposed domestic programs, during a campaign debate. Dukakis has refused to release a budget so far. Interview with Issues Dirextor for the Dukakis campaign, Christopher Edley, who says that Dukakis is an experienced chief executive and that he does not need to release a budget during a presidential campaign. Vaillancourt reviews Dukakis's proposals on day care, affordable housing, and drugs. She notes that he has not talked about a budget for these proposals. Interview with community activist and Jackson supporter Mel King, who also supports Jackson in his demand for Dukakis's budget. Dukakis has talked about funding for his education proposals and for his "Rebuild America" proposal. Vaillancourt reviews Dukakis' budget priorities and notes that he would fund increases in domestic funding through cuts in the defense budget. Vaillancourt reviews the events of Dukakis's first term as Governor of Massachusetts. She notes that a massive state debt forced Dukakis to raise taxes and cut spending.
1:00:02: Visual: Footage of Jesse Jackson (Democratic US Presidential candidate) and Michael Dukakis (Democratic US Presidential candidate) at Steel Valley Debate in Pennsylvania. Jackson says that "Reaganomics" must be reversed. The audience applauds. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Jackson has challenged Dukakis to come up with a budget detailing which domestic programs need support and how Dukakis would pay for them. Vaillancourt notes that Dukakis has stuck to his own script; that he has refused to enter into a budget battle with Jackson. V: Footage of Dukakis at the debate. Dukakis says that partnerships between Washington DC, management, and labor need to be built. Vaillancourt reports that public-private partnerships are the key to Dukakis's domestic programs. V: On-screen visuals and text detail Dukakis's positions on day care, affordable housing, and drugs. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis has called for "'a national partnership to create affordable day care for all'"; that Dukakis's position paper carries no price tag for his day care program. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis supports a reallocation of money to build more affordable housing; that Dukakis's position paper carries no price tag for the affordable housing program. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis would fight drugs by restoring funds to the Coast Guard and to other enforcement measures; that Dukakis's position paper carries no price tag for his anti-drug program. V: Shot of Jackson at the campaign debate. Footage of Christopher Edley (Issues Director for the Dukakis campaign) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Edley says that Dukakis is an experienced chief executive; that Dukakis has put together ten balanced budgets in his tenure as Governor of Massachusetts. Edley says that an electoral campaign is not the time to put together a budget. Footage of Mel King (Jackson supporter) saying that the voters need to know about Dukakis's priorities; that voters need to know where Dukakis will find the money to implement his programs. Vaillancourt notes that Dukakis has talked about the budgets for two of his programs. V: Shots of Dukakis and Jackson at the campaign debate. On-screen text and visuals detail Dukakis's positions on job creation and education. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis's "'Rebuild America'" program would "invest $500 million from federal government to regional development." Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis supports increasing the education budget by $250 million in his first year. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson would raise taxes on corporations and the wealthy to pay for his domestic programs; that Dukakis would like to generate additional money by cracking down on tax cheats and by making the government more efficient. V: Shots of Dukakis and Jackson at the campaign debate. On-screen text and visuals detail Dukakis's budget priorities. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis will "finance all new domestic spending through cuts in Star Wars." V: Shot of King being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Footage of Dukakis speaking at a press conference in 1974. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis promised no new taxes in his first campaign for governor of Massachusetts in 1974; that the massive state debt forced him to raise taxes and to cut spending. V: Footage of King being interviewed by Vaillancourt. King says that Dukakis has not learned the lesson of 1974; that Dukakis has not honored his commitments to meet the needs of people on welfare. King says that voters need to know where the money will come from for his programs. Vaillancourt notes that Dukakis probably does not want to quote specifics in order to avoid becoming the captive of special interest groups. V: Shot of Dukakis at the campaign debate. Footage from C-Span of Walter Mondale (1984 Democratic US Presidential candidate). Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis has avoided giving Jackson specifics outside of the areas of job creation and welfare reform; that Dukakis has left himself room to maneuver in the general election.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/25/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on discriminatory practices by the Boston Housing Authority (BHA). African American families are passed over on the waiting list for apartments in South Boston housing projects. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has ordered the BHA to stop this policy. Interview with Doris Bunte, director of the BHA. Bunte says that the BHA is not intentionally engaged in discrimination. Bunte adds that she concentrated on maintenance and repair of units when she took office and has now turned her attention to the fair housing issue. Bunte notes that she is concerned about the safety of non-white families in South Boston housing projects. Vaillancourt reviews previous efforts to desegregate public housing projects in Charlestown. She notes that the BHA must change its policy despite public resistance in South Boston.
1:00:11: Visual: Footage of Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) in her office. Bunte says that separate facilities are unequal facilities. Meg Vaillancourt reports that the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) has practiced discrimination against African American families; that white families are given preference over African American families for apartments in South Boston. V: Shot of a white woman and white children outside of a housing project building in South Boston; of a white woman speaking to a reporter from a window of a project apartment in South Boston. Footage of Bunte being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Bunte says that a conscious decision was made "at some point" not to send minority families to projects in South Boston. Vaillancourt asks why Bunte did not change the BHA policy. Bunte says that the BHA is moving slowly to change the policy; that the safety of non-white families in South Boston is a concern. Bunte says that the BHA has been involved in outreach and meetings to move the policy along. Vaillancourt reports that the same argument was used by Bunte's predecessors at the BHA; that white families still have more housing options than African American families in South Boston. V: Shots of a housing project; of white residents sitting outside of a housing project in South Boston; of parochial school students walking toward a housing project; of a white boy scrambling under a fence near a housing project. Vaillancourt reports that some white families in South Boston are living in apartments which are too large for their family size; that African American families in other parts of the city are living in apartments which are too small; that the BHA did not offer available apartments in white housing developments to African American families. V: Shots of an African American girl standing outside of a housing project building; of African American children playing outside of a housing project. Vaillancourt reports that the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has called the BHA policy discriminatory; that the BHA must change its policy. V: Footage of Bunte saying that the BHA does not plan to discriminate against anyone; that the BHA will not steer anyone to a particular project. Vaillancourt reports that HUD has ordered the BHA to stop discriminating against non-white families; that the BHA has not been asked to integrate its housing projects. V: Shots of a white woman and children outside of a housing project building; of a young white boy running around outside of a housing project; of a group of African American schoolchildren walking on a sidewalk. Vaillancourt reports that HUD has ordered the BHA to offer available apartments in South Boston to African American families. V: Footage of a white female resident of a South Boston project. The woman saying that public housing projects decline when African American families move in. Footage of a white female project resident saying that gang fights will erupt if African American families move into the South Boston projects. Shot of a white woman walking in the snow with two white children in Charlestown. Shots of a public housing project in Charlestown. Vaillancourt reports that African American families were integrated into an all-white public housing project in Charlestown; that Harry Spence (former BHA director) organized the integration of the Charlestown projects. Vaillancourt notes that Spence carefully selected the families to move into the Charlestown projects; that the families did not include teenage boys who were likely to become involved in turf wars with other residents. V: Shots of Spence talking to a reporter; of racially diverse residents outside of a project in Charlestown. Shot of a white woman and child looking out of a window of a project apartment. Vaillancourt reports that HUD will not allow the kind of selection engaged in by Spence. V: Footage of Bunte saying that it is discriminatory to pass over families with teenagers when filling apartment in white housing projects. Vaillancourt notes that Bunte has not moved any African American families into public housing projects in South Boston. V: Footage of Bunte saying that she concentrated on making repairs to vacant units when she took over the BHA; that families are now living in units which were vacant. Bunte says that she also concentrated on maintenance; that only 20% of units were in compliance with the sanitary code in 1984. Bunte adds that 88% of units are now in compliance. Bunte says that the BHA did not turn its attention to the fair housing issue until 1986. Bunte says that the BHA should have considered integrating South Boston before Charlestown. Shots of vacant apartments strewn with trash; of a broken door in the hallway of a public housing apartment building; of the exterior of a public housing project building; of the snowy grounds surrounding a public housing project. Vaillancourt reports that Spence had planned to integrate the public housing projects in Charlestown, and then to move on to the rest of the city. Vaillancourt notes that Bunte did not follow up on Spence's plan until 1986; that the federal government found a pattern of discrimination before the BHA could remedy its policies. V: Shot of Spence; of a white project resident climbing over a pile of snow outside of a public housing project building; of African American men standing outside of a public housing project building; of children playing in the snow outside of a public housing project building. Vaillancourt notes that the BHA must change its policy in the face of public resistance in South Boston. V: Footage of Bunte saying that fair housing is an important issue; that the BHA will implement a fair policy for all residents.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1988
Description: Christopher Lydon interviews in-studio guests Howie Carr (columnist, The Boston Herald) and Byron Rushing (State Representative) about the murder of Carol Stuart in Mission Hill. Carr talks about criticism received by the Boston Herald for running a brutal photograph of the murder. Rushing and Carr talk about how to solve the problem of violence on the streets. Rushing accuses city officials of making policy "based on frustration." He adds that the government must focus on the root of the problem. Rushing and Carr talk about class and race issues surrounding media response to the murder. Rushing says that education and community development will help to stop violence on the streets.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/25/1989
Description: David Boeri reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and the Boston City Council will work together to create a public housing policy that ensures equal access while providing some element of choice. Boeri notes that the city must comply with the policy of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) if they wish to continue receiving federal funds. Boeri's report includes footage of Flynn, Charles Yancey (Boston City Council), and Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) at a press conference about fair housing policy. Boeri's report also features footage from an interview with James Kelly (Boston City Council). Kelly says that free choice is more important than racial diversity. Boeri reviews the current housing policy and the policy requirements of HUD. Boeri's report also includes footage of white and African American tenants of public housing and by footage of Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council). This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Sonia Sanchez
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) speaking to the press. Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) stands beside him. Flynn says that Boston's housing policy will guarantee equal access to housing for all. David Boeri reports that Flynn met with the Boston City Council about public housing issues; that Yancey said that the meeting was productive. Boeri reports that Flynn and the Council agreed that equal access to public housing must be guaranteed. V: Footage of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) saying that no families will be displaced from public housing in order to achieve integration. Boeri reports that Flynn and the Council agreed to work together constructively on the issue. Boeri notes that Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council) was not present at the meeting; that James Kelly (Boston City Council) did not join Flynn and the other councillors for the press conference after the meeting. V: Shot of O'Neil at a meeting in the City Council chambers. Footage of Kelly in his office. Kelly says that people should be able to choose where they want to live; that the new policy will create "forced housing" instead of "fair housing." Boeri notes that the current housing selection process allows each applicant to select choose three public housing projects where he or she would like to live. Boeri reports that South Boston residents usually list the three housing projects in South Boston; that the three housing projects are all white. V: Shots of Flynn and the councillors speaking to the press; of a white woman looking out of a window of an apartment in a project building; of a white woman and white children in front of a project building; of a sign for the Old Colony Housing Project in South Boston. Shot of a housing project in South Boston. Shots from a moving vehicle of a housing project in Mission Hill. Shot of an African American boy near a dumpster outside of a public housing project. Boeri notes that the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has called Boston's housing policy discriminatory; that the three-choice system has been rejected in other cities. Boeri reports that HUD has recommended a city-wide list, where applicants take the first available apartment. V: Shots of white residents outside of a public housing project in South Boston. Footage of Kelly saying that there is nothing wrong with giving tenants a choice about where they want to live. Kelly says that free choice may result in housing developments which are not racially diverse; that free choice is more important than racial diversity. Shot of Bolling. Boeri reports that Bolling would also like to protect the three-choice system. Boeri notes that HUD provides 70% of Boston's public housing funds; that Boston stands to lose $75 million if they do not comply with HUD policy. V: Shot from a moving vehicle of a manicured lawn in front of a public housing development; of a public housing project on Fidelis Way. Footage of Bolling saying that the city will try to negotiate with HUD to develop an application process with some degree of choice for tenants. Boeri notes that the HUD policy will make tenants choose between living in public housing and living in the neighborhood of choice. Boeri notes that there are 14,500 families on the waiting list for public housing in Boston. V: Shots of public housing projects in Boston; of a racially diverse group of children playing outside of a project building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/14/1988
Description: David Boeri reports that Senator Edward Kennedy took a cruise on a Coast Guard boat to Little Brewster Island in Boston Harbor. Little Brewster Island is the site of a lighthouse that was repaired with funds procured by Kennedy from the federal government. Funding for the Coast Guard has been cut by the federal government, resulting in closed facilities and fewer patrols. Interview with Robert Johanson, Rear Admiral of the US Coast Guard, about the budget cuts. Kennedy and Jesse Jackson have called for a restoration of funds to the Coast Guard. Coast Guard patrols can stem the flow of drugs into the US. Jackson talks about the Coast Guard. Kennedy on Little Brewster Island.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Edward Kennedy (US Senator) shaking hands with a Coast Guard officer on board a boat. Shot of a Coast Guard boat cruising in Boston Harbor. Shot of Kennedy with a cigar, walking toward the lighthouse on Little Brewster Island. Shots of the lighthouse. Shots of the Boston skyline from Little Brewster Island. David Boeri reports that Kennedy took a boat cruise with a crew of Coast Guard officers and reporters; that Kennedy was trying to draw attention to his legislative record on Boston Harbor; that the boat brought Kennedy to visit the lighthouse on Little Brewster Island in Boston Harbor. Boeri notes that the lighthouse was repaired with funds from an amendment that Kennedy tacked on to an appropriations bill two years ago. Boeri notes that the the lighthouse marks the entrance to Boston harbor; that the lighthouse is still operational. Boeri adds that other lighthouses have been closed recently. V: Footage of Kennedy on Little Brewster Island. Kennedy says that light stations have been closed for budgetary reasons; that reduced services are the result of budget-tightening measures. Boeri reports from Little Brewster Island. The lighthouse is visible behind him. Boeri reports that Ronald Reagan (US President) and the Congress made cuts in the Coast Guard budget in 1988; that the Coast Guard has closed facilities. Boeri adds that the Coast Guard is running fewer patrols as a result of cuts in the budget for fuels, parts, and maintenance. Boeri reports that search and rescue patrols and fisheries enforcement patrols have been eliminated. V: Shot of a Coast Guard boat in Boston Harbor. Footage of Robert Johanson (Rear Admiral, US Coast Guard) saying that the Coast Guard has cut back on law enforcement patrols; that an increase in drug trafficking could be the result. Shot of a Coast Guard officer driving a boat. Boeri reports that the cuts in law enforcement patrols have provoked some to call for a restoration of money to the Coast Guard budget. V: Footage of Jesse Jackson from October 5, 1987. Jackson says that the Coast Guard needs to be stronger; that the Coast Guard can prevent the flow of drugs to the US. Footage of Kennedy on Little Brewster Island. Kennedy calls for a restoration of money to the Coast Guard budget. Boeri reports that Kennedy has called for Congress to transfer an additional $60 million to the Coast Guard budget. Shot of the Boston skyline from Little Brewster Island.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/04/1988
Description: Marcus Jones interviews conductor Kay George Roberts about her career as one of the few African American female orchestral conductors. Roberts answers the question "what is it like to be a black woman conductor?" Roberts talks about race and gender in classical music. Jones reviews Roberts's career. Roberts is the first woman to receive a PhD in orchestra conducting from Yale University. Jones' report includes footage of Roberts conducting an orchestra. The tape also includes additional footage of the interview with Roberts and additional footage of Roberts conducting the orchestra.
1:00:03: Visual: Footage of Kay George Roberts (conductor) walking onto a stage to conduct. The audience applauds. Footage of Roberts being interviewed by Marcus Jones. Roberts says that women have not traditionally been the conductors of orchestras. Jones asks if women conductors are different from men conductors. Roberts jokes that women are probably better conductors than men. Footage of Roberts conducting an orchestra. Jones reports that Roberts is one of only a few African American female orchestral conductors. V: Footage of Robers being interviewed by Jones. Jones asks if Roberts ever takes offense when people point to her race instead of her skill. Roberts says that she is not offended by the acknowledgement of her race and gender. Roberts says that black Americans are always referred to as "black Americans"; that black Americans are rarely referred to as "Americans." Jones reports that Roberts is the first woman to receive a PhD in orchestra conducting from Yale University; that she is the second African American to do so. Jones notes that Roberts has been a professor and orchestra conductor since 1978 at the University of Lowell. V: Footage of Roberts conducting an orchestra. Footage of Roberts saying that she will always teach; that she enjoys the excitement and energy of young students and college-age students. Footage of Roberts conducting. Jones reports that Roberts and several female composers will perform a marathon of contemporary classical works at the First Parish Church in Watertown. Jones notes that Roberts hopes the annual event will broaden appreciation for contemporary classical works. V: Footage of Roberts saying that she would love to have the opportunity to conduct a major orchestra. Footage of Roberts conducting an orchestra.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/21/1989
Description: Deborah Wang reports that the Boston Police Department and the District Attorney's Office keep the money confiscated from drug arrests. Neighborhood groups want the money to go back into the community to fund drug education, drug treatment, and crime watch efforts. Interview with Bill Good of the Boston Police Department. Good says that the Police Department needs the money to keep its "operational edge" over drug traffickers. Interview with City Councilor Charles Yancey, who says that community residents are the most valuable asset in the war against drugs. Press conference at City Hall, where Yancey, Ben Haith (Roxbury Multi-Service Center) and Louis Elisa (NAACP) talk about the need to return confiscated drug money to the community. City Councilor Dapper O'Neil arrives at the press conference. O'Neil and State Rep. Byron Rushing confront each other on the issue. Wang reports that the city budget is tight and various groups are fighting over small amounts of money. Wang's report is accompanied by footage of police officers making a drug arrest.
1:00:01: Visual: Footage of a police cruiser stopped behind a red sports car. A white police officer searches an African American man. Shot of a plastic bag containing drugs. Deborah Wang reports that 7,500 people were arrested by police on drug-related charges last year; that police have confiscated weapons, drugs, and money from drug arrests. V: Footage of Bill Good (Boston Police Department) saying that approximately $990,000 has been forfeited to the Police Department through drug arrests. Shots of police officers searching the trunk of a red sports car. Shot of a police officer searching a handbag. Wang reports that the Boston Police Department has gone to court to obtain the money; that the Police Department has split the money with the District Attorney's office. Wang reports that the Police Department uses the money to pay informants, to buy drugs for deals, and to conduct police investigations. V: Footage of Good saying that the money is essential to the Police Department; that the money represents an "operational edge" for drug investigators. Good says that the money can be used at the discretion of drug investigators. Wang reports that some city officials see other uses for the money. V: Footage of Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) being interviewed by Wang. Yancey says that the city needs to fight an effective war against drugs. Yancey says that community residents are the city's most valuable allies in the war against drugs. Wang reports that neighborhood groups want the money to go back into the community; that the groups want the money to fund drug education, drug treatment, and crime watch efforts. V: Footage of Yancey at a press conference at City Hall. A group of neighborhood activists including Byron Rushing (State Representative) are with Yancey at the press conference. Shot of Ben Haith (Roxbury Multi-Service Center) speaking at the press conference. Footage of Louis Elisa (NAACP) speaking at the press conference. Elisa says that funding is needing to fight the war on drugs; that the confiscated money belongs to the community. Elisa says that the confiscated money comes from Charlestown, South Boston, Roxbury and Dorchester; that the confiscated money should go back to the communities to fund anti-drug initiatives. Footage of Good being interviewed by Wang. Good says that the neighborhood groups have good intentions. Good says that it is a mistake to take the money from the Police Department. Good says that the confiscated money funds the day-to-day operations of the Police Department's anti-drug effort. Shots of three police officers conferring near a police cruiser; of a police officer searching a handbag. Wang reports that the Boston City Council has the support to pass a bill requiring the confiscated money go back to the neighborhoods. Wang notes that Dapper O'Neil (Boston City Council) is opposed to the initiative; that O'Neil "crashed" the press conference at City Hall today. V: Footage of Rushing and O'Neil confronting one another over the issue. O'Neil says that Rushing is trying "to shake people down" for money. Rushing walks away from O'Neil. Yancey and David Scondras (Boston City Council) look on. O'Neil has an exchange with another neighborhood activist. Yancey addresses the media from a microphone. Wang reports that the dispute revolves around a relatively small amount of money; that the money represents less than one percent of the police budget. Wang notes that the city budget is tight; that money is hard to come by.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/01/1989
Description: Christy George reports that the campaigns of Jesse Jackson and Michael Dukakis have different agendas for the upcoming Democratic convention. She notes that Jackson may not support Dukakis's choice of running mate because he would like to be named as Dukakis's running mate. George reports that Jackson has threatened to have floor fights on all platform issues that he does not win, and to present his speech outside of the convention if he feels slighted by the party. George speculates on whether the delegates for each candidate will unite at the convention. Interview with Dukakis delegate Raymond Jordan and Jackson delegate Saundra Graham about their views of the convention. Jordan says that he is working to unite all Democrats behind Dukakis. Graham says that Dukakis must accommodate Jackson's platform to win his delegates. George's report includes footage of Dukakis and Sen. Lloyd Bentsen at a press conference and footage of Dukakis campaigning. George's report also features footage of Jackson and footage of Sen. Dianne Feinstein at the 1984 Democratic National Convention. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: An African American family moves into the McCormack housing project
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of Raymond Jordan (Dukakis delegate) being interviewed by Christy George. Jordan says that he is working to unite all Democrats behind the nomination of Michael Dukakis (Democratic US Presidential candidate). Footage of Saundra Graham (Jackson delegate) saying that Jesse Jackson (Democratic US Presidential candidate) has broken the barrier which had kept people of color from running for elected offices. George reports that the Jackson campaign and the Dukakis campaign have different agendas for the Democratic Convention in Atlanta next week. V: C-Span footage from the 1984 Democratic National Convention. Dianne Feinstein (US Senator) urges the members of the Democratic Party to put aside their differences in order to work for their goals. Shot of Democratic leaders including Jackson shaking hands at the the Convention. Shots of construction workers preparing the set and stage for the 1988 Democratic National Convention. George reports that Jackson may not support Dukakis's choice of running mate; that Jackson wants to be Dukakis's running mate. V: Shot of Dukakis and Lloyd Bentsen (US Senator) at a press conference. Footage of Jordan saying that Dukakis supporters are going to the convention to support Dukakis. Footage of Graham saying that Dukakis needs to accomodate Jackson supporters. George reports that Jackson is threatening floor fights on all 13 platform issues that he does not win. V: Shot of Jackson speaking from a podium. Footage of Jordan saying that Dukakis has done everything he can to accomodate Jackson on the platform issues. Footage of Graham saying that she is going to the convention to fight for the issues which are important to her and her constituents. George reports that Jackson is threatening to give his speech outside of the convention hall if he feels mistreated by the Democratic Party leadership. V: C-Span footage of Jackson addressing the 1984 Democratic Convention. Shot of the audience. Footage of Jordan saying that Jackson's attitude is "political posturing." Jordan says that no one knows what Jackson's real motives are. Footage of Graham saying that Dukakis is acting unreasonably; that Dukakis is trying to control the convention rules and the party platform. George speculates as to whether Jackson supporters and Dukakis supporters will unite at the convention. V: Shots of Dukakis standing at the shore of a lake; of Jackson addressing a small crowd; of the convention set being constructed in the Atlanta convention center. Footage of Graham saying that Jackson needs to urge his supporters to support Dukakis as the Democratic nominee. Footage of Jordan saying that Jackson supporters and Dukakis supporters both want the Democratic nominee to win the presidency. George notes that the convention could be boring if both sides unite immediately behind one candidate and one platform.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/11/1988
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports that Michael Dukakis is the frontrunner among the Democratic presidential candidates after faring well in the Super Tuesday primary elections. Dukakis did well in the Southern states because he had money to travel and to buy advertising time. Jesse Jackson won the African American vote and some votes from southern whites. Vaillancourt discusses the performances of Democratic candidates Al Gore, Dick Gephardt, and Paul Simon. She notes that Gore did better than analysts had predicted. Vaillancourt analyzes the candidates' chances in the upcoming Illinois primary election. Vaillancourt's report includes footage of Dukakis campaigning, footage of Dukakis speaking to the media and footage from a Dukakis campaign advertisement. Vaillancourt's report is also accompanied by footage of Jackson campaigning, by footage of Gore campaigning and by footage of Gephardt and Simon. Vaillancourt's report features footage from a Gephardt campaign advertisement and footage of Dukakis with Walter Mondale.
1:00:14: Visual: Footage of Michael Dukakis (Democratic US Presidential candidate) speaking to reporters. Kitty Dukakis (wife of Michael Dukakis) stands next to him. Dukakis says, "It's a fight for delegates." Shot of Dukakis exiting a voting booth and posing for reporters with Kitty Dukakis. Meg Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis is the frontrunner for the Democratic nomination after the Super Tuesday primaries; that Dukakis did better in the South than political analysts had predicted. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis targeted districts in which he thought he could do well; that Dukakis focused on states in which he could pick up bonus delegates. Vaillancourt notes that Dukakis's political organization allowed him to compete in the twenty states holding primaries on Super Tuesday; that Dukakis has raised a lot of money to buy advertising time and to travel. V: Footage from a 1988 campaign advertisement for Dukakis. Shots of Dukakis campaigning during the 1988 primary season. Footage of Dukakis speaking to reporters. Dukakis says that he will focus on the Illinois primary next. Vaillancourt reports that Jesse Jackson (Democratic US Presidential candidate) won the African American vote as well as votes from southern whites. V: Shot of Jackson surrounded by media and supporters. Jackson picks up a young girl. He gives a thumbs-up sign to the crowd. Shots of Jackson speaking to supporters. Vaillancourt notes that Jackson's success may be worrisome for the Democratic Party. V: Footage of Dukakis saying that Jackson is a "formidable competitor." Vaillancourt reports that Al Gore (Democratic US Presidential candidate) did better in the South than political analysts has predicted. V: Shots of Gore and Tipper Gore (wife of Gore) visiting a factory. Gore shakes hands with workers. Vaillancourt reports that Gore sees Dukakis as his main competitor for the Democratic nomination. Vaillancourt notes that Gore has been comparing Dukakis' candidacy with that of Walter Mondale (1984 Democratic US Presidential candidate). V: Shot of Dukakis shaking hands with Mondale at a campaign rally in 1984. Vaillancourt reports that Jackson and Paul Simon (Democratic US Presidential candidate) are well known in Illinois; that Gore is not. V: Shots of Gore; of Jackson; of Simon; of Dukakis. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis has been organizing his campaign in Illinois since October. Vaillancourt notes that Gore is telegenic. Vaillancourt adds that Gore hopes to have success in the North, like Gary Hart (1984 Democratic US Presidential candidate) did in 1984. V: Shots of Gore and Tipper Gore exiting a building; of Hart campaigning in 1984; of Gore speaking at a podium. Vaillancourt reports that Dick Gephardt (Democratic US Presidential candidate) did not do well in the South. V: Shot of Gephardt at a campaign rally. Footage from 1988 Gephardt political advertisement. The political advertisement attacks Dukakis. Vaillancourt notes that Gephardt was hurt by his own political advertisements attacking Dukakis; that Gephardt has had difficulty raising funds. V: Shot of Gephardt with supporters. Vaillancourt notes that there is speculation that Gephardt will skip the Illinois primary. Vaillancourt reports that Dukakis is already in Illinois. V: Footage of Dukakis saying that he has a good chance of winning some delegates in Illinois. Shot of Dukakis getting into a car. Supporters and the media surround the car.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/08/1988