Description: Bud Collins interviews Arthur Ashe at Longwood Cricket Club about playing tennis on different court surfaces. Ashe wears Hard Rock Cafe t-shirt. Game play from match in US Pro tournament: Ramirez vs Dominguez.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/27/1978
Description: At press conference Celtics general manager Red Auerbach introduces new owners John Y. Brown and 'silent partner' Harry Mangurian. Brown expresses his wish for Red Auerbach to stay with the Celtics. He says he's an active owner and talks about how he became an owner and his plans for the Celtics. He answers other questions from the press. Red Auerbach smokes a cigar throughout. Press asks Auerbach about the decision he has to make about whether to stay with the Celtics. Leprechaun logo on Celtics banner.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/12/1978
Description: Bernadette Devlin McAliskey (Irish Republican activist) holds a press conference in Boston as part of a 13-city tour of the United States. Devlin speaks about her recent candidacy for the European parliament and says that her speaking tour is intended to help defray debts incurred during her campaign. Devlin's campaign was organized around a human rights platform. Devlin notes that international organizations have condemned the human rights abuses in Northern Ireland but that the United Nations and western countries will not speak out against Great Britain. Devlin expresses cynicism towards politicians and doubts about an American political response to the situation in Northern Ireland. She equates the oppression in Northern Ireland to the inequalities that exist in the United States and notes that Irish Americans engage in oppression of African Americans in Boston. Devlin compares the dearth of Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland to the lack of white working class support for busing in Boston; recounts the history of the Irish conflict from the Irish elections in 1918; and discusses changes that must be made by Great Britain in Northern Ireland. Devlin discusses her activities in the years since she left parliament; the use of violence by Catholics in Northern Ireland; the death of Lord Louis Mountbatten (British official). She accuses the international press of hypocrisy; answers questions about her speaking schedule and her life in Ireland.
0:58:09: Visual: Bernadette Devlin McAliskey (Irish Republican activist) prepares for a press conference as part of a 13-city tour of the United States. She sits at a small table in front of a microphone and takes questions from reporters. The press conference takes place in an informally furnished room; the walls are covered with handmade political posters. A reporter asks Devlin if she is doing the speaking tour to pay off debt accumulated during her recent campaign for a seat in the European parliament. Devlin says that her candidacy focused on human rights issues; that her candidacy was announced only three weeks before the election; that she ran on behalf of the H-Block political prisoners. Devlin says that her political party still has a debt of $10,000 after the elections; that she has come to the US to raise money through speaking engagements and from contributions. Devlin says that she has raised about $3,000 so far. A reporter asks Devlin's opinion on US involvement in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that Amnesty International, the International Red Cross and the European Court of Human Rights have all condemned the human rights abuses in Northern Ireland; that Jimmy Carter (US President) condemns human rights abuses all over the world, but ignores the deprivation of human rights in Northern Ireland. Devlin questions Carter's sincerity on human rights issues. Devlin says that the United Nations and western countries will not speak out against Great Britain; that she is trying to raise awareness of the situation among the white population of the US. The reporter asks Devlin if she expects a response from Irish Americans and Irish American politicians. Devlin says that she has a cynical view of politicians; that Edward Kennedy (US Senator) and Carter might speak out against the situation in Northern Ireland if they thought it would win them some votes; that she is not sure if Irish American politicians will take any action. Devlin says that the Irish American community has been made to feel guilty about giving money to Ireland; that they are made to feel like they are supporting violence. Devlin says that US politicians do not want Irish Americans to take interest in the situation in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that there are enough Irish Americans in the US to pressure the US government to take some firm action about Northern Ireland; that Irish Americans might become aware of the inequalities in US society if they started to think about the oppression in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that it saddens her to see Irish Americans involved in the oppression of African Americans in Boston. Devlin says that Irish Americans would get themselves on the "right side" of the civil rights struggle in the US if they understood the situation in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that Catholics in Northern Ireland were inspired by the civil rights movement in the US; that they identify with the struggles of African Americans. Devlin says that Irish Americans appear to be actively involved in the oppression of African Americans. Devlin says that she could probably raise money more easily if she avoided discussing the role of Irish Americans in the oppression of African Americans; that she is not willing to keep silent for money. Devlin says that she hopes Irish Americans will become more aware of their contradictory behavior; that many fled oppression in Ireland only to become oppressors in the US. 1:07:11: V: Devlin says that there is little Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland. She compares the amount of Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland to the amount of white working class support for busing in Boston. Devlin says that Great Britain needs to withdraw the undemocratic veto given to Protestants in Northern Ireland in 1921; that Great Britain needs to support change in Northern Ireland. Devlin reviews the history of the Irish conflict from the Irish elections in 1918 to the partition of the country by Great Britain. Devlin accuses Great Britain of partitioning the country in order to create a Protestant majority where there was none before. A reporter asks Devlin what she did during the years before the most recent election. The reporter comments that Devlin had not been visible on the political scene. Devlin responds that she has never stopped working for her cause; that the media ignored her activities because she was no longer a member of the British Parliament. Devlin says that the world took no notice of the violence used by Great Britain to oppress Catholics in Northern Ireland before 1969; that the oppressed Catholics are adopting the methods of violence used by Great Britain. Devlin questions why the Catholics are condemned for using violence, when they are only reacting to the violence used to oppress them. Devlin says that the international media have portrayed Lord Louis Mountbatten (British official) as a brave soldier and an aristocrat; that the oppressed peoples of the British Empire see Lord Mountbatten as a symbol of oppression. Devlin adds that public figures who represent the oppression of the British Empire will inevitably become targets of the oppressed. Devlin questions why the life of Mountbatten is worth more than the lives of all the Irish people who have died at the hands of the British; that the Irish victims fought for their country as Mountbatten did; that they were portrayed as terrorists by the international press. Devlin accuses the international press of hypocrisy. She says that the Irish people will not be "chastened" by the press coverage of Mountbatten's death. Devlin adds that if Great Britain was not occupying Northern Ireland, Mountbatten would be alive today. A reporter asks Devlin about Princess Margaret of England's comment that the Irish are "pigs." Devlin responds with a translation of an old Irish saying that "a pig thinks the whole world is pigs." Devlin answers questions about her speaking schedule and her life in Ireland. Devlin says that she has three children; that she does not have a regular job; that she works in the resistance movement. Devlin adds that she works with Catholics whose welfare benefits have been taken away by the British government. Devlin says that the money she raises will pay off her party's campaign debt. She adds that if the debt is paid, the rest of the money will go to a fund to benefit Irish prisoners.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/19/1979
Description: Ride along Blue Hill Avenue. Decrepit, boarded up and abandoned storefronts. Many defunct businesses. Vacant lot. Zion Apostolic and Immanuel Pentecostal Churches. Warren Street intersection. Bridge Free Medical Van. Houses on Supple Road. Prince Hall Masonic Lodge. Sign for the Mayor's Office of Housing. Street sweeping vehicle. Mayor Kevin White walks with Julian Bond through neighborhood with press entourage. White answers questions about his candidacy and housing policy decisions as mayor especially involving the Boston Housing Authority, and says urban revitalization will come to reality within 3-5 years but need more federal $$. White and Bond meet local business owners and community members.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/20/1979
Description: Boston Garden seating plan showing ticket prices from $4 to $10 for Celtics games. Team photos from 1956-1957, 1964-1965, 1972-1973. Empty seats and concession stand. Interview with Celtics vice president Jeff Cohen.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/26/1979
Description: Start of Boston marathon. Bill Rodgers crosses finish line with police escort. Shots of runners and moving feet clad in running shoes.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/17/1978
Description: Senator Edward Brooke concedes the Senate race to Paul Tsongas in the ballroom of the Copley Plaza Hotel. With him on the stage are supporters including State Sen. William Owens, his mother Helen Brooke, community leader Elma Lewis, and campaign field director Thomas Trimarco. Sharon Stevens reports from behind the cheering crowd, anticipating Brooke's speech; Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) is on the stage, waiting to interview Brooke after the speech. Brooke thanks the crowd, his family, and his campaign staff. Brooke congratulates Tsongas for waging an honorable campaign. Brooke says that he will do his best to assure the smooth transition of the Senate seat and that he continues to support full equality and justice for all. Brooke thanks voters for giving him the opportunity to have served as both State Attorney General and US Senator and assures those who did not vote for him that he has no bitterness toward them. Brooke shakes hands and answers questions from the press as he slowly makes his way off stage surrounded by an entourage. B-roll of Brooke supporters in ballroom after the speech.
0:58:17: Visual: Shot of Edward Brooke (US Senator) at a podium, waving to a cheering crowd in the ballroom of the Copley Plaza Hotel. A large campaign banner behind him reads, "Brooke - United States Senator." William Owens (State Senator), Helen Brooke (Edward Brooke's mother), Elma Lewis (African American community leader), Thomas Trimarco (field director for Brooke's campaign) and other supporters are all on stage with Brooke. Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) stands behind the cheering crowd, anticipating Brooke's speech. 0:59:15: V: Brooke thanks the crowd, which continues to cheer for him. Brooke says that preliminary results show Paul Tsongas (candidate for US Senator) to be the victor. Brooke congratulates Tsongas for waging an honorable campaign. Brooke says that he will do his best to assure the smooth transition of the Senate seat. Brooke thanks his campaign workers and contributors for their support. Brooke notes that there are US Senators who will continue to fight for senior citizens, minorities, the poor, and the handicapped. Brooke says that he continues to support full equality for women and equal justice for all. Brooke thanks voters for giving him the opportunity to have served as both State Attorney General and US Senator. Brooke assures those who did not vote for him that he has no bitterness toward them. Brooke says that he leaves the Senate with the feeling that there is much left to be accomplished; that he remains committed to the causes he has supported. Brooke paraphrases Lillian Hellman, saying that "I could never cut my consciensce to fit the fashion of any year." Brooke commends his supporters for their hard work, faith and courage. Brooke thanks his family, his campaign manager, John Volpe (chairman of Brooke's campaign committee), and Trimarco. Brooke says that he regrets not having spent enough time with the voters of Massachusetts during the campaign. He notes that his Senate responsibilities kept him in Washington D.C. during much of the campaign. Brooke says that he wishes Tsongas well; that he is sorry he did not deliver a victory for his campaign workers and supporters. Brooke says that he is very happy that a woman has been elected to the US Senate. He jokes about going out to look for a job and wishes his supporters well. 1:09:35: V: Brooke shakes hands with members of the crowd. Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) is on the stage with a microphone, waiting to interview Brooke. The crowd continues to clap for Brooke. Stevens recaps Brooke's speech. Brooke is still on the stage, talking to members of the media. The crowd remains on the floor. 1:11:11: V: Brooke remains on the stage. He waves to supporters. Members of the media surround him. He answers questions about the race and his future plans. A jazz band plays and the noise of the crowd is audible. Brooke attempts to move off of the stage. The media continue to surround him. Brooke waves at the crowd as he moves slowly off the stage. Flashbulbs go off as the media take his photograph. 1:15:51: V: Shot of a sign reading, "We still love you Ed. You're the best.". Shots of campaign supporters on the floor; of members of the crowd. Shots of the media and their equipment in the corner of the room. Members of the crowd mill about in the ballroom. Shot of the jazz band playing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1978
Description: Senator Edward Brooke holds a press conference at the offices of Robert McGrath (attorney for Edward Brooke) to address a story about his personal finances that appeared in the Boston Globe. Brooke admits to making a false statement about the receipt of a personal loan in an out-of-court deposition for his divorce. Brooke says that he did not commit perjury by making a "misstatement" in the divorce proceedings; that he did not inflate his financial liability in the divorce settlement. Brooke discusses the divorce settlement and says that it is "fair and equitable." Brooke denies allegations by the Boston Globe that he spends more than he earns. Brooke describes the sources of his income, including details of the purchases and estimated values of his properties. Brooke apologizes to constituents and asks for their forgiveness and understanding. The media asks probing questions about his personal life and finances. Brooke admits that his daughter is responsible for leaking the story to the press.
11:27:58: Visual: Members of the media are gathered in a small room at the offices of Robert McGrath (attorney for Edward Brooke). The media waits for the arrival of Edward Brooke (US Senator). Members of the press are crowded into the small room. Some are sitting and some are standing. Camera crews set up cameras and microphones. Walt Sanders (WBZ) is among the reporters. 11:30:19: V: Brooke arrives and stands at the front of the room. McGrath stands at his side. Brooke says that the story in The Boston Globe about his personal finances is mostly correct. He notes that there was an error in the caption. Brooke says that he has never admitted to swearing falsely about a $49,000 loan. Brooke apologizes for making a "misstatement and a mistake." He asks for forgiveness and understanding from his constituents. Brooke admits that he never received a $49,000 loan from A. Raymond Tye (Boston liquor wholesaler). He adds that he made a false statement about the receipt of the loan in an out of court deposition for his divorce case. Brooke says that he does owe $49,000; that $2,000 is owed to Tye; that the remaining money belonged to his mother-in-law; that the money was in his control and spent according to the wishes of his mother-in-law. Brooke adds that his divorce is a private matter; that he does not want to discuss the $47,000 debt; that the debt is a family matter. Brooke notes that the out of court deposition was never signed; that McGrath and Monroe Inker (attorney for Brooke's wife) stated in the deposition that the debt was a matter to be settled privately. Brooke states that the depositions were never entered into court. He apologizes for having made a misstatement about the loan. 11:34:57: V: A reporter asks Brooke about allegations that he has been spending more than he has earned. Brooke says that those allegations in The Boston Globe story are untrue; that he has never spent more money than he has earned. Brooke adds that he made rough estimates of his living expenses in a financial statement for the divorce; that his income is comprised of his salary, honoraria received from speaking engagements, stocks, and rental fees from his properties on St. Martin and Martha's Vineyard. Brooke discusses details of the purchases and estimated values of his properties on Martha's Vineyard and St. Martin, his home in Newton, and his apartment in Washington D.C. Brooke notes that he bought his home in Newton with funds realized from the sale of his first home in Roxbury. He adds that he is regularly paying off a $125,000 loan which he received to pay for the property in St. Martin; that he is also paying a mortgage on his apartment in Washington D.C. Brooke says that he has no cash and securities holdings, despite reports to the contrary by The Boston Globe. Brooke notes that he has one checking account from which he pays all of his bills. He says that he would like to put an end to rumors about his "vast holdings." Brooke adds that there is nothing wrong with making a profit from a "sane" investment in real estate. 11:39:16: V: A reporter asks Brooke if he committed perjury in making a "misstatement" in the divorce proceedings. Brooke says that he did not commit perjury; that he admitted under oath to owing $49,000; that he misstated the party to whom he owed the money. The reporter insists that Brooke committed perjury by saying that he owed all of the money to Tye. Brooke insists that he did not commit perjury; that he stated the correct amount of money owed; that he said the money was owed to Tye in order to avoid bringing a private family matter into the court settlement. The reporter asks if his misstatement inflated his financial liability in the divorce settlement. Brooke says that he had always intended to pay back the money; that he had spent the money for his family with his mother-in-law's consent; that he did not inflate his liability because he was obligated to pay back the money. Brooke notes that his wife knew about the debt to his mother-in-law; that the debt did not affect the settlement. Brooke adds that the settlement gave his wife their home in Newton and the property in St. Martin as well as an annual alimony payment of $18,000 and all health and medical insurance. Brooke explains that he has assumed all mortgage payments for the property in St. Martin given to his wife in the settlement; that the divorce settlement was fair and equitable. Brooke says that divorce settlements are very painful; that he does not know how The Boston Globe gained access to the depositions; that he has never read the depositions. Brooke says that he wants to clarify the facts surrounding the divorce settlement because of inaccuracies in the story by The Boston Globe. Brooke says that he thinks his constituents will forgive him; that he has a strong record of public service. Brooke says that his mistakes in the divorce proceedings were not related to public funds or to his performance as US Senator. Brooke adds that he has never tried to cheat his wife; that he has never received any money through dishonest means. Brooke says that he will not take legal action against The Boston Globe; that their story was substantially correct. Brooke notes that he never admitted to falsely swearing about his finances under oath, as was reported in the Globe. Brooke says again that he made a "mistake and a misstatement." Brooke says that the depositions were not provided to the Globe by him or his attorney; that the depositions must have been provided by his wife or her attorney; that the depositions were never filed in court; that he never read them; that they exist for the sole purpose of reaching a financial agreement in the divorce settlement. A reporter asks Brooke if someone has "an axe to grind" about the settlement. Brooke says that someone peddled this story to the news media all over the state of Massachusetts and in Washington D.C.; that the release of the story coincides with his bid for reelection to the US Senate; that he feels like he is being "blackmailed." Brooke says that he thinks the story is being used in an attempt to force him to give up more to his wife in the divorce settlement. Brooke notes that he has given "three-fourths" of his assets to his wife in the settlement; that the settlement is fair and equitable. Brooke admits that his daughter, Remi, is responsible for leaking the story to the media. A reporter asks Brooke if his mother-in-law "holds the note" to the personal debt. Brooke responds that there is no note. Brooke explains that his mother-in-law received an insurance settlement of $100,000 from a car accident which left her paraplegic. Brooke says that this money was spent according to the wishes of his mother-in-law; that she gave him control of this money; that much of this money was spent on her doctor's bills and expenses; that he has been paying this money back and owes about $30,000. A reporter notes that Brooke sponsored legislation forcing full financial disclosure from US Senators. Brooke says that he has always fought against corruption in government; that full financial disclosure by US Senators is ethically important. A reporter asks Brooke if he has received a "bum rap." Brooke says no.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/26/1978
Description: Visuals related to the district attorney's inquiry into the finances and divorce case of Senator Edward Brooke. Shots include court drawings, newspaper headlines, and articles from The Boston Globe, photographs of A. Raymond Tye (Boston liquor wholesaler) and Brooke, and the typed cover of the district attorney's inquiry.
1:54:07: Visual: Shots of court drawings relating to an inquiry into the divorce case of Edward Brooke (US Senator). The drawings include Brooke sitting in the courtroom, lawyers approaching the judge's bench and testimony being given. 1:56:50: V: Shot of newspaper articles and headlines about the Brooke case. One Boston Globe article has a headline reading, "Brooke admits to swearing falsely on $49,000 loan." Another article includes a photo of A. Raymond Tye (Boston liquor wholesaler). 1:57:44: V: Shot of the typed cover page of the district attorney's inquiry into the Brooke divorce case. 1:58:32: V: Shot of another court drawing related to the inquiry into the Brooke divorce case. The drawing shows the judge sitting at the bench. The stenographer is seated in front of the judge. The lawyers stand in the courtroom. 1:59:24: V: Shots of the front page of The Boston Globe from Tuesday, August 22, 1978. A headline reads, "Brooke case: Fraud found, he's cleared. Medicaid to in-law held illegal by state panel." 2:00:39: V: Shots of a still photo of Brooke.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/22/1978
Description: John Buckley announces Republican candidacy for governor of Massachusetts. Speaks about taxes and correctional institutions. In a second speech, he addresses the successes of Massachusetts, including the invention of the telephone, the safety razor, the Polaroid camera, and the pacemaker, the establishment of the first public school, and the founding of the first university.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/06/1978