Description: Burned out and abandoned buildings and houses. Narrow spaces between tall houses. Footage shot for a moving vehicle. Roxbury highlands.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/04/1982
Description: Interview with South End based artist Allan Rohan Crite. He tells a story about selling paintings in the 1940s, tracking them down, and recently finding them. He talks about his paintings, inspired by different parts of African American lives, including religion. He also talks about the poetry and essays he's been working on recently. They focus on his version of the African American experience. They shoot cutaways with no sound.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/04/1982
Description: Interview with Andrew Young, Mayor of Atlanta at the Parker House. Young talks about his efforts to facilitate international trade between Atlanta businesses and third-world nations. He says that urban mayors can help local businesses by leading trade delegations and encouraging local businesses to get involved in emerging markets. Young criticizes the federal government's reliance on the military in conducting foreign policy. He says that the US must act with intelligence and rely on diplomacy to solve world problems. He talks about US involvement in Vietnam, Lebanon, and El Salvador. Young and Christy George discuss African Americans in politics. Young does not believe that a candidate should not represent one single constituency. Young says that more African Americans need to be elected as senators, mayors and governors before an African American is elected as president. George reasks questions for cutaways. Young attends a cocktail party at the Parker House. Other guests include Bruce Bolling, Boston City Councilor, and Hubie Jones, Dean of the School of Social Work at Boston University.
1:00:04: Visual: Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) is interviewed by Christy George in the Parker House. George asks about urban mayors taking on international roles. George notes that Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) is interested in Young's work in Atlanta with third-world nations; that Kevin White (Mayor of Boston) calls Boston a "world-class city." Young says that most governments help businesses; that the federal government has done little to help businesses. Young says that mayors can help local businesses. Young talks about leading trade delegations of Atlanta businessmen to other parts of the world. Young says that businessmen can gain access to government officials through the mayor. Young says that he took businesspeople, educators and a YMCA soccer team on a trip to Jamaica and Trinidad. Young says that the businesspeople did $150 million of business during a one-week trade mission. Young says that business people were allowed to see the decision-makers in foreign governments. Young says that white mayors can do the same thing. Young says that the mayors of Seattle and Indianapolis have done the same thing. Young says that there are large concentrations of Dutch and Japanese businesses in Georgia; that he is trying to build on that. George notes that African-American mayors are now dealing with third-world countries. Young says that the emerging markets are in the third world. Young says that he will visit Nigeria next week. Young says that Nigeria is buying products from Atlanta; that Nigeria is developing at a rapid rate. Young notes that Japanese and German businesses have been doing business with the third world for a long time. Young says that US businesses never needed to do business abroad until 1975. George notes that Young had been talking about doing business with the third world when he worked for Jimmy Carter (former US President). George remarks that the Democratic Party has not advocated more trade with the third world. Young says that Ronald Reagan (US President) sees everything in terms of an East-West conflict. Young says that the US needs to look beyond the East-West conflict. Young talks about US involvement in Egypt and Panama in the 1970s. Young says that diplomatic treaties can undercut communist influence. Young says that military solutions seem popular, easy and "macho." Young says that military solutions have seldom succeeded for the US or for the Soviet Union. 1:05:15: V: George asks what the Democratic Party should be doing to prepare for the 1984 elections. Young says that the Democratic Party must approach world problems with "reason and sanity." Young talks about how the US was drawn into the Vietnam War. Young says that US ships are present off the coasts of Central America and Lebanon; that the US could easily become trapped in a military situation in one of these regions. Young says that there is no military solution in Lebanon; that the US has no business there. Young says that there is no military solution in El Salvador. Young says that the US needs to show its strength through intelligence; that the US should not show its strength through destructiveness. Young says that the Democratic Party must offer clear a alternative to Reagan. Young says that the US is living on the brink of war; that this policy is insane. George asks how the Democratic Party should deal with political unrest and revolutions in the third world. Young says that the US needs to understand the impulses behind revolutions in third world country. Young says that Harry Truman (former US President) probably did not know that Ho Chi Min (former Vietnamese leader) worked as a chef at the Parker House while he was a student in Boston. Young talks about the influence of American ideas of freedom on Ho Chi Min in the 1940s. Young says that third world leaders should not be discounted as Marxists. Jump cut in videotape. George asks if African Americans need an African American candidate for president in 1984 in order to gain political influence. Young says that he disagrees; that politicians should not represent only one segment of the population. Young says that the present Democratic candidates have strong records on civil rights and minority issues. Young says that African Americans need to be involved in the campaign of a winning candidate. Young says that candidates never live up to promises made at the convention. George asks if it is time for an African American presidential candidate. Young says that there need to be more African American mayors, governors and senators before there is an African American president. George closes the interview. 1:09:57: V: The crew takes cutaway shots of George. 1:14:40: V: Footage of a cocktail reception at the Parker House. Attendees eat, drink, and socialize. Attendees include Hubie Jones (Dean of the School of Social Work, Boston University), Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council), Carol Bolling (wife of Bruce Bolling), Young, and others. Shot of Young socializing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/22/1983
Description: Exteriors of building and signage at the Bank of New England; Neworld Bank exterior shots and close up of sign; The First National Bank of Boston exterior signage; 1st American Bank for Savings exterior and close shot of signs.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/22/1982
Description: Barney Frank and John Anderson campaigning in Wellesley. They walk down the street, shake hands and talk with constituents. Exteriors of Howard Johnson's. Campaign workers holding signs.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/26/1982
Description: Massachusetts Fair Share register African American voters to vote in Roxbury. Christy George interviews a female community worker who discusses Mass Fair Share's voter registration drive, its lawsuit against the Boston Election Department and the importance of voter education in the African American community. The woman says that some city officials do not want to disrupt current voting patterns by registering new voters; that the Boston Election Department started to cooperate only after the lawsuit was filed. She adds that the recent voter registration drives have been successful.
0:59:57: V: An African American man and an African American woman sit behind a table on a sidewalk in front of the Charles Drew Neighborhood Health Center in Roxbury. Handmade signs for voter registration are posted behind the table. The signs read, "Voter registration here today" and "Save your health center. Register and vote." An African American woman stands in front of the table. A young African American man in a blue shirt sits beside the woman at the table. He watches her fill out forms. More young African Americans stand in front of the table. The male community worker fills out a form for another young African American male. He asks the young man questions as he fills out the form. The young man signs the form. Shot of the community worker's hand as he fills out the form. 1:03:29: V: The two community workers sit behind the table. The young man in the blue shirt stands in front of the table. The young man hands his license to the male community worker, who is filling out a form. The young man signs the form and walks away. Three more young African American males stand in line in front of the table. Close up shot of one of the African American males. The male community worker fills out forms for one of the young men. The young man gives his license to the community worker. Shots of the female community worker; of the book and papers she is studying. 1:10:19: V: A middle-aged African American woman stands at the voter registration table. An African American man registers to vote with the male community worker. The young woman in the red skirt passes by the people gathered at the bus stop. She speaks to two men standing on the sidewalk. She turns and walks back to the voter registration table. The young woman in the red skirt directs someone to the voter registration table. A middle-aged African American woman registers to vote at the table. Shot of the exterior of the Charles Drew Building. The young woman in the red skirt speaks to two young African American men on the sidewalk. 1:13:17: V: An African American woman exits an MBTA bus. The young woman in the red skirt directs her to the voter registration table. They young woman continues to approach people on the street and direct them to the table. 1:14:44: V: Christy George interviews the female community worker. The worker says that Mass Fair Share filed a lawsuit concerning voting discrepancies in the primary elections of September,1982. The worker says that the Boston Election Department was not cooperative last year; that the department failed to provide reliable registrars and sites for Mass Fair Share voting registration drives. The worker says that Mass Fair Share fought to set up voting registration tables at MBTA stations. George notes that voting registration tables need to be set up in a "site of principal activity." The worker says that the Boston Election Department determines which sites can be used; that the department has not made it clear which sites are allowed. The worker says that parks are now allowed as voter registration sites; that the Boston Election Department had previously allowed mills, schools, factories; that churches and welfare offices are recent additions to the list. The worker says that the Boston Election Department began to cooperate after Mass Fair Share filed a lawsuit. George notes that Mass Fair Share has organized voter registration drives all week long. The worker says that the turnout has been excellent at the drives; that the Boston Election Department had predicted a low turnout; that Mass Fair Share is trying to create a momentum around voter registration. George asks the worker if the City of Boston was trying to make voter registration difficult. The worker says that the city can predict which areas vote and how they will vote; that the city does not want to disrupt current voter patterns by registering new voters. The worker says that Mass Fair Share wants to educate people on the importance of voting and on the issues; that the organization is not supporting individual candidates. George asks if voter registration is a civil rights issue. The worker says that voter turnout in the African American community was below the city average; that Mass Fair Share would like to encourage voting in the African American community; that voter registration is more of a problem than voter turnout. The worker says that voter education is important in the African American community; that citizens need to know that voting is a basic right; that citizens need to understand why voting is important. The crew takes cutaway shots of George and the worker.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/28/1983
Description: Governor Edward King speaks on lifting blue laws to permit Sunday business. King signs bill that allows businesses to open Sundays, although the law prohibits forcing anyone to work Sundays. King states that this bill will increase job opportunities.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/22/1982
Description: B-roll footage of Boston Garden box office and surrounding structures. Pedestrians and automobiles pass by. Close up of people purchasing tickets from box office window. Pans around interior of box office area; digital clock and sign; line of people waiting to purchase tickets. Close up of exterior of Causeway Ticket Agency and lighted sign with concert listings. Footage from a moving vehicle passing Boston Garden box office and building with Newport Cigarettes ad above sign. Green line trolleys enter North Station under Boston Garden building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/06/1982
Description: Final stretch and finish line of the Boston Marathon. Wheelchair competitors crossing finish line. Blimps in above the crowd. Announcer makes comments on how closer the leading runners are to each other. Runners cross finish line. Alberto Salazar and Dick Beardsley finish very close together, running the marathon faster than anyone had in the history of the race. Kevin White awards winner Alberto Salazar with medal and laurel wreath. Third place runner, John Lodwick, crosses finish line. Fourth place runner, Bill Rodgers, crosses finish line. Other runner cross finish line. Charlotte Teske, winner of the women's race of the Boston Marathon, awarded medal and laurel wreath. Women's second place runner, Jacqueline Gareau, crosses finish line. Glenda Manzi does several takes of reporter standup. Interview with Charlotte Teske.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/19/1982
Description: B-roll footage of Charles Street Jail building models from various angles; footage of snow outside and jail building; Suffolk County Jail exterior and sign shots from various angles. CHARLES STREET JAIL, SUFFOLK COUNTY SHERIFF DENNIS KEARNEY, JUDGE W. ARTHUR GARRITY PRESS CONFERENCE, INTERIOR, EXTERIORS, BARBED WIRE, TRUCKS
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/08/1982