Description: Christopher Lydon interviews Vice President Dan Quayle. Quayle talks about his visit to Mission Hill Elementary School and the Carol Stuart murder case. He says that respect among people will bring racial harmony. Quayle talks about his upcoming visit to Latin America and US foreign policy in Panama. He also talks about the Republican Party's position on abortion. Following the edited story is additional footage of the interview, mostly the second camera view of the same content in the edited story.
1:00:04: Footage of Dan Quayle (US Vice President) being interviewed by Christopher Lydon. Quayle describes his visit to Mission Hill Elementary School. Quayle says that the kids were involved; that the parents were committed to education; that the teachers were respected by the students. Lydon asks who came up with the idea for a visit to Mission Hill Elementary School. Quayle says that his staff asked Bernard Cardinal Law (Archbishop of Boston) for suggestions about which school to visit; that Law recommended Mission Hill Elementary School. Lydon asks Quayle about the Stuart murder case. Quayle says that he talked about the Stuart murder case in a private meeting with parents, administrators, and teachers at the school. Quayle says that people must respect one another. Quayle says that respect will bring racial harmony. Lydon asks about Quayle's upcoming visit to Latin America. Lydon mentions the US invasion of Panama. Quayle says that some Latin American leaders have expressed concerns about the US invasion of Panama. Quayle says that he will meet with Carlos Andres Perez (President of Venezuela); that he will ask Perez and other leaders to help build a democracy in Panama. Quayle says that the public statements of some Latin American leaders do not represent their private sentiments. Quayle says that there is strong support for the US invasion in Panama and across Latin America. Lydon asks if the US should assume some responsibility for the rise of Manuel Noriega (leader of Panama). Quayle says that the US should assume no responsibility for Noriega. Quayle says that Noriega declared war on the US; that Noriega's forces killed and wounded an innocent US marine soldier; that Noriega's forces sexually harassed US women. Quayle says that the US should not assume responsibility for the stolen election in Panama. Lydon asks Quayle about the Republican Party's position on abortion. Quayle says that the party platform advocates the protection of the unborn. Quayle says that many party members disagree with the platform; that the Republican Party is inclusive. Quayle says that people are welcome to disagree with the platform. Quayle says that abortion is a divisive issue. Quayle accuses the Democratic Party of becoming a one-issue party. Quayle says that pro-life supporters are not welcome in the Democratic Party. Quayle says that he does not want pro-choice Republicans to abandon the party.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/22/1990
Description: John Hashimoto reports on a visit to Boston by David Duke (Louisiana State Representative and former Ku Klux Klansman). Hashimoto notes that protesters turned out for Duke's speech at the Old South Meeting House. Hashimoto's report includes footage of protesters in front of the Old South Meeting House and footage of Duke's speech inside, which protesters try to drown out with chanting. Duke struggles to make himself heard above the jeers of protesters in the Meeting House. A scuffle breaks out between a protester and a Duke supporter. Hashimoto reports that Duke is trying to trying to overcome his past as a Ku Klux Klan leader, but that his white rights agenda was not well received during his visit to Boston. Hashimoto interviews Duke. Duke says that he has overcome his past and that he is not longer a "hater." Hashimoto reports that Duke answered questions from callers on a radio talk show while in Boston. Hashimoto's report includes footage of Duke speaking to callers in a radio studio. Duke defends himself against charges of racism. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Avi Nelson and Dianne Wilkerson talk about quotas and civil rights and Carmen Fields reports on the history and present activities of the Ku Klux Klan
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of protesters outside of the Old South Meeting House in Boston. The protesters march in a circle, carrying signs. A protest leader shouts into a bullhorn, "Hitler-lovers you can't hide. Shots of protesters; of a man carrying a sign reading, "David Duke: Klan in a suit." John Hashimoto reports that David Duke (Louisiana state representative) spoke at the Old South Meeting House tonight. V: Shot of Duke sitting inside the Old South Meeting House. Audio of the audience booing and whistling at Duke. Hashimoto reports that there was tight security in the Meeting House; that tension erupted from the moment he appeared. V: Shots of audience members yelling and clapping their hands. Hashimoto reports that some audience members were trying create so much noise that Duke could not speak. V: Shot of Duke sitting in the Meeting House; of audience members on their feet making noise. Footage of Duke speaking from a podium. Duke says that freedom of speech exists for all points of view. Duke says that there are many historical examples of people who have stood up for an idea, only to find out that the idea was wrong. Hashimoto reports that Duke visited Boston in his own bus in 1974; that Duke was a Ku Klux Klan member in 1974; that Duke tried to stir up trouble in South Boston during the busing crisis. V: Shots of Duke speaking from the podium; of the audience. Audio of the audience yelling. Hashimoto reports that Duke is now a state representative from Louisiana; that he is a former candidate for the US Senate. Hashimoto reports that Duke is running for governor of Louisiana; that some recognize him as a powerful political force. V: Footage of Duke being interviewed by Hashimoto. Hashimoto asks Duke if people see him as a "hater." Duke says that some people think of him as a "hater." Duke says that he is sorry if some people feel that way. Duke says that he does not hate anyone; that he want the country to work for everybody. Duke says that the country's liberal social policies have not worked. Footage of Duke speaking from the podium at the Old South Meeting House. Audio of audience members making noise. Duke condemns the nation's welfare program. Hashimoto reports that Duke repeatedly refers to the underclass. Hashimoto reports that Duke believes that the underclass is a burden to society. Hashimoto says that Duke is haunted by his past and by his present rhetoric. V: Footage of Duke being interviewed by Hashimoto. Duke says that he has felt hatred in the past; that he regrets that hatred. Duke says that he has evolved and grown. Duke says that he is a Christian; that he has been "made new" by Christ. Hashimoto reports that Duke took calls on a WHDH radio show with Ted O'Brien (radio personality); that Duke was not rattled by callers. V: Footage of Duke in a radio studio. Duke speaks into a broadcaster's microphone. Duke says that affirmative action is discrimination against white people; that affirmative action is wrong. Duke says that discrimination against African Americans is also wrong. Duke says that voters have a right to question his past. Duke says that his past should not be the only issue. Duke says that Edward Kennedy (US Senator) overcame Chappaquiddick; that Duke should be able to overcome his past. Duke says that the first child born in New Orleans this year was the eighth illegitimate child of a local woman. Duke says that there are differences between the various chapters of the Ku Klux Klan; that none of the members of his chapter were ever accused of harming a minority. Shot of O'Brien in the studio. Footage of Duke being interviewed by Hashimoto. Duke says that he never hated all African Americans and Jews; that he felt hatred toward those who committed robbery and rape in the South. Hashimoto asks if those criminals were African American or Jewish. Duke says no. Hashimoto reports that a Duke supporter clashed with protesters during Duke's speech at the Old South Meeting House; that Duke's speech was a sideshow. V: Shots of police and media in the balcony of the Old South Meeting House. Police are breaking up a fight. The crowd mills around. Hashimoto stands in the Old South Meeting House. The audience boos and whistles at Duke. Duke is visible at the podium. Hashimoto reports that Duke's white rights agenda was not well received publicly in Boston.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/28/1991
Description: Marcus Jones compares the differing opinions on law enforcement of Deputy Superintendent of Boston Police William Celester and Reverend Graylan Hagler of the Church of the United Community. Interview with Celester, who says that the police are at war with drug addicts and gang members in the neighborhood, and that some of these individuals need to be scared of police. Celester says that police officers are not well equipped to serve as mentors. Jones reports that Hagler and others believe that a new approach is necessary. Hagler recommends that police academy graduates serve as mentors to community youth. Jones' report includes footage of Hagler talking about his plan from December 15, 1989. Hagler and his supporters see prevention as an effective weapon against drugs and violence. Following the edited story is b-roll of Celester and police officers at police headquarters.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of William Celester (Deputy Superintendent, Boston Police Department) talking to a group of Roxbury residents at Boston Police Department Area B Headquarters on August 21, 1989. Marcus Jones reports that Celester believes that the police officers in his division are at war with drug addicts and gang members in Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan. V: Shot of two plain-clothes police officers arresting an African American man on the street. The man struggles with the police officers. Footage of Celester being interviewed by Jones. Celester says that there is a war over who will run the community. Celester says that either the "thugs" or the residents can run the community. Shot of a white police officer putting handcuffs on an African American man. The man stands beside a red sports car. Shots of police officers standing near a police cruiser with flashing lights. Shots of police officers at police headquarters; of a police officer sitting on a police motorcycle; of two white police officers searching a young African American man. Jones reports that Celester and the officers in his division were criticized last year; that some critics did not think the officers did enough to fight crime. Jones notes that others criticized the officers for going too far; that many opposed the police department's stop-and-search policy. V: Footage of Celester being interviewed by Jones. Celester says that some people need to be scared; that some people only understand fear. Footage of Graylan Ellis-Hagler (Church of the United Community) from December 15, 1989. Hagler says that police need to find some new tactics because the old tactics do not work. Shots of Ellis-Hagler walking with two African American men toward the Church of the United Community building. Shots of a sign for the Church of the United Community. Shots of Ellis-Hagler talking with a group of African American men at the Church of the United Community. Shots of the individual men in the group. Jones reports that Ellis-Hagler and other community activists are urging the police department to consider ways to prevent young people from getting involved with drugs and gangs. Jones notes that Ellis-Hagler recommends that rookie police officers serve as mentors for the community youth. V: Footage of Ellis-Hagler from December 15, 1989. Hagler says that most police officers are concerned about the community. Hagler says that many police officers are frustrated because they realize that an more innovative approach is necessary. Jones reports that Celester does not think that police officers should serve as social workers. V: Footage of Celester being interviewed by Jones. Celester says that police officers are not well equipped to serve as mentors. Celester says that the police must care about the community; that the police cannot do everything. Shot of an African American man and an African American woman walking past a fire truck in Los Angeles; of police officers arresting a suspect. Jones reports that police officers in Los Angeles and Washington are taking the call for prevention seriously. V: Shot of English High School students walking on a street. Jones notes that the effectiveness of prevention measures cannot be easily measured; that many see prevention as an effective weapon in the war against drugs and violence. V: Shots of a white police officer guiding a group of African Americans away from a crime scene; of medics putting a wounded person on a stretcher into an ambulance.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/02/1990
Description: Hope Kelly reports that more than a dozen students at Harvard Law School have filed a lawsuit which charges the school with discriminatory hiring practices. Kelly notes that Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School) supports the lawsuit, but thinks it will be difficult to win. Kelly reports that Bell has taken an unpaid leave of absence from the school to protest the lack of diversity among the faculty. Kelly interviews Bell. Bell talks about the culture at Harvard Law School and about the need for a diverse faculty. Bell says that he has taken a leave of absence because it is important to make sacrifices in order to advance one's beliefs. Kelly reports that Bell is teaching a seminar called "Civil Rights at the Crossroads." She notes that Bell is not paid for the course and that the students receive no credit. Kelly's report includes footage of Bell and his students in class. The students discuss the importance of diversity at the school. Kelly notes that there are three African Americans and five females among the sixty-six tenured professors at Harvard Law School. Kelly reports that the school has failed to provide a set of role models reflecting the diversity of the student body.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School) teaching a class. Hope Kelly reports that Derrick Bell is one of sixty-six tenured professors at Harvard Law School; that only two of Bell's colleagues are also African American. Kelly notes that there are no Asian, Latino or Native American professors at the school; that there are no African American female professors at the school. V: Footage of Bell's class. A white female student says that the school needs a woman of color on the faculty in order to provide a wider perspective on issues of women in international development and on issues of human rights. Shots of students in the class. Kelly reports that more than a dozen Harvard Law School students have signed on to a lawsuit which charges the school with discriminatory hiring practices. Kelly reports that many experts think the lawsuit will be difficult to win. V: Footage of Bell being interviewed by Kelly. Bell says that US courts only understand race discrimination if it is obvious. Bell says that Harvard Law School has not prohibited African American women and other minorities from being hired onto the faculty. Bell says that Harvard Law School will not hire a professor who does not share the Harvard culture. Kelly reports that the culture at Harvard Law School is overwhelmingly white and male.. Kelly notes that only five of the sixty-six tenured professors are women. V: Shots of students in Bell's class; of Bell's hands as he makes gestures while speaking. Footage of Bell being interviewed by Kelly. Bell says that all professors teach a perspective; that all professors have a worldview. Kelly reports that students in Bell's class think that their perspectives are being "whitewashed." V: Shots of students in the class. Footage of an African American male student saying that diversity and quality do not have to be mutually exclusive. Shots of Bell at the front of the class. Kelly reports that Bell's seminar is called "Civil Rights at the Crossroads." Kelly reports that students have flocked to the class. Kelly notes that the students receive no credit for the course; that Bell receives no salary for teaching the course. Kelly reports that Bell is on unpaid leave. Kelly reports that Bell says that he will stay on leave until a woman of color is hired onto the faculty. V: Shots of Bell and the students in class. Footage of Bell being interviewed by Kelly. Bell says that he is a teacher; that teachers teach best by example. Bell says that he has always tried to teach law students about the importance of taking risks and making sacrifices. Bell says that real success stems from standing up for one's beliefs. Bell says that he must practice what he teaches. Kelly reports that Bell is passing up a salary of more than $100,000 per year. Kelly notes that Harvard Law School has continued to provide him with his office, a secretary and a classroom in which to teach. Kelly reports that Harvard Law School has failed to provide a set of role models which reflect the diversity of the student body. V: Shots of students walking on the campus of Harvard Law School. Shots of Bell in the classroom; of an African American female student in Bell's class.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/03/1990
Description: Upon his release, Carmen Fields interviews South African exiles Themba Vilakazi and Janet Levine about the life and political development of Nelson Mandela. Vilakazi and Levine discuss Mandela's beginnings as a lawyer, his arrest and imprisonment, and his refusal to renounce armed struggle as a means to end apartheid. They talk about the importance of Mandela as a symbol. Levine talks about Winnie Mandela and her role in the struggle against apartheid. Vilakazi says that apartheid laws are still in place and that black South Africans are still struggling against the white regime. Fields notes that the figure of Nelson Mandela embodies the struggle of a nation. Fields's report includes footage and photographs of Nelson Mandela and Winnie Mandela from the 1950s to the present and footage of events in South Africa from the 1950s to the present.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Nelson Mandela (black South African leader) in South Africa after his release from prison. Mandela waves to supporters. Shots of a large demonstration in a South African stadium on February 13, 1990; of Mandela arriving at the demonstration. Footage of Themba Vilakazi (South African exile) being interviewed by Carmen Fields. Vilakazi says that he would not have predicted the recent turn of events in South Africa. Fields reports that Vilakazi left South African twenty-five years ago; that Vilakazi remembers when Mandela was imprisoned in June of 1964. Fields reports that Mandela was sentenced to life imprisonment on charges of high treason and sabotage. V: Black and white footage of a prison truck leaving a South African government building. A crowd stands outside of the building. Shot of a black and white photograph of Mandela surrounded by government officials. Fields reports that Janet Levine (South African exile) has been in the US for six years. V: Footage of Levine being interviewed by Fields. Levine says that Mandela disappeared and the African National Congress (ANC) was banned by the South African government. Levine says that she feared that Mandela would die in prison; that she was thrilled when he was released. Shots of Mandela at the demonstration in the South African stadium; of an upraised fist. Fields reports that Mandela is a living legend who embodies the struggle of a nation; that Mandela carries great moral authority. V: Shot of a black and white photo of Mandela before he went to prison. Shot of traffic passing by police in South Africa the late 1950s or early 1960s. Shot of a black and white photo of Mandela among a large group of people; of a black and white portrait of Mandela. Fields reports that Mandela was 25 when he joined the ANC; that Mandela became the ANC's national president six years after he joined the organization. Fields reports that Mandela was banned; that Mandela was arrested by South African police at a protest in Sharpeville in 1960. Fields notes that Sharpeville was the scene of a police attack which left 67 people dead. V: Black and white footage of a black demonstrators at Sharpeville; of two men holding protest signs. Shots of a body lying on the ground; of police dragging a body along the ground. Shots of black men running along a street; of black men waving from a departing bus. Shots of white police officers checking the identity papers of a black man; of a black man lying on the ground with his hands over his eyes; of the body of a black man lying on a street; of another body lying on the ground. Fields reports that Mandela fled to Algiers after his arrest; that Mandela received training in guerilla warfare in Algiers. Fields reports that Mandela no longer believed in 1960 that the fight against apartheid could be non-violent. V: Black and white footage of Mandela delivering a speech in 1961. Mandela says that it is useless to preach peace and non-violence against a government which engages in savage attacks on its defenseless citizens. Fields reports that Mandela was captured a year later; that Mandela's diary was used as evidence in his nine-month trial for treason. Fields reports that Mandela's diary contained notes on guerilla warfare tactics. V: Black and white shot of men handcuffed together. One man flips through a small notebook. Black and white shots of South African Security Forces outside of a government building; of a crowd in a street; of a prison truck moving along a street. Footage of Levine being interviewed by Fields. Levine says that it was a crime to have a photograph of Mandela; that it was a crime to have read Mandela's writings. Levine says that Winnie Mandela (wife of Nelson Mandela) was also an important figure; that Winnie Mandela was constantly protesting and defying the South African police. Black and white shot of Winnie Mandela in the 1960s. Color footage of Winnie Mandela arguing with white officials in the street. Winnie Mandela is led away. Fields notes that Winnie Mandela maintained her defiance while Nelson Mandela was in prison. V: Audio of Levine saying that Winnie Mandela kept Nelson Mandela's name alive while he was in prison. Shot of a black and white photo of Mandela in prison. Black and white shots of South African Security Forces; of a demonstration in South Africa; of demonstrators. Black and white shot of a park bench bearing a "whites only" sign. Fields reports that the South African government made conditional offers to set Mandela free; that Mandela refused to accept their conditions. V: Footage of Vilakazi being interviewed by Fields. Vilakazi says that Mandela has great appeal; that many would like to associate themselves with Mandela. Footage of Mandela at the demonstration in a South African stadium on February 13, 1990. Mandela addresses the crowd. Mandela raises his fist as he speaks. Fields reports that Mandela is uncompromising; that Mandela has never renounced armed struggle as a means to end apartheid. Fields notes that Mandela advocates peace. V: Footage of Mandela addressing the crowd at the demonstration. Mandlela says that the movement will move forward to achieve freedom and justice. Footage of Levine being interviewed by Fields. Levine says that Mandela is no longer a politician; that Mandela has been ennobled. Footage of Vilakazi being interviewed by Fields. Vilakazi says that South Africa has not changed a lot since Mandela was put in jail. Vilakazi says that there are more repressive laws now than in 1964.Vilakazi says that there is still reason to fight. Shots of a large group of people filling up a road in South Africa; of demonstrators at the stadium; of Mandela walking with an upraised fist; of a small black child with his hand held up.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/20/1990
Description: Hope Kelly reports on the removal of Judge Paul King, who was a former Chief Justice in the Dorchester District Court, from his position at Dorchester District Court. The State Supreme Court demoted King for misconduct in and out of court, including sexist remarks, racist standards for setting bail, and for public drunkenness. Kelly reviews the incidents leading to King's demotion. King was transferred to Stoughton District Court, where he is only allowed to sit on civil cases. Kelly's report includes shots of newspaper articles covering the story and footage of lawyers, clerks, and defendants in a courtroom.
0:59:53: Visual: Shot of the exterior of Dorchester District Court. Hope Kelly reports that Paul King (judge) was a judge for nearly twenty years at Dorchester District Court. Kelly notes that the Dorchester District Court is the busiest court in the system; that King was chief justice at the court for eleven years. Kelly reports that the State Supreme Court removed King in 1987; that King was transferred to Stoughton District Court. Kelly notes that King is only allowed to sit on civil cases at Stoughton District Court. V: Shots of a newspaper article with a photo of King. The headline reads, "Dorchester court has a history of trouble." Shot of another newspaper article with a photo of King. The headline reads, "Judge banned from Hub court." The article lists incidents of objectionable behavior by King. Kelly stands in front of the Dorchester District Court. Kelly notes that King made objectionable comments to battered women and Vietnam veterans in the courtroom. Kelly reports that King engaged in offensive behavior outside of the courtroom. V: Shots of a sign for Nanina's restaurant; of the exterior of Nanina's restaurant; of the parking lot of the restaurant. Kelly reports that King often went to Nanina's restaurant in Dorchester in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Kelly reports that the Judicial Conduct Commission found that King became visibly intoxicated regularly at Nanina's restaurant. Kelly notes that witnesses told the Commission that King frequently and openly urinated in the parking lot of the restaurant. Kelly reports that a court clerk testified that King set an unusually high bail amount for four African American defendants in 1982; that the clerk testified to King saying that African Americans deserve high bails for voting against his brother. Kelly notes that Michael Dukakis (former governor of Massachusetts) beat Ed King (brother of Paul King and former governor of Massachusetts) in the 1982 gubernatorial election. V: Shots of a clerk looking through court paperwork; of an audience in a courtroom; of lawyers, clerks, and defendants in a courtroom. Shot of a police officer and a clerk going through paperwork. Kelly reports that the media has covered the story intensely; that some judges say that King is a victim of the system. Kelly reports that some judges says that King's behavior is a sad reflection of the stresses under which the judges work.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/01/1991
Description: Christy George reports that F.W. de Klerk, the President of South Africa, announced that the ban on the African National Congress (ANC) in South Africa will be lifted, and Nelson Mandela will be freed. George's report includes footage of de Klerk making the announcement and footage of Desmond Tutu reacting to the announcement. George's report also features footage of black and white South Africans reacting to the news and footage of black South Africans celebrating. George interviews Gabu Tugwana, the editor of The New Nation over the telephone. Tugwana discusses de Klerk's announcement and describes reaction to the announcement in South Africa. Tugwana says that apartheid laws are still in force. George's story includes footage of black South Africans and South African security forces; it also includes footage of Koos van der Merwe and Dr. Andries Treunicht, both of the Conservative Party, reacting to the news. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Aggrey Mbere talks about South Africa and his exile in the US
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of F.W. de Klerk (President of South Africa) speaking in government chambers. De Klerk announces the lifting of the ban on the African National Congress (ANC) and other black political parties. De Klerk announces that Nelson Mandela (jailed ANC leader) will be freed. Shot of Archbishop Desmond Tutu (black South African leader) clapping and cheering. Shots of black and white South Africans as they listen to and watch de Klerk's speech. Christy George reports that de Klerk's announcement signaled dramatic changes for South Africa. V: Shots of a white South African taking a newspaper from a vendor; of white officers in the South African Security Forces as they flip through a newspaper. Shots of black South Africans marching in a street. Footage of black South Africans singing and dancing as they celebrate the lifting of the ANC ban. Shots of black South African school boys running in a road; of black South Africans running and cheering in a street. Shot of black South Africans marching in the street. Shots of officers in the South African Security Forces; of officers with german shephard dogs on leashes. Shot of black men running away from officers in the Security Force. Shot of a black man unfurling a flag in front of a building. Shots of a group of black South Africans chanting and waving signs; of black South Africans running from officers in the Security Force. Audio of Gabu Tugwana (editor, The New Nation) saying that there was much excitement and emotional celebration in South Africa today. Tugwana says that black South Africans were excited to be able to raise their flag; that the flag had been illegal. George reports that she spoke to Tugwana by telephone today. George notes that Tugwana described scenes of jubilation in South Africa today. V: Shot of a sign for the New Nation newspaper, hanging in the window of the newspaper's offices. Shot of George taking notes as she speaks on the telephone. Shot of a sign with a photo of Mandela on it. Footage of Tutu addressing a crowd. Tutu says that "the walls of apartheid are falling." Audio of Tugwana speaking to George. Tugwana says that Africa will join democracy movements across the world. Tugwana says that governments will not change unless threatened. Shots of de Klerk entering governmental changes. Government officials stand as he enters. Shots of de Klerk addressing the government officials; of the seated government officials. Shots of white South Africans standing outside of a government building. George reports that conservative white South Africans say that they will fight against de Klerk's changes. V: Footage of Koos van der Merwe (Conservative Party) saying that white South Africans will fight to retain their right of self-determination. Van Der Merwe says that white South Africans will fight any domination of blacks over whites. Footage of Dr. Andries Treunicht (Conservative Party) speaking to the media. Treunicht says that de Klerk has taken a "revolutionary" position; that the revolution has overtaken the national party. Shot of George taking notes as she speaks on the telephone. Audio of Tugwana saying that de Klerk has taken a revolutionary position; that progressive critics see de Klerk's reforms as "half-hearted." Shots of two white South African women reading a newspaper; of black South Africans marching and dancing in the street. Footage of George on the telephone. George asks Tugwana how his life will change because of these reforms. Tugwana says that his life will not change a lot. Tugwana says that the Population Registration Act will still be enforced; that he will still be confined to the Soweto Township. Tugwana says that he will still be prosecuted if he tries to live outside of Soweto. Shots of black South Africans singing together at a march. Shot of a man holding a newspaper. The headline reads, "ANC Unbanned."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/02/1990
Description: Director and curator of Gardner Museum and art historian speculate on identity and motives of thief of major works from museum at a press conference and in an interview. Comments on the museum's security system. Photos of stolen pieces.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/19/1990
Description: Hope Kelly reports that city and state officials held a ceremony at the Massachusetts State House to honor Robert Gould Shaw and the soldiers of the 54th regiment. Kelly reviews the history of Shaw and the African American soldiers of the 54th regiment in the Civil War. Kelly reports that the 1989 film Glory tells the story of the 54th regiment. Kelly's report includes clips from the film. Bill Owens addresses the ceremony. Part of the ceremony takes place in front of the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial. Michael Dukakis and Ray Flynn are part of the ceremony proclaiming Glory Day in Massachusetts. Marilyn Richardson, the curator of the Museum of Afro-American History, addresses at audience at the African Meeting House.
1:00:05: Visual: Footage of a re-enactment of civil war soldiers marching in front of the Massachusetts State House. Footage from the 1989 film Glory. Hope Kelly reports that Glory took four years to make. Kelly notes that the film is about African American soldiers in the Civil War. V: Footage of Bill Owens (State Senator) reading a proclamation. The proclamation makes reference to John Andrews (former Governor of Massachusetts) who issued a call to arms for African Americans and to Robert Gould Shaw (US Army colonel) who commanded the Massachusetts 54th Regiment. V: Footage from the film Glory. Kelly reports that the Massachusetts 54th Regiment became the first African American fighting unit in the nation's history; that the Regiment was led by Gould; that Gould was a an upper-class white man from Boston. Kelly reports that army officials at the time did not think that African Americans could be competent soldiers. Kelly notes that the Regiment proved army officials wrong. V: Footage from the film, Glory. Kelly reports that city and state officials held a ceremony outside of the Massachusetts State House; that Thursday has been proclaimed Glory day in Massachusetts. V: Shot of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston), Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), and other leaders at the ceremony. The leaders stand quietly in front of the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial as a trumpeter plays "Taps." Shot of the media at the ceremony. Shot of the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial. Kelly reports that the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial has stood on Boston Common for ninety-three years. V: Shot of the face of a soldier carved into the Shaw Memorial. Shot of a group of female singers singing a gospel song. Men in military uniform stand behind them holding flags. Kelly reports that the Shaw Memorial shows Shaw on horseback and the soldiers on foot. Kelly notes that Shaw was on horseback and the soldiers on foot when they charged Fort Wagner in South Carolina in July of 1863. Kelly reports that Shaw and 32 African American and white soldiers were killed in the attack; that Shaw and the soldiers were all buried together. V: Shot of the Shaw Memorial. Footage from the film, Glory. Shot of the re-enactment march in Boston. Kelly reports that today's ceremony started at the Memorial; that the ceremony moved to the African Meeting House on Beacon Hill. Kelly notes that the African Meeting House served as a recruitment center for local African Americans during the Civil War. V: Shot of an African American man in military dress holding an American flag; of a group of African Americans in military dress at the ceremony. Footage from the film Glory. Footage of Marilyn Richardson (Curator, Museum of Afro-American History) addressing an audience in the African Meeting House. Richardson says that society must honor the principles for which the soldiers fought. Footage from the ceremony at the State House. An African American man sings "Glory Hallelujah." A crowd of media and attendees is gathered. V: Footage from the film Glory.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/08/1990
Description: Marcus Jones reports on the competion of renovations at the Renaissance Building in the Grove Hall district of Roxbury. The project was funded with money from the city's only minority-owned bank and was overseen by minority architects and contractors. Jones adds that the building is a cornerstone of the Grove Hall revitalization effort. People hold a celebration for the completion of the restorations. A crowd stands outside of the building. Virginia Morrison (Neighborhood Development Corporation of Grove Hall) and Don Muhammad (Muhammad's Mosque) address the crowd. Muhammad says that gang activity will decline as more renovation takes place in the neighborhood. Interview with Trevor Blake (TTB Construction Inc.) and Ernest Scott, a businessman, about the renovations. Blake talks about the challenges faced by minority businesses and contractors. Scott says that renovations and increased foot traffic will force the drug trade out of the area. Jones reports that the city of Boston has committed an additional $50,000 to the Grove Hall revitalization effort.
1:00:01: Visual: Footage of a gathering to celebrate the restoration of the Renaissance Building in the Grove Hall district of Roxbury. Virginia Morrison (Neighborhood Development Corporation of Grove Hall) addresses the gathering. Morrison says that the building makes a statement on behalf of Muhammad's Mosque, of the Grove Hall Board of Trade, of the Prince Hall Masonic Lodge, of the residents of the area. Morrison says that the building represents the way that the residents of the area intend to live. Shot of a man tearing off paper above the door to reveal the street number. Marcus Jones reports the newly renovated Renaissance Building is located at 483 - 487 Blue Hill Avenue. Jones says that the building was "an eyesore" for more than a decade; that the building is now the cornerstone of the Grove Hall revitalization effort. V: Footage of Morrison addressing the gathered crowd. Supporters stand behind her, including Don Muhammad (Muhammad's Mosque). Morrison says that the building cost $1,276,000 to renovate; that the building was renovated by qualified African American workers from the community. Shot from an upper window of the Renaissance building, of the intersection of Blue Hill Avenue and Cheney Street. Shots of people looking at the interior of the newly-renovated building. Shot of the newly renovated kitchen. Jones reports that the project was funded with money from the city's only minority-owned bank; that the project was overseen by minority architects and contractors. Jones reports that the building includes twelve apartments on the upper floors of the building; that there is retail space on the bottom level. V: Shot of a man exiting the Ernest Scott Insurance Agency. Footage of Trevor Blake (TTB Construction Inc.) standing in one of the apartments. Blake talks about the challenges faced by African American businesses and contractors. Footage of Ernest Scott (businessman) saying that the whole neighborhood is improving. Jones reports that Scott's Insurance Agency has operated on Blue Hill Avenue for over thirty years. Jones notes that Scott's business is one of the new tenants in the Renaissance Building; that Scott believes that businesses and residents need to fight the gangs and drug dealers in the neighborhood. V: Shot of the exterior of the Ernest Scott Insurance Agency. Shot of a man fixing lettering to the interior of a window of the Insurance Agency; of an employee and customer at the Insurance Agency. Footage of Scott saying that foot traffic and business activity puts a damper on the drug trade. Scott says that participants in the drug trade will be forced out of the area. Shots of traffic on the street in the Grove Hall area; of the crowd gathered in front of the Renaissance Area. Jones reports that community organizers hope to refurbish the entire Grove Hall district within five years; that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has committed an addtional $50,000 to the effort. V: Footage of Muhammad addressing the crowd outside of the Renaissance Building. Muhammad says that the Grove Hall community deserves the same respect and resources as any other neighborhood. Muhammad says that gang activity will dwindle as more renovation takes place in the neighborhood. The crowd claps for Muhammad. Morrison approaches the microphone.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/12/1990