Description: Hope Kelly reviews the history of school desegregation in Boston. She notes that many critics cite the absence of middle-class and white students as a reason for the continued failure of the Boston Public Schools. She focuses on the Timilty Middle School in Boston, a magnet school with successful reading and math programs for its students. Kelly interviews teacher William Moran and principle Shirley Gonsalves about the school and its programs. Moran says that the students are successful. He adds that many come from disadvantaged backgrounds. Gonsalves talks about the benefits of school desegregation. Kelly reports that the Timilty School was named a National School of Excellence in 1989. Following the edited story is additional b-roll footage of students and teachers in classrooms at the Timilty School.
1:00:07: Visual: Shot of a school bus door closing. Shots of a school bus outside of the Timilty Middle School; of students on the bus; of white and African American students exiting the Timilty Middle School; of students boarding a bus outside of the school. Shots of African American and white students in a hallway of the school. Hope Kelly reports that busing for school desegregation began seventeen years ago in Boston; that busing was viewed as a way to bring equal opportunity to all students. Kelly notes that busing drove many middle-class white and African American parents away from the school system. Kelly reports that critics cite a lack of middle-class students as a reason for the continued failure of Boston Public Schools. V: Footage of William Moran (Timilty School) being interviewed. Moran says that all students can learn. Kelly reports that Moran grew up in the South End and Roxbury; that Moran attended Boston Public Schools and went to college. V: Shots of Moran walking through a corridor in the Timilty School; of Moran speaking to three students in the doorway of a classroom. Kelly reports that Moran is the seventh-grade coordinator at the Timilty Middle School; that Moran attended the Timilty School twenty years ago. Kelly reports that the Timilty Middle School ranks first city-wide in reading; that the Timilty Middle School is second city-wide in mathematics. Kelly notes that the students at the Timilty School do not come from advantaged backgrounds. V: Shots of a white teacher teaching students of diverse races in a well decorated classroom. Shots of the students in the classroom. Footage of Moran saying that students at the Timilty School low-income families; that many of the students live in housing projects. Moran says that the students come from disadvantaged neighborhoods across the city; that the school is a city-wide school. Kelly reports that most of the students at the Timilty School are non-white and poor. V: Shots of students walking in a corridor of the Timilty School. Footage of Shirley Gonsalves (Timilty School) being interviewed by Kelly. Gonsalves says that race and class are not the determining factors among the school's students. Gonsalves says that the school can do nothing about the relative poverty of its students. Kelly reports that Gonsalves is the assistant principal at the Timilty School; that she has worked in the Boston Public School System for seventeen years. V: Shot of Gonsalves walking through a corridor and up a set of stairs with a student. Kelly reports that Gonsalves began teaching in Boston during the first year of school desegregation. V: Footage of Gonsalves being interviewed. Gonsalves says that she grew up in the rural South where busing was used to maintain segregated schools. Gonsalves says that she rode a bus to school from the age of six to the age of eighteen. Shots of students walking in a corridor at the Timilty School. Kelly reports that there are low numbers of white students in the Boston Public School System; that 11% of students at the Timilty School are white. Kelly reports that Gonsalves believes that school integration has been a success. V: Shots of a white student entering a classroom at the Timilty School; of a white teacher standing with two African American students in a hallway. Footage of Gonsalves being interviewed by Kelly. Gonsalves says that students attended schools in their own neighborhoods with students of their own race before school integration. Gonsalves says that students were not exposed to other students of different backgrounds and from different neighborhoods. Gonsalves says that students need to learn about people of different backgrounds. Shots of a white teacher teaching to a class of middle school students; of an African American male student sitting at a desk in the classroom. Shots of other students in classrooms; of an African American female student writing on a chalkboard; of an African American boy reading a book at his desk. Shot of the white teacher teaching to students in the classroom. Kelly reports that the Timilty School is a magnet school; that classes are smaller at the Timilty School; that the schoolday at the Timilty School is 1.5 hours longer on four of five days per week. Kelly reports that the waiting list to enter the sixth grade class at the Timilty School had 200 names. Kelly reports that the Timilty School was named a National School of Excellence in 1989. V: Shot of Gonsalves and a student walking in the corridor.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/22/1991
Description: Alexandra Marks reports that Paul Tsongas addressed the members of the Organization for a New Equality (ONE) at a luncheon meeting. ONE is an organization committed to opening up new economic opportunities for minorities. The members of ONE welcomed Tsongas' pro-business, liberal agenda. Tsongas criticized the policies of George Bush in his speech and has accused him of promoting a racially divisive agenda. Tsongas is calling for a combination of tax incentives and government spending to revitalize inner-city neighborhoods. Interview with Robert Reich (professor, John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University) about Tsongas' position on economic issues and education. Interview with Tsonga, who talks about the importance of education. Interviews with Dorchester residents Chico Joyner and Faries Odom about Tsongas.
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Paul Tsongas (Democratic candidate for US President) at a luncheon for ONE (Organization for a New Equality). Tsongas walks to the podium as attendees applaud. Alexandra Marks reports that Tsongas is not known as a passionate speaker; that Tsongas showed his passion at a speech to ONE members. Marks reports that Tsongas spoke about the budget approved by the Massachusetts State Legislature. Marks notes that the State Legislature is controlled by Democrats. V: Footage of Tsongas addressing the attendees. Tsongas says that his generation will be the first to give less to their children than they got. Tsongas says that his generation should be uncomfortable with this state of affairs. Tsongas says that the legislators should not congratulate themselves for balancing the budget by ruining the schools. Shots of attendees at the luncheon. Marks reports that the attendees welcomed Tsongas' pro-business, liberal agenda. Marks reports that ONE is committed to opening up new economic opportunities for minorities. V: Footage of Tsongas addressing the attendees. Tsongas says that a politician needs to be "pro-business" in order to be "pro-jobs." Tsongas says that Democrats need to learn that it is hypocritical to be "pro-jobs" and "anti-business." Marks reports that Tsongas berated George Bush (US President) for championing ideology over common sense in supporting the previous day's Supreme Court ruling on abortion. Marks notes that the ruling upholds a federal regulation which forbids the mention of abortion in clinics where federal funds are used. V: Shots of Tsongas speaking; of attendees; of a cameraman at the conference. Marks reports that Tsongas chided Bush for using the racially divisive Willie Horton advertisement in the 1988 presidential campaign. Marks reports that Tsongas chided Bush for vetoing the Civil Rights Bill and for sabotaging efforts to salvage the bill. V: Footage of Tsongas addressing the attendees. Tsongas says that Bush opposed the Civil Rights Bill because he wants race to be an issue in the 1992 campaign. Marks stands on Blue Hill Avenue. Marks says that Tsongas is calling for a combination of tax incentives and government spending to revitalize inner-city neighborhoods. Marks says that Tsongas believes that government money is necessary to leverage private investment. Marks says that economists have mixed feelings about Tsongas' philosophy. V: Footage of Robert Reich (John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University) being interviewed by Marks. Reich says that the private sector in the US is globalizing quickly. Reich talks about the foreign activities of IBM and General Electric. Reich says that the government needs to be selective in its support of the private sector; that the government should not support companies who create jobs outside of the US. Marks reports that Reich believes that the key to economic development is to enhance the productive capabilities of individual Americans. V: Footage of Reich being interviewed by Marks. Reich says that education and infrastructure are important. Reich says that Tsongas emphasizes these things in his proposal. Footage of Tsongas being interviewed. Tsongas says that there is no future without education. Marks reports that some inner-city residents are supportive of Tsongas. V: Shots of Blue Hill Avenue. Footage of Chico Joyner (Dorchester resident) being interviewed. Joyner says that most people will rebel against a tax increase. Joyner says that new businesses would help the community. Footage of Faries Odom (Dorchester resident) being interviewed. Odom says that community involvement is crucial to the success of any initiatives in the neighborhood. Footage of Tsongas addressing attendees at the ONE luncheon. Tsongas says that all people are connected to one another; that people's actions have an affect on themselves and others. Marks reports that Tsongas intends to send this message during his presidential campaign; that Tsongas wants to fight against the racially divisive agenda of the Bush administration. V: Shot of Tsongas riding down an escalator with attendees. An African American man shakes his hand and wishes him luck.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/24/1991
Description: Winnie Mandela speaks to churchgoers at the Twelfth Baptist Church. South African exile Themba Vilakazi stands by her side. Children from the congregation stand at the front of the church. Mandela talks about the importance of love and says that South Africans must relearn the values taken for granted by the rest of the world. She talks about the political climate in apartheid South Africa and about how South African children suffered under the apartheid regime. Mandela thanks the audience for supporting the black South Africans in their quest for liberation. The audience applauds for Mandela. Mandela embraces Reverend Michael Haynes. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Byron Rushing campaigns for re-election
1:00:05: V: Footage of Reverend Michael Haynes (Twelfth Baptist Church) speaking from the pulpit of the Twelfth Baptist Church. Shots of two African American women seated in a pew. Haynes sings from the pulpit accompanied by a choir standing behind him. A group of African American children file toward the front of the church. The church attendees stand and applaud, then seat themselves. Footage of Winnie Mandela (wife of South African leader Nelson Mandela) speaking to the congregation. Themba Vilakazi (South African exile) stands by her side. Mandela thanks the congregation for their warm reception. Mandela says that the kind of love shown by the congregation does not exist in South Africa. Mandela says that the people of South Africa must relearn the values taken for granted by the rest of the democratic world. Shot of an African American man in the audience. Mandela says that South Africans must relearn how to love one another, themselves, and their children. Mandela says that apartheid has deprived South African children of their childhood. Mandela tells the children in the congregation that they are lucky to grow up in a loving community. Shots of two young girls sitting in the audience. Mandela says that South Africans have lost faith in God; that they must restore their faith in God. Mandela says that South Africans wonder why God has let them suffer for so long. Mandela says that South African mothers did not know how to teach their children to love; that South African mothers could not teach their children the difference between wrong and right. Mandela says that most black South Africans have spent time in jail for political crimes; that South African children do not learn that people go to jail for doing something wrong. Mandela says that people who have not spent time in jail may be sympathizers with the government. Shots of a group of African-American children standing at the front of the church. Mandela says that South Africans have a lot to learn from the congregation. Mandela talks about Hector Peterson. Mandela says that Peterson was seven years old when he was killed by South African government forces; that Peterson was the first victim during an uprising in 1976. Mandela says that the white government had passed a law calling for black children to be taught in the Afrikaaner language; that Peterson was among a group of children protesting the law. Mandela says that people should have the right to protest in a democratic society. Mandela says that thousands of South African children were killed while protesting against apartheid. Mandela thanks the congregation for recognizing the efforts made by South Africans for liberation. Mandela says that liberation in South Africa means liberation in the US. Shot of an African American woman seated in the audience. Mandela raises her clenched fist. She embraces Haynes. The members of the audience applaud and rise to their feet.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/22/1990
Description: Alexandra Marks reports that the Center for Disease Control (CDC) has reported that women are the fastest-growing segment of the HIV-positive population. Marks reports that many believe that the CDC has radically underestimated the number of women with AIDS. Interview with April Moore, a recovering drug addict, who has recently been diagnosed with AIDS, but has no health insurance and no steady job. A conference on women and AIDS was held in Boston recently. Interview with Jean McGuire of the Harvard School of Public Health and Martha Moon of the Fenway Community Health Center at the conference. McGuire and Moon believe that many women are dying of AIDS without being diagnosed. Moon says that the CDC definition of AIDS does not include the symptoms of female victims. McGuire and Moon say that many female victims are not eligible for medical benefits because they do not meet the CDC definition of the disease. The CDC says that there is not enough evidence to link the symptoms of women patients to AIDS. McGuire and Moon criticize the CDC's lack of initiative on the issue.
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of April Moore (recovering drug addict) walking with Alexandra Marks (WGBH reporter) through a local park. Moore and Marks sit down on some stairs outside of the playground. Marks reports that Moore is a former drug addict and prostitute who is now in recovery. Marks reports that Moore recently completed her GED (Graduate Equivalency Diploma); that Moore is looking forward to finding a job. Marks notes that Moore was diagnosed as HIV positive last year. V: Footage of Moore being interviewed by Marks. Moore says that she was in a state of disbelief when she found out about her condition; that she has known for a year now. Moore says that she does not know how long she has been infected with the HIV virus. Shots of Moore; of Marks. Marks reports that Moore is low-income, a minority and has no health insurance; that Moore is a typical woman with AIDS. Marks reports that the Center for Disease Control (CDC) has said that women are the fastest-growing segment of the HIV population. Moore notes that the CDC estimates that women comprise 11% of the HIV population. Marks reports that some experts believe that the CDC radically underestimates the number of women infected. V: Footage of Jean McGuire (Harvard School of Public Health) being interviewed by Marks. McGuire says that women are dying before they are diagnosed with AIDS. McGuire says that the medical field does not have an accurate image of the AIDS population. McGuire says that the women who die without being diagnosed were never eligible for benefits like Medicaid and Social Security. Marks reports that McGuire spoke at a conference on women and AIDS in Boston today. Marks reports that McGuire believes that the CDC has a narrow definition of AIDS. V: Shots of the conference on women and AIDS. Shots of a small AIDS quilt hanging on a wall; of attendees and panelists at the conference. Footage of McGuire being interviewed by Marks. McGuire says that the CDC definition was constructed to track an epidemic; that the CDC definition is constructed around narrow presentations of the disease. McGuire says that the CDC wants to be sure that it is definitively tracking the disease. McGuire says that the CDC definition narrows the population to males with AIDS. Footage of Martha Moon (Fenway Community Health Center) being interviewed by Marks. Moon says that women develop symptoms unknown to men with the disease; that the symptoms of women are not counted in the CDC definition. Moon says that women with HIV experience chronic yeast infections, recurrent cervical cancer, uterine tumors, and other pelvic diseases. Marks reports that Moon is the clinical director of the Fenway Community Health Center; that the Fenway Community Health Center was the sponsor of the conference. V: Footage of Moon being interviewed by Marks. Moon says that surgery eliminates cervical cancer in most women; that some HIV-positive women have recurring bouts of cervical cancer. Moon says that some of these women are completely disabled by the disease; that they are not eligible for medical benefits because they do not meet the CDC definition of the disease. Marks quotes Thomas Skinner (CDC Spokesperson) as saying that "We established this case definition of AIDS for our surveillance purposes. We do not control the use of the definition by other government agencies." V: Skinner's quote appears written on-screen in text. Footage of McGuire being interviewed by Marks. McGuire says that Medicaid has relied on the CDC definition; that the CDC refuses to take responsibility for the reimbursement structure of the government agencies. McGuire says that HIV-positive women do not care which agency is responsible. Footage of Moore being interviewed by Marks. Marks asks Moore what she will do if Medicaid will not cover her medical bills if she becomes ill. Moore says that she has not thought about it; that she tries not to think about it because stress could make her become ill. Marks stands on Commonwealth Avenue. Marks reports that the CDC says that there is not enough medical evidence to link female opportunistic infections to AIDS; that the CDC refuses to change its definition. V: Footage of McGuire being interviewed by Marks. McGuire says that the CDC refuses to include some symptoms in its definition; that those symptoms are those which are experienced by poor people and people of color. McGuire says that poor people and people of color are those who will need benefits. McGuire wonders if the dynamics of race, gender and class have anything to do with the government's reluctance to move forward on the issue. Marks reports that Moore has been unaffected by this issue so far. V: Shots of Moore walking on Commonwealth Avenue with Marks. Audio of Moore saying that she must keep an open mind; that she must stay aware in order to remain alive. Footage of Marks being interviewed by Moore. Moore talks about being afraid.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/19/1991