Description: Deborah Wang reports that minority workers are underrepresented in the advertising industry. Wang interviews Bink Garrison (President of Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson) about the lack of minority workers in the industry. Wang's report includes footage of workers in the offices of Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson (advertising firm). Wang reports that Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson is participating in industry efforts to attract students into the industry. Wang notes that the Ad Club at English High School teaches students about advertising. Wang reports that Ad Club students wrote and acted in a public service announcement last year. Wang's report includes footage of the public service announcement produced by the Ad Club. Wang's report also features interviews of Pam Piligian (Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson) and students working in the Ad Club. B-roll follows of workers at the offices of Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson, interiors of the lobby, closeups on advertisements.
1:00:13: Visual: Footage of white workers in the offices of Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson advertising agency. Deborah Wang reports that most of the workers at the Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson advertising agency are white. V: Shots of workers discussing projects and working at their desks. Footage of Bink Garrison (Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson) being interviewed by Wang. Garrison says that Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson is typical of the advertising industry; that it is hard to break into the advertising industry. Shot of a young African American male working on a project at Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson. Footage of Garrison saying that talented minority students do not often choose to enter the advertising industry because entry-level salaries are low. Wang reports that minority workers are underrepresented in the advertising industry. Wang reports that the Ad Club at English High School teaches students about advertising and the advertising industry. V: Footage of white and minority students working on ads and discussing projects at the Ad Club. The students are in a classroom. Wang reports that students from the Ad Club wrote and acted in a public service announcement last year. V: Footage of the public service announcement about the importance of a high school diploma. Footage of an African American male student and an African American female student practicing lines for another public service announcement. Footage of Pam Piligian (Ingalls, Quinn and Johnson) saying that the students will be producing public service announcements for radio this year; that the kids are enthusiastic about the project. Footage of Michelle Wilcox (11th grade student) saying that the advertising projects allow her to express herself and her opinions. Wang reports that the advertising industry is trying to recruit minority workers through efforts like the Ad Club; that the industry is working to provide internships and mentors to students. Wang notes that the industry leaders hope that a few of the students will end up choosing a career in advertising. V: Footage of Garrison saying that the program introduces students to the industry; that the program allows students to become acquainted with the business world. Shots of minority students in the Ad Club.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/01/1989
Description: Marcus Jones reports that some African American leaders, including Jesse Jackson, are promoting the use of the term "African American" instead of the term "black." Comedian Charles Cozart on the Arsenio Hall Show. Interview with Northeastern lecturer Robert Hayden, who promotes the use of the term. Hayden says that it is an accurate term that reflects the roots and history of African Americans. Interview with Elma Lewis, the Director of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, who believes that the term "black" is more inclusive. Lewis says that not all black people in the US are Americans. Interviews with students and teachers at the Ellis School in Roxbury about which term they prefer. Following the edited story is additional footage of Jones speaking to students and teachers at the Ellis School. Jones answers questions about his report on Jackie Robinson and the race relations of the time. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Meg Vaillancourt reports that the Boston School Committee is deeply divided over whether to renew the contract of Laval Wilson
1:00:11: V: Footage from the Arsenio Hall Show. Charles Cozart (comedian) tells jokes in front of the audience. Marcus Jones reports that the African American community is debating the use of the term "black." Jones notes that Jesse Jackson (African American political leader) is urging the use of the term "African American" instead of "black." V: Shots of Jackson addressing an audience. Shots of African Americans in the audience. Footage of Robert Hayden (Lecturer, Northeastern University) saying that many people of color have been calling themselves "African Americans" for years. Hayden says that many universities have departments of African American studies. Hayden says that people of African descent were living in Boston in the eighteenth century; that those people referred to their community as "African." Hayden says that the term is "accurate" and "useful." Footage of Elma Lewis (Director, National Center of Afro-American Artists) being interviewed by Jones. Lewis says that she does not have to follow the trend. Jones notes that Lewis is opposed to using the term "African American." V: Footage of Lewis saying that Africa is a whole continent. Lewis says that the terms "Nigerian American" or "Jamaican American" are more appropriate than "African American." Lewis says that the term "black American" is more inclusive. Footage of Jones addressing a class at the David A. Ellis School in Roxbury. Jones asks how many of the students are aware of the debate surrounding the term "African American." A few students raise their hands. Jones says that he asked students and teachers at the Ellis School in Roxbury about the terms "African American" and "black." V: Shots of students. Footage of an African American female student saying that it does not matter which term is used. Footage of a Latina teacher saying that there should be no mention of race in identification terms. Footage of an African American teacher asking if the term would be extended to "Afro-English" for blacks living in England. Footage of an African American male student saying that he likes the term "brown." Footage of a female student saying that it doesn't matter. Footage of Hayden saying that the term might inspire some to think about their African roots. Hayden says that some people might begin to look into their family histories. Footage of Lewis saying that it is important to teach children to be proud of their African roots. Lewis says that not all black people in the US are American; that all black people in the US are black. Shots of African Americans walking on a street; of a group of students walking away from a school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/15/1989
Description: Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge exhibit a collection of Norman Rockwell's paintings in celebration of Black History Month. The paintings in the exhibit depict African Americans, often in subservient positions, as well a his later works depicting moments in the Civil Rights Movement and African American history. People from the museum give historical context. Closeups on many of the paintings. Following the story is b-roll of the exhibit and individual paintings.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Maureen Hart Hennessey (curator, Rockwell Museum) saying that American painter Norman Rockwell's work tells a lot about how America viewed the civil rights movement. Hennessey points out that there was often a lag time between the occurrence of an actual event and the publishing of a Rockwell painting portraying the event. Hennessey says that it took time before these events entered "the mainstream consciousness." Shots of the Rockwell paintings, The Problem We All Live With and Murder in Mississippi. Shots of visitors on a tour of the Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA. Carmen Fields reports that the Rockwell Museum is commemorating Black History Month by exhibiting Rockwell's work featuring African Americans. V: Shots of paintings on display for the exhibit. Fields notes that Rockwell's first piece of work featuring an African American was from 1934. V: Footage of a tour guide at the Rockwell Museum speaking to visitors. She stands in front of a painting. The tour guide talks about illustrations for the Saturday Evening Post done by Rockwell. The tour guide notes that the Saturday Evening Post was aimed at white readers; that African Americans were often pictured in a subserviant position or not at all. Shots of two pieces of art hanging on the wall of the museum. Fields says that Peter Rockwell was the model for The Boy in the Dining Car, which was on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post in the 1940s. V: Shot of The Boy in the Dining Car. Footage of Hennessey being interviewed by Fields. Hennessey says that the painting focuses on the white boy in the painting; that many people are more drawn to the African American waiter who is standing beside the table in the painting. Hennessey notes that most white Post readers encountered African Americans as workers in subserviant positions. Fields reports that none of Rockwell's work from the late 1940s to the early 1960s featured people of color; that Rockwell was caught up in the turbulence of the 1960s while working for Look Magazine. Fields notes that one of Rockwell's most famous paintings portrays school desegregation in the South. V: Shots of a male tour guide at the Rockwell Museum talking to visitors. Shots of visitors in the gallery. Shots of paintings in the gallery. Shot of the painting, The Problem We All Live With. Footage of Hennessey saying that Rockwell paid great attention to detail. Hennessey talks about Rockwell's efforts to capture the details of the painting, The Problem We All Live With. Footage of a tour guide at the Rockwell Museum speaking to visitors about the painting, Murder in Mississippi. Shots of the tour guide; of the painting. The tour guide talks about the details of the painting. Fields reports that Look Magazine opted to publish a less detailed version of the painting, Murder in Mississippi; that the original was too graphic. V: Shot of a less detailed version of the painting. Fields reports that Rockwell used his neighbors as models for his paintings of African Americans; that his neighbors were the only African Americans in the area. V: Shots of black and white photographs of Rockwell's models. Footage of Hennessey talking about an African American family who lived in Stockbridge. Hennessey says that the children of the family were used as models in the paintings The Problem We All Live With and New Kids in the Neighborhoodl Shot of the painting, New Kids in the Neighborhood. Fields reports that Rockwell has been described as apolitical; that his works were commissioned by others. V: Shot of a black and white photo of Rockwell sitting in front of his painting, The Golden Rule. Shots of the painting The Golden Rule. Audio of Hennessey saying that Rockwell was a "social commentator." Hennessey says that Rockwell could have retired when he left the Saturday Evening Post in 1963; that Rockwell began doing paintings about the civil rights movement after 1963. Hennessey says that she believes that Rockwell supported the civil rights movement.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/24/1989
Description: Hope Kelly reports on a dispute between the tenants and the landlords of a building in Allston on Parkvale St. Kelly notes that the tenants have brought suit against the landlords for discriminatory practices. Kelly reports that a fire damaged the building in February. She notes that the landlords have aided white tenants with temporary relocation and have assured them an eventual return to their apartments. Kelly reports that African American tenants have been ignored. Kelly reports that the tenants have been barred from the building altogether. Kelly's report includes footage of a protest outside the apartment building by tenants and city officials. Brian McLoughlin (Boston City Council), Mel King (community activist), Domenic Bozzotto (Hotel Workers Union), and David Scondras (Boston City Council) are among those present. Tenants and city officials condemn the owners of the building and demand the return of tenants to the building. Kelly reviews the status of the lawsuit and gives the names of the owners of the building. She attempts to interview David Spada (owner) when he arrives at the building. Spada refuses to be interviewed.
1:00:16: Visual: Footage of Thomas Gallagher (New England Equity Institute) addressing a group of protesters under the awning of an apartment building at 56 Parkvale Avenue in Allston. Gallagher says, "It's a sorry state of affairs." Shots of protesters standing under the awning to get out of the rain. Hope Kelly reports that workmen are working on the interior of the apartment building; that tenants cannot enter the building. V: Footage of Etta Anderson (tenant) addressing the gathered protesters. Anderson says that the building looks habitable; that the building is empty. Shot of a street sign for Parkvale Avenue in Allston. Shots of the exterior of the building on Parkvale Avenue. Kelly reports that a fire damaged parts of the sixteen-unit building on January 15. V: Footage of Brian McLoughlin (Boston City Council) addressing the gathered protesters. McLoughlin criticizes the property owners for not allowing the tenants to return to their homes. Shots of the protesters under the awning. Several protesters hold signs. One of the signs reads, "Evict racist landlords, not tenants of color." Shots of Mel King (community activist) and Domenic Bozzotto (President, Hotel Workers Union) standing among the protesters. Kelly reports that the tenants say that the landlords are racist; that the tenants say that the landlords do not want the tenants to return to the building. Kelly reports that Pat Roberts (tenant) said that the landlords told her that they didn't want "colored people" in their building. V: Footage of Roberts addressing the gathering. Roberts says that she is living with her sister and her three children in a one-room apartment. Kelly reports that white tenants have testified that the landlords have helped them find temporary housing; that white tenants say that the landlords have assured them of an eventual return to their apartments. V: Shots of the protesters under the awning. Shots of signs reading, "Burned out" and "Real people, not real estate." Kelly reports that the tenants have brought suit against the landlords. V: Footage of Marian Glaser (Greater Boston Legal Services) saying that the tenants were first in court in February. Glaser says that the landlords said in February that the tenants could return to the building. Glaser says that the landlords changed their story at a second hearing. Glaser says that the landlords told the tenants that they could return to the building only if they dropped their legal claims against the landlords. Shots of the protesters. Kelly reports that the tenants have brought suit against the landlords for racial discrimination, retaliation, code violations from before the fire, and property loss since the fire. V: Shot of a man addressing the protesters. Shots through a window of a construction worker inside of the building. A sign in the window of the building reads, "Private Property." Footage of David Scondras (Boston City Council) addressing the gathering. Scondras accuses the landlords of suspicious behavior. Scondras wonders if the landlords wanted the fire to happen. Footage of King addressing the protesters. King says that the issue is of larger importance to the city of Boston. On-screen text details specifics of the building's ownership. Kelly reports that the property is owned by the Lightfoot Realty Trust and Bay State Property Management; that the owners are identified as Robert Kingman, Roman Zar, Charles M. Bernstein, and David Spada. V: Footage of David Spada (owner) saying that he will not comment on the case. Shots of protesters standing beneath the awning; of Spada passing by the protesters as he enters the building. Kelly reports that the case returns to housing court on Monday morning.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/19/1988
Description: Deborah Wang reports that notes that Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) was the keynote speaker at a gathering of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund gathered in Boston this evening. Wang notes that many members of the Legal Defense Fund are skeptical of President George Bush's commitment to civil rights; she adds that civil rights advocates are worried about Bush making conservative appointments to the judiciary. Wang interviews Young about Bush's presidency and his possible judicial appointments. Young says that Bush did not exhibit fairness and decency during the presidential campaign. Wang interviews Tom Franklin and Rona Kiley of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Franklin and Kiley say that Bush is beholden to the conservative wing of the Republican Party. Wang reports that there will be several openings in lower courts and a possible opening on the Supreme Court during Bush's term in office. Wang's report is accompanied by footage of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund gathering, by footage of Bush giving a speech and by footage of Ronald Reagan standing by as a judge is sworn in.
1:00:09: Visual: Shots of a gathering of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Attendees of the gathering are socializing in a large room. Footage of Tom Franklin (NAACP Legal Defense Fund) saying that his colleagues do not have a high regard for George Bush (US President-elect). Franklin says that he hopes that Bush will show more character and leadership than he has shown so far. Franklin says that he does not have high expectations for the Bush presidency. Footage of Bush addressing the Coalition of Black Republicans on August 11, 1988. Bush announces the formation of the Black Americans for Bush Committee. Wang reports that many members of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund are skeptical of Bush's commitment to civil rights. Wang notes that Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) was the keynote speaker at tonight's gathering of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. V: Footage of Young being interviewed by Wang. Young says that he wants to believe that Bush is not as bad as his campaign was. Young says that Bush could be counted on for decency and fairness in the past; that Bush did not exhibit decency and fairness during the presidential campaign. Footage of Franklin saying that Bush is beholden to the conservative wing of the Republican Party. Franklin says that Bush will talk about civil rights; that he will not take any action on civil rights issues. Wang reports that civil rights advocates are worried about Bush making conservative appointments to the judiciary. V: Shots of the exterior of the Supreme Court Building; of Reagan standing by as a federal judge is sworn in. Shot of Reagan standing behind an official at a press conference. Wang notes that there may be openings on the Supreme Court; that there will be numerous openings in lower courts. V: Footage of Young being interviewed by Wang. Young says that Bush needs to decide which wing of the Republican Party to represent. Young says that the "Eastern establishment" wing of the Republican Party has generally made wise judicial appointments. Footage of Rona Kiley (NAACP Legal Defense Fund) being interviewed by Wang. Kiley says that Bush has been playing to the conservative wing of the Republican Party. Kiley says that she hopes that Bush will not adopt Ronald Reagan's "litmus test" for making judicial appointments. Shots of the members of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund as they socialize.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/15/1988
Description: David Boeri reports that African American community leaders and city officials have proposed to build the new headquarters of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) in Roxbury. The MWRA headquarters would be the cornerstone in a project to develop Parcel 18, located near the Ruggles MBTA station. At a press conference with city officials and African American leaders, Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church), Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council), mayor Ray Flynn, Harold Hestnes (member of "The Vault"), and James Kelly (Boston City Council) all speak out in favor of Parcel 18. The Massachusetts State Legislature is also considering the city of Quincy for the MWRA site. African American leaders are asking state legislators to show their support for the African American community by choosing Parcel 18. State Sen. Paul Harold speaks to the media and says that Quincy is the right place for the MWRA headquarters. At a press conference Paul Levy of the MWRA says that the MWRA site does not have to be in Quincy.
1:00:08: V: Footage of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) at a press conference. Supporters stand behind him. Bolling says that "this project won on the merits." Footage of Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) saying that the project is very important to the community; that the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) must locate its headquarters on Parcel 18. Shots of the vacant land of Parcel 18 in Roxbury. Shot of the Ruggles MBTA station and the Boston skyline visible from Parcel 18. Shots of traffic on the street near Parcel 18. David Boeri reports that the development of Parcel 18 is part of a plan to bring jobs and development to Roxbury. Boeri notes that the development of Parcel 18 is a $200 million public/private venture; that the venture includes minority developers. V: Shots of two people entering the Ruggles MBTA station. Boeri reports that the MWRA would be the major tenant in the development. V: Shot of Parcel 18. Shot through a chain-link fence of the Boston skyline looming above Parcel 18. Boeri reports that the Massachusetts state legislators are considering other sites for the MWRA headquarters; that supporters of Parcel 18 development are lobbying for the MWRA to be located on Parcel 18. V: Footage of Bolling saying that people of color are told that they will be treated fairly in this country. Bolling says that the process should not be manipulated to prevent people of color from receiving their due. Shots of members of the media and the audience at the press conference. Boeri reports that African American leaders consider the MWRA vote to be a crucial litmus test for state legislators on the issue of race. V: Footage of Stith saying that many "progressive politicians" seem to lack the courage to stand up for their principles. Shots of Bolling; of other Parcel 18 supporters at the press conference. Boeri reports that the coalition at the press conference was assembled by Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston); that the coalition includes members of "The Vault" (Boston's powerful financial leaders). V: Footage of Harold Hestnes (member of "The Vault") speaking at the press conference. Hestnes says that the development of Parcel 18 would create a "climate of financial responsibility." Maura Hennigan (Boston City Council) is visible behind Hestnes. Shots of Richard Voke (State Representative) and David Scondras (Boston City Council) at the press conference. Boeri notes that the coalition is broad enough to include James Kelly (Boston City Council). V: Footage of Kelly turning around to look at the coalition standing behind him. Stith puts his hand on Kelly's shoulder and says, "You're with your own." The Parcel 18 supporters laugh along with Kelly. Shot of a reporter at the press conference. Boeri reports that Flynn believes that the development should proceed because it represents social justice and good business sense. V: Footage of Flynn at the press conference. Flynn says that this is a good opportunity for state legislators to prove their commitment to social and economic justice. Flynn says that the people of Roxbury have been disenfranchised and "left behind" in the past. Shot of a coalition member at the press conference. Boeri reports that the city of Quincy is competing with Parcel 18 for the MWRA headquarters. Boeri notes that Quincy will be the repository of the sludge from the Boston Harbor Cleanup project. V: Footage of Paul Harold (State Senator from Quincy) speaking to the media in a park. Harold says that the issue revolves around the survival of a sewage plant, a sludge plant and a landfill facility. Harold says that Parcel 18 has nothing to do with the real issue. Boeri reports that Paul Levy (Executive Director, MWRA) made a controversial decision today. V: Footage of Levy at an MWRA press conference. Levy says that Quincy must receive a premium from the MWRA; that the MWRA is open to discussing compensation for the city of Quincy. Levy says that compensation should not include locating the MWRA headquarters in the city. Footage of Harold saying that state officials have been ill advised on the issue. Harold says that the issue should have been decided days ago. Boeri stands in front of the Massachusetts State House. Boeri reports that the Parcel 18 coalition is trying to pressure a few state legislators to support Parcel 18. Boeri notes that the votes of those legislators will be necessary for Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) to sustain his veto of any vote which tries to move the MWRA headquarters from Roxbury to Quincy. Boeri notes with irony that the MWRA was created by state legislators to remove politics from the Harbor Cleanup Project.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/07/1989
Description: Deborah Wang reports that Boston City Hospital offers a weekly Failure to Thrive Clinic for malnourished children. A team of doctors, nurses and psychologists treat the children and talk to their families. Wang reviews the symptoms and effects of malnourishment. Health care workers treating patients at the Failure to Thrive Clinic. Interview with Dr. Deborah Frank of Boston City Hospital about malnourishment and its effect on children. Frank talks about the importance of the clinic to the lives of children. Frank examines children at the clinic. Wang reports that malnourished children are often victims of poverty and that some are neglected or abused. 80% of children attending the clinic have stabilized or improved their condition. Staff meeting of clinic employees. A health care worker talks about the improved condition of one of his patients. Wang reports that there are six Failure to Thrive Clinics, but that the clinics are underfunded. She adds that some families in Boston are not yet receiving the necessary care for malnourishment. Following the edited story is additional footage of health care workers and patients at the Failure to Thrive Clinic.
1:00:05: Visual: Shots of young children playing with toys and magic markers in the waiting room of a health clinic. Shot of an African American infant on an examination table in a health clinic. Deborah Wang reports that some children in Boston show signs of malnourishment. V: Footage of Dr. Deborah Frank (Boston City Hospital) saying that undernourished children become lethargic and apathetic. Frank notes that the children in the waiting room are very quiet. Shots of an African American health care worker weighing an African American infant on a scale. Wang notes that undernourished children are small for their age; that undernourished children are often ill. V: Footage of Frank saying that malnutrition impairs the body's ability to fight infection. Frank says that undernourished children become sick more often; that each infection contributes to the malnourishment. Shots of health care workers measuring an infant's height. The infant lies on an examining table. Shots of the infant; of the health care workers. Shot of a health care worker putting a diaper on an infant. Wang reports that some malnourished infants are neglected or abused; that most malnourished children are victims of poverty. V: Footage of Frank being interviewed by Wang. Frank talks about a malnourished boy who was admitted with a case of pneumonia. Frank talks about the poor conditions under which many poor families live. Wang reports that the Boston City Hospital offers a weekly Failure to Thrive Clinic for malnourished children; that a team of doctors, nurses, psychologists, social workers treat the children and talk to their families. V: Footage of a white female doctor in an examining room with an African American woman and a young African American girl. The doctor talks to the woman while filling out paperwork. The girl plays quietly in her chair. The doctor talks to the woman about meal times for the child. Footage of a meeting of employees at the Failure to Thrive Clinic. A white male health care worker talks about an infant who has gained weight after attending the clinic. Wang reports that the program has been a success; that 80% of the children attending the clinic have stabilized or improved their conditions. V: Shot of a Latina woman and young boy in an examining room. The woman wipes the boy's face. The boy draws with magic markers. Footage of Frank saying that the hospitals resources are stretched thin. Frank notes that there are families in Boston who are not receiving services. Wang reports that the Failure to Thrive Clinic has a $500,000 budget; that there are six Failure to Thrive Clinics. V: Shot of an African American health care worker taking the temperature of a young white boy. The boy sits on his mother's lap. Shots of an African American girl at the clinic; of a Latino boy drawing with a magic marker; of an African American infant on an examing table; of an African American child holding a stuffed doll. Audio of Frank saying that society needs to reassess its priorities; that these children are the next generation of US citizens. Frank says that society will pay a higher price in the future if these children are not treated now.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/30/1988
Description: David Boeri reports from a press conference with Mayor Ray Flynn, Doris Bunte, of the Boston Housing Authority, Neil Sullivan, the Policy Advisor to Flynn, and Robert Laplante, from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The officials attempt to explain the new rules for the Boston Housing Authority's revised public housing tenant selection policy. The policy is intended to end discrimination in the selection process, but will not result in the removal of current tenants from their apartments. Boeri reports that the explanation of the policy is very confusing, but two tenants in attendance are able to do understand the policy. Interviews with public housing tenants Jean Deaver and Marcia Langford. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Reporter Meg Vaillancourt at the Old Colony housing project
1:00:15: Visual: Footage of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and Doris Bunte (Boston Housing Authority) entering a press conference. Flynn approaches the podium and addresses the audience. Shots of the audience. Flynn says that he is asking for the goodwill and help of city residents. Shot of Bunte. David Boeri reports that Flynn has alienated some city residents on the issue of integration of public housing; that some white residents oppose integration; that some African American residents have been the victims of discrimination. V: Footage of Flynn addressing the audience. Flynn says that tenants will not be asked to vacate apartments in order to achieve housing integration. Shot of an African American woman in the audience. Boeri notes that Bunte and Flynn has some problems explaining the rules of the new public housing policy. V: Footage of Flynn at the press conference. Flynn shuffles through papers at the podium. Neil Sullivan (Policy Advisor to Flynn) approaches the podium to help Flynn. Sullivan addresses the audience. Sullivan tries to explain how tenants will be placed under the new policy. Shots of Flynn; of reporters at the press conference. Boeri notes that Sullivan's explanation was not very clear; that reporters at the press conference looked bored. V: Footage of Robert LaPlante (Department of Housing and Urban Development) addressing the audience. Laplante talks about the fine points of the new housing agreement. Shots of Flynn slipping out of the press conference; of Bunte. Sullivan looks for the mayor. Footage of Boeri at the press conference looking at a video monitor showing a speech by Flynn. Boeri looks at the camera and says, "I still don't understand this." Shots of audience members at the press conference. Boeri reports that several housing project tenants were at the conference; that the tenants were able to make sense of the rules of the new policy. V: Footage of Jean Deaver (tenant) saying that potential tenants will be put on one waiting list; that potential tenants will now be given equal treatment. Footage of Marcia Langford (tenant) saying that the rules are being put in place to assure South Boston white residents that they will not be moved out of their apartments for the purposes of integration.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/16/1988
Description: Marcus Jones reports on the affirmative action program at the Bank of Boston. Twenty percent of the employees at the bank are minorities. Interview with Charles Gifford from the Bank of Boston, who says that a diverse workforce makes sense. Gifford says that the bank will hire any qualified candidate, regardless of race. Gifford adds that he would like to hire more minorities in top bank positions. Jones reports that bank managers have set affirmative action goals that exceed federal requirements because they believe that an integrated workforce is good for business. Interview with Rosa Hunter, the Director of Affirmative Action Planning for the Bank of Boston. Hunter talks about the bank's commitment to diversity. Jones reviews statistics concerning minority professionals and minority managers at the Bank of Boston. He notes that most minority employees are hired for entry-level and mid-level positions. The edited story is followed by additional b-roll footage of Bank of Boston employees in the offices and cafeteria. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Meg Vaillancourt reports on affirmative action in the Boston Fire Department
1:00:10: Visual: Shots of Bank of Boston employees riding on an escalator in a Bank of Boston building; of a sign for the Bank of Boston. Shots of tellers helping customers in a Bank of Boston office. Marcus Jones reports that the Bank of Boston employs almost 20,000 people; that 20 percent of the employees are minorities. Shots of an African American bank teller; of employees eating lunch in a cafeteria. Jones reports that the bank has doubled its number of minority employees in the past ten years; that bank executives see room for more minorities among their employees. V: Footage of Charles Gifford (Bank of Boston) being interviewed by Jones in his office. Gifford says that a diverse work force makes sense regardless of affirmative action guidelines. Shots of the interior of the Bank of Boston; of customers and tellers inside of the bank. Jones reports that the Bank of Boston receives federal funding; that the Bank of Boston is obligated to comply with federal affirmative action guidelines. Jones notes that the bank management has often set goals which exceed federal requirements. Jones reports that the bank managers believe that an integrated workforce is good for business. V: Shots of employees in a Bank of Boston office. Footage of Gifford saying that the Bank of Boston is growing; that they need more employees. Gifford says that the bank will be at an advantage if it is known as an employer who is open to all. Gifford says that he wants the bank to hire people according to qualifications and performance. Jones reports that Rosa Hunter (Director of Affirmative Action Planning for the Bank of Boston) has worked at the Bank of Boston for 21 years; that Hunter has directed the Bank of Boston's affirmative action effort for two years. V: Footage of Hunter being interviewed by Jones. Hunter says that the Bank of Boston is committed to diversity; that the Bank of Boston will continue its diversity efforts regardless of court rulings against affirmative action programs. Shot of an African American employee at the Bank of Boston. Jones reports that the number of minority managers at the Bank of Boston increased from 4.3% to 9.7% between 1978 and 1988. Jones notes that the number of minority professionals at the Bank of Boston increased from 6.6% to 12.4% from 1978 to 1988. V: On-screen text and visuals detail statistics on the percentage of minority managers and the percentage of minority professionals at the Bank of Boston. Shots of employees eating at a cafeteria. Jones reports that minority employees are being hired for entry-level and mid-level postions; that few minority employees are being appointed to top-level management positions. V: Footage of Gifford saying that the bank is not satisfied with the low number of minority and female employees among its top positions. Gifford says that he expects those numbers to improve because the bank is open to promoting qualified employees to top positions regardless of race or gender. Shot of an African American female bank employee in a Bank of Boston office.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/15/1989
Description: Hope Kelly reports that Barbara Arnwine, the Executive Director of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights, is filing a lawsuit against the city of Boston, the Boston Housing Authority (BHA), and the department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) on behalf of public housing tenants in Boston. Mayor Ray Flynn has announced an agreement aimed at eradicating discriminatory housing practices, but Arnwine considers the agreement inadequate because it does not acknowledge that African American families were "victims" of discrimination. Arnwine says that the city of Boston and the BHA lied to African American families and that the BHA worked to keep housing projects segregated. Press conference held by Flynn, Doris Bunte (BHA), and Robert LaPlante (HUD). Interview with Arnwine in her office at the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights. She says that the city of Boston, the BHA, and HUD do not want to accept responsibility for the harm done to African American tenants and that, despite the difficulty of the struggle, racial equality is worth fighting for. Kelly reviews Arnwine's career as an activist and lawyer. Kelly's report also features footage of African American and white children playing outside of public housing projects and footage of African American students entering a Boston high school. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: Carmen Fields reports on nomination papers for Bill Owens and Royal Bolling, Sr.
1:00:16: Visual: Shot of the exterior of the offices of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights. An African American woman sits at a desk at the front of the offices. The woman answers the phone. Footage of Barbara Arnwine (Executive Director, Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights) being interviewed by Hope Kelly. Arnwine says that the city of Boston, the Boston Housing Authority (BHA), and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) do not want to face up to the harm they have caused to African American residents of public housing in Boston. Shot of Arnwine signing a business letter. Kelly reports that Arnwine is bringing a lawsuit against the city of Boston, the BHA, and HUD on behalf of tenants of public housing in Boston. Kelly reports that Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) has announced an agreement aimed at correcting the discriminatory housing practices of the past; that Arnwine believes the agreement to be inadequate. V: Shot of Flynn, Doris Bunte (BHA), and Robert LaPlante (HUD) entering a press conference in June of 1988. Footage of Arnwine in her office, being interviewed by Kelly. Arnwine says that the agreement does not acknowledge that African American families were the "victims" of discrimination; that the agreement calls the families "disadvantaged." Arnwine says that the African American families were injured by the discriminatory housing policy. Arnwine says that African American families were misled and lied to by the city and the BHA. Arnwine says that African American families were not placed in white housing projects because of their race. Shots of African American children outside of a housing project building; of white children playing with a garden hose outside of a housing project building in South Boston. Footage of Arnwine saying that some white families were also victims of discrimination; that white families were discouraged from living in primarily African American housing projects. Arnwine says that the BHA was engaged in an effort to keep public housing projects segregated. Shot of the name plaque on the door of Arnwine's office. Shots of Arnwine working in her office. Kelly reports that Arnwine grew up in a segregated housing project in Detroit. Kelly reports that the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights was involved in the struggles to desegregate the fire department, the police department, and the schools in Boston. V: Shots of a poster in the Lawyers' Committee offices. The poster has a caption reading, "I have a dream. . . ." Shots of Arnwine talking on the telephone in her office. Kelly notes that the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights filed the original school desegregation suit against the Boston School Committee in 1972. V: Shots of African American students entering a high school in Boston. Footage of Arnwine being interviewed by Kelly. Kelly asks if the housing discrimination suit can be compared to the school desegregation suit. Arnwine says that housing integration means that people of different races become neighbors. Arnwine says that housing integration represents change; that change is often met by resistance; that some people might get hurt in the resulting struggle. Arnwine says that it was difficult for the African Americans who first integrated the police department and the schools; that integration has a price. Arnwine says that racial equality is worth fighting for. Shots of Boston police officer taking an oath; of African American students entering Charlestown High School.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/21/1988