Description: Marcus Jones reports that drug addicts and community leaders held a demonstration in front of the Massachusetts State House, lobbying for more funding for drug treatment centers in Massachusetts. There are not enough publicly funded treatment programs to meet demand. Demonstrators hold signs and chant. Reverend Graylan Hagler and others address the demonstrators. Hagler says that access to drug treatment is a class issue. State Rep. Gloria Fox tells demonstrators to let state legislators know that drug treatment centers are needed. Interview with recovering addict David Watson about the need for treatment centers. Interview with another recovering drug addict who says that she intends to register to vote. Jones reports that the demonstrators went into the State House to register to vote after the rally, and they intend to vote against legislators who do not support their cause.
1:00:15: Visual: Footage of a demonstration in front of the Massachusetts State House. Supporters of treatment facilities for drug addiction are gathered. A man leads the demonstrators in a cheer. Shot of a sign reading, "Don't treat addiction as a crime. Treat it as a disease." Marcus Jones reports that hundreds of people were expected to attend today's demonstration outside of the State House; that rainy weather may have kept some demonstrators away. Jones notes that the demonstration went on as planned; that the demonstrators are committed to their cause. V: Shots of speakers and attendees at the demonstration. Footage of Nathaniel Askia (drug treatment provider) addressing the crowd. Askia tells the demonstrator to remain committed to the cause. Askia predicts that the movement will be successful. Shot of a button pinned to the shirt of a demonstrator. The button reads, "Treatment on demand." Jones reports that the demonstrators support drug treatment on demand; that the demand for drug treatment in Massachusetts is growing. Jones notes that over 1,000 drug addicts are turned away from treatment facilities each day in Massachusetts; that there are not enough publicly funded treatment programs to meet the demand. V: Shots of the demonstrators. The demonstrators carry umbrellas and wear hats to protect themselves from rain. Footage of Reverend Graylan Ellis-Hagler (Church of the United Community) addressing the crowd. Ellis-Hagler says that access to drug treatment is a class issue. Ellis-Hagler says that Kitty Dukakis (wife of Governor Michael Dukakis) has access to treatment because she belongs to the upper class. Ellis-Hagler says that class, race, gender, and sexual preference may bar some from treatment for their addictions. Jones reports that David Watson (recovering drug addict) was recently admitted to a treatment program; that Watson is recovering from 24 years of substance abuse. V: Footage of Watson being interviewed by Jones. Watson says that citizens will end up paying the price if more treatment centers are not built. Watson says that addicts are likely to steal and commit crime in order to pay for their habits. Watson says that he began stealing to support his habit at one point in the past. Footage of the supporters cheering at the demonstration. A leader leads the supporters in chanting, "What do we want? Treatment. When do we want it? Now." Footage of Gloria Fox (State Representative) addressing the crowd. Fox says that the demonstrators must let the legislators know that drug treatment centers are needed; that the legislators will soon begin work on the state budget. Footage of Brenda (recovering drug addict) being interviewed by Jones. Jones asks Brenda if she has registered to vote. Brenda says that she is going to register to vote today. Brenda says that she intends to vote; that she thinks her vote will make a difference. Jones stands outside of the State House. Traffic passes on the street behind him. Jones reports that demonstrators went into the State House to register to vote after the rally. Jones reports that the demonstrators will vote against legislators who do not support an increase in the present drug treatment program.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1990
Description: Carmen Fields reports on differing opinions of the African American studies program at Harvard University. Interviews with Harvard professors Harvey Mansfield and Orlando Patterson. Mansfield says that conservative scholars are excluded from the African American studies program at Harvard. He adds that the program is too political and not concerned enough with the study of the African American experience. Mansfield calls African American studies an "advocacy major" which promotes a certain point of view. Patterson notes that many academic departments are too political. He adds that history and English departments also often teach history from only one perspective. Patterson says that African American studies offers an inter-disciplinary approach to the study of one area of life. Patterson discusses his concerns over the lack of African American scholars entering academia. Fields's report is accompanied by footage of the Harvard campus and footage of students in a class taught by Derrick Bell at the Harvard Law School.
1:00:05: Carmen Fields reports that Harvey Mansfield (professor, Harvard University) has been a professor of government at Harvard University since 1965; that Orlando Patterson (professor, Harvard University) has been a professor of sociology at Harvard since 1970. Fields says that both men believe that students should learn about the African American experience; that Mansfield is critical of how it has been taught. V: Shots of Mansfield; of Patterson; of Harvard students in a lecture hall. Footage of Mansfield being interviewed by Fields. Mansfield says that teaching on the African American experience has been politicized; that teaching on the African American experience has been forced to be "politically correct." Mansfield says that the Afro-American Department at Harvard is too concerned with questions of power and the status of African Americans at Harvard; that the Afro-American Department is not concerned enough with the black experience in America. Shots of Harvard students in a lecture hall. Fields reports that Mansfield believes that African American Studies departments have lost sight of the richness and diversity of the African American experience. Fields reports that Mansfield believes that "leftists" and "liberals" are encouraged in the departments; that Mansfield believes that African American conservatives are ignored. V: Footage of Mansfield being interviewed by Jones. Mansfield says that African American conservatives are not welcomed by the Afro-American Department at Harvard. Mansfield says that the limited scope of the department has a bad effect on the university. Shot of Harvard Yard through one of the gates. Fields reports that Mansfield believes that African American studies departments turn academics into activism. Fields reports that Mansfield says that African American Studies departments and Women's Studies departments design their majors to promote particular points of view. V: Shot through an iron gate of the window to a classroom. Footage of Mansfield being interviewed. Mansfield says that "advocacy majors" promote certain points of view. Mansfield says that the classes for these majors presuppose a certain viewpoint; that questions are not raised; that professors address a "rally" of like-minded people. Footage of Patterson being interviewed. Patterson says that many history and English departments contain like-minded professors and like-minded students; that many of these departments take a narrow view of their subject. Patterson says that American history was taught in a narrow way until the 1960s and 1970s; that history and English are still taught in a narrow way in some places. Fields reports that Patterson agrees that overly politicized departments are a problem; that Patterson is more worried about a lack of African American scholars. Fields reports that there has been a decline in African American scholars since the late 1960s. V: Shot of Derrick Bell (Professor, Harvard Law School) teaching a class at Harvard Law School in December of 1990. Shots of the students in Bell's class. Footage of Patterson being interviewed. Patterson says that he is concerned about the low numbers of African American students entering graduate schools in all areas. Patterson says that the African American culture does not have an "intellectual tradition." Patterson says that African American culture has made major contributions to American life. Fields reports that African American Studies departments may encourage more African American students to pursue higher education in a variety of fields. V: Shots of students on the Harvard campus; of Bell teaching a class; of an African American female student in Bell's class. Footage of Patterson saying that African American Studies offers an inter-disciplinary approach to the study of a particular area of life.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/27/1991
Description: Marcus Jones reports that Alex Haley discussed African American history and his work at a Black History Month event at Harvard University. Haley is in great demand as a speaker during Black History Month. Haley speaks to students and faculty. Interview with Haley, who talks about how he came to write the novel Roots. Haley also discusses the importance of African American history and the importance of Black History Month. Haley believes that Black History Month is important because it draws attention to African American history; he is concerned about a lack of historical awareness among African Americans. Jones's report is accompanied by footage from the television series based on Roots.
1:00:10: Visual: Footage of Alex Haley (author) walking into a building with two other men. Marcus Jones reports that February is the busiest month of the year for Haley; that February is known as Black History Month. V: Shot of Haley standing up as an a small audience applauds for him. Footage of Haley being interviewed by Jones. Haley says that he will speak at thirty-two different venues during the month of February, 1991. Jones reports that Haley discussed history and his work with students and faculty at Harvard University today; that Haley will speak at Salem State College this evening. V: Shots of Haley speaking to students in a room at Harvard University. Shots of the students. Shot of the cover of Haley's novel, Roots. Jones reports that Haley told the story of his own family in Roots; that Haley is in great demand as a speaker during Black History Month. V: Footage Haley being interviewed by Jones. Haley says that people tend to talk about black history as if it is separate from American history. Haley says that black history is a part of American history; that people who claim to know American history must be familiar with black history. Haley says that American history has many components; that historians of American history must also know Native American history. Jones reports that Haley says that he does not court controversy. Jones reports that Haley is known for documenting the life of Malcolm X (African-American leader); that Malcolm X is a controversial figure. V: Shot of the cover of The Autobiography of Malcolm X. Footage from the TV series, Roots. Jones reports that history is always controversial; that Haley learned the power of history when he traced his family tree back to Africa. Footage of Haley being interviewed by Jones. Jones asks Haley about his motivation for writing Roots. Haley says that he had heard family stories from his grandmother and her sisters; that his initial motivation was curiousity. Haley says that the civil rights movement made him begin to think about Africa and his roots there; that his grandmother had told him stories handed down about Africa. Footage from Roots. Jones reports that all newcomers to the US are aware of their roots; that Haley is concerned about the lack of historical awareness among African Americans. V: Footage of Haley being interviewed by Jones. Haley says that most images of cowboys in the old west are of white cowboys; that more than half of the cowboys in the old west were African American. Haley says that it is important for young African Americans to know that African Americans were also cowboys. Haley says that young African Americans need to know the part played by their people in American history. Haley says that young African Americans cannot grow up thinking that they are the same as white people. Haley says that young African Americans need to be able to identify with other African Americans. Shots of Haley speaking to students at Harvard; of the students. Jones reports that Haley is not a critic of the limited attention given to black history during one month per year. Jones reports that Haley does not see Black History Month as "tokenism." Jones says that Haley sees Black History Month as an opportunity to encourage people to explore their roots. V: Footage of Haley being interviewed by Jones. Haley says that Black History Month is necessary because it sets aside a block of time to concentrate of black history. Haley says that he hopes that successive Black History Months in the coming years will leave a strong imprint on the popular perception of black history. Footage from Roots.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/25/1991
Description: Hope Kelly reports on an increase in the incidence of anti-Semitic incidents in Massachusetts, some of which may have been provoked by the Persian Gulf War. Interview with Sally Greenberg an attorney at the Anti-Defamation League. She says that the incidents include threats, assaults, and beatings, and age-old stereotypes of Jews are being resurrected by Holocaust revisionists, Ku Klux Klan members and others. Kelly reviews statistics for hate crimes against various racial and ethnic groups as well as against gays and lesbians in Boston. Kelly reports that hate crimes rose by 20% in Boston in 1990. Kelly's report is accompanied by footage of Fred Leuchter, Jr. (Holocaust revisionist) and David Duke (Louisiana politician) and by footage of anti-Semitic graffiti and flyers.
1:00:08: Visual: Shots of anti-semitic graffiti on a building. Hope Kelly reports that 1685 incidents of anti-semitism were reported in the US in 1990; that there were 250 more incidents in 1990 than there were in 1989. V: Footage of Sally Greenberg (attorney, Anti-Defamation League) being interviewed by Kelly. Greenberg says that the number of reported anti-semitic incidents has grown for the past four years. Greenberg says that Massachusetts has the fourth-highest rate of anti-semitic incidents and vandalism in the country. Kelly reports that Greenberg has worked for the Anti-Defamation League for five years. Kelly notes that law enforcement now tracks the incidents in a more thorough manner. Kelly adds that violent bigotry is common. V: Shot of a Boston Police cruiser pulling out of a parking lot. Shot of anti-semitic graffiti. Footage of Greenberg being interviewed by Kelly. Greenberg says that the 1685 incidents included threats, assaults and beatings. Greenberg says that age-old stereotypes about Jews are being resurrected by Holocaust revisionists, Ku Klux Klan members and others. Shot of Fred Leuchter, Jr. (Holocaust revisionist). Greenberg mentions Louis Farrakhan (leader, Nation of Islam) and David Duke (Louisiana politician and former Ku Klux Klan member). Greenberg says that Duke received 60% of the white vote when he ran for Senator in Louisiana; that Duke is a former Klan member who has cleaned up his image. Shots of Duke being sworn in as a state representative in Louisiana; of fellow representatives applauding. Footage of Duke from February of 1989. Duke says that he has put his past behind him; that his future actions will counteract any past acts of racism. Kelly reports that the Persian Gulf War has exacerbated the situation. V: Shots of US Army tanks during the Persian Gulf War. Shot of an anti-semitic flyer which reads, "Georgie's Jewish War." Footage of Greenberg being interviewed by Kelly. Greenberg says that the anti-semitic flyer was sent to someone at the Anti-Defamation League; that the flyer is signed by Adolph Hitler (former dictator of Germany). Greenberg says that the Persian Gulf War has provoked anti-semitic incidents. Kelly reports that anti-semitism can take many forms; that the city of Boston classifies acts of hate against any group as "hate crimes." Kelly reports that hate crimes rose by 20% in Boston in 1990. V: Shots from the window of a car of city streets at night. Kelly reports that the Boston Police Department reported 243 hate crimes in 1990. Kelly reports that African Americans were the victims of 82 hate crimes in 1990; that African Americans were the victims of 65 hate crimes in 1989. Kelly reports that Asian Americans were the victims of 39 hate crimes in 1990; that Asian Americans were the victims of 21 hate crimes in 1989. Kelly reports that Latinos were the victims of 38 hate crimes in 1990; that Latinos were the victims of 20 hate crimes in 1989. Kelly reports that the gay and lesbian community saw the largest increase in attacks from 1989 to 1990. Kelly notes that gays and lesbians were the victims of 39 hate crimes in 1990; that gays and lesbians were the victims of 13 hate crimes in 1989. Kelly reports that the white community saw a decrease in attacks from 1989 to 1990. Kelly notes that whites were the victims of 65 hate crimes in 1990; that whites were the victims of 83 hate crimes in 1989. V: On-screen text and visuals detail the hate crime statistics for each group. Footage of Greenberg being interviewed by Kelly. Greenberg says that society's level of tolerance for hate crimes is too high. Greenberg says that more people need to speak out against bigoted remarks and hate crimes. Shot of anti-semitic graffiti on a building.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/04/1991
Description: Marcus Jones reports that a group of African American teenagers have created an anti-violence tele-play called "A Second Chance," which will air on the Boston Neighborhood Network. Jones notes that the teenagers spent the summer rehearsing, writing and recording the video, with encouragement from counselors from the Dorchester Counseling Center. Jones reports that the 30-minute video takes a stand against drugs and violence. Jones' report includes footage from an interview with Maxine Rawlins (Dorchester Counseling Center). Rawlins says that parents, teachers, and peer counselors can use the video in discussions about violence. Jones' report also includes interviews with teenagers involved in making the video. The teenagers talk about the video and their efforts to turn others away from violence. Jones notes that the lives of many of these teenagers have been touched by violence. Jones' report includes footage from the video, footage of a teenager performing a rap song, and footage from the funeral of teenager Kingsley Allen who was killed at Boston High School.
1:00:21: Visual: Footage from the Boston Neighborhood Network of a video made by African American teenagers from the Dorchester Counseling Center. The video is called A Second Chance. Marcus Jones reports that a group of African American teenagers have created a tele-play called A Second Chance. Jones notes that the teenagers are trying to send a message to other teenagers about stopping violence. V: Footage of Tanachee Babbitt (student) being interviewed. Babbitt says that kids need to stop killing other kids. Babbitt says that the violence needs to stop or there will be no one left. Footage of a group of African American teenagers being interviewed. One teenage boy says that anyone can have a second chance. A teenage girl says that people should not waste those second chances. Shots of the teenagers. Jones reports that the teenagers were encouraged by counselors at the Dorchester Counseling Center; that the teenagers spent the summer writing, rehearsing, and recording the video. Jones notes that the video was recorded at the Roxbury studio of the Boston Neighborhood Network. V: Footage of one of the teenagers performing a rap song. Jones reports that the video will premiere on the Boston Neighborhood Network tomorrow; that the video speaks is 30 minutes long; that it speaks out against drugs and violence. Jones reports that the cast members do not think that the video alone will stem the violence in their community. V: Footage of Babbitt sitting at a table with two teenage boys. Babbitt says that it is easy to send a message while making people laugh at the same time. Footage of Maxine Rawlins (Dorchester Counseling Center) being interviewed. Rawlins says that the video will not make people suddenly turn away from drugs and violence. Rawlins says that she hopes that the video will make people think twice before engaging in these activities. Footage of a teenage boy sitting with Babbitt at a table. The boy says half-seriously that he and the others can make a difference. Babbitt laughs. Shot of Jones. Jones reports that each of these teenagers has been touched by violence; that each has experienced the death of a friend or family member. Jones reports that the father of one of the boys was killed in a street robbery; that a funeral was held yesterday for Kingsley Allen (Babbitt's brother). V: Shots of one of the teenage boys; of the funeral service for Allen. Jones reports that Allen was stabbed to death by another teenager at Boston High School. V: Footage of Babbitt being interviewed. Babbitt says that her brother was "a bad boy." Babbitt says that she talked to her brother about the video project; that her brother had talked to her about trying to end his violent lifestyle. Babbitt says that her brother was killed two days after speaking to her. Footage of Rawlins saying that she would like to make a guide to go along with the video; that parents, teachers and peer counselors can use the video in discussions about violence. Footage from the video, A Second Chance.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/18/1990
Description: Christy George interviews Maria LeBron about her experiences as a tenant in Boston's public housing, specifically in the Mission Hill Housing Project. George notes that LeBron is one of 370 tenants who have been compensated for the discriminatory policies of the Boston Housing Authority (BHA). The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and a federal court found the BHA policies to be discriminatory. The Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights filed a lawsuit on behalf on tenants. LeBron talks about how she was placed on a waiting list for an apartment even though there were empty apartments in housing projects in South Boston and Charlestown. She talks about the discriminatory policies of the BHA. LeBron says that it is very difficult to be homeless. She adds that people of color should not be afraid to challenge government agencies. George reports that nearly 1,000 people are eligible for settlement money from the BHA.
1:00:11: Visual: Footage of Maria LeBron (public housing tenant) calling to her children in the courtyard of the Mission Hill Housing Project. LeBron takes one of her children by the hand. She walks with along with them toward one of the buildings in the development. Christy George reports that the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) placed LeBron in the Mission Hill Public Housing Project three years ago. George notes that LeBron is Puerto Rican; that LeBron's neighbors are Puerto Rican and African American. George reports that the BHA used to assign tenants by race; that LeBron was forced to wait for a long time to be placed in an apartment. George adds that LeBron signed up for public housing after the city condemned the building in which she was living; that LeBron was six months pregnant. V: Footage of LeBron sitting in her apartment with her two sons. LeBron says that she wondered why the BHA took so long to place her in an apartment. LeBron says that she knew that there were empty apartments. LeBron says that she waited three months before being placed in an apartment. Shots of LeBron working in the kitchen of her apartment. George reports that LeBron spent three months shuttling between a homeless shelter and the Milner Hotel. George notes that BHA apartments in Charlestown and South Boston sat empty while LeBron waited for an apartment. V: Shot of one of LeBron's sons sitting on the floor of the apartment. A toy car is in the foreground of the shot. George reports that LeBron was assigned to an apartment in Mission Hill two weeks before her baby was born. V: Shot of LeBron's two sons in the kitchen with her while she works. Footage of LeBron being interviewed by George. LeBron says that she noticed that there were no white families in the housing project where she was placed. LeBron says that a neighbor told her that the BHA only places white families in Charlestown and South Boston; that there are no white people outside of those two areas. LeBron says that she thinks that is wrong. Shots of LeBron in the kitchen with her sons. LeBron gets some chocolate milk for one of her sons. Shot of the boy drinking from a small bottle of chocolate milk. George reports that the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and a federal court ruled that the BHA housing policies were discriminatory. George reports that the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights filed suit on behalf of the NAACP and tenants. V: Shots of Lebron giving her other son a cup of milk. Shot of an $500 invoice made out to LeBron from the BHA. George reports that LeBron received $500 from the BHA yesterday; that LeBron will receive a total of three checks as compensation for the discriminatory practices of the BHA. George notes that she will receive two more checks for $250. V: Shot of LeBron and her two sons on the couch. Footage of LeBron being interviewed by George. LeBron says that the BHA learned an expensive lesson. LeBron says that there are many people who do not have homes. LeBron says that it is hard to be homeless; that homeless people do not know where they will go for their next meal or for shelter. LeBron says that she wanted a home. Shot of the housing development from a window in LeBron's apartment. George reports that LeBron is one of 370 people who have been compensated for the BHA's discriminatory policies. George notes that nearly 1,000 more people are eligible for settlement money. George notes that these people will be hard to find; that some do not speak English; that others may be afraid to collect. V: Shot of three people standing at the entrance to one of the development buildings. Footage of LeBron being interviewed by George. LeBron says that many people of color are intimidated by large government bureaucracies like the BHA. LeBron says that people should not be intimidated, especially if they are in the right. Shot of LeBron handing each of her sons a coin. LeBron stands near a bureau. George reports that LeBron will use her first check to bring her sons to Puerto Rico for a visit to their grandparents. George notes that LeBron would like to attend college in the future to study law. George adds that LeBron has already won her first case. V: Shot of LeBron following her sons out of a room in the apartment.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/02/1990
Description: Christy George reports that poor Boston neighborhoods lack access to banking services. Banking leaders met with community leaders today to announce an agreement that will provide better banking services to poor neighborhoods. George reviews the details of the agreement, which will provide bank branches, loans, and increased investment to poor neighborhoods. At the meeting Richard Pollard (Massachusetts Bankers Association) says that redlining did not take place in the 1980s. Charles Stith (Organization for a New Equality), Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council), Willie Jones (Community Investment Coalition), John Hamill (Shawmut Bank),Ronald Homer (Boston Bank of Commerce), and Michael Dukakis all speak out in favor of the proposal. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following items: Julian Bond at Harvard University and Christopher Lydon interviews Sarah Small
1:00:06: Visual: Aerial shot of Somerville. Shot of residents walking on a street in Roxbury. Shots of street signs for Blue Hill Avenue and Dudley Street; of a Western Union office in Roxbury; of signs in the window of the Western Union office. Shot of a man walking into the Western Union office. Christy George reports that poor communities lack access to banking services. George reports that Boston banks have few branches in poor communities. V: Footage of Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) at a gathering of Massachusetts bankers. Dukakis shakes hands with meeting attendees. George reports that Dukakis outlawed the practice of redlining in the 1970s; that bankers and business leaders were upset about the law. George says that poor communities still lack banking services in spite of the law. George reports that Dukakis has supported a program to get banks to give better service to poor communities. V: Footage of Dukakis standing with banking leaders and community leaders at the meeting. Footage of Richard Pollard (Massachusetts Bankers Association) saying that he will not admit that redlining has been taking place in the 1980s; that redlining is illegal. Shots of banking leaders and community leaders socializing. George says that banking leaders met with community leaders today. George reports that banking leaders have agreed to open 10 to 15 new branches of downtown banks in poor neighborhoods over the next five years; that banking leaders have agreed to open 20 to 35 new ATM machines in poor communities. George reports that banking leaders have agreed to restructure mortgage programs; that the new program will grant mortgages to families earning as little as $27,000 per year. George reports that the banks will participate in a $100 million affordable housing pool to finance renovation and construction of affordable housing. George reports that bank leaders will support a $10 million corporation which will direct investments to minority-owned businesses. V: On-screen text details the specifics of the agreement between bank leaders and community leaders. Footage of Charles Stith (Organization for a New Equality) at the meeting. Stith encourages the leaders to join hands and raise them in the air. The leaders raise their hands and say "Amen." Stith stands next to Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council). Shots of Dukakis and other leaders. Shots of the media; of Stith. George reports that the leaders need to decide how to monitor progress; that both sides were optimistic about the plan. V: Footage of Stith speaking at the meeting. Stith says that it has taken a long time to reach an agreement. Footage of Bolling speaking at the meeting. Bolling says that the agreement is like "a Catholic marriage"; that there is no divorce. Footage of John Hamill (Shawmut Bank) speaking at the meeting. Hamill says that the agreement is not like a new marriage; that the agreement is "a renewal of vows." Footage of Ronald Homer (Boston Bank of Commerce) speaking at the meeting. Homer says that "the only way to say 'I love you' in business is with money. Footage of Dukakis saying that the agreement is "fantastic." George says that the agreement was reached when communication between the two sides improved. V: Footage of Pollard speaking at the meeting. Pollard says that the community used to have the feeling that the banks had unlimited funds with which to provide mortgages. Pollard says that the banks needed to explain their business model to the community. Footage of Willie Jones (Community Investment Coalition) speaking at the meeting. Jones says that the banks have realized that poor communities are looking for basic services instead of "bells and whistles." George stands in a residential neighborhood. George reports that banking rules have made it difficult for poor people to qualify for loans and mortgages. George reports that banks have restructured their rules to allow access for poor people. George notes that the banks will make money in poor communities; that they will not make as much money as in wealthy communities.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1990
Description: Meg Vaillancourt reports on the annual Black/Jewish Seder Supper at the Union United Methodist Church. Interviews with Leonard Zakim from the Anti-Defamation League, Charles Stith from the Union United Methodist Church, and Eric Karp from the Temple Ohabei Shalom about the importance of the Black/Jewish Seder supper. Zakim says that the supper celebrates the continuing struggle for freedom and civil rights on the part of both communities. Stith talks about the kinship between the two communities. Karp says that both communities have struggled against oppression. Interviews with attendees about the significance of the supper. Vaillancourt notes that this year's Seder supper falls on the eve of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. This edition of the Ten O'Clock News also included the following item: James Williams protests lack of minority faculty at MIT
1:00:07: Visual: Shot of the steeple of the Union United Methodist Church at dusk. Shots of the annual Black/Jewish Seder supper at the Union United Methodist Church. Shot of an African American woman and a white man speaking at the supper. A choir sings, "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot." Meg Vaillancourt reports that a group of local African Americans and Jews celebrated the Seder. V: Footage of Leonard Zakim (Anti-Defamation League) being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Zakim says that the supper celebrates the continuing struggle for freedom and civil rights. Footage of Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church being interviewed. Stith says that society is polarized along racial lines; that the supper is an celebrates efforts to promote peaceful coexistence between groups of people. Stith says that the supper affirms the goals of Martin Luther King Jr. (civil rights leader). Vaillancourt reports that attendees gathered at the Union United Methodist Church) for the eleventh Black/Jewish Seder. V: Shots of attendees reading from a religious text. The attendees hold pieces of matzoh in their hands. Footage of Eric Karp (Temple Ohabei Shalom) being interviewed. Karp says that the Seder celebrates the deliverance of the Jewish people from oppression; that the African American community has fought a long battle against oppression. Karp says that the two communities can learn from one another. Footage of an African American woman being interviewed at the supper. The woman says that she is attending her first Seder; that the two communities are brought together through their belief in God. Footage of an older Jewish woman being interviewed by Vaillancourt. Vaillancourt asks what the two communities have in common. The woman says that the two communities share a lot of things including prejudice and hard times. Footage of an older African American woman being interviewed by Vaillancourt. The woman says that African Americans and Jews are treated the same way. Footage of a young Jewish boy being interviewed. The boy says that "prejudice stinks." Shots of attendees at the supper. Vaillancourt reports that the ceremony is Jewish; that the date is important to those involved in the civil rights struggle. Vaillancourt notes that King gave his last speech twenty-three years ago tonight; that King was murdered in Memphis on the following day. Vaillancourt stands outside of the room where the supper is held. Vaillancourt reports that the Passover meal is symbolic of the exodus from Egypt by the Israelites after 400 years of slavery. V: Footage of Stith being interviewed. Stith says that enslaved African Americans identified with the struggle of Moses and the people of Israel. Stith says that there is a theological kinship between the two communities. Footage from the Seder supper. A choir sings, "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/03/1991
Description: Jan von Mehren reports on the "Black Wings" exhibit at the National Park Service Visitors Center on State Street. She walks through the exhibit with a group of African American World War II veterans. The men all trained at the Tuskegee airfield during World War II. Interviews with Frank Roberts (retired US Army major), George Hardy (retired US Army Lieutenant Colonel) and John Roach (retired US Air Force Reservist) about their experiences in the military. The men talk about racism and the missions in which they participated. Roberts and Hardy describe their experiences while training at Tuskegee Airfield. Roach talks about the career of Benjamin Davis (first African American general in the US Air Force). The men point out photos in the exhibit and reminisce together.
1:00:14: Visual: Shots of Frank Roberts (retired US Army major) and another man at the "Black Wings" exhibit at the National Park Service Visitors Center on State Street. The men point to the red tail on a model of a WWII airplane. Shot of color picture of a red-tailed bomber plane. Shot of a of a red-tailed model plane. Jan von Mehren reports that red-tailed airplanes were piloted by African American pilots during WWII. V: Footage of Roberts talking about his experience as a pilot in WWII. He says that a group of white bomber pilots once expressed gratitude to him and his colleagues. Von Mehren reports that the African American pilots experienced blatant racism during WWII. Von Mehren reports that African American military pilots trained at the Tuskegee Airfield in Alabama; that Tuskegee opened in 1941 to the dismay of top military brass. Von Mehren reports that some people at the time believed that African Americans did not have the mental or moral fiber to fly in combat. V: Shots of a group of former Tuskegee pilots at the exhibit. The group includes Roberts. Shots of black and white photos of African American trainees and pilots at the Tuskegee Airfield. Footage of George Hardy (retired US Army Lieutenant Colonel) saying that his group flew over 200 missions; that they never lost a bomber to enemy fighters. Shot of a color image of a red-tailed bomber plane from the exhibit. Footage of John Roach (retired US Air Force reservist) talking about the distinct sound of the planes flown during the war. The other men agree that the planes had a very distinct sound. Roberts talks about filling gas tanks in mid-flight. Shot of a black and white photo of Roberts as a pilot during WWII. Von Mehren reports that Roberts graduated from Tuskegee in 1944; that he flew combat missions in Europe. V: Footage of Roberts saying that he was twenty-six when he graduated from Tuskegee; that he was one of the oldest men in his class. Roberts says that the men studied very hard in order to make the grade of lieutenant; that the men were committed to becoming Tuskegee airmen. Footage of Hardy saying that the Tuskegee Airfield provided a "cocoon" for the men. Hardy tries to recall the name of the local sheriff. Hardy says that the men tried to avoid getting into trouble outside of the airbase. Shot of an exhibit poster detailing the biography of Benjamin Davis (first African American general in the US Air Force). Footage of Roach saying that Davis graduated from West Point in the 1930s; that Davis was the only African American cadet at West Point at the time; that no one spoke to him for four years. Von Mehren reports that Roach is a retired colonel in the Air Force Reserve; that Roach left the military to work for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Von Mehren reports that Roach worked to evaluate pilots for commercial airlines; that commercial airlines would not hire African American pilots at the time. V: Shot of a black and white photo of a group of African American pilots in front of a plane. Roach is among them. Shot of a black and white photo of Roach in the cockpit of a military plane. Shots of Roach and another man looking at part of the exhibit. Von Mehren reports that the Tuskegee Airmen were very young when they trained to become pilots during WWII; that this exhibit allows the men to see themselves documented in history. V: Shots of the group of men at the exhibit. Footage of Roberts as he points to a photo of himself in the exhibit. Powers says that the photo was taken after the group had completed 200 missions. Shot of the photo in the exhibit. Shot of a black and white photo of the Tuskegee Airmen lined up for an inspection.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/19/1990
Description: Jan von Mehren reports that African American community leaders expressed their rage over the handling of the Carol Stuart murder case. Von Mehren notes that the leaders accused city officials, the Boston Police Department and the news media of racism in handling the case. Von Mehren's report includes angry speeches by Don Muhammad (Muhammad's Mosque), Rev. Graylan Hagler (Church of the United Community), and Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council). Von Mehren notes that the African American leaders have accused police of ignoring obvious clues during their investigation. Von Mehren adds that some leaders called for the resignation of Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) and Francis "Mickey" Roache (Commissioner, Boston Police Department). Von Mehren interviews Hagler. Hagler says that police officers ignored community residents who approached them with information about the case. Von Mehren concludes by saying that the African American community suffered a grave injustice in the aftermath of the murder.
1:00:04: Visual: Footage of Bill Owens (State Senator) speaking at a press conference. A group of African American community leaders stand behind him. The group includes Graylan Ellis-Hagler (Church of the United Community) and Don Muhammad (Muhammad's Mosque). Owens says that a great injustice has been done to the African-American community. Shots of the attendees at the press conference. Jan von Mehren reports that African American community leaders expressed rage and fury at a press conference today. V: Footage of Ellis-Hagler speaking at the press conference. Ellis-Hagler accuses Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) of placing blame too quickly on the African American community. Ellis-Hagler compares Flynn's actions to that of the Ku Klux Klan. The attendees at the press conference give vocal support to Ellis-Hagler's assertions. Footage of Muhammad at the press conference. Muhammad asks if white public officials will call Charles Stuart (murderer of Carol Stuart) "an animal." The crowd cheers. Von Mehren reports that African American leaders believe that Flynn, the Boston Police Department, and the media rushed to conclusions about the Stuart case. Von Mehren notes that the African American leaders say that racism played a huge role in the case. V: Shots of the press conference; of Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) addressing the press conference. Footage of Muhammad at the press conference. Muhammad says that police usually suspect the husband when a woman is killed. Muhammad says that police automatically suspect an African American man when a woman is killed in an African American neighborhood. Von Mehren stands outside of Muhammad's Mosque. Von Mehren reports that African American leaders have accused the police, the mayor, and the media of ignoring vital information about the case. Von Mehren notes that the African American leaders says that the vital information was circulating on the streets of Roxbury on the day after the shooting. V: Footage of Muhammad at the press conference. Muhammad says that there were rumours on the street that Charles Stuart was a drug addict. Muhammad says that police should have investigated those rumours. The crowd cheers. Von Mehren notes that Ellis-Hagler runs a recovery center for drug addicts out of his church in Roxbury. V: Footage of Ellis-Hagler being interviewed by von Mehren. Ellis-Hagler says that the workers in his recovery center told him that Charles Stuart was the murderer on the day after the murder occurred. Ellis-Hagler talks about a man from the community who went to police with information about the murder. Ellis-Hagler says that the man shared information with police which confirmed the alibi of William Bennett (suspect). Ellis-Hagler says that the police told the man that they had a suspect who suited their purposes. Footage of Muhammad at the press conference. Muhammad says that apologies are worthless; that the damage has already been done. Muhammad says that the city has stabbed the African American community in the back. Muhammad says that the African American community has been devastated. Shot of a sign at the press conference. The sign reads, "What does (sic) Boston and South Africa have in common? Stopping and detaining men because of the color of their skin." Von Mehren reports that some African American leaders called for the resignation of Flynn and Francis "Mickey" Roache (Police Commissioner, City of Boston); that some called for restitution to Mission Hill residents. V: Shots of Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council) speaking at the press conference; of attendees at the press conference. Shot of Muhammad at the press conference. Von Mehren adds that the African American community was dealt a grave injustice when police, public officials, and the media were taken in by Charles Stuart's hoax.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/05/1990