Description: Mayor Ray Flynn welcomes a delegation of African diplomats to Boston at a ceremony in City Hall. Irene Smalls (Director of Public Information for Flynn) and Flynn present a book about Boston to each diplomat. Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) addresses the delegation. He reads a proclamation from the Boston City Council, welcoming the diplomats to Boston. City Councilors David Scondras, Bruce Bolling and Maura Hennigan are introduced to the delegation. The ambassador from Gambia thanks Flynn and the city of Boston for receiving their visit. Yancey delivers closing remarks at the ceremony. He thanks the ambassadors. The diplomats and city officials socialize at a reception at City Hall. Flynn circulates among the members of the delegation. Flynn and one of the diplomats raise their glasses in an informal toast. Members of the delegation speak to one another.
1:00:00: Visual: Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) addresses a delegation of African diplomats at City Hall. Flynn speaks into a microphone about the historic heritage of Boston. The African delegation stands and listens. Flynn talks about John F. Kennedy (former US President) and other political leaders from Boston. Shots of the members of the African delegation. Flynn welcomes the delegation to Boston. Shot of Flynn from the back of the room. Shots of the members of the delegation. Flynn presents books to the members of the delegation. Irene Smalls (Director of Public Information for Flynn) reads out the names of the delegation members. Flynn hands gifts of the book "A Book for Boston," to ambassadors and representatives from Benin, Burundi, the Central African Republic, Guinea, the Ivory Coast, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Togo, Uganda, Cameroon, Lesotho, Swaziland, Mali, the Congo, Sierra Leone, Kenya, and Gambia. Smalls has trouble pronoucing some of the ambassadors' names. Flynn shakes hands with each ambassador as he hands him the book. The ambassadors from Chad and Gabon are absent. Shots of the books on a table. Shots of the members of the delegation. 1:06:54: V: Smalls introduces Charles Yancey (Boston City Council). Yancey addresses the delegation. Yancey reads a proclamation from the Boston City Council. The proclamation notes that the delegation has come to visit Boston as part of the African Diplomats' Project, sponsored by the United States Information Agency and the African American Institute of Washington DC. The proclamation talks about the mission of the African Diplomats' Project. The proclamation welcomes the diplomats to Boston. Shots of the members of the delegation; of the proclamation in Yancey's hands. Yancey compliments Flynn on his sensitivity to the interests of all people. Yancey says that he has a copy of the proclamation for each ambassador. The delegation applauds Yancey's speech. 1:09:10: V: Flynn invites City Councillors David Scondras, Bruce Bolling and Maura Hennigan to the front of the room. Scondras, Bolling and Hennigan walk to the front of the room. Bolling shakes hands with the members of the delegation. Chris Ianella (Boston City Council) is announced. The ambassador from Gambia addresses the group. The ambassador thanks Flynn and extends greetings from the people of Africa to the people of Boston. The ambassador says that the group has come to Boston to learn from the city; that the group will return to their countries more able to meet the needs of modern Africa. The ambassador thanks Flynn and the city for giving the delegation a warm welcome. He wishes continued success to the city. The ambassador shakes hands with the councillors. Small invites Yancey to give closing remarks. Yancey notes that the city of Boston is honored to receive the delegation. He says that there are strong ties between Boston and the countries and Africa. Yancey thanks the delegation. The delegation applauds. 1:13:25: The delegation enters a room where refreshments have been set up. The diplomats sip champagne and punch while they socialize. Shot of the ambassador from the Central African Republic talking with another ambassador. An official directs the diplomats to the food table. V: Shots of glasses of champagne arranged on a table. An African American catering worker gives a glasses of punch to the ambassador from Madagascar and another diplomat. Flynn circulates among the members of the delegation. Shots of Flynn and various members of the delegation. Flynn and one of the diplomats raise their glasses in an informal toast. Members of the delegation stand near the food table. Shots of hors d'oevres in warming pans. A member of the media approaches one of the diplomats. A few of the diplomats serve themselves from the food table. Two diplomats confer with one another.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/10/1985
Description: Callie Crossley interviews several students about the student occupation of Ballou Hall at Tufts University. One female student says that the demonstrators have demanded that the university divest completely from South Africa and that the university increase financial aid for low-income and minority students. She criticizes the administration's decision to bar food from Ballou Hall during the student occupation. She remarks that the demonstrations across the nation prove that college students are not apathetic. Members of this protest have been circulating petitions, recently issued a report on institutional racism at Tufts, and received over 2,000 signatures (more than half the student body) on their petitions. A male student, the editor of the school paper, is interviewed as well who argues that while divestment is a complicated issues, this protest is counterproductive and the students are making things confrontational with the administration. He suggests holding a committee forum to discuss the issue further. He is skeptical that the students' demands will be met immediately. He further discusses Tufts' current image and history in social/political activism. A second female student is interviewed about her thoughts on the issue. An administrator is interviewed and asked about the administration's position on the demonstration. He states that they will let the demonstration run it's course and is working on informing the student body of what the university is doing. He also states that Tufts currently has agreed to selective divestment, not total divestment. Reporter compares this protest to activism seen in the 1960s and 1970s.
1:00:09: Visual: Callie Crossley interviews Alysa Rose (Tufts student) on the quadrangle at Tufts University. Crossley asks Rose about the previous evening's events in Ballou Hall. Rose says that 150 to 180 entered Ballou Hall yesterday evening; that the students refused to leave until their demands were met. Rose says that the protesters demanded total divestment from South Africa and increased financial aid for low-income and minority students. Rose says that there is a great feeling of unity inside the building; that students on the outside are trying to spread the protesters' message. The interview is interrupted by a commotion from Ballou Hall. Shots of security guards trying to keep students from throwing food to the protesters. One security guard catches a box of crackers. Crossley continues the interview. Rose says that she left the building in order to circulate a letter to Tufts' professors, encouraging them to show their support for the protesters. Rose talks about the protests which are being held across the nation. Crossley asks if the administration has met with the protesters. Rose says that the deans of the university met last night; that they decided to close down Ballou Hall, which houses the administrative offices of the university. Rose says that the deans are not allowing students or food into the building. Rose condemns Jean Mayer (President of Tufts University) for not allowing food into the building. Rose says that there are some seniors in the building who say they will not come out of the building, even for graduation. Crossley comments that college students today have a reputation of being apathetic. Rose says that these protests prove that today's students are not apathetic. Rose notes that Jesse Jackson (African American leader) is touring campuses; that Jackson tells students not to be materialistic or to become "yuppies"; that she is not sure if she completely agrees with Jackson. Rose says that she hopes that people in South Africa hear about the protests in the US. Rose says that she feels a kinship with protesting students at other colleges. Rose names other universities where protests are being held. The crew takes cutaway shots of Crossley and Rose. Crossley asks Rose if she knew what apartheid was before she came to Tufts. Rose says that she only recently became aware of apartheid. 1:04:51: V: Crossley sets up an interview with Michael Mayo (student, Tufts University). Crossley asks for the Mayo's opinion on the protests. Mayo says that he does not agree with the protesters' confrontational approach to the issue; that divestment is a complicated issue. Mayo says that he supports efforts to draw attention to the issue of apartheid. Mayo says that confrontation is counterproductive and has led to a stalemate between the protesters and the administration. Mayo says that the Tufts administration opted for a policy of selective divestment in 1979; that the university does not invest in companies which refuse to sign the Sullivan Principles. Mayo suggests that a committee of students, faculties and administrators discuss the issue of complete divestment. Mayo says that the student demonstration is disruptive. Mayo says that the students will probably leave the building over the weekend; that finals are coming up for most students. Mayo says that he has heard that the mood inside the building is becoming less enthusiastic. Mayo notes that the protesters begin to chant when the media show up. Mayo says that the protesters have drawn attention to the issue; that he is not sure if the administration will decide to divest as a response to student demonstrations. Crossley asks about student attitudes toward the demonstration. Mayo says that some students disagree with the protesters' methods; that some students view the demonstrators as "leftovers" from the 1960s. Mayo comments that the demonstrators had been circulating petitions protesting "institutional racism" at Tufts; that over 2,000 people signed the petitions. Mayo says that he is not sure if all of the 2,000 signees understood the issues brought up in the petition; that some signees wanted to be part of the 1960s "resurgence." Crossley comments that college students today have a reputation of being apathetic. Mayo says that there is a history of protest demonstrations at Tufts. He talks about specific protests in the 1960s and 1970s. Mayo says that the renewal of activism on campus is "refreshing." The crew takes a cutaway shot of Crossley and Mayo. Mayo talks about his experiences as editor of the campus newspaper. 1:09:16: V: Crossley sets up an interview with Tiffany Wheeler (Tufts student). Crossley asks for Wheeler's opinion on the protests. Wheeler says that the protests are a good thing; that she wishes she could help out more; that she signed petitions and attended the rallies. Wheeler says that she thinks the protest might help change the administration's policy. Crossley comments that college students today have a reputation of being apathetic. Wheeler says that she hopes that these protests signal a renewal of campus activism. Crossley thanks the student. 1:10:10: V: Shot of a protest sign reading, "Invest in students, not in apartheid." The protesters are heard chanting, "We need your support" and "The people united will never be defeated." Shot of a white female protester. Tufts University police officers stand in front of the Ballou Hall. Student protesters sit and stand in the entrance and foyer of the building. Crossley asks a police officer why the administration is not allowing food into the building. The officer tells Crossley to ask the chief of the Tufts police force. The officer directs Crossley to the chief. 1:10:58: V: Thomas Foster (Chief, Tufts University Police Department) stands with another man near the side of Ballou Hall. Crossley asks Foster why food is not being allowed into the building. Foster tells Crossley to speak to Curtis Barnes (Tufts University Communications Department). Crossley asks Foster when the administration decided to keep food out of the building. Foster says that the administration decided at the beginning of the protest to keep food from the building. Foster tells Crossley to ask Curtis Barnes about the university's policy toward the demonstrators. 1:12:03: V: Shot of a typed sheet reading, "What's going on at Ballou?" The typed sheet explains the background of the student demonstration at Ballou Hall. The chants of the demonstrators are audible in the background. 1:12:33: V: Crossley sets up an interview with Barnes. Crossley asks about the administration's position. Barnes says that the administration will let the demonstration continue; that student protests are part of the educational process. Barnes says that the administration's policy at this time is to abide by the Sullivan Principles. Barnes says that he hopes the demonstration will end soon. Crossley asks if it is true that the university has agreed to selective divestment. Barnes talks about the Sullivan Principles. Barnes says that the university has sold its stock in companies which refuse to abide by the Sullivan Principles. Barnes notes that the university holds stock in a company which is currently deciding whether or not to abide by the Sullivan Principles; that the university will sell the stock of that company if the company does not choose to follow the Sullivan Principles. Barnes adds that some people think that total divestment is a bad idea. The official says that stockholders are the people who can influence the policies of major corporations; that stockholders can change the policies of corporations doing business in South Africa. Crossley asks the official if the administration will change it position in response to the demonstration. Barnes says that he is preparing a fact sheet to inform all Tufts students about adminstrative action to combat racism. Barnes notes that the administration has strengthened financial aid packages for incoming minority students. Crossley asks if the administration plans to meet with the students protesters. Barnes notes that the protesters and the administration agree on divestment; that they only disagree on the extent of divestment. Barnes says that the administration will not negotiate with the students under any circumstances; that the administration will provide access to information about its policies; that the administration will not negotiate because they are already in agreement with the students. Crossley asks if the administration is feeling pressure to divest completely from South Africa. Barnes says that the administration and faculty have carefully considered the issue. Barnes notes that student protesters have demanded the addition of a course to the curriculum; that the faculty makes curriculum decisions. Barnes says that he hopes the demonstrations will lead to more discussion. Crossley asks why food has not been allowed into Ballou Hall. Barnes says that a student demonstration is not a "picnic." Barnes says that the students are welcome to eat in the dining hall; that the administration will not bring "food caravans" to the students. Barnes says that the demonstrators have put a stop to the proper functioning of the university; that the administration will not allow the demonstrators to cycle in and out; that the administration would like to focus on the issues and return to normal. Crossley asks if participation in the demonstration will keep hurt students academically or keep seniors from graduating. Barnes says that there is time to bring the protest to an end before commencement; that the protesters need to realize that sitting on the steps of Ballou Hall is not the most productive way to focus on the issue. Barnes says that he hopes to resolve the issue in the next few days. The crew takes cutaway shots of Crossley and the Barnes. Crossley asks why the administration is not allowing the students to take crackers or snacks from other students. Barnes says that the students have the option to leave the building if they are hungry. 1:19:29: V: Crossley stands near Ballou Hall. Crossley reports that the current student demonstrations against apartheid are reminiscent of student protests in the 1960s. Crossley notes that the student demonstrations are part of a national movement against apartheid. Crossley reports that students say that they will not back down from an administration which refuses to hear their demands.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/25/1985
Description: Apartheid protesters gather in front of the South African Consulate at 100 Charles River Plaza in Boston, surrounded by press. Mel King (community activist), Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) and Willard Johnson (Head, TransAfrica) demand to see Richard Blankstein (honorary consul to South Africa). Police officers bar entry to the building. Johnson announces to the media that the protesters will ask for Blankstein's resignation from his post. He adds that they will ask Blankstein's law firm to sever ties with South Africa. Johnson and the others are eventually allowed to enter the building. Several takes of reporter standup. Police, protesters and the media wait outside of the building. Themba Vilakazi (member of African National Congress) is interviewed by the media, announcing the resignation of Blankstein, and noting that Blackstein doesn't want to talk to the media. Johnson, King and Yancey exit the building. Johnson reads a statement of resignation from Blankstein, which says he is not a supporter of apartheid. Johnson announces a victory for the protesters. Johnson, King and Yancey walk over to a group of protesters on the street. Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) leads the protesters in a chant. Johnson announces the resignation of Blankstein. The crowd cheers.
1:04:34: V: Johnson tells the media that the protestors have asked for the right to meet with Blankstein; that they would like to ask Blankstein to resign from his post as honorary consul. Johnson says that the protestors are acting in the best interest of the public. Johnson says that the protestors are willing to meet with Blankstein outside of the building. Johnson says that Blankenstein must resign publicly; that his law firm must sever ties with South Africa. Johnson says that the police officer has gone inside to ask Blankstein to meet with the protestors. Johnson says that the protestors' goal is to force the resignation of Blankstein; that the protestors will focus next on other corporations with ties to South Africa. 1:06:30: V: Four protestors, including Yancey and Johnson, are let into the building. They are accompanied by Themba Vilakazi (member, African National Congress). Police officers stand guard at the entrance to the building. Protestors and the media wait on the sidewalk outside of the entrance. Tug Yourgrau reports from the sidewalk in front of the entrance. The chants of protestors are audible. Yourgrau reports that Blankstein has been honorary counsel to South Africa in Boston for two years; that Blankstein has refused to be interviewed on camera. Yourgrau reports that the protestors have promised to picket Blankstein's offices again of Friday; that a candlelight vigil has been planned on Sunday at the Boston Public Library. Yourgrau does several takes of his comments for the news story. 1:09:13: V: Police officers are lined up in front of the entrance to the building. The sidewalk is crowded with members of the media, protestors and bystanders. 1:10:13: V: Vilakazi talks to the media. Vilakazi reports that Blankenstein has signed a letter of resignation, which he will hand to the protestors. Vilakazi reports that Blankenstein has said that the actions of the protestors influenced his decision to resign. Vilakazi notes that Blankenstein has said that he does not support apartheid. 1:11:20: V: The media and protestors peer curiously into the lobby of the building. Johnson exits the building, accompanied by King and Yancey. Johnson reads a statement of resignation from Blankstein. Blankstein's statement describes his post as honorary consul. The statement denies that Blankstein is a supporter of apartheid. The statement reads that Blankstein does not wish to be made an apologist for the South African government. Johnson shows the letter to the media. Johnson says that Blankenstein's resignation is a victory for the protestors. Johnson says that the protestors will target other corporations with ties to the South African government. 1:14:02: V: Johnson, King and Yancey walk away from the building. The three men walk toward a group of protestors on the street. A large group of protestors is picketing on the sidewalk. The protestors chant, "Blankstein, resign." Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) stands on the bed of a pick-up truck, leading the chant through a bullhorn. Johnson takes the bullhorn from the man and addresses the crowd. Stith starts to cheer. King and Yancey stand on the bed of the pick-up truck with Johnson. Johnson announces Blankstein's resignation and holds up the letter. Johnson reads a portion of the statement from Blankstein. The crowd cheers as Johnson reads the statement. Shots of the crowd of protestors. The crowd chants, "Freedom, yes. Apartheid, no."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/04/1984
Description: A group of apartheid protesters picket the South African Consulate at 100 Charles River Plaza in Boston. Police officers stand at the door to the consulate. Willard Johnson (Head of TransAfrica) speaks to the crowd of picketers through a bullhorn. Themba Vilakazi (member of the African National Congress) addresses the crowd, condemning the South African government and criticizing Ronald Reagan for engaging in a policy of "constructive engagement" with the South African government. City Councilor Charles Yancey addresses the crowd, praising Bishop Desmond Tutu and urging the protesters to engage in acts of civil disobedience to protest apartheid. Community activist Mel King addresses the crowd, calling for the resignation of Richard Blankstein (honorary consul to South Africa). King criticizes the Reagan administration's policies in South Africa and talks about the need for large companies to divest from South Africa. Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) stands beside the speakers. Johnson expresses his support for Nelson Mandela and all those fighting apartheid in South Africa.
1:00:00: Visual: The WGBH camera crew sets up its equipment. A diverse group of anti-apartheid protestors picket the South African Consulate at 100 Charles River Plaza. More than 100 protestors carry signs and chant, "1, 2, 3, 4, let's close the consulate door." Shot of a white protest leader leading the chant with a bullhorn. 1:02:48: V: A police officer stands in front of the entrance to the building. He carries a two-way radio. Another officer stands with him. 1:03:20: V: The protestors continue to picket, chanting "Hey, hey, ho, ho, this consulate has got to go." Willard Johnson (head of TransAfrica) speaks to the crowd of picketers through a bullhorn. He urges them to keep the picket line moving. 1:04:19: V: Themba Vilakazi (member, African National Congress) speaks to the crowd about the struggle of black South Africans. Vilakazi criticizes the policies of the ruling government in South Africa. He says that the South African government in engaged in a brutal repression of the residents of black townships. Vilakazi says that the African National Congress (ANC) welcomes worldwide condemnation of the white regime. Vilakazi criticizes the policy of Ronald Reagan (US President) toward South Africa. Vilakazi condemns the Reagan administration's policy of "constructive engagement" with the ruling government. Vilakazi praises the actions of three US political leaders who encouraged an anti-apartheid sit-in at the South African embassy in Washington DC. Vilakazi encourages anti-apartheid protestors across the world. Shots of the picketers. Vilakazi talks about the ANC struggle for freedom in South Africa. Vilakazi closes his speech by saying, "We will win." The protestors chant, "We will win." 1:07:10: V: Johnson introduces Charles Yancey (Boston City Council). Johnson says that Yancey introduced legislation in the City Council for the divestment of city funds from South Africa. Yancey talks about his "unceasing opposition" to the policies of apartheid. Yancey criticizes the repression of blacks in South Africa. Other protest leaders help Yancey to adjust the bullhorn. Yancey says that the international community cannot tolerate the apartheid policies of the South African government. Yancey talks about the previous day's visit to Boston by Bishop Desmond Tutu (South African anti-apartheid leader). Yancey notes that Tutu has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Yancey calls on all people to join the protest against apartheid. Yancey criticizes the federal government's policy toward South Africa. Yancey talks about the importance of acts of civil disobedience in opposing apartheid in South Africa. The crowd applauds. 1:10:15: V: The crowd applauds as Mel King (political activist) takes the bullhorn. King thanks the protestors for coming out to protest. Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) stands next to King. King challenges Richard Blankstein (honorary consul to South Africa) to come down from the consulate and speak to the protestors. King challenges Blankstein to resign in protest of the South African government's apartheid policies. King accuses the Reagan administration of engaging in racist policies in South Africa. King says that protestors will picket multi-national corporations who do business in South Africa; that large corporations need to divest from South Africa. King accuses these corporations of supporting apartheid. King talks about a South African trade union leader who has been jailed by the South African government. King says that the trade union leader has encouraged US protestors to push for corporate divestiture from South Africa. King calls for an end to Reagan's policies and an end to apartheid. 1:14:16: V: Johnson puts on a hat with a sign pinned to it. The sign reads, "For shame." Johnson addresses the crowd. Johnson quotes Nelson Mandela (ANC leader) as saying that he is prepared to die for a free South Africa. Johnson expresses support for Mandela and the black South Africans who are fighting apartheid.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/04/1984
Description: Callie Crossley interviews Boyce Slayman (Rainbow Coalition) about African American perceptions of US President, Ronald Reagan. Slayman criticizes Reagan's policies and talks about racism in the campaign. Slayman says that the Democratic Party needs to address civil rights issues and other issues important to the African American community. Slayman adds that African Americans will become more politically active at the local level; he says that Reagan cannot afford to ignore the minority population. The tape includes footage of African American and white voters lining up at a polling station to vote. Voters enter and exit voting booths. Slayman and other campaign workers hold campaign signs in front of a polling station; the workers approach voters as they enter the polling station. Crossley interviews an African American man outside of the polling station. The man talks about why he voted for Walter Mondale and Reagan's proposed cutbacks. The man says that Reagan does not care about issues affecting the African American community. Crossley interviews a white woman and a white man. The woman says that she voted for Mondale and Geraldine Ferraro because she is a democrat and a supporter of women's issues. The man says that he voted for Mondale and that Ferraro's presence on the ticket did not affect his decision.
1:00:11: Visual: Callie Crossley interviews Boyce Slayman (Rainbow Coalition) near Washington Street. Crossley asks Slayman about African American perceptions of Ronald Reagan (US President). Slayman says that African Americans have suffered under the Reagan administration; that Reagan has cut programs in education, healthcare, and nutrition programs; that Reagan has rolled back affirmative action programs. Crossley asks Slayman about racism in the campaign. Crossley notes that most African Americans are supporting Mondale; that the majority of white voters are supporting Reagan. Slayman says that racism is a factor in the election. Slayman says that Jesse Jackson (candidate for US President) was treated poorly by the media during the primary elections. Slayman says that the Democratic Party is not speaking to the issues of African American voters; that the Democratic Party needs to address civil rights issues. Crossley asks what African Americans can expect if Reagan wins the election. Slayman says that African Americans can only hope that Reagan will change his policies. Slayman lists the policies that need to be changed under the Reagan administration. Slayman says that the nation will see declines in the areas of employment, civil rights and housing if Reagan does not change his policies. Crossley asks if a continuation of Reagan's policies will lead to unrest or riots. Slayman says that he would not expect riots; that riots would ensue if Jackson were assassinated. Slayman says that people of color will become more politically active at the local level; that African Americans are ignored at the national level of politics; that African Americans cannot be ignored if they take control of their immediate environment. Slayman says that African Americans will not support growth at their expense. Slayman says that an increase in African American political activity grew from African American opposition to Reagan's policies. Slayman says that Reagan cannot afford to ignore minority populations; that these populations need to benefit from the nation's growth and economic recovery. 1:07:23: V: The camera crew takes cutaway shots of Crossley and Slayman. Crossley and Slayman speak informally. Crossley and Slayman discuss whether the Democrats will retain control of Congress. Slayman talks about voting patterns in the South. 1:08:26: V: African American and white voters are lined up to vote in a hallway outside of a polling station. Poll workers sit behind a table. The poll workers flip through voter lists as they check in the voters. Shots of voters entering and exiting voting booths. An African American woman directs voters to the voting booths. Shots of the voting booths with curtains closed; of poll workers checking in voters. Shot of a voting machine with levers inside of a voting booth. 1:12:41: V: An African American man hands out flyers outside of a polling station. Slayman campaigns for a candidate outside of the polling station. Slayman and other African American campaign workers approach voters outside of the polling station. Shots of campaign signs for John Kerry (candidate for US Senate) and Walter Mondale (candidate for US President). The campaign workers continue to campaign outside of the polling station. A pick-up truck passes by, playing music from a loudspeaker. A sign on the truck reads, "Jesse yes. Walter no. Independent is the way to go." Shots of campaign signs. 1:14:51: V: Crossley interviews an African American man and an African American woman. The man says that he voted for Mondale because he is the best candidate. Crossley asks if Reagan has any understanding or caring for the needs of African Americans. The man says that Reagan does not; that Reagan's past performance shows that he does not care. The man fears that Reagan will make more cutbacks if reelected. Crossley asks if the man was influenced by Mondale's choice of Geraldine Ferraro as his running mate. The man says that Mondale sent a positive message by choosing Ferraro; that the ERA (Equal Rights Amendment) is a good thing. Crossley asks the woman about her vote. The woman says that she voted for Mondale. The woman says that she does not want to be interviewed. 1:16:33: V: Crossley interviews a white woman and a white man. The woman says that she voted for the Mondale/Ferraro ticket because she is a Democrat and supports women's issues. The woman says that she would have voted Democratic even if Ferraro had not been on the ticket. The woman says that the ERA must be passed. Crossley asks the man about his vote. The man says that he voted for the Mondale/Ferraro ticket because he is embarrassed to have Reagan as the leader of the country. The man says that he was more influenced by issues than he was by the presence of Ferraro on the ticket.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/06/1984
Description: Dr. Gloria White-Hammond (pediatrician) examines a young Latina child in an examining room. The child cries and White-Hammond comforts her, speaking in English and in Spanish. White-Hammond speaks to the child's mother about treatments for the child. White-Hammond examines the child with a stethoscope. Interview with White-Hammond about a program designed to increase the number of African American physicians across the nation. She says that medical schools lack the financial, academic and other kinds of support necessary to retain some students. She discusses the need for more minority physicians, who bring a "sensitivity" to the treatment of minority patients. Video cuts out and then comes back with stills of infographics on new Boston University medical school program and minority doctors.
1:03:41: V: The camera crew sets up a shot of the doctor examining the child. The child begins to cry. White-Hammond examines the rash on the child's leg. The child grows upset as she sits on the examining table. The child's mother removes her dress. White-Hammond comforts the child in Spanish. White-Hammond examines the child with a stethoscope. White-Hammond tries to comfort the child as she cries. 1:06:32: V: White-Hammond talks to Callie Crossley (WGBH reporter) and the camera crew. Crossley asks White-Hammond her opinion on a program designed to increase the number of African American physicians across the nation. White-Hammond says that she is not very familiar with the program; that the program sounds like a good idea. Crossley explains some of the features of the program. Crossley notes that the program eliminates the MCAT entrance exam for medical school. White-Hammond says that the program has potential; that the structure of the program and the selection process will be important. White-Hammond says that medical schools lack the kind of support system needed to retain some students; that financial, academic and other kinds of support are necesssary for students to do well in medical school. White-Hammond says that the medical field needs more minority doctors; that minority patients request to be treated by minority doctors. White-Hammond says that minority doctors bring a "sensitivity" to the treatment of minority patients; that many minority students have the intellectual capability and the determination to become successful doctors. Crossley closes the interview.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/28/1984
Description: Thomas Saltonstall (Area Director, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) speaks at a press conference to mark the opening of a Boston office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Saltonstall introduces Robert Williams (regional attorney for the EEOC). Saltonstall discusses the EEOC's commitment to the elimination of race discrimination in employment and to equal opportunities for women, older workers and minorities; he announces the initiatives planned by the EEOC to enforce federal anti-discrimination laws. Saltonstall says that the EEOC will focus on voluntary compliance. Saltonstall discusses statistics illustrating the underrepresentation, or "opportunity gap," in the employment of women in management and of minorities in the city's overall work force. Saltonstall presents statistics illustrating the "opportunity gap" for minorities in the printing/publishing industry, the communications industry, investment companies, brokerage firms, and retail stores. Saltonstall talks about the concentration of Boston's minority workers in lower-paying jobs. Tape 1 of 2
1:00:05: Visual: A federal official from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the US Department of Labor stands at a podium speaking to the media at a press conference on the opening of a Boston office of the EEOC. The official commends Thomas Saltonstall (Regional Director, EEOC) and the General Services Administration (GSA) for the design and effective use of space in the new EEOC office. Shot of the EEOC seal on the front of the podium. The official says that the EEOC is committed to equal treatment and access for all citizens; that minorities and women must be given an equal opportunity to advance themselves in the workplace. The official talks about the need for society to renew its commitment to civil rights. The official thanks the audience. Shot of audience members. 1:05:16: V: Saltonstall introduces Robert Williams (regional attorney for the EEOC). Saltonstall talks about the need to redress the employment opportunity gaps which exist for minorities in Boston. Saltonstall says that he will focus on race discrimination in employment; that the EEOC is also committed to equal opportunities for women, older workers and other minorities. Saltonstall announces the initiatives which will be taken by the EEOC to enforce federal anti-discrimination laws. Saltonstall says that the EEOC will promote a program of voluntary compliance with the statutes; that the EEOC will expand its services to the public; that the EEOC will focus on eliminating broad patterns and practices of employment discrimination; that the EEOC will focus on improving the quality and impact of the lawsuits filed. Saltonstall notes that he does not want to preach or embarass anyone. 1:08:23: V: Saltonstall defines the term "opportunity gap." Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the opportunity gap existing in 1980 for women as officials and managers in the Boston area. Saltonstall says that Boston rates among the lowest of six cities in a survey measuring the percentage of women in managerial positions. Saltonstall notes that minorities make up 29% of the labor force in the city of Boston; that minorities make up only 8% of the work force in the metropolitan area; that this disparity is greater in Boston than in any other major city. Saltonstall explains that the metropolitan figure of 8% has been used to calculate opportunity gaps; that the metropolitan figure is low when applied to businesses in the city. Saltonstall defines minorities. Saltonstall explains how the statistics were compiled. 1:13:58: V: Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the opportunity gap for minorities in the business of security/commodity brokerage. Saltonstall explains that individual companies will have performances which are better or worse than the average. Saltonstall notes that an unnamed private company in the Boston area has been targeted for enforcement action by the EEOC; that the unnamed company employs between 500 and 1000 employees; that all of the employees are white and only 3 employees are women. 1:15:28: Visual: Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the underrepresentation in the printing/publishing industry. Saltonstall notes that minorities are underrepresented as office workers and sales workers. Close-up shot of chart indicating statistical representation of minorities in jobs in the printing/publishing industry. Saltonstall says that many employers have claimed that they cannot find qualified minority employees to hire. Saltonstall says that there is not a shortage of qualified minority employees for low-paying clerical and sales positions. Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap widened for minority workers in the communications industry and other industries between 1970 and 1982. Close-up shot of the chart illustrating statistical representation of minority workers in the communications industry. Saltonstall notes that minorities are underrepresented in all white collar job categories in the communications industry except for office/clerical jobs. Saltonstall adds that many major companies in the communications industry failed to report statistics to the EEOC; that private employers are required by law to report statistics to the EEOC. 1:17:13: Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap widened for minority workers in food stores between 1970 and 1982. Saltonstall says that the statistics are "appalling"; that minority workers are underrepresented in all positions except as laborors and sales workers. Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating representation of minority workers in investment companies. Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap for minorities in investment companies widened between 1970 and 1982; that hiring for managerial positions tripled, while the number of minority workers in those positions decreased. Saltonstall notes that minority workers are underrepresented in all white collar jobs except for clerical positions; that all of the laborors working for investment companies are white; that all of the companies represented by the statistics are located within the city of Boston. Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating minority worker representation in general merchandise stores. Saltonstall says that the retail industry should be hiring more minority workers because a significant share of their income comes from minority shoppers. Saltonstall notes that the opportunity gap for minority workers in general merchandise stores widened between 1970 and 1982; that the minority participation rate in the industry has declined since 1970. Saltonstall talks about the concentration of minorities in lower-paying jobs.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/19/1984
Description: Kim Reid , a student at Brighton High School, sits with a group of students in a classroom. The students talk about school activities and look at yearbooks while discussing a movie they saw on television. Another group of students in the classroom also look at yearbooks. This tape also includes footage of Reid exiting Brighton High School and boarding a school bus outside.
1:00:00: Visual: Kim Reid (Brighton High School student) sits with a three white and Hispanic students in a classroom at Brighton High School. They talk about ordering sweatshirts to sell at school. The students talk about scheduling meetings after school. Another student points out that Kim needs to know about meetings in advance because she needs to arrange transportation home. The students talk about choosing a theme for their class night. A female student seated across from Kim looks at a yearbook. A racially diverse group of boys is seated near Kim's group. A white teacher arranges files and papers at her desk. Kim's group continues to talk to one another. Kim's group looks at a yearbook. Close-up shot of Kim. The students talk about the upcoming prom. Shots of a girl turning pages of the yearbook. Kim opens the yearbook in front of her. Kim says that she knows fewer people now than she did in the ninth grade. The group identifies and talks about the people in the yearbook. The group of boys also look at yearbooks. 1:08:24: V: Kim walks over to the teacher's desk. She looks for a book on the teacher's desk. The crew sets up a shot of Kim walking across the room with a book. Kim sits down with her group. Kim and the other students talk about a TV movie. Shots of the two other girls in Kim's group. Shots of the group of boys talking to one another. 1:14:00: V: Shots of the exterior of Brighton High School; of school buses waiting on Warren Street in front of the school. An African American male student jokes around with the camera crew. Kim descends the stairs toward the buses with a group of African American and Asian American students. The students wave and talk to the camera crew as they board the buses. A police officer stands against the fence on the sidewalk. Kim walks toward her bus. The camera crew does a three takes of Kim and other students boarding the buses.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1985
Description: Martin Nolan (Boston Globe) opens a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Nolan talks about the novel. Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) addresses the meeting. Flynn says that the novel is the first piece of journalism to report accurately on the busing crisis. Flynn says that he is pleased that the novel touches on class issues as related to school desegregation in Boston. Flynn talks about the poor institutional leadership that led to the deterioration of the Boston Public School System. He adds that parents were never consulted during the school desegregation process. Mark Roosevelt (Executive Director, John F. Kennedy Library) addresses the audience and compliments Lukas on his book. Lukas addresses the meeting. Lukas mentions the name of each family member portrayed in the novel. He asks them all to stand. He expresses his sadness at the absence of the McGoff family (family portrayed in Common Ground) from the meeting. Lukas notes each family's connection to John F. Kennedy (former US President). Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 1 of 8
0:59:58: Visual: A man addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the book Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author). The man speaks from a podium. Panelists are assembled at tables on either side of the podium. Panelists include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe). The man introduces Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe). Nolan reads from a glowing review of Common Ground, written by Robert B. Parker (author) for the Chicago Tribune. Nolan praises the book. He talks about the book's attention to the people it portrays. Nolan says that the book is not about the "movers and the shakers," but it is about "the moved and the shaken." Nolan jokes that everyone in the audience is a minor character in the book. Nolan introduces Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston). Nolan says that Flynn is always searching for common ground among the residents of Boston. The audience applauds. 1:03:39: V: Flynn says that he is honored to address the audience. Flynn says that Lukas' book is the first piece of journalism to report accurately on the "real Boston." Flynn notes the complexity issues portrayed in the book. Flynn says that the vast majority of Bostonians occupied a "middle ground" during the busing crisis. Flynn says that Lukas listened to the residents of Boston who lived through the busing crisis; that Lukas found the common ground among these people. Flynn says that there are more issues that unite people than there are issues which divide people. Flynn says that people are looking for the same opportunities in education and training. Flynn adds that people in Boston are still struggling under the weight of social and economic injustice. Flynn talks about the need to give "poor people" an opportunity to receive a good education. Flynn says that he is pleased that Lukas's book tackles the issues of class. Flynn says that the deterioration of the school system in Boston was a result of poor institutional leadership. Flynn adds that no one individual or organization was responsible for the lack of leadership; that it reflects poorly on everyone in the city. Flynn says that the institutional responses to problems in education were unsatisfactory to parents and schoolchildren. Flynn adds that the schools needed to be desegregated and reformed. Flynn says that parents of schoolchildren were never consulted during the desegregation process. Flynn says that the busing crisis divided people along class lines; that education became a secondary concern. Flynn adds that "a wall of legal paper clouded the city of Boston." Flynn says that parents were powerless to effect change in the desegregation process. Flynn talks about his respect for the people in the audience and on the panel at the town meeting. Flynn cautions the audience and panelists at the town meeting not to spend the day rehashing the history of the busing crisis. Flynn says that the city of Boston must move forward and continue to find its "common ground." The audience applauds. 1:11:28: V: Nolan runs through the program for the town meeting. Nolan notes that two panelists are missing; that there are audience members in a second theater; that those audience members will be included in the discussion period. Nolan adds that each panelists will speak about Lukas' book. Nolan paraphrases Flynn in urging the panelists to focus on how the city of Boston can reach "common ground." Nolan introduces Mark Roosevelt (Executive Director, John F. Kennedy Library). Roosevelt introduces J. Anthony Lukas. Roosevelt thanks the audience and the panelists. Roosevelt thanks Lukas for his contribution to the city of Boston. Roosevelt says that Lukas's book has helped Boston residents to understand their differences and to see their city more clearly. The audience applauds. 1:14:51: V: Lukas thanks Roosevelt for making the town meeting possible. Lukas talks about his roots in New York City. Lukas says that his "heart is in Massachusetts." Lukas says that many audience members helped him with the book. He thanks those people. Lukas makes special mention of the families portrayed in the book. Lukas says that he sees the families as "collaborators" on the book, not as "subjects." Lukas talks about the candor, generosity and courage of the families who allowed themselves to be portrayed in the book. Lukas mentions each family member by name, and then invites them to stand as one. Lukas expresses his sadness that no member of the McGoff family is present. Lukas mentions the names of Rachel Twymon, Rachel Twymon (daughter), Michael Twymon, Cassandra Twymon, Wayne Twymon, Valerie Twymon, Reverend George Walker, Hasan Sharif, Joan Diver, Colin Diver, Brad Diver, Ned Diver, George McKechnie, Ethleen Diver, Norman McKechnie, Judy McKechnie. The audience applauds for the family members when they stand up. 1:18:44: V: Lukas notes that it is fitting that the town meeting be held at the JFK Library. Lukas adds that all three families were "charter members" of the Kennedy Coalition twenty-five years ago. Lukas says that Alice McGoff can remember seeing John F. Kennedy (former US President) march in the Bunker Hill Day Parade in 1946. Lukas talks about McGoff's enduring allegiance to Kennedy. Lukas says that Rachel Twymon used to listen to Martin Luther King (African American civil rights leader) when he preached at the Twelfth Baptist Church in Roxbury. Lukas talks about Twymon's respect for the connection between King and Kennedy. Lukas notes that Joan Diver attended Kennedy's inauguration in 1960.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985
Description: Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts) addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The meeting is held in honor of the release of J. Anthony Lukas's novel, Common Ground. The novel is about the busing crisis in Boston. Brown says that Lukas' novel brings perspective to the busing crisis. Brown commends Lukas on his exhaustive research into the history of each family portrayed in the novel. Brown talks briefly about the history of each family. He notes that Lukas's novel depicts the richness and struggle of everyday life. Marie Clark (parent and member of the Home and School Association) addresses the panel. Clark says that she speaks from the perspective of a parent who lived through the busing crisis. Clark says that she supports school integration, but opposed the court order. She adds that the court order was disruptive and too broad in scope. She urges audience members to support the Boston Public School system. She notes that the school system has improved as a result of desegregation. Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist) addresses the meeting. Gillen says that he remains opposed to busing. He adds that the federal court usurped the rights of the parents of Boston's schoolchildren. Gillen notes that the anti-busing movement was committed to protesting by legal and moral means. He says that he is glad to live in a society where protest and opposition to the law is allowed. Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston) addresses the audience. Groden says that the court orders did not allow for genuine input from parents. He says that a parents' movement could have overcome issues of race and class during the busing crisis. Groden talks about the need for grassroots leadership within the city and the need for a network of human connections across the city's neighborhoods. Panelists at the meeting include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, Atlantic Monthly), Brown, Clarke, Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Groden, Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, Boston Globe). Tape 3 of 8
1:00:01: Visual: Martin Nolan (The Boston Globe) addresses a Town Meeting on Race and Class at the John F. Kennedy Library. The town meeting is held in honor of the release of the book, Common Ground by J. Anthony Lukas (author). Nolan speaks from a podium. Panelists are assembled at tables on either side of the podium. Panelists include Jack Beatty (Senior Editor, The Atlantic Monthly), Thomas Brown (Professor, University of Massachusetts), Marie Clarke (parent and member of the Home and School Association), Moe Gillen (Charlestown community activist), Father Michael Groden (Archdiocese of Boston), Robert Kiley (former Deputy Mayor of Boston), Theodore Landsmark (attorney), Sandra Lynch (former general counsel to the State Department of Education), Kim Marshall (Director of Curriculum, Boston Public Schools), Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), and Thomas Winship (former editor, The Boston Globe). Nolan introduces Thomas Brown. Brown says that he is a historian; that many of the other panelists were participants in the busing crisis. Brown says that comments that Lukas focused on the history of the McGoff, Twymon, and Diver families, which were each portrayed in the book. Brown commends Lukas for his exhaustive research into the history of each family. Brown notes that Lukas probably uncovered facts which were previously unknown to each family. Brown talks about the way in whick Lukas shows how past history affects the contemporary events portrayed in the book. Brown says that Lukas's book brings needed perspective to the busing crisis. Brown says that the Diver family emerges from the violence of the colonial struggle in Boston; that the McGoff family is informed by the violent past of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Ireland; that the Twymon family emerges from the violent past of slavery. Brown says that the recent struggles of each family pale in comparison to the hardships and struggles of their past family histories. Brown notes that the trouble endured by the families during the busing crisis has been accompanied by social progress and change. Brown says that previous speakers have suggested that a common ground existed in the coalition which was formed around John F. Kennedy (former US President) in 1960. Brown suggests that Lukas' book is also "common ground." Brown says that Common Ground is a "loving" book which moves readers to tears; that it details the richness and struggles of everyday life. Brown says that readers can take away the love put into the book by Lukas; that the readers of the book can find "common ground." The audience applauds. 1:08:30: V: Nolan introduces Marie Clark. Clark says that she brings the perspective of a parent who lived through the busing crisis. Clark says that she was one among many parents who supported integration, but opposed the plan put forth by Arthur Garrity (federal judge). Clark says that the plan was disruptive and too broad in scope. Clark says that she objected to the disruption of schools which were already integrated; that she objected to African American students being bused to a new school at the start of each year; that she objected to students being denied access to programs because of racial quotas. Clarke says that wrongs were committed by people on both sides of the issue; that Boston has emerged from the busing crisis as a stronger city. Clarke says that the Boston Public Schools have improved as a result of desegregation; that "common ground" can be found in the children of Boston who attend the public schools. Clarke adds that the Boston Public School System needs the support of parents, the business community and suburbanites. Clarke says that the future of the city depends upon a strong school system. The audience applauds. 1:11:42: V: Nolan introduces Moe Gillen. Gillen says that many in the audience are familiar with his opinions on the busing crisis. Gillen says that "common ground" can be found in Lukas' book; that the book brings people together; that the book shows the "common heritage" of Boston residents. Gillen notes that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and Dennis Kearney (Suffolk County Sheriff) are in the audience; that Flynn and Kearney were representatives of the anti-busing movement. Gillen says that many in the anti-busing movement were committed to protesting the court orders in a "legal, moral way." Gillen praises anti-busing mothers for their commitment to their families; that many anti-busing parents set a good example for their children. Gillen says that he remains "adamently opposed to a government that takes and usurps the rights of parents." Gillen says that hindsight shows that the court orders were not successful. Gillen says that the busing crisis showed the strength of US society; that opponents to busing did not resort to "violence and anarchy," even though their "personal values" were at stake. Gillen says that he is thankful to live in the US instead of "some banana republic." Gillen invites audience members to address the issues during the discussion. The audience applauds. 1:16:08: V: Nolan introduces Father Michael Groden. Nolan talks about Groden's work as an advocate for the city's working lobstermen and his work on school issues during the busing crisis. Groden says that he wrote a letter to Garrity as he was completing his first term as director of the Citywide Coordinating Council (CCC); that he wrote to Garrity about the "parent movement" withing the city schools. Groden says that he did not think the system allowed for genuine and enduring input from parents. Groden notes that a "common ground" presented itself through the opportunity for parents to come together and effect changes in the schools. Groden says that the opportunity to bring parents together was not fully exploited; that a parents' movement would have overcome issues of race and class. Groden says that a parents' movement needs to be organized in order to build connections in and across the neighborhoods of the city. Groden says that the roles of civic and religious leaders are discussed in Lukas's book. Groden says that the city was focused on "elitist" leadership instead of grassroots leadership. Groden notes that grassroots political and religious leadership is much more effective than "moral imperatives." Groden says that moral courage is born of faith and of a healthy set of relationships with others. Groden adds that Lukas' book benefits from Lukas' ability to communicate effectively with others. Groden says that Ray Flynn (mayor of Boston) has set the right tone for the city since his inauguration; that Flynn has "lived across the lines of color and, to some extent, class." Groden adds that "moral imperatives and gospel mandates" are clear in their message. Groden concludes by saying that "common ground" can only be found in a new "set of human connections." The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1985