Description: David Boeri reports on a demonstration by members of ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now), outside of the offices of Mayor Ray Flynn. Demonstrators advocate for more affordable housing in Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan. Footage of Peggy Jackson (ACORN demonstrator) and Neil Sullivan (Director of housing policy for the Flynn administration) debating the administration's affordable housing policy. Boeri notes that the demonstrators demanded the deed to a vacant lot in order to develop affordable housing themselves.
1:00:03: Visual: Shot of a multi-colored, hand-drawn sign reading, "Welcome to the mayor's office." A group of demonstrators stand outside of the mayor's office chanting, "Mayor Flynn, come on out." One of the demonstrators holds a sign reading, "ACORN: Housing Now." The demonstrators are affiliated with ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now). V: Shot of an office telephone; of the demonstrators. Shot of a sign reading, "Shelter is our need. Give us the deed." David Boeri reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) refused to meet with the demonstrators; that the demonstrators are fighting for affordable housing in Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan. V: Footage of Peggy Jackson (ACORN demonstrator) saying that her organization can build affordable housing if they are given one lot to build on. Boeri reports that the demonstrators say that the housing that the city calls "affordable" is not affordable for Roxbury residents; that the median income in Roxbury is $13,000. V: Footage of Jackson talking to Neil Sullivan (Director of housing policy for Flynn). Jackson says that fewer than 500 units of the city's affordable housing are affordable for Roxbury residents. Sullivan says that fewer than 500 housing units were built by the White administration between 1981 and 1983. Boeri reports that Sullivan blames the housing crisis on Kevin White (former Mayor of Boston) and a lack of federal money. Boeri reports that the Flynn adminstration is bundling low-income units with high-income units; that the Flynn administration is using the high-income units to subsidize the low-income units. V: Shots of Jackson; of the demonstrators. Footage of Sullivan saying that the Flynn administration has built over 500 low-income and moderate-income units in the first 6 months of 1986. The demonstrators respond that they cannot afford these units. Boeri reports that the demonstrators will have to incorporate themselves as non-profit developers before they can bid on a vacant lot. V: Footage of Sullivan telling the demonstrators that other groups have incorporated themselves and are bidding on land. Jackson tells Sullivan that the demonstrators do not have time to incorporate themselves; that another 3,000 people will be homeless before they are able to complete the legal paperwork. Shot of Sullivan. Boeri reports that the ACORN demonstrators ended up walking out; that the demonstrators say that they will take over the land next week. V: Footage of the demonstrators leaving the mayor's office.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/14/1986
Description: Massachusetts has decided to allow businesses and insurance companies to test people for the AIDS antibody. Critics complain that the proposed policy favors insurance companies over patients. Paula Gold, Massachusetts Secretary of Consumer Affairs, speaks at a press conference. She says that testing will be allowed under limited circumstances and controlled conditions. The Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts is a strong opponent of the policy. Don Polk of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts speaks at a press conference. He condemns involuntary testing except for clear public health reasons. He believes that the policy does not contain appropriate measures to ensure patient confidentiality and is discriminatory against African American life insurance policy holders. He states that the proposed policy fails to take into account the discrepancy in life expectancy between African American AIDS victims and white AIDS victims. The Urban League believes that the new state policy de-emphasizes public health education campaigns, which are important in minority communities. Public health informational brochures and African Americans at a bus stop. Following the edited story is footage of public health education literature. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Boston City Council delays vote on school reform
1:00:01: Visual: Shots of medical laboratory workers undertaking the processes involved in testing vials of blood. Callie Crossley reports that businesses and insurance companies have been lobbying for the right to test for the AIDS antibody. Crossley reports that Paula Gold (Secretary of Consumer Affairs) and the administration of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) have decided to allow testing for life insurance. V: Footage Gold at a press conference. Gold says that testing will be allowed under limited circumstances and under controlled conditions. Crossley reports that critics complain that the proposed policy favors insurance companies; that Peter Hiam (former Insurance Commissioner) resigned in protest of the policy. Crossley reports that the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts also disagrees with the proposed policy. V: Footage of Don Polk (Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts) at a press conference. Polk says that involuntary testing of any segment of the population should only take place for clear public health reasons; that involuntary testing will have a "chilling effect" on those who have a reason to seek testing; that involuntary testing includes tests taken as a precondition for life insurance. Shot of a white audience member at the press conference. Crossley adds that Polk says that some provisions of the policy discriminate against African Americans; that African Americans are more likely to purchase life insurance policies for under $100,000. Crossley reports that the new provisions state that purchasers of life insurance policies under $100,000 will not get payment if they die of AIDS within two years of purchasing a policy. V: Shots of African Americans waiting for public transportation in Roxbury; of an African American man crossing the street; of African Americans boarding an MBTA bus. Footage of Polk at the press conference. Polk refers to evidence that African American AIDS patients have an average life expectancy of three to nine months after their initial diagnosis; that white victims have an average life expectancy of two years. Polk says that the proposed policy fails to take into account the discrepancies between African American and white life expectancies. Shot of an African American woman in the audience. Crossley reports that a spokesperson from Gold's office said that Gold "did not feel that the regulations discriminated against blacks." V: Shot of Gold speaking at a press conference. Crossley notes that Polk does not think that the proposed regulations go far enough in guaranteeing confidentiality. V: Shot of an African American man taking notes at Polk's press conference. Polk says that there are confidentiality measures in the regulations; that there is no enforcement mechanism to ensure adherence to those measures; that we live in an age of "rapid information processing." Shot of a "public health fact sheet" released by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health; of public health informational brochures about the AIDS virus. Crossley says that the Urban League accuses the new regulations of taking emphasis away from public health education and initiatives. Crossley notes that Polk says that public health campaigns are important in minority communities; that African Americans make up 25% of the 25,000 current AIDS victims. Crossley reports that the Urban League will recommend at a public hearing that the new proposed policy be rejected.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/03/1987
Description: Meg Vaillancourt interviews Sterling Anderson of the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) outside of the Dudley Branch Library about the lack of affordable housing in the Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan areas. Anderson says that the city is not doing enough to provide affordable housing for low-income residents. Anderson questions the city's definition of low-income. He adds that most residents do not make enough money to meet the city's definition of low-income. Anderson and a group of ACORN protesters march to the offices of the Boston Redevelopment Authority on Washington Street in Dudley Square. Anderson and the protesters enter the office and confront Ricardo Millet of the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) about the city's affordable housing policies. The protesters read a list of demands including that 70% of all new developments in the area must target low and moderate-income residents. The protesters demand information on all new planned developments in the Roxbury/Dorchester/Mattapan neighborhoods. Millet discusses the city's affordable housing policy with the protesters. He gives them handouts including a list of planned developments in the area. Millet says that the BRA is trying to provide affordable housing despite a lack of subsidies from the federal government.
1:00:14: Visual: A fire engine pulls out onto Washington Street. Elevated train tracks are visible. An African American firefighter operates the rear of the truck. Cars pull to the side of a congested street to let another fire engine pass. 1:01:22: V: Meg Vaillancourt sets up an interview with Sterling Anderson (ACORN). Vaillancourt asks about the march organized by ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now) to protest the affordable housing policies of the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA). Anderson says that redevelopment in the areas of Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan is not geared toward the current residents of those areas; that ACORN is trying to put pressure on the mayor and the BRA to include housing for current residents. Anderson says that most of the residents of those areas do not make more than $13,000 per year; that one-bedroom apartments are selling for $18,000 in one of the new developments. Anderson says that Ray Flynn (mayor of Boston) deserves credit for developing housing; that these efforts are insignificant if the residents of these areas cannot live in the new housing. Anderson talks about how poor people have been thrown out of areas like the South End. Anderson says that the residents need housing, not shelters; that the city needs to commit itself to affordable housing. Anderson says that the city defines low income as a salary of $18,000 to $23,000 per year; that the city defines a moderate income as an income of $23,000 per year. Anderson says that he defines low income as under $13,000; that he defines moderate income as $13,000 to $24,000 per year. Vaillancourt asks if the city is really serving its lower income residents. Anderson says that the city is not serving those residents; that a lot of people cannot afford housing; that the city is pushing low-income residents out of the areas of Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan. Vaillancourt asks if race is the issue. Anderson says that it is an economic issue; that the low-income residents of Roxbury are African American; that there are low-income whites with the same problems in South Boston, Chelsea, and East Boston. Vaillancourt asks if Anderson doubts Flynn's commitment to the neighborhoods. Anderson says that he respects Flynn; that Flynn needs to understand that low-income residents are committed to fighting for affordable housing; that he needs to help these people. Anderson says that he cannot afford to give up on the fight for affordable housing; that he will have no place to live in five years if he does not put up a struggle. Anderson says that shelters are not the answer to the housing problem; that poor people do not want to live in shelters. Anderson says that there are some people who benefit from shelters; that the majority of people with low incomes are intelligent and hard-working. Anderson says that he hears the same statistics from the city at every meeting on affordable housing; that the city needs to make a commitment because working people cannot afford housing right now. The crew takes cutaway shots of Vaillancourt and Anderson. Anderson says that the BRA says the same thing at every meeting; that public housing advocates are always pushing for more low-income housing. Anderson says that 70% of the housing in the areas of Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan needs to be for low- and moderate-income people. Anderson says that people in these areas have no place to live, despite the BRA's commitment to affordable housing; that developments in these areas should be priced at $35,000 instead of $65,000. 1:08:18: V: Housing protesters gather on the sidewalk on Washington Street, outside of the BRA's Dudley Office. The elevated train tracks are visible. The protesters chant, "We want housing. We won't wait. 2, 4, 6, 8." The protesters gather behind a banner reading, "ACORN." Shot of the BRA sign above the entrance to the office. The protesters march slowly into the BRA offices. The protesters chant, "What do we want? Housing. When do we want it? Now." The majority of the protesters are African American. The protesters file into the building. 1:10:48: V: The housing protesters enter a large room swith chairs set up for a meeting. The protesters chant, "2, 4, 6, 8. We want housing. We won't wait." The protesters stand at the side of the room, holding protest signs and chanting. Shot of a sign reading, "Third notice: Please be advised that you are required to build affordable housing." Shots of individual protesters. Ricardo Millet (BRA) sits in one of the chairs in the meeting room. He watches the protesters with interest. Millet invites the protesters to sit down. Anderson says that the protesters will remain standing. Anderson addresses Millet. Anderson says that there is a housing shortage in the areas of Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan; that the BRA housing policy is ineffective; that residents of these areas need housing that they can afford. Anderson says that the newly developed housing target people with incomes of at least $23,000 per year; that most residents make less than $13,000 per year. Anderson says that the BRA and the city of Boston need to make a commitment to low-income housing; that 70% of the new development needs to target low-income residents. Anderson demands information on new developments planned for the Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan areas. Anderson says that the BRA has not been forthcoming with that information; that the BRA needs to work with developers work with developers who have committed to building low-income housing. 1:14:34: V: An African American woman addresses Millet. She reads a list of ACORN demands: the cessation of development on Fountain Hill by June 15 unless the development is 70% affordable to those with low- and moderate-incomes; 70% of all new housing must target low- and moderate-income residents; that ACORN wants information on plans for new development in the area. Another protester says that the 70% quota applies to housing in the Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan areas; that many residents of these areas make less than $13,000 per year; that an average income is more than $26,000 per year. The protester says that the voices of the poor must be heard. The protesters applaud. Anderson asks for a map of planned developments in the Roxbury/Mattapan area. Anderson says that the protesters will not allow new developments to be built if they cannot live in them. Millet stands to face the protesters. He listens as Anderson speaks. 1:16:10: V: Millet addresses the protesters. He invites the protesters to sit down and to discuss the issues with him. Anderson says that the protesters have been sitting in meetings for months; that the protesters want a list of the planned developments in the area. Millet says that he has never been asked for a list of the planned developments before now. Millet offers to provide the protesters with a list of projects currently undertaken by the BRA. Millet gives copies of a handout to the protesters. Millet notes that the BRA, under the Flynn administration, has approved 912 units of housing. Millet adds that the handout includes a list of approved projects as well as their locations, developers and affordablility. Shot of the printed handout. Millet says that 60% of the units in the approved developments are affordable to low- and moderate-income people. Shot of statistic on the handout reading, "60.4% of units below market rate." Anderson asks Millet to define low- and moderate-income. Millet says that the BRA will work with the protesters on the issue of low-income housing; that the BRA and the city want to respond to the needs of low-income people. Millet notes that it is hard to achieve these goals because the federal government has stopped subsidizing housing. Millet adds that the city has done well to achieve a 60% affordability rate in its new projects. Millet gives out copies of another handout. Millet explains that the handout covers the BRA's and the city's positions on affordable housing; that the handout describes the problem of affordable housing. Millet notes that the city is aware of the housing shortage. Anderson says that he gets the same responses every time he meets with the city and the BRA about housing; that no one is responding to their concerns. Shot of the crowd of protesters. Millet says that he has met with ACORN representatives in the past; that the BRA agrees with ACORN on the need to provide affordable housing; that the BRA is trying to achieve these goals without subsidies from the federal government. Millet stresses the fact that the BRA is committed to achieving these goals; that the BRA is trying their best to build affordable housing; that the BRA's achievement of a 60% affordabliltiy rate is remarkable.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/28/1986
Description: Carmen Fields reports on the restoration of the African Meeting House on Beacon Hill. The Meeting House is the oldest African American church in the nation and it was gutted by fire in 1973. Interview with Philip Hart (Board of Directors, African Meeting House) and Ruth Batson (Director, African Meeting House). Hart talks about the significance of the Meeting House. Batson talks about plans for music, scholarly debate, and religious services at the Meeting House. Fields notes that a series of rededication programs will begin soon. Footage of construction workers and staff at the Meeting House and photographs documenting the history of African Americans in Boston.
1:00:01: Visual: Footage of woodworkers and construction workers doing restoration work at the African Meeting House on Beacon Hill. Carmen Fields reports that the African Meeting House is being restored; that the African Meeting House is the oldest African American church in the nation. V: Shots of the exterior of the Meeting House; of a commemorative stone reading, "A gift to Cato Gardner. First promoter of this building, 1806." Footage of Fields interviewing Philip Hart (Board of Directors, African Meeting House). Hart says that Frederick Douglass (abolitionist) spoke at the Meeting House; that the Meeting House was important to the Underground Railroad. Hart talks about the history of the Meeting House. Hart says that the Meeting House hosted notable figures and the average citizens. Shots black and white images of Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison (abolitionist). Fields reports that the Meeting House was gutted by fire in 1973; that a series of rededication programs begin on Sunday. V: Shots of the interior of the Meeting House with scaffolding; of white and African American workers involved in the rededication programs. Shots of Ruth Batson (Director, African Meeting House); of a black and white image of the Meeting House; of a 19th century photograph of a group of African Americans. Footage of Batson saying that she would like to have music, scholarly debate, and special religious services in the Meeting House. Batson says that the building will serve multiple purposes; that she hopes it will unite the people of Boston. Shots of photographs by Hamilton Smith, documenting the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century African American community. Fields notes that photographs by Hamilton Smith will be part of a permanent exhibit at the Meeting House. Field adds that the nineteenth-century African American community was centered on the north slope of Beacon Hill. V: Shot of a black and white photo of three African American women; of a black and white image of the Meeting House. Footage of Batson saying that the African American community began on Beacon Hill; that the African American community must celebrate their heritage. Footage of Hart saying that the building is a reminder of the role of the African American community in the history of Boston. Shots of black and white images of African Americans in the nineteenth century. Shot of the exterior of the Meeting House. Footage of Batson saying that she can hear the voices of past generations when she stands in the building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/09/1987
Description: Fritz Wetherbee reports that Annie Johnson, a Boston resident, will receive the Living Legacy Award in Washington DC. Johnson grew up in Boston and organized domestic workers through the Women's Service Clubs of Boston in the 1960s. She led the workers on a campaign for benefits. Interview with Johnson in her home. She talks about the importance of helping others. Johnson discusses her aunt, Eleanor Graves Chandler, who was an early community activist. Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen and visiting a senior citizen meal program at the Grace Baptist Church.
1:00:12: Visual: Footage of Annie Johnson (Living Legacy Award winner) saying that a person can be poor and "colored" and still help everybody. Fritz Wetherbee reports that Johnson is 83 years old; that Johnson will fly to Washington DC to receive her Living Legacy Award. V: Footage of Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen at home. Wetherbee reports that Johnson is preparing the food for Project Soup; that Project Soup is a senior citizen meal program at Grace Baptist Church. V: Footage of Johnson saying that people have called her for help when she is sick in bed; that she will get up to try to help them, before going back to bed to lie down. Wetherbee reports that Johnson grew up in Boston; that she has lived in the same house on Elmwood Street for 46 years; that she raised seven children in the house. V: Shots of Elmwood Street in Boston; of the exterior of Johnson's house on Elmwood Street. Footage of Johnson preparing chicken in her kitchen. Wetherbee reports that Johnson organized domestic workers in the 1960s, through the Women's Service Clubs of Boston. Wetherbee notes that Johnson succeeded in winning minimum wage, worker's compensation, social security, and regular days off for the workers. Wetherbee adds that Johnson organized a job training program for the workers. V: Shot of the prepared chicken in a foil dish. Wetherbee reports that Johnson is the niece of Eleanor Graves Chandler. V: Shot of an African American woman serving chicken to elderly women at Project Soup. Footage of Johnson saying that Chandler was a politician; that Chandler believed that African American women should be active in politics and civic life. Johnson says that she can remember taking people to register to vote when she was younger. Johnson talks about another one of her relatives who was "an advocate for her race." Shot of Johnson leaving the Grace Baptist Church, carrying some flowers. Wetherbee reports that Martin Luther King Sr., Jesse Owens, Rosa Parks, A. Philip Randolph, and Roy Wilkins have all been awarded the Living Legacy Award; that Johnson will receive the award this evening. V: Footage of Johnson saying that many other racial groups have followed the lead of African Americans in their struggle for civil rights.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/20/1987
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on the slow pace of public housing integration in South Boston. Footage of Doris Bunte, the director of the BHA talking about housing integration in 1986. The waiting list for public housing is 80% minority, but that there are no African American families living in the three public housing projects in South Boston. One resident talks about her opposition to housing integration. The Boston Housing Authority (BHA) says that white families were first on the waiting lists for South Boston Projects. Interview with William Wright of the BHA, who denies any discriminatory practices on the part of the BHA. Vaillancourt notes that the BHA says that the safety of African American families in all-white housing projects cannot be assured. Interview with with Alex Rodriguez of the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination. Rodriguez accuses the BHA of practicing segregation in their housing policies. Kathy Gannett a former employee of the Department of Housing and Urban Development has also accused the BHA of practicing discrimination. Interview with Gannett. Vaillancourt reports that neither Bunte nor Mayor Ray Flynn will comment on the slow pace of desegregation.
1:00:02: Visual: Footage of Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) from 1986. Bunte says that separate facilities are unequal facilities. Meg Vaillancourt reports that little has been done to desegregate public housing in Boston. V: Shot of a white woman and white children standing outside of a housing project building in South Boston. Footage of a white woman talking to a reporter from the window of her project apartment. The woman says that she would like the neighborhood to remain white. Shots of white project residents standing at the entrance to a project building; of white girl reading on the stoop of an apartment; of a white boy scrambling under a fence near a housing projects; of white children in the area surrounding the project buildings. Vaillancourt reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) hired Doris Bunte to run the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) four years ago; that Bunte is a former project resident. Vaillancourt notes that there are still no African American families living in the three public housing projects in South Boston. Vaillancourt adds that African American families are on the waiting list for public housing. V: Shots of white residents sitting on park benches outside of a project; of parochial school students walking home from school. Vaillancourt reports that the BHA says that families are placed on a first come, first served basis; that the BHA says that white families were first on the waiting list for the South Boston projects. V: Shot of an African American girl looking out of the window of a project apartment. Footage of William Wright (BHA) saying that African American families have not been passed over on the waiting list for the South Boston projects. Vaillancourt notes that non-whites comprise 80% of the BHA waiting list. V: Shots of African American children and adults outside of a housing project building. Footage of Kathy Gannett (former employee, Department of Housing and Urban Development) saying that African American families were passed over on the waiting list for apartments in South Boston public housing projects; that the BHA is denying access to public housing projects on the basis of skin color. Vaillancourt reports that Gannett has been fired from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD); that Gannett says that Bunte complained about her aggressive investigation of the BHA's desegregation efforts. V: Footage of Bunte from 1986. Shot of Wright sitting behind a desk. Vaillancourt notes that the BHA has denied Gannett's accusations. V: Shots of a child being held by a woman standing in the window of a project apartment; of a woman feeding a child dinner in an apartment; of the exterior of project buildings in South Boston; of a sign reading, "Old Colony Public Housing Development." Vaillancourt reports that the BHA has an emergency list; that families on the emergency list must be placed in the first available apartment. V: Footage of Wright being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks if an African American family on the emergency list would be placed in an available South Boston apartment. Wright says that the BHA is not housing people from the emergency lists in South Boston projects at this time. Wright adds that the families did not request apartments in South Boston; that the BHA is not discriminating against those families. Wright says that the turnover rate in South Boston public housing projects is very low. Wright says that he does not know if African American families on the emergency list were turned away from South Boston apartments. Vaillancourt reports that the BHA says that the safety of African American families in the all-white South Boston projects cannot be assured. V: Shot of white residents outside of a project building. Footage of Alex Rodriguez (Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination) saying that families are being denied access to public housing on the basis of race; that the housing authority has engaged in "social engineering" by continuing segregation in public housing projects. Rodriguez says that the BHA must abide by the law. Vaillancourt says that neither Bunte nor Flynn will comment on the situation. V: Shot of Bunte speaking to someone at a social function; of Flynn; of a white woman and white children sitting on the steps of a housing project; of a white child running around in front of a South Boston project building; of an African American man raking leaves in front of a project building. Vaillancourt notes that Flynn has said that the South Boston public housing projects will be desegregated by 1988; that Flynn will not comment on why desegregation has taken so long.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/05/1987
Description: Callie Crossley reports on the documentary film Street Cop, set in Roxbury. Interview with Roxbury community activists Georgette Watson and Ben Haith about the documentary's portrayal of crime and drug traffic in the community. Watson complains about the negative images of Roxbury in the media and about the negative attitude of many police officers toward African Americans. Crossley's report includes footage from Street Cop and footage of Crossley, Watson, and Haith walking in Dudley Square. Interview with Larry Brown of the Boston Minority Police Association, who says that the documentary gave a realistic and effective portrayal of law enforcement. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: David Boeri reports that William Celester has been accused of sexual assault by a female employee of the Police Department
1:00:00: Visual: Footage from Street Cop, a documentary film produced for Frontline. The footage shows a police plainclothes police officer entering a family's apartment. Women and children in the apartment are screaming and crying. Callie Crossley reports that Street Cop is a gritty documentary set in Roxbury; that the documentary profiles police officers from Area B headquarters in Roxbury; that the documentary examines crime and drug traffic. Crossley reports that some Roxbury activists say that the film shows the disrepectful attitude of the police toward citizens in the community. V: Footage of Crossley interviewing Georgette Watson (Roxbury community activist) and Ben Haith (Roxbury community activist). Watson says that police show less respect and restraint in Roxbury than they do in other communities. Watson wonders if the police are helping the community or destroying it. Crossley reports that Watson and Haith are concerned about the portrayal the Roxbury community in the documentary. V: Footage from Street Cop of a police officer breaking down an apartment door with a sledgehammer. Footage of Watson saying that drug problems exist all over the city, not just in Roxbury. Footage of Haith saying that the documentary showed the police attacking the neighborhood as if they were engaged in warfare. Footage from Street Cop of police officers searching for drugs in an apartment. Footage of Crossley, Watson, and Haith walking across the street in Dudley Square in Roxbury. Watson says that there are massive drug deals taking place across from the police station; that police are more concerned with forcefully entering homes to search for nickel bags of marijuana. Footage from Street Cop. Stanley Philbin (Boston Police Department) drives by a depressed housing project in Roxbury, saying that if he were young, black and living in that housing project, he would probably sell drugs; that "being black is no bargain." Crossley reports that Roxbury activists say that comments by police officers in the documentary reflect racist attitudes. V: Footage from Street Cop of a white police officer grabbing an African American girl as he tries to chase some African American kids away from a residential home. Footage of Watson saying that Roxbury needs police officers who understand the community; that police officers from South Boston do not understand the culture of African Americans. Watson says that Roxbury needs police officers who do not have a negative attitude toward African Americans. Footage of Larry Brown (Boston Minority Police Association) saying that the documentary was realistic and effective portrayal of law enforcement. Footage from Street Cop of a police officer reaching down the shirt of an old woman to pull out drugs. Footage of Brown saying that drugs and guns are a huge problem in communities; that police officers need to protect themselves from violence. Footage from Street Cop of police officers making an arrest. Footage of Brown saying that the community needs to support the police officers in the fight against the drug problem; that tough tactics are necessary to eradicate the drug problem. Footage from Street Cop of a uniformed African American police officer in a cruiser.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/31/1987
Description: Marcus Jones reports that the Black Political Task Force has announced its candidate endorsements for the upcoming elections. Footage from a press conference at which the Task Force announces its slate of candidates. Salvatore DiMasi (candidate for State Representative) addresses the audience. The Task Force has generated controversy by endorsing some white candidates over African American candidates. Footage of Georgette Watson and Robert Rufo talking about Black Political Task Force endorsement. Jones interviews Peter Hardie (President, Black Political Task Force) about the endorsements. Clips of Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP), Baroness Williams-Martin (political activist), and Regina Placid (candidate for State Representative) commenting on the endorsements. Clips of Mel King (political activist) and Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) campaigning.
1:00:21: Visual: Footage of Peter Hardie (President, Black Political Task Force) addressing a crowd at a press conference in front of the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial on Boston Common. Hardie talks about the mission of the Black Political Task Force. Marcus Jones reports that the Black Political Task Force was started in 1979; that the Task Force is comprised of 60 minority activists who collect dues, hold forums, and endorse candidates. V: Shots of a male Task Force member wearing a Bob Rufo campaign pin; of a female Task Force member; of Mel King (political acitivist) campaigning in Roxbury; of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts). Jones reports that the Task Force endorsed Mel King in the 1983 mayoral race; that they endorsed Michael Dukakis in the 1982 governor's race. V: Shots of African American campaign workers holding campaign signs for Georgette Watson (candidate for Suffolk County Sheriff); of Bob Rufo (candidate for Suffolk County Sheriff) shaking hands with Hardie. Jones reports that the Task Force has endorsed Bob Rufo over Georgette Watson in the race for Suffolk County Sheriff. V: Footage of Jack E. Robinson (President, Boston chapter of the NAACP) saying that the Task Force does not always have to endorse African American candidates; that Watson deserves the endorsement of the Task Force because she is a good leader. Footage of Baroness Williams-Martin (political activist) saying that the Task Force's endorsement of Rufo was unfair; that the endorsement was "a political slap in the face to Watson." Jones says that Watson was shaken by the Task Force's endorsement of Rufo. V: Footage of Watson with supporters at a press conference. Watson has tears in her eyes. Watson says that the Task Force's decision has been an "emotional experience"; that she is going to wage a winning campaign. Footage of Hardie at the Task Force press conference. Hardie says that Rufo is a better candidate for the position than Watson. Footage of Rufo saying that the race is important to him; that the voters need to decide which candidate is most qualified for the position. Rufo says that he hopes that the endorsement does not become an issue between him and Watson. Jones says that the Task Force announced its full slate of candidates at the press conference today. Jones reports that the Task Force has endorsed Rufo for Suffolk County Sheriff, Gerry D'Amico for lieutenant governor, Jo Ann Shotwell for attorney general, Byron Rushing for state representative for the ninth Suffolk District. Jones notes that the Task Force endorsed Salvatore DiMasi over Regina Placid for state representative of the third Suffolk District. V: Shots of Rufo at the Task Force press conference; of Gerry D'Amico (candidate for lieutenant governor) at the press conference; of Jo Ann Shotwell (candidate for state attorney general) at the press conference; of Byron Rushing (candidate for state representative) at the press conference. Footage of Salvatore DiMasi (candidate for state representative) at the Task Force press conference. DiMasi says that this endorsement shows that people from different communities and ethnic backgrounds are working together. DiMasi says that he is proud to receive the Task Force's endorsement. Footage of Regina Placid (candidate for State Representative) saying that the Task Force's endorsement does not represent the true voice of the African American community. Footage of Hardie at the press conference. Hardie says that the Task Force is accustomed to the controversy which often accompanies their endorsements. Jones stands on the Boston Common. Jones reports that no one can predict if the Task Force's endorsements will make a difference in the upcoming elections. Jones notes that critics of the Task Force say that their endorsements may backfire. Jones says that some critics predict that the African American community may back the African American candidates not backed by the Task Force.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/25/1986
Description: Harold Washington (Mayor of Chicago) and W. Wilson Goode (Mayor of Philadelphia). The city of Hartford, Connecticut has elected Carrie Perry, an African American woman, as mayor of the city. Marcus Jones notes that Hartford is the only major city in New England with an African American mayor. Jones' report includes footage of Perry at a polling station and at a press conference. Jones reports that Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) is seen as having the best chance at becoming Boston's first African American mayor. Interview with Bolling, who says that he might run for mayor someday, but that he is concentrating on his agenda in the City Council. Jones notes that Bolling differed with Mel King (candidate for Mayor of Boston in 1983) and other African American community leaders over the issue of Roxbury's secession from Boston. Footage of Bolling, King, Andrew Young (Greater Roxbury Incorporation Project) and Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) on the Phil Donahue Show in 1986. Jones notes that the minority community in Boston is becoming impatient for an African American mayor. Interviews with Charles Weeks (Black Political Task Force) about the chances of Boston electing an African American mayor.
1:00:09: Visual: Shots of Harold Washington (Mayor of Chicago) celebrating his victory at the polls; of W. Wilson Goode (Mayor of Philadelphia); of an African American man official from the campaign of Carrie Perry in Hartford. Shot of Carrie Perry (Mayor of Hartford) entering a polling booth. Marcus Jones reports that Carrie Perry is the first African American to be mayor of Hartford; that Hartford is the only major city in New England with an African American mayor. V: Footage of Perry at a press conference. Footage of Bruce Bolling (President, Boston City Council) being interviewed by Jones. Bolling says that the city of Hartford deserves a lot of credit; that Hartford voters have looked beyond race in electing city officials. Jones reports that Bolling is seen as having the best chance of becoming Boston's first African American mayor. V: Footage of Bolling saying that he is not preoccupied with the thought of running for mayor. Bolling says that he is pursuing his agenda in the City Council. Jones notes that Bolling was once seen as a successor to Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston in 1983); that King and Bolling differed publicly on the issue of Roxbury's proposed secession from Boston. V: Shot of King campaigning in Roxbury in 1983. Footage of Bolling, King, Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) and Andrew Jones (Greater Roxbury Incorporation Project) on the Phil Donahue show on October 30, 1986. Bolling says that African Americans and voters from other races supported King's candidacy in 1983 because they wanted a change in the city. Footage of Charles Weeks (Black Political Task Force) saying that there will be an African American mayor in Boston; that the African American mayor will need to be the mayor for all residents, not just African Americans. Jones notes that the Black Political Task Force endorsed Bolling's last bid for re-election to the City Council. V: Footage of Weeks saying that whites are becoming more accustomed to seeing African Americans in positions of authority; that an African American will eventually become mayor of Boston. Footage of Bolling saying that it is possible that he might become mayor someday. Bolling adds that an African American will become mayor of Boston in the future. Footage of African American audience members debating on the Donahue show. Marcus Jones notes that the minority community in Boston is becoming impatient for an African American mayor.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/04/1987
Description: Christy George reports on the end of a two-week fast by chaplains at Brandeis University. George notes that the chaplains fasted to protest the university's investments in South Africa. George's report includes footage from a gathering of apartheid protesters on the Brandeis campus. Father Maurice Loiselle, Rabbi Albert Axelrad and Reverend Diane Moore discuss their fast and the university's policy regarding South Africa. The protesters sing and hold hands at the gathering. George reports that the chaplains' fast serves as the last phase of a community protest against apartheid. George notes that Brandeis trustees will review their investment policy at an upcoming meeting. George reviews the apartheid protest at Brandeis University since last year. George's report includes footage of Brandeis students at a shantytown on campus from the previous year.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/13/1987