Description: Exteriors of the Massachusetts State House. AFSCME (American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees) state workers on strike, picketing outside State House with placards. Closeup on Beacon St. street sign.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/21/1976
Description: Day 3 after blizzard, traffic around Charles Circle at base of Beacon Hill. People walking on Charles Street. Car drive on unplowed roads. Pigeons search sidewalk for food.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/07/1982
Description: Interview with South End based artist Allan Rohan Crite. He tells a story about selling paintings in the 1940s, tracking them down, and recently finding them. He talks about his paintings, inspired by different parts of African American lives, including religion. He also talks about the poetry and essays he's been working on recently. They focus on his version of the African American experience. They shoot cutaways with no sound.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/04/1982
Description: Back Bay Amtrak station entrance. Train, viewed from above, starts up and moves slowly along tracks. Train histle and bells. Railroad bed. Commuter train pulls up, passengers board. Two trains pass in opposite directions. Looking down tracks to old and new Hancock buildings. Orange line elevated structure along Washington Street. T train passes overhead with typical clunking sound; congested vehicular traffic below. Camera moves on complex steel skeleton of tracks above.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/04/1977
Description: John Anderson press conference before Massachusetts primary. He thanks his supporters and the audience cheers him. Edward Kennedy press conference at the Parker House. He talks about the need to improve the U.S. economy.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/05/1980
Description: Interview with Andrew Young, Mayor of Atlanta at the Parker House. Young talks about his efforts to facilitate international trade between Atlanta businesses and third-world nations. He says that urban mayors can help local businesses by leading trade delegations and encouraging local businesses to get involved in emerging markets. Young criticizes the federal government's reliance on the military in conducting foreign policy. He says that the US must act with intelligence and rely on diplomacy to solve world problems. He talks about US involvement in Vietnam, Lebanon, and El Salvador. Young and Christy George discuss African Americans in politics. Young does not believe that a candidate should not represent one single constituency. Young says that more African Americans need to be elected as senators, mayors and governors before an African American is elected as president. George reasks questions for cutaways. Young attends a cocktail party at the Parker House. Other guests include Bruce Bolling, Boston City Councilor, and Hubie Jones, Dean of the School of Social Work at Boston University.
1:00:04: Visual: Andrew Young (Mayor of Atlanta) is interviewed by Christy George in the Parker House. George asks about urban mayors taking on international roles. George notes that Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) is interested in Young's work in Atlanta with third-world nations; that Kevin White (Mayor of Boston) calls Boston a "world-class city." Young says that most governments help businesses; that the federal government has done little to help businesses. Young says that mayors can help local businesses. Young talks about leading trade delegations of Atlanta businessmen to other parts of the world. Young says that businessmen can gain access to government officials through the mayor. Young says that he took businesspeople, educators and a YMCA soccer team on a trip to Jamaica and Trinidad. Young says that the businesspeople did $150 million of business during a one-week trade mission. Young says that business people were allowed to see the decision-makers in foreign governments. Young says that white mayors can do the same thing. Young says that the mayors of Seattle and Indianapolis have done the same thing. Young says that there are large concentrations of Dutch and Japanese businesses in Georgia; that he is trying to build on that. George notes that African-American mayors are now dealing with third-world countries. Young says that the emerging markets are in the third world. Young says that he will visit Nigeria next week. Young says that Nigeria is buying products from Atlanta; that Nigeria is developing at a rapid rate. Young notes that Japanese and German businesses have been doing business with the third world for a long time. Young says that US businesses never needed to do business abroad until 1975. George notes that Young had been talking about doing business with the third world when he worked for Jimmy Carter (former US President). George remarks that the Democratic Party has not advocated more trade with the third world. Young says that Ronald Reagan (US President) sees everything in terms of an East-West conflict. Young says that the US needs to look beyond the East-West conflict. Young talks about US involvement in Egypt and Panama in the 1970s. Young says that diplomatic treaties can undercut communist influence. Young says that military solutions seem popular, easy and "macho." Young says that military solutions have seldom succeeded for the US or for the Soviet Union. 1:05:15: V: George asks what the Democratic Party should be doing to prepare for the 1984 elections. Young says that the Democratic Party must approach world problems with "reason and sanity." Young talks about how the US was drawn into the Vietnam War. Young says that US ships are present off the coasts of Central America and Lebanon; that the US could easily become trapped in a military situation in one of these regions. Young says that there is no military solution in Lebanon; that the US has no business there. Young says that there is no military solution in El Salvador. Young says that the US needs to show its strength through intelligence; that the US should not show its strength through destructiveness. Young says that the Democratic Party must offer clear a alternative to Reagan. Young says that the US is living on the brink of war; that this policy is insane. George asks how the Democratic Party should deal with political unrest and revolutions in the third world. Young says that the US needs to understand the impulses behind revolutions in third world country. Young says that Harry Truman (former US President) probably did not know that Ho Chi Min (former Vietnamese leader) worked as a chef at the Parker House while he was a student in Boston. Young talks about the influence of American ideas of freedom on Ho Chi Min in the 1940s. Young says that third world leaders should not be discounted as Marxists. Jump cut in videotape. George asks if African Americans need an African American candidate for president in 1984 in order to gain political influence. Young says that he disagrees; that politicians should not represent only one segment of the population. Young says that the present Democratic candidates have strong records on civil rights and minority issues. Young says that African Americans need to be involved in the campaign of a winning candidate. Young says that candidates never live up to promises made at the convention. George asks if it is time for an African American presidential candidate. Young says that there need to be more African American mayors, governors and senators before there is an African American president. George closes the interview. 1:09:57: V: The crew takes cutaway shots of George. 1:14:40: V: Footage of a cocktail reception at the Parker House. Attendees eat, drink, and socialize. Attendees include Hubie Jones (Dean of the School of Social Work, Boston University), Bruce Bolling (Boston City Council), Carol Bolling (wife of Bruce Bolling), Young, and others. Shot of Young socializing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/22/1983
Description: Apartheid protesters gather in front of the South African Consulate at 100 Charles River Plaza in Boston, surrounded by press. Mel King (community activist), Charles Yancey (Boston City Council) and Willard Johnson (Head, TransAfrica) demand to see Richard Blankstein (honorary consul to South Africa). Police officers bar entry to the building. Johnson announces to the media that the protesters will ask for Blankstein's resignation from his post. He adds that they will ask Blankstein's law firm to sever ties with South Africa. Johnson and the others are eventually allowed to enter the building. Several takes of reporter standup. Police, protesters and the media wait outside of the building. Themba Vilakazi (member of African National Congress) is interviewed by the media, announcing the resignation of Blankstein, and noting that Blackstein doesn't want to talk to the media. Johnson, King and Yancey exit the building. Johnson reads a statement of resignation from Blankstein, which says he is not a supporter of apartheid. Johnson announces a victory for the protesters. Johnson, King and Yancey walk over to a group of protesters on the street. Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) leads the protesters in a chant. Johnson announces the resignation of Blankstein. The crowd cheers.
1:04:34: V: Johnson tells the media that the protestors have asked for the right to meet with Blankstein; that they would like to ask Blankstein to resign from his post as honorary consul. Johnson says that the protestors are acting in the best interest of the public. Johnson says that the protestors are willing to meet with Blankstein outside of the building. Johnson says that Blankenstein must resign publicly; that his law firm must sever ties with South Africa. Johnson says that the police officer has gone inside to ask Blankstein to meet with the protestors. Johnson says that the protestors' goal is to force the resignation of Blankstein; that the protestors will focus next on other corporations with ties to South Africa. 1:06:30: V: Four protestors, including Yancey and Johnson, are let into the building. They are accompanied by Themba Vilakazi (member, African National Congress). Police officers stand guard at the entrance to the building. Protestors and the media wait on the sidewalk outside of the entrance. Tug Yourgrau reports from the sidewalk in front of the entrance. The chants of protestors are audible. Yourgrau reports that Blankstein has been honorary counsel to South Africa in Boston for two years; that Blankstein has refused to be interviewed on camera. Yourgrau reports that the protestors have promised to picket Blankstein's offices again of Friday; that a candlelight vigil has been planned on Sunday at the Boston Public Library. Yourgrau does several takes of his comments for the news story. 1:09:13: V: Police officers are lined up in front of the entrance to the building. The sidewalk is crowded with members of the media, protestors and bystanders. 1:10:13: V: Vilakazi talks to the media. Vilakazi reports that Blankenstein has signed a letter of resignation, which he will hand to the protestors. Vilakazi reports that Blankenstein has said that the actions of the protestors influenced his decision to resign. Vilakazi notes that Blankenstein has said that he does not support apartheid. 1:11:20: V: The media and protestors peer curiously into the lobby of the building. Johnson exits the building, accompanied by King and Yancey. Johnson reads a statement of resignation from Blankstein. Blankstein's statement describes his post as honorary consul. The statement denies that Blankstein is a supporter of apartheid. The statement reads that Blankstein does not wish to be made an apologist for the South African government. Johnson shows the letter to the media. Johnson says that Blankenstein's resignation is a victory for the protestors. Johnson says that the protestors will target other corporations with ties to the South African government. 1:14:02: V: Johnson, King and Yancey walk away from the building. The three men walk toward a group of protestors on the street. A large group of protestors is picketing on the sidewalk. The protestors chant, "Blankstein, resign." Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) stands on the bed of a pick-up truck, leading the chant through a bullhorn. Johnson takes the bullhorn from the man and addresses the crowd. Stith starts to cheer. King and Yancey stand on the bed of the pick-up truck with Johnson. Johnson announces Blankstein's resignation and holds up the letter. Johnson reads a portion of the statement from Blankstein. The crowd cheers as Johnson reads the statement. Shots of the crowd of protestors. The crowd chants, "Freedom, yes. Apartheid, no."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/04/1984
Description: A group of apartheid protesters picket the South African Consulate at 100 Charles River Plaza in Boston. Police officers stand at the door to the consulate. Willard Johnson (Head of TransAfrica) speaks to the crowd of picketers through a bullhorn. Themba Vilakazi (member of the African National Congress) addresses the crowd, condemning the South African government and criticizing Ronald Reagan for engaging in a policy of "constructive engagement" with the South African government. City Councilor Charles Yancey addresses the crowd, praising Bishop Desmond Tutu and urging the protesters to engage in acts of civil disobedience to protest apartheid. Community activist Mel King addresses the crowd, calling for the resignation of Richard Blankstein (honorary consul to South Africa). King criticizes the Reagan administration's policies in South Africa and talks about the need for large companies to divest from South Africa. Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) stands beside the speakers. Johnson expresses his support for Nelson Mandela and all those fighting apartheid in South Africa.
1:00:00: Visual: The WGBH camera crew sets up its equipment. A diverse group of anti-apartheid protestors picket the South African Consulate at 100 Charles River Plaza. More than 100 protestors carry signs and chant, "1, 2, 3, 4, let's close the consulate door." Shot of a white protest leader leading the chant with a bullhorn. 1:02:48: V: A police officer stands in front of the entrance to the building. He carries a two-way radio. Another officer stands with him. 1:03:20: V: The protestors continue to picket, chanting "Hey, hey, ho, ho, this consulate has got to go." Willard Johnson (head of TransAfrica) speaks to the crowd of picketers through a bullhorn. He urges them to keep the picket line moving. 1:04:19: V: Themba Vilakazi (member, African National Congress) speaks to the crowd about the struggle of black South Africans. Vilakazi criticizes the policies of the ruling government in South Africa. He says that the South African government in engaged in a brutal repression of the residents of black townships. Vilakazi says that the African National Congress (ANC) welcomes worldwide condemnation of the white regime. Vilakazi criticizes the policy of Ronald Reagan (US President) toward South Africa. Vilakazi condemns the Reagan administration's policy of "constructive engagement" with the ruling government. Vilakazi praises the actions of three US political leaders who encouraged an anti-apartheid sit-in at the South African embassy in Washington DC. Vilakazi encourages anti-apartheid protestors across the world. Shots of the picketers. Vilakazi talks about the ANC struggle for freedom in South Africa. Vilakazi closes his speech by saying, "We will win." The protestors chant, "We will win." 1:07:10: V: Johnson introduces Charles Yancey (Boston City Council). Johnson says that Yancey introduced legislation in the City Council for the divestment of city funds from South Africa. Yancey talks about his "unceasing opposition" to the policies of apartheid. Yancey criticizes the repression of blacks in South Africa. Other protest leaders help Yancey to adjust the bullhorn. Yancey says that the international community cannot tolerate the apartheid policies of the South African government. Yancey talks about the previous day's visit to Boston by Bishop Desmond Tutu (South African anti-apartheid leader). Yancey notes that Tutu has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Yancey calls on all people to join the protest against apartheid. Yancey criticizes the federal government's policy toward South Africa. Yancey talks about the importance of acts of civil disobedience in opposing apartheid in South Africa. The crowd applauds. 1:10:15: V: The crowd applauds as Mel King (political activist) takes the bullhorn. King thanks the protestors for coming out to protest. Reverend Charles Stith (Union United Methodist Church) stands next to King. King challenges Richard Blankstein (honorary consul to South Africa) to come down from the consulate and speak to the protestors. King challenges Blankstein to resign in protest of the South African government's apartheid policies. King accuses the Reagan administration of engaging in racist policies in South Africa. King says that protestors will picket multi-national corporations who do business in South Africa; that large corporations need to divest from South Africa. King accuses these corporations of supporting apartheid. King talks about a South African trade union leader who has been jailed by the South African government. King says that the trade union leader has encouraged US protestors to push for corporate divestiture from South Africa. King calls for an end to Reagan's policies and an end to apartheid. 1:14:16: V: Johnson puts on a hat with a sign pinned to it. The sign reads, "For shame." Johnson addresses the crowd. Johnson quotes Nelson Mandela (ANC leader) as saying that he is prepared to die for a free South Africa. Johnson expresses support for Mandela and the black South Africans who are fighting apartheid.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/04/1984
Description: Deborah Wang reports that Boston City Hospital offers a weekly Failure to Thrive Clinic for malnourished children. A team of doctors, nurses and psychologists treat the children and talk to their families. Wang reviews the symptoms and effects of malnourishment. Health care workers treating patients at the Failure to Thrive Clinic. Interview with Dr. Deborah Frank of Boston City Hospital about malnourishment and its effect on children. Frank talks about the importance of the clinic to the lives of children. Frank examines children at the clinic. Wang reports that malnourished children are often victims of poverty and that some are neglected or abused. 80% of children attending the clinic have stabilized or improved their condition. Staff meeting of clinic employees. A health care worker talks about the improved condition of one of his patients. Wang reports that there are six Failure to Thrive Clinics, but that the clinics are underfunded. She adds that some families in Boston are not yet receiving the necessary care for malnourishment. Following the edited story is additional footage of health care workers and patients at the Failure to Thrive Clinic.
1:00:05: Visual: Shots of young children playing with toys and magic markers in the waiting room of a health clinic. Shot of an African American infant on an examination table in a health clinic. Deborah Wang reports that some children in Boston show signs of malnourishment. V: Footage of Dr. Deborah Frank (Boston City Hospital) saying that undernourished children become lethargic and apathetic. Frank notes that the children in the waiting room are very quiet. Shots of an African American health care worker weighing an African American infant on a scale. Wang notes that undernourished children are small for their age; that undernourished children are often ill. V: Footage of Frank saying that malnutrition impairs the body's ability to fight infection. Frank says that undernourished children become sick more often; that each infection contributes to the malnourishment. Shots of health care workers measuring an infant's height. The infant lies on an examining table. Shots of the infant; of the health care workers. Shot of a health care worker putting a diaper on an infant. Wang reports that some malnourished infants are neglected or abused; that most malnourished children are victims of poverty. V: Footage of Frank being interviewed by Wang. Frank talks about a malnourished boy who was admitted with a case of pneumonia. Frank talks about the poor conditions under which many poor families live. Wang reports that the Boston City Hospital offers a weekly Failure to Thrive Clinic for malnourished children; that a team of doctors, nurses, psychologists, social workers treat the children and talk to their families. V: Footage of a white female doctor in an examining room with an African American woman and a young African American girl. The doctor talks to the woman while filling out paperwork. The girl plays quietly in her chair. The doctor talks to the woman about meal times for the child. Footage of a meeting of employees at the Failure to Thrive Clinic. A white male health care worker talks about an infant who has gained weight after attending the clinic. Wang reports that the program has been a success; that 80% of the children attending the clinic have stabilized or improved their conditions. V: Shot of a Latina woman and young boy in an examining room. The woman wipes the boy's face. The boy draws with magic markers. Footage of Frank saying that the hospitals resources are stretched thin. Frank notes that there are families in Boston who are not receiving services. Wang reports that the Failure to Thrive Clinic has a $500,000 budget; that there are six Failure to Thrive Clinics. V: Shot of an African American health care worker taking the temperature of a young white boy. The boy sits on his mother's lap. Shots of an African American girl at the clinic; of a Latino boy drawing with a magic marker; of an African American infant on an examing table; of an African American child holding a stuffed doll. Audio of Frank saying that society needs to reassess its priorities; that these children are the next generation of US citizens. Frank says that society will pay a higher price in the future if these children are not treated now.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/30/1988
Description: Downtown exteriors of Boston banks. Monolithic view of Federal Reserve Bank from Summer Street. High rises in financial district. Keystone building. Severe angle view of Shawmut. Revolving clock at entrance to State Street Bank. Hornblower & Weeks, Hemphill, Noyes sign. First National Bank of Boston. Gillette headquarters along water.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/25/1977
Description: Bernadette Devlin McAliskey (Irish Republican activist) holds a press conference in Boston as part of a 13-city tour of the United States. Devlin speaks about her recent candidacy for the European parliament and says that her speaking tour is intended to help defray debts incurred during her campaign. Devlin's campaign was organized around a human rights platform. Devlin notes that international organizations have condemned the human rights abuses in Northern Ireland but that the United Nations and western countries will not speak out against Great Britain. Devlin expresses cynicism towards politicians and doubts about an American political response to the situation in Northern Ireland. She equates the oppression in Northern Ireland to the inequalities that exist in the United States and notes that Irish Americans engage in oppression of African Americans in Boston. Devlin compares the dearth of Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland to the lack of white working class support for busing in Boston; recounts the history of the Irish conflict from the Irish elections in 1918; and discusses changes that must be made by Great Britain in Northern Ireland. Devlin discusses her activities in the years since she left parliament; the use of violence by Catholics in Northern Ireland; the death of Lord Louis Mountbatten (British official). She accuses the international press of hypocrisy; answers questions about her speaking schedule and her life in Ireland.
0:58:09: Visual: Bernadette Devlin McAliskey (Irish Republican activist) prepares for a press conference as part of a 13-city tour of the United States. She sits at a small table in front of a microphone and takes questions from reporters. The press conference takes place in an informally furnished room; the walls are covered with handmade political posters. A reporter asks Devlin if she is doing the speaking tour to pay off debt accumulated during her recent campaign for a seat in the European parliament. Devlin says that her candidacy focused on human rights issues; that her candidacy was announced only three weeks before the election; that she ran on behalf of the H-Block political prisoners. Devlin says that her political party still has a debt of $10,000 after the elections; that she has come to the US to raise money through speaking engagements and from contributions. Devlin says that she has raised about $3,000 so far. A reporter asks Devlin's opinion on US involvement in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that Amnesty International, the International Red Cross and the European Court of Human Rights have all condemned the human rights abuses in Northern Ireland; that Jimmy Carter (US President) condemns human rights abuses all over the world, but ignores the deprivation of human rights in Northern Ireland. Devlin questions Carter's sincerity on human rights issues. Devlin says that the United Nations and western countries will not speak out against Great Britain; that she is trying to raise awareness of the situation among the white population of the US. The reporter asks Devlin if she expects a response from Irish Americans and Irish American politicians. Devlin says that she has a cynical view of politicians; that Edward Kennedy (US Senator) and Carter might speak out against the situation in Northern Ireland if they thought it would win them some votes; that she is not sure if Irish American politicians will take any action. Devlin says that the Irish American community has been made to feel guilty about giving money to Ireland; that they are made to feel like they are supporting violence. Devlin says that US politicians do not want Irish Americans to take interest in the situation in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that there are enough Irish Americans in the US to pressure the US government to take some firm action about Northern Ireland; that Irish Americans might become aware of the inequalities in US society if they started to think about the oppression in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that it saddens her to see Irish Americans involved in the oppression of African Americans in Boston. Devlin says that Irish Americans would get themselves on the "right side" of the civil rights struggle in the US if they understood the situation in Northern Ireland. Devlin says that Catholics in Northern Ireland were inspired by the civil rights movement in the US; that they identify with the struggles of African Americans. Devlin says that Irish Americans appear to be actively involved in the oppression of African Americans. Devlin says that she could probably raise money more easily if she avoided discussing the role of Irish Americans in the oppression of African Americans; that she is not willing to keep silent for money. Devlin says that she hopes Irish Americans will become more aware of their contradictory behavior; that many fled oppression in Ireland only to become oppressors in the US. 1:07:11: V: Devlin says that there is little Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland. She compares the amount of Protestant support for her cause in Northern Ireland to the amount of white working class support for busing in Boston. Devlin says that Great Britain needs to withdraw the undemocratic veto given to Protestants in Northern Ireland in 1921; that Great Britain needs to support change in Northern Ireland. Devlin reviews the history of the Irish conflict from the Irish elections in 1918 to the partition of the country by Great Britain. Devlin accuses Great Britain of partitioning the country in order to create a Protestant majority where there was none before. A reporter asks Devlin what she did during the years before the most recent election. The reporter comments that Devlin had not been visible on the political scene. Devlin responds that she has never stopped working for her cause; that the media ignored her activities because she was no longer a member of the British Parliament. Devlin says that the world took no notice of the violence used by Great Britain to oppress Catholics in Northern Ireland before 1969; that the oppressed Catholics are adopting the methods of violence used by Great Britain. Devlin questions why the Catholics are condemned for using violence, when they are only reacting to the violence used to oppress them. Devlin says that the international media have portrayed Lord Louis Mountbatten (British official) as a brave soldier and an aristocrat; that the oppressed peoples of the British Empire see Lord Mountbatten as a symbol of oppression. Devlin adds that public figures who represent the oppression of the British Empire will inevitably become targets of the oppressed. Devlin questions why the life of Mountbatten is worth more than the lives of all the Irish people who have died at the hands of the British; that the Irish victims fought for their country as Mountbatten did; that they were portrayed as terrorists by the international press. Devlin accuses the international press of hypocrisy. She says that the Irish people will not be "chastened" by the press coverage of Mountbatten's death. Devlin adds that if Great Britain was not occupying Northern Ireland, Mountbatten would be alive today. A reporter asks Devlin about Princess Margaret of England's comment that the Irish are "pigs." Devlin responds with a translation of an old Irish saying that "a pig thinks the whole world is pigs." Devlin answers questions about her speaking schedule and her life in Ireland. Devlin says that she has three children; that she does not have a regular job; that she works in the resistance movement. Devlin adds that she works with Catholics whose welfare benefits have been taken away by the British government. Devlin says that the money she raises will pay off her party's campaign debt. She adds that if the debt is paid, the rest of the money will go to a fund to benefit Irish prisoners.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/19/1979
Description: B-roll footage of African American and white students at work in the pottery studio at English High School. Footage of an African American teacher teaching a history class at English High School. The class discusses social unrest in the 1960s and government efforts to fight poverty. Footage of students passing through a hallway and using escalators at English High School. Exteriors of English High School. Several takes of reporter standup on a new code of discipline that Judge Arthur Garrity has called for in the Boston City Schools. School suspension guidelines have been called into question because minority students are given suspensions more frequently than white students.
1:00:01: Visual: African American and white students work in the pottery studio at English High School. Students mold clay, work on the pottery wheel and paint their finished projects. Students work on a large art project on a table. Shots of projects, including ceramic block letters. 1:04:16: V: An African American teacher teaches a history class at English High School. The students are seated at small tables, facing the blackboard. The class discusses social unrest in the 1960s and government efforts to fight poverty. Shots of African American and white students in the class. 1:09:09: V: African American and white students pass through a hallway at English High School. Students use the escalators to move in between floors. Shots of students and teachers riding escalator. Students move through the hallway. 1:11:39: V: Shots of the exterior of English High School on Avenue Louis Pasteur; of the courtyard outside of the school; of the multi-story building. Sharon Stevens reports on a new code of discipline for Boston Public School students, called for by Judge Arthur Garrity (federal court judge). Stevens reports that school suspension guidelines have been called into question; that minority students were given suspensions more frequently than white students. Stevens reports that the Boston School Committee is scheduled to vote next week on the new code of discipline. Stevens does several takes of the introduction and ending to her report. Shots of the exterior of English High School; of student baseball players standing in the courtyard of the school; of a group of African American students exiting the school.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/18/1980
Description: African American voters line up at the polls to vote in the Boston mayoral primary election. A few young African American men pose for the camera and voice their support for candidate Mel King. Footage of voters in line to get booths; going to booths. Donna Hodge interviews several African American voters about their support for King. Hodge interviews the members of an African American family who complain of voting irregularities and registration problems.
1:00:02: Visual: African American voters line up at the polls to vote in the mayoral primary election. A few young African American men pose for the camera and voice their support for Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston). Voters pass by the camera into a building. 1:00:26: V: Voters line up at a table. Poll workers behind the table check the voters' names against the list of registered voters. Shots of African American voters in line; of voters at the table; of poll workers seated at the table. An African American poll worker leads a white female voter to a voting booth. An African American male poll worker examines the voting rolls in front of him. 1:02:39: V: Voters check in with the poll workers at the table. Donna Hodge interviews an African American male voter. The man says that he voted for King; that it is not his first time voting; that King has a chance to win; that he did not like mayoral candidates Ray Flynn or David Finnegan. Hodge interviews a young African American female voter. The young woman says that today his her first time voting; that she voted for King because he is the first African American man to run for mayor of Boston. Hodge interviews a middle-aged African American female voter. The woman says that she has been voting since she turned 18; that she voted for King; that King did not engage in bickering with the other candidates; that she hopes King will win. Hodge interviews an African American male voter. The man says that he is a middle-class African American from New York City who wants his Boston neighborhood cleaned up; that he voted for King because the city needs prominent African Americans; that he is a first-time voter. Hodge interviews a young African American male voter. The young man says that he voted for King because he wants an African American mayor. The young man says that he was impressed by King because he went out on the streets to hand out his own campaign flyers and to meet people. The young man says that he likes King's position on employment for young people; that he is a first-time voter. Hodge interviews a young African American female voter. The young woman says that she is a first-time voter; that she voted for King because he is the best man for the job. 1:08:37: V: Hodge and the crew set up an interview with an African American family outside of the polls. Hodge asks the male family member why he was unable to vote. The man says that his address was not on the list; that he was not allowed to vote on an absentee ballot because he lacked proper identification. The man's mother says that she and her daughter were allowed to vote without showing identification; the woman says that she has been voting at this polling station for 13 years. The daughter agrees that she was not asked to show identification; that her brother was the only voter asked for identification. The man's mother says that the voter lists were not complete; that she does not understand why she and her daughter were allowed to vote but not her son. The son and daughter add that their address is not on the voter list; that there were several addresses in the neighborhood not included on the voter lists.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/11/1983
Description: Blizzard of '78. Snow falling and blowing. People digging out on Western Avenue. Plow on Storrow Drive. Chains on truck tires. Students and dogs on Harvard Square streets blanketed with snow. Cross-country skiers and people on snowshoes. Shots inside the news van, with radio reports on blizzard in the background. People trudge along Mt. Auburn St. and Mass. Avenue in Cambridge; some carry provisions on sleds. Massachusetts Avenue street sign. Man shovels out storefront. Deep snow banks. Tractor trailer jackknifed on Mass Ave. bridge over Charles River. People wait in line in front of White Hen Pantry.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/07/1978
Description: No audio. First half runs in black and white, second half in color. Exteriors of Boston City Hall, wide and close shots. People crossing plaza, and going through revolving door at entrance to City Hall. Municipal workers exit building; some carry briefcases.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/11/1977
Description: Boston City Hospital patient admitting desk with English and Spanish signs in corridor. Ambulance bay and emergency entrance sign. One ambulance departs with flashing lights and siren. Several takes of reporter standup on an investigation involving the hospital.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/03/1976
Description: Thomas Saltonstall (Area Director, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) speaks at a press conference to mark the opening of a Boston office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Saltonstall introduces Robert Williams (regional attorney for the EEOC). Saltonstall discusses the EEOC's commitment to the elimination of race discrimination in employment and to equal opportunities for women, older workers and minorities; he announces the initiatives planned by the EEOC to enforce federal anti-discrimination laws. Saltonstall says that the EEOC will focus on voluntary compliance. Saltonstall discusses statistics illustrating the underrepresentation, or "opportunity gap," in the employment of women in management and of minorities in the city's overall work force. Saltonstall presents statistics illustrating the "opportunity gap" for minorities in the printing/publishing industry, the communications industry, investment companies, brokerage firms, and retail stores. Saltonstall talks about the concentration of Boston's minority workers in lower-paying jobs. Tape 1 of 2
1:00:05: Visual: A federal official from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the US Department of Labor stands at a podium speaking to the media at a press conference on the opening of a Boston office of the EEOC. The official commends Thomas Saltonstall (Regional Director, EEOC) and the General Services Administration (GSA) for the design and effective use of space in the new EEOC office. Shot of the EEOC seal on the front of the podium. The official says that the EEOC is committed to equal treatment and access for all citizens; that minorities and women must be given an equal opportunity to advance themselves in the workplace. The official talks about the need for society to renew its commitment to civil rights. The official thanks the audience. Shot of audience members. 1:05:16: V: Saltonstall introduces Robert Williams (regional attorney for the EEOC). Saltonstall talks about the need to redress the employment opportunity gaps which exist for minorities in Boston. Saltonstall says that he will focus on race discrimination in employment; that the EEOC is also committed to equal opportunities for women, older workers and other minorities. Saltonstall announces the initiatives which will be taken by the EEOC to enforce federal anti-discrimination laws. Saltonstall says that the EEOC will promote a program of voluntary compliance with the statutes; that the EEOC will expand its services to the public; that the EEOC will focus on eliminating broad patterns and practices of employment discrimination; that the EEOC will focus on improving the quality and impact of the lawsuits filed. Saltonstall notes that he does not want to preach or embarass anyone. 1:08:23: V: Saltonstall defines the term "opportunity gap." Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the opportunity gap existing in 1980 for women as officials and managers in the Boston area. Saltonstall says that Boston rates among the lowest of six cities in a survey measuring the percentage of women in managerial positions. Saltonstall notes that minorities make up 29% of the labor force in the city of Boston; that minorities make up only 8% of the work force in the metropolitan area; that this disparity is greater in Boston than in any other major city. Saltonstall explains that the metropolitan figure of 8% has been used to calculate opportunity gaps; that the metropolitan figure is low when applied to businesses in the city. Saltonstall defines minorities. Saltonstall explains how the statistics were compiled. 1:13:58: V: Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the opportunity gap for minorities in the business of security/commodity brokerage. Saltonstall explains that individual companies will have performances which are better or worse than the average. Saltonstall notes that an unnamed private company in the Boston area has been targeted for enforcement action by the EEOC; that the unnamed company employs between 500 and 1000 employees; that all of the employees are white and only 3 employees are women. 1:15:28: Visual: Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating the underrepresentation in the printing/publishing industry. Saltonstall notes that minorities are underrepresented as office workers and sales workers. Close-up shot of chart indicating statistical representation of minorities in jobs in the printing/publishing industry. Saltonstall says that many employers have claimed that they cannot find qualified minority employees to hire. Saltonstall says that there is not a shortage of qualified minority employees for low-paying clerical and sales positions. Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap widened for minority workers in the communications industry and other industries between 1970 and 1982. Close-up shot of the chart illustrating statistical representation of minority workers in the communications industry. Saltonstall notes that minorities are underrepresented in all white collar job categories in the communications industry except for office/clerical jobs. Saltonstall adds that many major companies in the communications industry failed to report statistics to the EEOC; that private employers are required by law to report statistics to the EEOC. 1:17:13: Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap widened for minority workers in food stores between 1970 and 1982. Saltonstall says that the statistics are "appalling"; that minority workers are underrepresented in all positions except as laborors and sales workers. Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating representation of minority workers in investment companies. Saltonstall says that the opportunity gap for minorities in investment companies widened between 1970 and 1982; that hiring for managerial positions tripled, while the number of minority workers in those positions decreased. Saltonstall notes that minority workers are underrepresented in all white collar jobs except for clerical positions; that all of the laborors working for investment companies are white; that all of the companies represented by the statistics are located within the city of Boston. Saltonstall refers to a chart illustrating minority worker representation in general merchandise stores. Saltonstall says that the retail industry should be hiring more minority workers because a significant share of their income comes from minority shoppers. Saltonstall notes that the opportunity gap for minority workers in general merchandise stores widened between 1970 and 1982; that the minority participation rate in the industry has declined since 1970. Saltonstall talks about the concentration of minorities in lower-paying jobs.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/19/1984
Description: Thomas Saltonstall (Regional Director, EEOC) speaks at a press conference to mark the opening of the Boston office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Saltonstall calls for an end to employment discrimination against minorities; he remarks that minorities in Boston are concentrated in low-paying jobs. Saltonstall refers to charts illustrating the under representation of minorities in office/clerical and sales positions. Saltonstall advocates affirmative action programs and discusses the EEOC's intention to pursue litigation against companies that continue to discriminate in their employment practices. Saltonstall says that minority underemployment is a problem in the Boston area. He defends and explains the intended function of affirmative action programs.Saltonstall discusses the under representation of minorities in the public sector and some pending investigations against employers in the Boston area. Saltonstall describes the realtionship between the EEOC and the Civil Rights Commission; he talks about EEOC enforcement of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. A reporter asks if employers are receiving mixed messages from a conservative federal government and a more liberal EEOC. Saltonstall says that businesses should comply voluntarily with EEOC guidelines and explains the importance of goals and timetables in a voluntary compliance program. Saltonstall says that discrimination exists in the New England region even though there are fewer minorities in northern New England. Saltonstall says that he does not know of a city with worse statistics regarding job discrimination. Tape 2 of 2.
1:00:01: Visual: Thomas Saltonstall (Regional Director, EEOC) stands at a podium speaking to the media at a press conference on the opening of a Boston office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Saltonstall notes that minorities in Boston are better educated than in other areas of the country; that minorities in Boston are more likely to be concentrated in lower-paying jobs. Saltonstall refers to charts indicating industries which underutilize minorities in office/clerical and sales positions. Saltonstall calls for an end to job discrimination and job segregation. Saltonstall says that some Boston employers may not want to hire minority workers to represent their companies in sales positions; that racial discrimination is unacceptable. Saltonstall says that the problems of job discrimination and the underemployment of minorities must be solved; that action must be taken in the face of these complex problems. Saltonstall notes that advances in the elimination of job discrimination in Boston have been made only through litigation; that the EEOC will pursue litigation to this end; that employer efforts including voluntary affirmative action programs and voluntary compliance with the law will bring about change more quickly. Saltonstall talks about the necessity and importance of affirmative action programs. Saltonstall refers to EEOC guidelines for employer affirmative action programs. Saltonstall notes that affirmative action is a "remedy" for discrimination; that affirmative action programs are not discriminatory. Saltonstall adds that the EEOC wants to work with employers to promote diversity and to end job discrimination. Saltonstall says that Clarence Thomas (Chairman, EEOC) has initiated a voluntary assistance program to help employers understand federal anti-discrimination statutes. Shots of audience members. Saltonstall announces that an EEOC symposium will be broadcast to Chambers of Commerce across the nation. Saltonstall says that he hopes that voluntary compliance will be the norm in Boston; that the EEOC will pursue litigation if necessary. 1:09:21: V: Saltonstall answers questions from the audience. Saltonstall talks about the problem of underemployment of minorities in the greater Boston area. Saltonstall says that the problem is caused by inadequate attention to the problem and by discriminatory practices; that the problem is widespread in Boston. Saltonstall says that the underrepresentation of minorities in the public sector is a problem; that the mayor and the governor are committed to redressing the problem. Saltonstall says that the EEOC is pursuing investigations of employers in the Boston area; that he will not discuss the employer(s) against whom the EEOC will file suit. Saltonstall talks about the relationship between the EEOC and the Civil Rights Commission. Saltonstall talks about the EEOC's enforcement of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Saltonstall reads a section of Title VII to the audience. 1:13:32: V: A reporter asks if employers are getting mixed messages from the EEOC and from a more conservative federal government. Saltonstall says that employers should be paying attention to the EEOC instead of other government agencies. Saltonstall says that many cases are settled before litigation is filed. Saltonstall says that voluntary compliance by private employers is important; that the EEOC does not have the resources to pursue every case. Saltonstall notes the presence in the audience of directors from several civil rights enforcement agencies from across New England. Saltonstall says that there are fewer minorities in northern New England; that discrimination exists in the region. Saltonstall does not say that Boston is the "worst city in the nation" in terms of job discrimination. Saltonstall says that he does not know of a US city with a worse problem. Saltonstall says that the 1983 mayoral elections created a dialogue about race in the city; that it is important to take action to solve the problem of job discrimination; that voluntary compliance programs are an effective in resolving the problem. Saltonstall explains the importance of goals and timetables in a voluntary compliance program. Saltonstall explains that statistics for the metropolitan area can be skewed because of the low number of minorites living in the suburbs; that he does not know if Boston is the "worst city in the nation" in terms of this problem.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/19/1984
Description: Boston Garden seating plan showing ticket prices from $4 to $10 for Celtics games. Team photos from 1956-1957, 1964-1965, 1972-1973. Empty seats and concession stand. Interview with Celtics vice president Jeff Cohen.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/26/1979
Description: Final stretch and finish line of the Boston Marathon. Wheelchair competitors crossing finish line. Blimps in above the crowd. Announcer makes comments on how closer the leading runners are to each other. Runners cross finish line. Alberto Salazar and Dick Beardsley finish very close together, running the marathon faster than anyone had in the history of the race. Kevin White awards winner Alberto Salazar with medal and laurel wreath. Third place runner, John Lodwick, crosses finish line. Fourth place runner, Bill Rodgers, crosses finish line. Other runner cross finish line. Charlotte Teske, winner of the women's race of the Boston Marathon, awarded medal and laurel wreath. Women's second place runner, Jacqueline Gareau, crosses finish line. Glenda Manzi does several takes of reporter standup. Interview with Charlotte Teske.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/19/1982
Description: Boston Marathon finish line. Wheelchair finisher. Bill Rodgers on Hereford Street. Man running in a tutu.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/21/1980
Description: Mass of spectators gathered at Prudential Center finish line of Boston Marathon. David Ives watches. Cloudy, cold day. Airplanes fly around trailing message banners. First wheelchair finisher George Murray rolls in with police escort. Press photographers truck. Bill Rodgers wins a close race in 2:10:15. Randy Thomas and Kevin Ryan cross line. Rodgers climbs up to platform for Gov. Michael Dukakis, Mayor Kevin White and Will Cloney to congratulate him with laurel wreath and medal. He is then surrounded by press horde and police. More top runners cross. Bob Hall places third in wheelchair division. Other runners cross the finish line.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/17/1978
Description: Several takes of reporter standup on the Boston Public Library having to shut down the bookmobile. Exteriors of Boston Public Library older (McKim) building. Pan of the inscription “The Commonwealth requires the education of the people as the safeguard of order and liberty.” Move to the attached modern building entrance. Interiors of the Library. Sign reads “Effective Sunday, February 13, the Library will be closed on Sundays until further notice.” Patrons in line at circulation desk in lobby. Librarian stamps due dates on borrowing cards. Patrons at reading tables in research room.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/15/1977
Description: Start of Boston marathon. Bill Rodgers crosses finish line with police escort. Shots of runners and moving feet clad in running shoes.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/17/1978
Description: Boston landmarks: swan boats at Public Garden, Bunker Hill Monument, Old Ironsides, State House, Paul Revere statue, Hancock tower, Faneuil Hall / Quincy Market, Gardner Museum, Museum of Fine Arts, rowers on Charles River, two views of skyline, City Hall plaza, Harvard Yard and Widener Library, Hatch Shell on Esplanade, New England Aquarium.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Description: Outdoor press conference with Brock Adams, US Secretary of Transportation, flanked by Sens. Edward Brooke and Edward Kennedy, on southwest corridor mass transit project. Fred Salvucci stands behind them. $669 million in federal funds approved. An additional $1 billion will be invested through public/private initiatives for urban development contingent with relocation of the orange line. Kennedy and Brooke make grateful remarks. Reps. Mary Good and James Craven. Mel King appears (in t-shirt and baseball cap) to acknowledge the efforts of community activists. This very large scale public works project will create jobs and keep the neighborhoods from being physically divided along racial lines. Adams answers question on air traffic congestion expected at large airports.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/11/1978
Description: Senator Edward Brooke concedes the Senate race to Paul Tsongas in the ballroom of the Copley Plaza Hotel. With him on the stage are supporters including State Sen. William Owens, his mother Helen Brooke, community leader Elma Lewis, and campaign field director Thomas Trimarco. Sharon Stevens reports from behind the cheering crowd, anticipating Brooke's speech; Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) is on the stage, waiting to interview Brooke after the speech. Brooke thanks the crowd, his family, and his campaign staff. Brooke congratulates Tsongas for waging an honorable campaign. Brooke says that he will do his best to assure the smooth transition of the Senate seat and that he continues to support full equality and justice for all. Brooke thanks voters for giving him the opportunity to have served as both State Attorney General and US Senator and assures those who did not vote for him that he has no bitterness toward them. Brooke shakes hands and answers questions from the press as he slowly makes his way off stage surrounded by an entourage. B-roll of Brooke supporters in ballroom after the speech.
0:58:17: Visual: Shot of Edward Brooke (US Senator) at a podium, waving to a cheering crowd in the ballroom of the Copley Plaza Hotel. A large campaign banner behind him reads, "Brooke - United States Senator." William Owens (State Senator), Helen Brooke (Edward Brooke's mother), Elma Lewis (African American community leader), Thomas Trimarco (field director for Brooke's campaign) and other supporters are all on stage with Brooke. Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) stands behind the cheering crowd, anticipating Brooke's speech. 0:59:15: V: Brooke thanks the crowd, which continues to cheer for him. Brooke says that preliminary results show Paul Tsongas (candidate for US Senator) to be the victor. Brooke congratulates Tsongas for waging an honorable campaign. Brooke says that he will do his best to assure the smooth transition of the Senate seat. Brooke thanks his campaign workers and contributors for their support. Brooke notes that there are US Senators who will continue to fight for senior citizens, minorities, the poor, and the handicapped. Brooke says that he continues to support full equality for women and equal justice for all. Brooke thanks voters for giving him the opportunity to have served as both State Attorney General and US Senator. Brooke assures those who did not vote for him that he has no bitterness toward them. Brooke says that he leaves the Senate with the feeling that there is much left to be accomplished; that he remains committed to the causes he has supported. Brooke paraphrases Lillian Hellman, saying that "I could never cut my consciensce to fit the fashion of any year." Brooke commends his supporters for their hard work, faith and courage. Brooke thanks his family, his campaign manager, John Volpe (chairman of Brooke's campaign committee), and Trimarco. Brooke says that he regrets not having spent enough time with the voters of Massachusetts during the campaign. He notes that his Senate responsibilities kept him in Washington D.C. during much of the campaign. Brooke says that he wishes Tsongas well; that he is sorry he did not deliver a victory for his campaign workers and supporters. Brooke says that he is very happy that a woman has been elected to the US Senate. He jokes about going out to look for a job and wishes his supporters well. 1:09:35: V: Brooke shakes hands with members of the crowd. Natalie Jacobson (WCVB reporter) is on the stage with a microphone, waiting to interview Brooke. The crowd continues to clap for Brooke. Stevens recaps Brooke's speech. Brooke is still on the stage, talking to members of the media. The crowd remains on the floor. 1:11:11: V: Brooke remains on the stage. He waves to supporters. Members of the media surround him. He answers questions about the race and his future plans. A jazz band plays and the noise of the crowd is audible. Brooke attempts to move off of the stage. The media continue to surround him. Brooke waves at the crowd as he moves slowly off the stage. Flashbulbs go off as the media take his photograph. 1:15:51: V: Shot of a sign reading, "We still love you Ed. You're the best.". Shots of campaign supporters on the floor; of members of the crowd. Shots of the media and their equipment in the corner of the room. Members of the crowd mill about in the ballroom. Shot of the jazz band playing.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1978
Description: Interviews reviewing K.C. Jones as the Celtics coach, especially comparing his management style to former coach Bill Fitch. Interveiw with K.C. Jones describing his own coaching techniques. LA Lakers warmup on the Boston Garden court before championship game. Celtics locker room scenes. Interviews with Celtics players Larry Bird, Cedric Maxwell, Scott Wedman, and Kevin McHale comparing the two coaches they've played under.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/29/1984
Description: Celtics Pride Day at Government Center, after winning championship. Huge crowd of fans wearing Celtics hats and t-shirts. Some have banners and pennants. Celtics players, families, and Mayor Ray Flynn cut cake as part of Celtic's Pride Day celebrations.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/14/1984
Description: Celtics vs Houston Rockets with Moses Malone. John Havlicek, Scott, Curtis Rowe, JoJo White, Dave Cowens. Souvenirs for sale. Fans entering Boston Garden. Audience says tickets cost about $9 per seat. They discuss ticket pricing and player salary.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/06/1977
Description: Boston Celtics vs Houston Rockets at Boston Garden. Red Auerbach sits with Celtics owner Harry Mangurian. Quarterly statistics hoisted on cord to announcer's booth above court. Interview with Houston owner George Maloof.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/12/1979
Description: Charles Street Jail exteriors. A reporter asks members of administration about issues with the Charles Street Jail and Deer Island regarding the possibility of a new combined facility. Stated problems with building a new jail include security and the size of the proposed site. Charles Street physical plant issues include plumbing, recreation facilities, eating facilities, kitchen facilities, and noise level.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/25/1977
Description: Charles Street jail interiors. Four tiers of cell blocks seen through chain link fence. Zoom into guards on ground level. Guard patrols upper walkway. Cell behind bars with toilet and cot. Interview with Suffolk County Sheriff Robert Rufo about delay in transferring inmates to state prisons after sentencing. Charles Street is supposed to serve only as pretrial detention center but prison system is so overcrowded that inmates stay there much longer than intended in inappropriate incarceration, without rehabilitation support and furlough programs. They shoot cutaways. Howard Husock does several takes of reporter standup in front of the jail.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/03/1980
Description: Interview with vice president of Society for Commercial Archeology, Arthur Krim, on significance of Citgo sign in Kenmore Square. Its neon display was shut off by the state as an energy conservation measure. Close-up of the sign. They shoot cutaways. Several takes of reporter standup. Kenmore Square environs.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/01/1980
Description: Father Michael Groden (Advisor to Humberto Cardinal Medeiros) introduces a press conference with Cardinal Medeiros (Archbishop of Boston), Bishop Edward Carroll (United Methodist Church) and Donald Luster (President, Ministerial Alliance). Medeiros denounces incidents of violence and hatred and encourages citizens to celebrate the diversity of the urban community. Medeiros says that the clergy has prepared a Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony to be signed by the citizens of Boston. Medeiros urges the clergy and every city institution to dedicate itself to working towards peace in the city. Medeiros announces a gathering of religious leaders on the Boston Common on November 19 that will initiate a movement to help the city heal its wounds. Bishop Edward Carroll (United Methodist Church) reads a letter inviting the city's clergy to gather at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross the following Friday. Carroll speaks about the clergy's responsibility to cooperate in promoting peace, justice and harmony in the city; denounces recent acts of violence and hatred; and encourages all citizens to unite. Donald Luster (President, Ministerial Alliance) reads the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony. Groden reviews the series of events planned by the clergy to promote peace in the city. Groden and Luster respond to questions from the media about the movement for peace and the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony.
0:22:45: Visual: Father Michael Groden (Advisor to Cardinal Medeiros) welcomes the press to a press conference. He introduces Humberto Cardinal Medeiros (Archbishop of Boston). Medeiros approaches the podium and addresses the press. Medeiros says that Boston's religious leaders are calling on citizens of all races and religions to examine the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony." Medeiros says that incidents of violence and hatred in the city cannot be tolerated; that citizens must act together to celebrate the diversity of the urban community. Medeiros says that a spirit of religious and pastoral solidarity is growing; that all of the clergy in the city are invited to a meeting on Friday at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross. Shot of the front of the podium. A branch with different colored leaves is pictured on a matted print hanging from the podium. Shots of the press in the audience. Medeiros urges the clergy to join together in an effort to improve the atmosphere in the city. Medeiros says that every institution and business in the city must dedicate itself to working toward a peaceful atmosphere in the city. Medeiros says that the city's religious leader will gather on the Boston Common on November 19; that the clergy will initiate a movement to help the city heal its wounds. Shots of Donald Luster (President, Ministerial Alliance), Bishop Edward Carroll (United Methodist Church) and Groden sitting at a table beside the podium. Medeiros says that the ecumenical movement will encourage citizens to act peacefully toward one another. Medeiros quotes Pope John Paul as saying that a city needs to have a soul; that the citizens are the soul of a city. Medeiros quotes Pope John Paul as saying that Boston has always been a community in which diverse people live and work together peacefully. Medeiros says that every citizen of Boston will be asked to sign the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony; that citizens will be expected to uphold their pledge to work toward a better atmosphere in the city. Medeiros thanks the media and retreats from the podium. 0:29:10: V: Groden introduces Bishop Carroll. Carroll reads a letter inviting the city's clergy to gather at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross on Friday. The letter reads that the clergy must work together to foster an atmosphere of peace, justice and harmony in the city. Shot of the matted print hanging from the podium. The letter mentions a growing spirit of pastoral and religious solidarity. The letter denounces the recent acts of violence and hatred in the city. The letter encourages all citizens to unite in a spirit of solidarity. Shots of Luster, Medeiros and Groden , sitting at the table beside the podium. The letter urges the clergy to participate in the meeting. The letter reads that the clergy have an obligation to encourage its citizens to love one another; that the clergy must join together to renew their Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony. Shots of the members of the media at the press conference. The letter is signed by Medeiros and Carroll. 0:31:59: V: Groden introduces Luster. Luster reads the Covenant of Justice, Equity and Harmony. The covenant celebrates freedom and call for the pursuit of equal rights and justice for all. The covenant calls for citizens to celebrate the diversity of the city's communities. The covenant calls for a mood of healing and forgiveness. The covenant denounces conflict and violence. The covenant denounces the atmosphere of hatred and fear in the city. The covenant rejects "special interest groups" which divide the community. Luster finishes reading and sits down at the table beside Medeiros. 0:35:16: V: Groden thanks Luster. Groden reviews the events organized by the city's religious leaders in the coming weeks. Groden mentions the meeting at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross on Friday. Groden says that religious leaders are working on a pastoral letter which will be read at religious services on the weekend of November 17 and 18. Shot of a nun taking a photo. Groden talks about the ecumenical gathering on the Boston Common on November 19. Groden says that civic, political, and religious leaders will be invited to the gathering on the Common; that leaders will be encouraged to examine and sign the covenant; that leaders will be encouraged to take the covenant to their constituents. Shots of the members of the press. Groden says that another ecumenical event will take place in December; that the event will celebrate the signing of the covenant. 0:38:10: V: Groden and Luster respond to questions from the audience. A reporter asks how the leaders will get signatures for the covenant. Luster says that city leaders will sign the covenant on November 19; that these leaders will take the covenant to their constituents, who may sign it. Luster notes that these leaders will be given pins to wear; that the pins will signify peace. A reporter asks which religious leaders will be involved in the movement. Luster says that clergy from all denominations and faiths will gather together on November 19; that business and political leaders will be invited as well. A reporter asks what this series of ecumenical meeting and events will accomplish. Luster says that the events will try to capitalize on the atmosphere of goodwill created by the covenant; that the religious leaders will work to strengthen this atmosphere by preaching the scripture. A reporter asks if these efforts will improve the racially charged atmosphere in the city's schools. Luster says that the religious leaders have a responsibility to set a good example for young people; that the religious leaders need to sound a warning to those who are promoting the negative atmosphere. A reporter asks how the religious leaders will reach out to those who do not attend church. Groden says that religious leaders know that they cannot reach out to all citizens through religious services; that religious leaders will reach out to schools and to the neighborhoods. A reporter asks if the efforts by religious leaders are connected to a recent neighborhood summit. Luster says that their movement has been put together by religious leaders; that religious leaders have a "higher mandate" which propels them to preach the gospel of peace. A reporter asks if the religious leaders expect political leaders to speak out on these issues. Groden says that political leaders have accused religious leaders of not doing enough; that the religious leaders are fulfilling their responsibilities with this movement; that he hopes other leaders will join in. A reporter asks a question about the reference to "special interest groups" in the covenant. Groden says that religious leaders encourage membership in and support of "positive" community groups; that religious leaders are asking people to disassociate themselves from groups whose behavior is not constructive. Groden says that they will not single out any groups.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/29/1979
Description: Astor Theatre marquee says Union Station (disco and game room). Wide shot of Combat Zone, Tremont and Washington Streets. Seedy facades with flashing lights. Pilgrim Theater marquee "first run adult films all night." Paramount Theater. Naked i "all nude strip tease." Pornography.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/07/1979
Description: Environmentals. Shot of the Channel 2 news van. Exterior of Daniel F. O'Brien Funeral Home. Exterior of Smiles, The Teeth Cleaning Professionals. Exterior of Paradise Cafe. Exterior of the Scene XXX Adult Movies. LaGrange Street sign. Exterior of Milner Hotel. Sack 57 Cinema marquee, showing Star Trek IV and Crocodile Dundee. Exterior of Pussycat Cinema. Neon signs. Combat zone environs. Day and night shots.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/26/1985
Description: Combat Zone environs. Marquees and store signs: “adult movies,” “uncensored books,” “nude review,” “XXX.” Publix Theater, Pussycat Cinema, Naked i, Two O'Clock Lounge. New England Medical Center adjacent. Display of pornographic materials and erotic books. District police headquarters sign and police station on Washington Street.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/15/1977
Description: Tape dropout in beginning. Combat Zone environs. Thriving pornography district. XXX rated movies, peep shows, Naked i, Pussy Cat Cinema, adult book store, State and Pilgrim Theaters, Intermission Lounge. Garish marquees with flashing lights. MBTA and Boston police cars.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/15/1976
Description: No audio at beginning of video. Marquees and signs for: Publix, The Book Mart, Adult Books, First Amendment Ltd., The Scene XXX Adult Movies, 200 Book Club, Book Store, Books Peeps, Fantasy Book Shop, La Connoisseur, 14th Amendment. Some with boarded up shop fronts.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/26/1982
Description: Chinatown and Combat Zone environs. Pedestrians. Storefront signs for adult entertainment, including Boston Bunnies, Live Nudes, the Pilgrim, Club 66, Naked i, Intermission Lounge, Peep Show, The Scene, Pussycat Cinema. Orange line MBTA station entrance. Corner of Boylston Street and Washington Street. Beach Street between Harrison Avenue and Washington Street. Various street addresses on Washington Street. Storefront signs for business with English and Chinese.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/30/1985
Description: Structural details and signage on combat zone architecture. E.M. Loew's Publix Theater ('vaudeville, burlesque' words on brick side). Marquees of: The Scene: Adult Movies, Center Theater, featuring Chinese martial arts movies. Paramount and State Theater signs. Pussycat Cinema next to New England Medical Center. Interiors of a theater building, in the theater district. Sign for "Modern Theatre Restoration Circus." Interview with theater manager about reopening the theater, the shows they will feature, the restoration they will do on the building, including work with the Boston Redevelopment Authority, and neighborhood development.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/15/1979
Description: Computer show at Hynes Auditorium. Children converse with robots. Man types on keyboard producing synthesized voice. Music synthesizer. Pen plotter printer. Photograph printer.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/21/1980
Description: Copley Square environs on a rainy day. John Hancock tower, Old Hancock Building, Trinity Church, and other buildings. Pedestrians and cars go by. Puddles on the sidewalk. Pidgeons.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/18/1984
Description: Interview with jazz pianist and band leader Count Basie at the Berklee Performance Center. He talks about his long career and current musicians.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/25/1982
Description: Interview with the Crown Prince of Jordan at the Ritz-Carlton. He talks about his optimism for negotiations in the Middle East. He talks about relations between individual Middle Eastern countries, specifically Jordan, Israel, and Palestine. He adds his advice to the US administration in working with the Middle Eastern countries. They have an informal discussion while getting a wide shot. Lydon reasks questions for cutaways.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/18/1982
Description: Interview with Albert "Dapper" O'Neil during his run for Suffolk County sheriff. He accuses his oppenent of corruption and complains that no Boston newspapers will report the negative allegations he has made against his opponent. He discusses his plan to make the sheriff's department more visible and says "I'm a law and order man." He discusses his plan for the Charles St. Jail. He defends the office of the sheriff in the face of claims that the state should take over its responsibilities. He accuses the current sheriff of patronage and speaks against it in his campaign. He expresses his conservatism against the liberalism of the current sheriff., which includes his position against furloughs and halfway houses. He explains how he got the nickname "Dapper." He explains why he thinks former mayor and governor James Curley is the greatest man that ever lived. Video dropout in the middle of the video.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1978
Description: Guests walk in front of the Museum of Fine Arts. Barbara Bush walks into the event tent. Dedication ceremony of the West Wing of the museum. Speeches given by Chairman Howard Johnson and Director Jan Fontaine cover the history of the museum and facilities of the new wing. Honored guest Barabra Bush is introduced and addresses the audience. Governor Ed King addresses the audience. I.M. Pei, and Mayor Kevin White also sit on stage during ceremony. Interiors of the new wing. Entrance to the People's Republic of China exhibit.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/17/1981
Description: Deer Island prison exterior with snow. Main brick dormitory and several outbuildings. Boston skyline across harbor with whitecaps on waves. Plane flying low on approach to Logan Airport touches down on runway in distance.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/27/1977
Description: The Boston School Committee holds a meeting in the School Committee chambers. Members of the School Committee discuss school business. John O'Bryant (Boston School Committee) reports on the need for school repairs; Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) reports on staffing issues. Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) interviews Kathleen Kelly (President, Boston Teachers Union) about a proposed school choice plan. Kelly says that many parents support a school choice plan because the current system allows little flexibility. Kelly says that the school choice plan must be considered carefully to prevent a return to segregated schools. Stevens interviews O'Bryant about the proposed school choice plan. O'Bryant says that the plan promotes greater access to schools across the city; that the current system is archaic and inflexible. Stevens interviews Barbara Gray (parent) about the proposed school choice plan. Gray says that parents should be allowed to choose a school with programs suited to the needs of their children. Gray says that the schools need to be improved; that the Boston Public Schools are not truly integrated because there are few white students. Stevens has extended conversations with interviewees while cutaways are shot. Takes of Stevens doing standup about supporters of the school choice plan working on an official proposal for the end of the month. The audio quality on this tape is uneven.
1:00:12: Visual: A Boston School Committee meeting is held in the chambers of the Boston School Committee. School committee members Jean McGuire, John O'Bryant, Jean Sullivan McKeigue, Kevin McCluskey, and Rita Walsh Tomasini are seated at the front of the room. Robert Spillane (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools) sits at the front with the members of the School Committee. Community members and the press are seated in the audience. O'Bryant talks about the need for $40 million to make school repairs. He says that the mayor, the Boston City Council, and the community must be made aware of the money needed for repairs. Shots of the various committee members. McKeigue agrees that school repairs are needed. A vote is taken on approving a draft of a letter to the mayor and the Boston City Council. O'Bryant thanks Spillane for his report. O'Bryant asks Spillane a question about staffing. Spillane says that more staff is needed before instituting a certain program. Audio is muffled. Shots of Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter); of members of the audience; of the stenographer; of the committee; of the audience. The committee members discuss school business. Audio remains muffled. Shot of the committee members from the perspective of the audience. 1:05:10: Visual: Spillane talks about setting objectives for the school Social Studies programs. Shots of the committee members; of the audience. Audio is muffled. The committee members take a vote. Committee members discuss school contract issues. Shot of Stevens; of Kathleen Kelly (President, Boston Teachers Union) speaking to another audience member; of audience members. 1:08:15: V: Stevens sets up an interview with Kelly. Stevens asks Kelly about a "freedom of choice" proposal supported by some African American parents. Kelly says that she has not yet seen the proposal; that many African American and white parents support a "freedom of choice" plan because the geocode system allows little flexibility; that parents are more interested in good education than racial statistics. Kelly says that a control mechanism must be put in place to prevent a return to segregated schools; that the plan must be given careful thought. Kelly says that the choice of educational programs is more important than the choice of school location. Stevens asks Kelly if busing is "almost dead." Kelly says that busing is no longer the only remedy for Boston schools; that busing can serve as a tool to further the goals of desegregation and educational quality. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and Kelly. Stevens and Kelly speak informally. 1:12:36: V: Stevens sets up an interview with O'Bryant. Stevens asks for O'Bryant's opinion of the "freedom of choice" proposal. O'Bryant says that parents are trying to reform the rigid geocode system; that students have been denied access to schools because of the geocode system. O'Bryant mentions students who have been denied access to the Trotter School. O'Bryant says that the parents are asking for more accessibility to the schools; that the "freedom of choice" proposal has been made into a bigger issue than it should be. O'Bryant says that the geocode system assigns students to schools based upon their residence; that the geocode system is archaic and inflexible; that the geocode system must be addressed in the consent decrees put forth by the court; that leaving the geocode system in place would have "disastrous" consequences. Stevens asks O'Bryant about NAACP intervention in the court case, and NAACP opposition to the "freedom of choice" plan. O'Bryant says that there is a lack of communication between the NAACP and supporters of the plan; that supporters of the plan want greater access to the schools. Stevens asks if the "freedom of choice" plan could result in a return to segregated schools. O'Bryant says that schools in Boston are already segregated because white parents refuse to send their children to most schools located in African American communities; that African American parents want greater access to quality schools all over the city. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and O'Bryant. O'Bryant says again that the "freedom of choice" plan does not represent a return to segregated schools. 1:16:13: V: Stevens sets up an interview with Barbara Gray (parent), who supports the "freedom of choice" plan. Gray says that the supporters of the plan want greater access to all of the schools; that supporters of the plan want an end to the rigid geocode system. Gray explains that the geocode system assigns children to schools according to address and race. Gray says that all of Boston schools need to have high standards; that the each of the schools should have different programs designed to suit specific needs; that students should be able to choose a school whose programs suit their needs. Gray says that education needs to be improved so that all of the schools are equally competitive and able to provide a good education. Stevens asks if the "freedom of choice" plan could result in a return to segregated schools. Gray says that she does not want to go back to segregated schools; that true integration does not exist in Boston because there are not enough white students in the school system; that white students might return to the system if the schools are reformed. The crew takes cutaway shots of Stevens and Gray. Gray says that parents want more control over the education of their children. 1:19:59: V: Stevens records the closing segment of the story from outside of the headquarters of the Boston School Committee. She reports that the supporters of the "freedom of choice" plan are working on an official proposal for the end of the month; that the Massachusetts State Board of Education will propose an end to court intervention in the Boston School System. Stevens does two more takes of the closing segment.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/08/1982
Description: Robert DiGrazia resigns as Boston police commissioner to become police chief in Montgomery County, Maryland. Gives press conference on strengths and weaknesses in his department.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/04/1976
Description: Diana Ross rehearses at Music Hall. She wears a "Boston Loves Diana Ross" T-shirt. She answers questions from reporters at the edge of the stage. She talks about playing Dorothy in the Wiz and her inspirations. She talks about having children.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/10/1977
Description: The Commerce and Labor Committee of the Massachusetts State Legislature holds a hearing on proposed legislation barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Royal Bolling Sr. (State Senator) testifies in favor of the legislation. Bolling says that legislators must guarantee protection and equal rights for all citizens. Suzanne Bumps (State Representative) testifies in favor of legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps defines sexual harassment and talks about the its effect on women in the workplace. John Olver (State Senator) and Thomas Vallely (State Representative) testify in favor of the legislation. Vallely says that legislators must fight one of the last remaining civil rights battles by banning discrimination on the grounds of sexual preference. Vallely talks about a proposed amendment barring religious organizations from some aspects of civil rights law; he says that such an amendment is unnecessary. Peter Morin (State Representative) asks Vallely a question about language used in the legislation. Vallely talks about other exceptions granted under the proposed legislation. John Businger (State Representative) testifies in favor of the legislation. Businger talks about the need to make citizens aware of their civil rights by posting anti-discrimination policy and legislation. George Bachrach (State Senator) testifies in favor of the legislation.
1:00:00: Visual: The Commerce and Labor Committee of the Massachusetts State Legislature sits at the front of a room. The committee prepares to hear testimony on proposed legislation barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. The room is crowded with audience members and members of the press. Audience members stand and seat themselves on the floor. The committee chairman invites Royal Bolling Sr. (State Senator) to testify. 1:00:28: V: Bolling thanks the committee members. Bolling notes that the Senate could not vote on this legislation during the previous year; that the vote was held up until the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled on the constitutionality of the legislation. Bolling talks about discrimination against gays and lesbians. Bolling says that opponents of legislation barring discrimnation on the grounds of sexual orientation have ignored ugly incidents involving discrimination against gays and lesbians. Bolling makes reference to a television show which depicted the absurdity of society's prejudices against gays and lesbians. Bolling notes that gay and lesbians make up 10% of the population. Bolling says that many citizens will be positively affected by the passage of legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Bolling says that gays and lesbians will be denied equal protection under the law unless this legislation is passed; that there cannot be exceptions to the government's guarantee of equal access to all citizens. Bolling says that the legislators must guarantee protection for all citizens, even if legislators disagree with those citizens' way of life. Bolling says that Massachusetts must be a safe haven from discrimination. Bolling says that this legislation reaffirms the dignity and integrity of our democracy; that legislators must be willing to take risks to assure civil rights for all citizens. Bolling says that legislators must speak out against discrimination in all forms. Bolling reaffirms the right of citizens to live free from fear. Bolling says that he hopes the law will be passed this year. 1:11:11: V: The committee chairman thanks Bolling and calls the next speaker. Suzanne Bump (State Representative from Braintree) speaks on behalf of the Massachusetts Caucus of Women Legislators. She notes that the caucus strongly supports legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps defines sexual harassment and talks about the ill effects of sexual harassment on students and female employees. Bump adds that surveys show that 75% to 95% of women have been harassed at some point in their working lives. Bumps says that sexual harassment is a form of sexual discrimination; that sexual harassment is degrading and humiliating to women. Bumps notes that women who quit their jobs because of sexual harassment are unable to collect unemployment benefits. Bumps says that grievance procedures for victims of sexual harassment are non-existant; that victims who complain about sexual harassment often receive little support. Bumps says that sexual harassment is often perpetrated by men in positions of power who go unpunished; that the perpetrators are often the bosses or professors of these women. Bumps notes that federal courts have upheld the use of Title VII of the civil rights act in some sexual harassment cases; that Title VII bars discrimination in the work place; that there are limits to the application of Title VII in sexual harassment cases. Bumps talks about the importance of the current legislation barring sexual harassment. Bumps notes that the legislation defines sexual harassment, puts cases of sexual harassment under the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination and establishes a uniform grievance procedure for cases of sexual harassment within state government. Bumps notes that the legislation allows for the prompt resolution of complaints. She urges legislators to support the bill. 1:15:05: V: The committee chairman thanks Bumps and calls the next speaker. John Olver (State Senator) says that he is testifying as a Democratic state senator and on behalf of the Massachusetts State Democratic Party. Olver urges the Massachusetts state legislature to ban discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Olver says that discrimination against gays and lesbians must be ended in housing, employment, public accomodation, and in the consumer marketplace. Olver thanks the Congressional committee. 1:17:06: V: Tom Vallely (State Representative) speaks to the committee about his support for legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Vallely notes that he has been one of the principal sponsors of this legislation in the Massasachusetts House of Representatives. Vallely reviews the history of the legislation. Vallely notes that the legislation allows for the protection of gays and lesbians under the state civil rights law. Vallely says that legislators are not condoning homosexuality by offering protection for gays and lesbians under the civil rights law; that legislators need to allow citizens a form of redress against widespread discrimination. Vallely notes that this legislation has been debated by the legislature for more than a decade. Vallely says that the debate about the "gay lifestyle" is inappropriate; that the lifestyles of gays and lesbians is the same as the lifestyle of straight people. Vallely says that gays and lesbians are looking for equal protection, not "special treatment." Vallely refers to the controversy about Mark Twain's book, Huckleberry Finn. Vallely says that the book is a moving exploration of discrimination in American society; that the book is not racist. Vallely says that discrimination on the grounds of race or sexual preference is not acceptable in our society; that discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation is one of the "last civil rights battles" to be fought. Vallely says that opponents to the legislation will try to add an amendment exempting religious organizations from some aspects of the civil rights law. Vallely says that this amendment is unnecessary because the separation of church and state already exists. Vallely says that religious groups do not need to be exempted from legislation about the ERA (Equal Rights Amendement) or from legislation barring discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Vallely offers to speak to the members of the committee individually about why special legislation exempting religious groups from the civil rights law would be a "grave error." Vallely says that the legislation is important and worth the fight to get it passed. 1:25:44: V: Peter Morin (State Representative) asks a question about the language used in the legislation. Morin points out that there is an exemption to the discrimination law in the case of "bona fide occupational qualifications." Vallely says that the exemption grants authority to the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD) to consider the qualifications necessary for a certain occupation before deciding a discrimination case. Vallely says that it is important to give the MCAD some leeway in its decisions; that he cannot name a list of these "occupational qualifications." Vallely thanks the Congressional committee. 1:28:11: V: John Businger (State Representative from Brookline) notes that he has co-sponsored legislation in the Massachusetts House of Representatives barring sexual harassment and discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation. Businger says that government has a role in protecting its citizens from discrimination and harassment. Businger says that sexual harassment and discrimination against gays and lesbians are "unreasonable" and "arbitrary" forms of harassment. Businger talks about the need to make citizens aware of this legislation; that he has sponsored a bill to increase the posting requirements for anti-discrimination legislation; that the people affected by the legislation must be well informed in order to take advantage of it. Businger says that anti-discrimination policy and legislation must be posted on applications for credit, for employment, for services and for membership in organizations. Businger urges the legislators to pass this bill so that people can be made aware of their civil rights. Businger urges the legislators to pass the bills barring sexual harassment and discrimination of the basis of sexual orientation. 1:31:29: V: George Bachrach (State Senator) makes a lighthearted joke. The members of the panel laugh. Bachrach says that he is testifying in support of the Senate bill which bars discrimination against gays and lesbians in housing, employment, and credit. Bachrach says that he is sorry that this legislation has not already been passed into law.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/28/1985
Description: Michael Dukakis speaks at State House after upset defeat by Edward King in gubernatorial primary. Kitty, Frank Keefe, Barbara Ackermann, Evelyn Murphy.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/20/1978
Description: Edward F. King (not to be confused with Edward J. King) holds a press conference to announce his Republican gubernatorial candidacy at Park Plaza Hotel. Otto Walrab, former Chairman of the Republican State Committee, introduces King. King talks about his past experience and Massachusetts economic policy. He talks about cutting across traditional party lines, especially in Massachusetts, a heavily Democratic state. He criticizes Michael Dukakis for tax plan and for his judicial appointments, including Robert Bonin and Margaret Burnham. King takes questions from the press. Several takes of reporter standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/04/1978
Description: A pageant of Kennedy family members (including matriarch Rose and Jackie Onassis) assembles at Faneuil Hall to hear Sen. Edward Kennedy announce his presidential candidacy. Ted appears but the tape does not include the announcement itself.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1979
Description: Governor Edward King's first press conference in office. Lieutenant Governor Thomas O'Neill sits next to King throughout. King talks about the Cabinet meeting he just had about the administration's future plans. He takes questions from the press, mostly focused on the budget.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/24/1979
Description: Edward King gives victory speech at Park Plaza Hotel after winning gubernatorial election. He thanks the community and introduces his family.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1978
Description: B-roll of campaign workers holding campaign signs and handing out flyers for mayoral candidates Ray Flynn and Mel King, and other political candidates. Poll workers check in voters at polling stations. Voters stand in line to vote. A poll worker holds a stack of absentee ballots. Exteriors of the Mel King for Mayor headquarters. Campaign staff members work and make telephone calls at the campaign headquarters of Flynn and King. A Flynn worker telephones voters to remind them to vote for Flynn. Campaign workers for King and Flynn are gathered outside of a polling station in the evening. Some campaign workers approach voters. One campaign worker remarks on the cold weather. Voters stand in line and vote at a polling station. Shot of a voting booth.
1:00:00: Visual: Shot of a street corner posted with campaign signs for Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) and Craig Lankhorst (candidate for Boston School Committee). Footage of campaign workers holding signs for Mark Roosevelt (candidate for Boston City Council), King, Lankhorst, and Abby Browne (candidate for Boston School Committee). The workers give out flyers to people as they enter a building. Shot of poll workers sitting at a table. Voters are lined up in front of the table. 1:00:48: V: Shots of campaign workers in front of a building, holding signs for Roosevelt, King, Browne, Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston), and others. Shots of the interior of a a polling station. Poll workers are seated at a table. Two women confer on one side of the room. One of the women examines a stack of absentee ballots, which she holds in her hands. Shot of a voter list being examined by a poll worker. Shots of poll workers at the table with the voter lists. Shot of the stack of absentee ballots on the poll workers' table; of the cover of the "City of Boston List of Registered Voters" for 1983. 1:04:17: V: Shots of the headquarters for the King mayoral campaign. King campaign signs are posted in the window. A man is heard speaking into a bullhorn, urging voters to vote for King. Shots of the crowded interior of the King headquarters. Several campaign workers are present. One campaign worker is organizing a ride to the polls for a voter. Shot of a sign for the Rainbow Coalition. 1:05:57: V: Shots of the interior of the Flynn campaign headquarters. Campaign workers are telephoning voters to remind them to vote for Flynn. 1:06:47: V: Shot of two campaign workers standing in front of a building, holding Flynn campaign signs. In the background is a King supporter with a King campaign sign. People are gathered in front of the building. Shot of the white King supporter talking to an African American man. Shots of the people gathered in front of the building; of two men walking away from the building. 1:08:18: V: Footage of a woman entering a polling station in the evening. She refuses the flyers offered to her by campaign workers. The campaign workers joke about how cold it is outside. The campaign workers hand out more flyers to voters as they enter the polling station. Shot of campaign signs covering a pole on the sidewalk of a busy street. 1:09:48: V: Footage of the interior of a polling station. Poll workers sit behind a table as they check in voters. A white voter is shown to a polling booth. Poll workers continue to check in voters. 1:12:00: V: Footage of an African American male voter checking in with the poll workers. Voters stand in line to enter the polling booths. Shot of a ballot on a voting machine with levers. Shot of voters feet as they stand in the voting booths.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/05/1983
Description: Video starts with them talking over the color bars. End of an interview with Elma Lewis about the endurance of the African American community. She talks about the relationship between young and older African Americans, and the problems the older people suffered through to provide better opportunities for the younger generation. They talk informally while they shoot cutaways. Sound cuts out in the middle of cutaways. B-roll of the dancers rehearsing at the Elma Lewis School. Closeups on young boys drumming and dance instructor. Signs for the National Center of Afro-American Artists and the Elma Lewis School of Fine Arts. Closeups on pieces of African American art. Several takes of reporter standup.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/24/1980
Description: Several takes of reporter standup in empty Boston Garden. Bruins banners hang over ice rink. Long circular pan of unoccupied seats.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 12/18/1978
Description: Sound dropout in the beginning of the video. Boston City Council meeting on the Boston School budget. City Councilor reads communications from Mayor White to the City Council. Boston schools superintendent Marion Fahey testifies to City Council about school budget deficit. Accompanying Fahey are Paul Kennedy, Associate Superintendant in charge of personnel and John McGran, member of the superintendent's office on budgetary matters. Councilors Louise Day Hicks, Albert "Dapper" O'Neil, Larry DiCara are among those on the panel questioning Fahey. Mayor White and Superintendent Fahey both address the effect of Judge Arthur Garrity's 1975 court order on the Boston School Department budget. Video goes black in the middle for a few second, but audio continues.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/20/1976
Description: Mounted Boston police officer near Quincy Market. Crowds of children pet horse. Street performer. Angled view of upper facade of Faneuil Hall juxtaposed with Sixty State Street high rise. Quincy Market plaque. Grasshopper weather vane. Sign for “Where's Boston?”
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 06/15/1978
Description: Press conference held by Attorney General Francis X. Bellotti and Paula Gold, chief of consumer protection division, on criminal prosecution of fraud to combat white collar economic crime. She talks about technology to facilitate communication between law enforcement agencies. A man talks about fraud in the nursing home industry. High rises in Boston financial district. Several takes of reporter standup. He curses when he messes up.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/22/1976
Description: Boston mayoral candidate David Finnegan speaks outside Faneuil Hall in opposition to low property taxes paid by developer of Quincy Market pursuant to deal made with city. He compares the tax rates paid by Faneuil Hall and Milton Street in Dorchester.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/23/1979
Description: No audio. Boston bank building exteriors. First National Bank of Boston. Shawmut. State Street Bank. Fidelity.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/04/1982
Description: Boston waterfront. Dock scenes. Just caught fish in barrels on dock. Lumpers with rubber gloves and overalls. Boston Fish Market Corporation building. Press conference led by Massport director David Davis, who announces renovation of Fish Pier. Rep. Joseph Moakley speaks. He goes over the history of the fishing industry in Boston, Massachusetts, and the United States. He provides details on the redevelopment of the pier, and mentions the effects of the 200 mile limit enacted by Congress. Helen Keyes of the U.S. Dept. of Commerce speaks. George Kariotis, transportation secretary Barry Locke, Lt. Gov. Tom O'Neill are present.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/15/1979
Description: Charles Bennett interviews a longtime fisherman on the state of the fishing industry and the change in quota regulations. Boat docked at Fish Pier in snow flurries. Boston Fish Market Corporation building on pier. Seagulls hover over water in the Boston Harbor. Assorted catch offloaded by the bucketful and sorted by hand into wooden bins. Fishermen in yellow and orange rain gear. Tracking hauls wooden bins of fish. Men inside booth listening to the radio.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/06/1982
Description: State Senator Jack Backman opens a press conference in support of Mel King (Boston mayoral candidate) in front of the State House. Other participants include Byron Rushing (State Representative from the South End), Mary Jane Gibson (State Representative from Belmont), Susan Schur (State Representative from Newton), Mary Goode (former State Representative from Roxbury), and Barney Frank (US Congressman). Frank voices his support for King's candidacy and discusses the reasons for his endorsement, specifically, Frank talks about King's views on economic development and about his leadership abilities. Frank says that King is a creative leader who will bring "enlightened policy" to the city. Various reporters point out that Frank endorsed Dennis Kearney (candidate for mayor of Boston) in the primary elections. King arrives, shakes hands with Frank, thanks endorsers, and asserts that his administration will focus on employment, education, and the youth of the city.
1:00:10: Visual: Shot of a Mel King campaign sign. Jack Backman (State Senator) opens a press conference in front of the State House. He notes that Mel King (candidate for mayor of Boston) has not yet arrived. He voices his support for King. He introduces Byron Rushing (State Representative from the South End), Mary Jane Gibson (State Representative from Belmont), Susan Schur (State Representative from Newton), Mary Goode (former State Representative from Roxbury). Bachman lists off some state representatives who are due to arrive shortly at the press conference. Shots of Schur; of Rushing. Bachman introduces Barney Frank (US Congressman). 1:02:33: V: Frank says that he will support King for mayor of Boston; that he served with King for eight years in the legislature. Frank says that King is an advocate for enlightened policy for the city of Boston. Frank talks about King's ideas for economic development programs; about the Community Development Corporation. Frank says that King's ideas for development are in tune with the needs of city residents; that King is sensitive to the problems of displacement and the needs of area residents. Frank says that King can speak effectively on behalf of a diverse group of people; that King was an effective and respected legislator. Frank says that King will make an excellent mayor. A reporter asks Frank about his previous endorsements for mayor. Frank says that he is not always good at picking the winning candidate; that he speaks out on behalf of candidates who have good ideas and programs. A reporter notes that Frank endorsed Dennis Kearney (State Representative) in the primary election. He asks Frank how Kearney would have been a better mayor than King. Frank says that he endorsed Kearney in the primary because he thought Kearney was a good candidate with a good chance of winning. Frank says that Kearney and King take similar positions on the issues. Shot of King supporters standing behind Frank. Shot of Christy George (WGBH reporter). Audio is muffled. 1:07:45: V: Frank says that the many of the candidates in the race had similar positions on the issues; that King has helped shape the debate on the issues; that King was one of the first people to talk about the adverse effects of development on the elderly and the poor. Frank says that King is responsible for focusing the attention of the city on the management of economic development in a compassionate and effective manner. Frank says that he respects Ray Flynn (candidate for mayor of Boston); that King is more creative, thoughtful and consistent candidate; that King has proven himself to be an effective leader. Frank refuses to speculate on who he would have endorsed if King were not in the race. Frank says that he is endorsing a candidate because he is an elected official with an opinion; that he does not know what effect his endorsement has on a candidate's chances. A reporter asks Frank about the differences between King and Flynn. Frank says that the differences between the candidates stem from their past records; that King has proven himself to be a consistent and effective leader on economic issues for many years; that King has the capacity to stay with these issues. Frank notes that he does not agree with King on a mayor's role in foreign policy. A reporter asks Frank if King needs to highlight the issues on which he differs from Flynn. Frank says that King has stuck with the same issues for ten years; that his leadership has brought attention to these issues. Frank says that this has been a good mayoral campaign; that it has focused on issues. 1:13:15: V: Frank jokes with the reporters about his endorsement bringing in the voters from Brookline and Newton. A reporter asks Frank how King can get white liberal voters to support him instead of Flynn. Frank says that King can win voter support by focusing on the issues; that his positions on economic development may win over voters from traditionally "conservative" neighborhoods. A reporter asks Frank about his campaign advice for King. Frank says that King is doing the right thing by focusing on the issues; that King has proven his ability to be a leader on the issues. 1:16:32: V: King's supporters clap as he arrives at the State House. King and Frank shake hands. King thanks Frank and the assembled state representatives for their endorsements and support. King says that his administration will make the city open and accessible; that his administration will focus on employment, education, and the youth of the city.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/21/1983
Description: Former CIA director George H. W. Bush speaks on national security and foreign affairs. In regards to relations with South American countries, Bush explains his belief that one should not use 1977 morals to pass judgment on events that happened in the past. Denies allegations that the CIA used the African Swine Fever Virus in Cuba to "destabilize". Also denies that he ever authorized any use of chemical or biological warfare agents. He touches briefly on his potential candidacy for presidency.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/08/1977
Description: George McGovern visits Boston to raise funds among liberals for his 1980 Senate reelection campaign in South Dakota. He doubts that there will ever be a senate race run purely on funds contributed within the border of the state. He thinks that campaigns should be financed publicly. Speaks about his nomination for presidency in 1972. Additional footage includes McGovern meeting and speaking with liberal Massachusetts politicians at a gathering.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/20/1979
Description: Governors Conference in Boston. Sen. Edward Kennedy and Rep. John Anderson meet with the National Governors Association, including Govs. Jerry Brown, Ella Grasso, Reubin Askew, Dixie Lee Ray, Ed Herschler, James Longley, Harvey Wollman, Richard Lamm, Meldrim Thomson, Mike O'Callaghan, and Richard Snelling. End of the discussion on health care and insurance policy. Governor Dukakis speaks and Senator Kennedy responds. Many closeups on Kennedy, Dukakis, and audience pans. Governor Snelling introduces John Anderson and the panel on government regulations. Cuts of Anderson's speech about the problem of over-regulation by Congress and the legislative veto, with shots of governors around the table. The Director of the US Office of Management and Budget, James T. McIntyre, speaks to the same issues. Rep. Anderson takes questions.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/28/1978
Description: Greek dancers in traditional folk costumes do circle dances in Massachusetts State House rotunda to celebrate Greek independence day. Crowd of spectators. Greek music, and crowd sings Greek songs. Michael Dukakis, Kitty Dukakis, William Bulger, and Paul Tsongas join in. Buzzing sounds over audio at the end of video.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 03/15/1983
Description: Green line T pulling into and out of Kenmore station underground during rush hour. Old style PCC trolley and newer LRV cars. Driver's point of view, looking down tracks into dark subway tunnel. Passengers get on and off.Passenger reading Benjamin Disraeli. Passenger complains about MBTA service.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/15/1979
Description: Dedication ceremony of John Hancock glass tower, in lobby. General James M. Gavin is introduced and addresses the audience. Gavin and other speakers talk about the history of the building project. Thomas O'Neill and Kevin White are also on stage. Unveiling of massive reproduction of Declaration of Independence on wall of lobby. English High School chorus sings patriotic songs. Hundreds of guests crowded in lobby.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/15/1976
Description: Vincent Canzoneri does several takes of reporter standup. Boston city skyline with State House dome. Juxtaposition of old and new John Hancock towers with Charles River in foreground, and then with city streets and Mass. Turnpike in foreground.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/05/1979
Description: Exteriors of Harvard Medical School, Longwood Campus. Main building with ionic columns on Shattuck Street. A few students in front of the building. Countway library next door. Audio goes in and out throughout.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/17/1976
Description: High, wide, long shots of Boston environs from observation deck of Hancock Tower. Nearly aerial views of South End, Charles River, Boston Harbor, State House, and orange line T moving along elevated tracks.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/10/1976
Description: Boston Redevelopment Authority public hearing on the homeless shelter Rosie's Place. Community members voice concerns and suggestions, including increased security and better lighting to protect the homeless women. Developer Elizabeth Fitzgerald speaks on behalf of Rosie's Place. Shots of the new development plan model. Board votes to tentatively designate Rosie's Place the development rights on Harrison Avenue. Elizabeth Fitzgerald, Kip Tiernan and Ray Flynn make statements at a press conference. Tiernan presents Flynn with a t-shirt that says "I helped rebuild Rosie's Place." Sound cuts out for a while in the middle of the video.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/09/1984
Description: Interview with Massachusetts Representative Johnston on the reforms he is trying to push through the legislature, which deal with the appointing and workings of committees within the House. Speaker of the House, Thomas W. MgGee is fighting against these changes. Massachusetts State House interiors. Door into the House Chambers. Shot of the House Chambers from multiple angles. Several takes of the reporter standup. Door into the Senate Chambers. Still images of Representative Johnston and Speaker McGee.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 01/02/1979
Description: Exteriors of Hynes Auditorium, Prudential Center, and Boylston Street. Traffic and fire truck. Man roller skating in the road. Pedestrians and bicyclists.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/07/1982
Description: Christian Science Center environs. Ornate facade of Mother Church. Reflecting pool, surface of water. Flower beds, close-up of begonias. Christopher Lydon interviews an expert about architect I.M. Pei, particularly his work in Boston.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/01/1983
Description: Carmen Fields reports that the US Postal Service will issue a postage stamp bearing James Weldon Johnson's image in honor of Black History Month. Johnson was a poet, lawyer, diplomat, composer, and former director of the NAACP. Johnson is the composer of "Lift Every Voice," which is known as the "black national anthem." The Madison Park High School Choir performing "Lift Every Voice. Interview with professor Samuel Allen of Boston University, who was a student of Johnson's. He talks about Johnson's life and his legacy. Allen reads two of Johnson's poems. Fields report is accompanied by photos of Johnson and a shot of the postage stamp bearing his image.
1:00:07: Visual: Footage of the Madison Park High School Glee Club singing "Lift Every Voice." Carmen Fields reports that "Lift Every Voice" is known as the "black national anthem"; that the words to the song were written by James Weldon Johnson; that Johnson was a poet, diplomat, educator and the first African American lawyer in the state of Florida. V: Shots of a black and white photo of Johnson; of the caption beneath the photo. Fields reports that Johnson fought for anti-lynching laws as the executive director of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People); that Johnson also wrote lyrics for operas with his brother. Fields reports that Samuel Allen (professor, Boston University) was one of Johnson's students at Fisk University in the 1930s. V: Shot of a painting of Johnson. Footage of Allen being interviewed by Fields. Allen says that Johnson was "a Renaissance man." Allen notes that Johnson was an artist, writer, and diplomat. Allen reviews Johnson's accomplishments as US consul in Venezuela and in Nicaragua. Fields reports that Johnson is known for his poetry; that Johnson's poetry reflects the religious fervor in African American culture. V: Shot of a book of poetry held by Allen. Footage of Allen talking about and reading Johnson's poems, "The Creation" and "God's Trombones." Allen says that Johnson tried to immortalize the sermon of an African American preacher. Shot of a black and white photograph of Johnson. Fields reports that critics accused Johnson of hypocrisy for using religious themes in his poetry. V: Footage of Allen saying that Johnson was an agnostic. Shot of an image of Johnson on a US Stamp. Fields reports that "Lift Every Voice" was once seen as an unpatriotic and divisive song; that the song is now sung by school choirs and in churches. Fields notes that the US Postal Service will issue a stamp in honor of Johnson; that the stamp includes musical notation from "Lift Every Voice." V: Footage of the Madison Park High School Glee Club singing "Lift Every Voice." Shot of the US postal stamp featuring Johnson's image. Footage of Allen reading the lyrics of "Lift Every Voice."
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/01/1988
Description: Jane Fonda and Tom Hayden hold press conference at State House to give their progressive stances on social justice issues, and to discuss their work with grass roots organizations. They hope to influence the 1980 presidential election.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1979
Description: Interview with Boston Pops conductor John Williams in back room at Symphony Hall. He compares the repertoires and missions of the Pops versus the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He speaks about his possible plans for expanding the repertoire of the orchestra, the types of music they might adapt, and the changes it would require. He says he doesn't want to use Pops as a place to showcase his own work. He laughs about kids always asking why he doesn't play Star Wars. He discusses his future involvement with Pops and staying in Boston. They shoot cutaways with no audio. Lydon reasks questions, with audio.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/01/1981
Description: Courtroom visual of Boston School Desegregation Case. Judge W. Arthur Garrity, Thomas Atkins, Mary Simonds. (Sketches only)
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 02/05/1985
Description: W. Arthur Garrity (federal judge) speaks at a meeting of the Citywide Educational Coalition (CWEC). Jane Margulis (CWEC) introduces Garrity. Laval Wilson (Superintendent, Boston Public Schools), Sidney Smith (Headmaster, English High School), and Ellen Guiney (CWEC) sit on stage. Garrity talks about his efforts to wrap up the school desegregation case. He says that there are a few lingering matters to be handled before he withdraws. Garrity thanks the CWEC for providing factual and reliable information about school desegregation. Garrity talks about a "sea of misinformation" surrounding school desegregation. He refutes rumors that he was involved in hiring teachers and buying supplies. Garrity compliments John Coakley (Boston School Department) on his career in the Boston School Department; he mentions Coakley's integrity and dedication to his job. Garrity sums up the challenges facing the Boston Public Schools; he says that school integration is an ongoing process. Reel 1
0:59:59: Visual: Arthur Garrity (federal judge) speaks at English High School at the annual meeting of the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC). Garrity is at the end of his involvement in the Boston school desegregation case. Jane Margulis (CWEC) introduces Garrity. Garrity sits on stage, with a group of officials including Laval Wilson (Superintendent of Boston Public Schools), Sidney Smith (Headmaster, English High School), and Ellen Guiney (CWEC). Margulis tells a few anecdotes as she introduces Garrity. Garrity shakes her hand and kisses her on the cheek as he approaches the podium. 1:02:17: V: Garrity thanks Margulis. Garrity tells a story about how he and Margulis spoke at a seminar about school desegregation in Virginia. Garrity says that members of the audience were so impressed with Margulis that she received a job offer on the spot from a school system in Texas. Garrity says that he has not come to talk about the final court orders that he handed down on September 3. Garrity reads from the canon of judicial conduct, which instructs a judge not to comment publicly on court proceedings. Garrity reminds the audience that the court case is not entirely over; that the Boston Teacher's Union has filed an appeal of the court orders issued on September 3. Garrity says that he has extended the time period in which other appeals may be filed. Garrity adds that there is another court hearing on Friday to discuss support services for the Boston Latin School. Garrity talks about a motion filed by the city of Boston to modify one of the court orders dealing with emergency school repairs. 1:07:57: V: Garrity says that he has come to thank the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC). Garrity commends the CWEC for gathering and disseminating factual information since the beginning of desegregation. Garrity says that there was "a sea of misinformation" during that time period. Garrity cites an article from The New York Times written on September 6. The article says that Garrity was involved in hiring teachers and buying supplies. Garrity says that it is "laughable" to think that he was involved in those areas of the school system. Garrity notes that he was only involved in the hiring of one person; that he helped to hire Jerome Wynegar (Headmaster, South Boston High School). Garrity says that he wanted to acknowledge the debt owed to the CWEC by the court. Garrity adds that he wanted to meet Laval Wilson; that Wilson has a good reputation as a school administrator. Garrity says that he wanted to be present to honor John Coakley (Boston School Department). Garrity says that the Boston school desegregation case "is nothing else if not a hundred stories." Garrity talks about referring to one of the school desegregation plans filed in court as "the Coakley plan," because it was written by Coakley. He adds that a friend counseled him to stop calling it the "Coakley plan" so as not to ruin Coakley's future in the Boston School Department. Garrity says that he had recently written a a memo connected to one of the court orders, in which he commended Coakley's conscientious job performance. Garrity talks about Coakley's integrity and dedication to his job. Garrity says that there never would have been a student assignment system without Coakley. 1:12:56: V: Garrity says that school desegregation is an ongoing process. Garrity talks about the many tasks facing the Boston Public School System. Garrity talks about differences between the city of Boston and the state over the budget for facilities and school repair. Garrity talks about the need to determine which schools will get money to improve facilities. Garrity talks about the question of the Latin Schools. Garrity notes that the Boston Globe recently printed a letter from Robert Dentler (Dean of Education, Boston University) on the subject of the Latin Schools. Garrity denies charges printed in the newspapers that he vetoed a plan to improve the Latin Schools. Garrity adds that no plan has been filed to improve the Latin Schools. Garrity says that critics have misread the court orders; that planning must be undertaken for the Latin Schools. Garrity talks about the challenges involved in plans to improve vocational and occupational education. Garrity notes that the Boston School Committee faces some deadlines in its plans to improve vocational education. Garrity stresses that there is much work remaining to be done in the schools; that "the challenges of the future are greater than the challenges of the past." Garrity commends Rita Walsh-Tomasini (Boston School Committee) for advocating the formation of a committee to work with parents' organizations in the schools.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/23/1985
Description: Kenmore Square and Brighton night environs. Nightclubs, liquor stores, package stores, and bars: Rathskeller, Narcissus, Bunratty's. Cameramen and reporter talk in background. They discuss all of the Boston University students in the area and the use of positive identification to prevent underage drinking. Allston/Brighton police station. Two detectives are interviewed in the lobby of the station. They answer questions about the problems of underage drinking and fake identification. They give their opinion on the changes that will occur based on the newly raised drinking age.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/02/1985
Description: Kevin White gives press conference after mayoral reelection victory. He says the campaign was the toughest political battle of his life. He denies entertaining ambitions for national office. He also denies involvement in an accusation of one reporter being involved with organized crime.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 11/05/1975
Description: Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) holds a press conference to discuss his victory the previous day in the mayoral election. White discusses his potential role as a national spokesman on urban issues. White says that he has no plans to assume a national role. White predicts great success in his next term; rejects Boston's reputation as a racist city; guarantees the safety of all citizens in the city; discusses the city's affirmative action program as it relates to his administration; and says his administration will not tolerate racial violence. White notes the community's responsibility to speak out against racial violence; discusses the recent shooting of Darryl Williams (African American Jamaica Plain student). White talks about former city employee James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) and the need to be sensitive in making appointments to city jobs. White discusses the city's poor racial climate, and assesses the extent to which he is responsible for it, and his belief that other cities are more racist than Boston. White talks about his support base in the mayoral election and about his opponent, Joseph Timilty. He discusses the US Senate race and notes that he has not been asked to endorse Edward Kennedy (US Senator) or any other candidates. White expresses confidence in the vitality of the city and talks about his priorities for the next term, including tax reform and the development of the North Station area. White is very relaxed and has a good rapport with the media.
0:00:11: Visual: Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) walks into a small room where a press conference will be held. He greets the members of the media informally, saying "Hi everybody." He jokes with the media about having forgotten his tie. White sits down on a couch. Microphones are set up on the coffee table in front of him. White says that he is pleased about his victory. A reporter asks White if he and Henry Maier (Mayor of Milwaukee) will join Dick Hatcher (Mayor of Gary, Indiana) as national spokesmen for urban issues. White says that he will speak out on urban issues as he always has; that he has no plans to assume a national role. White adds that there are mayors in other cities who will become influential and make themselves heard. He mentions Bill Green (Mayor of Philadelphia) and Don Frasier (Mayor of Minneapolis). Another reporter asks White if he will be eclipsed by these new urban mayors. White makes a joke, "the old gray mare, he is what he used to be." White says that he will speak out on national issues which affect Boston. A reporter asks what the next four years will bring to Boston. White says that the next term will be the greatest of his terms as mayor. He mentions that Bob Ryan (Director, Boston Redevelopment Authority) is optimistic about new building projects. A reporter comments on Boston's reputation as the most racist city in the nation. White says that Boston's reputation as a racist city is not correct. He notes that he cannot rid the city of racism and hypocrisy. White guarantees that people of all colors and nationalities will be able to walk the streets safely by the end of his term. A reporter asks White if he will hire more African Americans to key positions in the city administration. White says that there is a good affirmative action program in place; that the African American community supported him in the election. White says that racial violence will not be tolerated in the city. He says that the residents of Charlestown helped to apprehend the youth involved in the shooting of Darryl Williams (Jamaica Plain student); that the residents of Charlestown did not want to be seen as harboring racist criminals. White says that his administration will not tolerate racial violence. 0:06:24: V: White notes that the Charlestown Business Association held a press conference within hours of the Williams shooting; that they condemned racial violence in the press conference; that people in the community need to speak out against racist violence. White says that he will enlist his supporters in the neighborhoods to speak out. A reporter asks White if he will be more sensitive about whom he puts on the city payroll after the "Jimmy Kelly affair." White says that he is always sensitive about whom he puts on the city payroll; that the media will always disagree with his hiring decisions. White notes that James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) resigned from his city job; that he was not fired. The reporter asks if it is a good idea to have Kelly representing the city by holding a city job. White says that he was not willing to fire Kelly in order to court African American voters during the campaign. White says that he wanted to be elected on his record, not for his ability to play upon the emotions of voters. White adds that Kelly was qualified to do the job for which he was hired; that hiring Kelly was not a mistake. White says that he does not want to fire city workers because of their beliefs, even if their beliefs are unpalatable. 0:09:32: V: A reporter asks White if he feels responsible for the poor racial climate in the city. White says that he cannot change it all by himself; that he has never ducked a crisis. White adds that the city will not come together until more people become active; that the voters need to elect good people to the Boston School Committee and the Boston City Council. A reporter asks White how Boston got its reputation as a racist city. White says that racism is a national problem; that problems in Boston get more media coverage than problems in other cities. White mentions that there are severe racial problems in Detroit and other cities; that many affluent communities are very racist. White says that Boston has lived through busing and has learned from it; that there are racial problems in Boston; that he does not think of Boston as the most racist city in the US. A reporter asks White about low voter turnout in the election. Jump cut on videotape. 0:13:14: V: White says that he expanded his political base in this election; that he did not lose support in areas where he has always been popular. He expresses confidence in the vitality of the city. White says that he has not been approached for an endorsement of Edward Kennedy (US Senator) or any other candidates for US Senate. White jokes with reporters about not needing to talk to the media now that he has been reelected. A reporter asks White about his priorities for the next term. White talks about tax reform and the development of the area around North Station. A reporter asks White why he did not attend Kennedy's announcement at Faneuil Hall this morning. Jump cut on videotape. 0:15:16: V: White talks further about the race for the US Senate. A reporter asks White to analyze the campaign strategy of Joseph Timilty (former mayoral candidate). White says that he does not like to pick apart the strategy of an opponent. White says that both he and Timilty knew that Timilty had a good chance to win the election. A photographer focuses on White and takes his photo. A reporter asks if he will lay off workers from the city payroll. White deflects the question with a joke. He has a good rapport with the reporters. White closes the press conference. He commends the reporters on their professionalism, saying that they treated both him and Timilty fairly. White and the reporters prepare to leave the room. White speaks informally to Sharon Stevens (WGBH reporter) and others.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 11/07/1979
Description: Press conference at City Hall. Boston Mayor Kevin White and Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia read prepared statements about the following day's school opening in the third year of court-ordered busing. White expresses confidence in a peaceful opening of schools. DiGrazia says that police have been instructed to use minimum force, but to act decisively against any disruptions of public order. Both men hope that police can be removed from schools as soon as possible. White notes that the atmosphere seems calmer this year than during the previous two years. White says that he would like to remove police from the schools as soon as possible because their presence hinders the development of a healthy learning environment. Reporters question them on the school opening. Shots of Pam Bullard listening to the press conference.
2:09:33: Visual: Members of the press are assembled for a press conference at City Hall with Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) and Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston). White begins reading a statement, then stops because there is a problem with sound. 2:11:53: V: White reads a prepared statement. He says that school opens tomorrow; that fewer students face assignments to new schools this year; that more students are attending the schools of their choice; that many schools are benefitting from programs linked with universities and businesses; that three new schools are opening; that he is confident that the school year will be productive. White says that the city is prepared to guarantee the safety of all schoolchildren; that he hopes to reduce the police presence at the schools this year; that police will restore order if disruptions occur. White urges citizens to share in the responsibility for a peaceful school opening; that the city will focus on improving schools this year. 2:14:32: V: DiGrazia reads a prepared statement. He expresses confidence in a peaceful school opening. He reports that police have received instructions to allow peaceful demonstrations, but to maintain public order; that police officers have been instructed to use minimum force and to treat those arrested with respect and courtesy. DiGrazia says that police will not tolerate any acts of violence or disruption; that these acts are often committed by only a few citizens. 2:15:56: V: White invites questions from the reporters. A reporter asks DiGrazia what kind of preparations have been made for additional police support. DiGrazia says that Massachusetts State Police will be assigned to South Boston; that MDC Police will be assigned to Charlestown; that US Marshals will be present for the opening of schools. DiGrazia says that the atmosphere on the streets seems calm; that a few citizens are engaging in disruptive behavior; that the atmosphere seems calmer than in the previous two years; that police presence will be less visible than last year; that additional police will stand by for support. DiGrazia says that the police have not received any indication that there will be outside agitators at the schools. DiGrazia says that he hopes there will be little overtime for police officers this year. DiGrazia says that uniformed State Police officers will be assigned to South Boston High School; that community service officers and juvenile officers will be assigned to monitor the other schools. 2:18:52: V: A reporter asks about cooperative efforts between the School Department, the city of Boston, and the Police Department. White says that the three entities have been working together on school desegregaton for three years; that differences about the school budget have not affected efforts to achieve a successful school opening. DiGrazia says that police will continue to enforce ordinances forbidding the assembly of more than three people along a bus route, or assemblies within 100 yards of schools. Shot of Pam Bullard. White says that he would like to remove police from schools as soon as possible; that police presence hinders a healthy learning atmospheres; that police can be removed if citizens refrain from disrupting the schools. A reporter asks DiGrazia to clarify the term "minimum force" in police conduct. DiGrazia says that he hopes police can dissuade citizens from engaging in disruptive behavior; that he would like to see the police removed from the schools as soon as possible. DiGrazia refuses to elaborate on minimum tolerance policy guidelines, but says that warnings will be given to disruptors before action is taken. DiGrazia says that the school department instituted the use of metal detectors at the schools; that they will be used again this year. DiGrazia refuses to give out information on the number of police officers assigned to the schools
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1976
Description: Mayoral candidates Mel King and Ray Flynn participate in a forum on education sponsored by the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC) at English High School. Flynn talks about his experience in government and his commitment to the public schools. He notes his familiarity with the city and school budgets, and he discusses the importance of public education and public housing. King stresses the importance of early childhood education programs and a "child-centered" school system. King speaks of the need for the mayor to work together with the Boston School Committee. King says that the city must continue to demonstrate its support of integrated schools. King and Flynn respond to a question about requiring students to pass a standardized test in order to graduate. Tape 1 of 2.
1:00:05: Visual: Four members of the Citywide Education Coalition (CWEC) sit at a table on stage at English High School. A member of the CWEC welcomes mayoral candidates Ray Flynn and Mel King to the annual meeting of the CWEC. Flynn and King are seated at a table at the center of the stage. Shots of Flynn and King. The CWEC member says that the candidates and the audience will discuss the future of public education in Boston. 1:01:55: V: Flynn thanks the moderator and the CWEC. Flynn mentions his experience as a state legislator and a member of the Boston City Council. He says that he was a student in the Boston Public Schools. Flynn congratulates the CWEC for their commitment ot public education. Flynn stresses the importance of public education and a good school system. Flynn says that he has a Master's Degree in education from Harvard; that he is committed to education. Flynn says that he would visit a few public schools and a few public housing projects on his first day as mayor; that education and public housing will be major concerns for his administration. Flynn says that the mayor should be involved in public education; that politicians in Boston have distanced themselves from the public schools since desegregation. Flynn says that the mayor should serve as an ex-officio member of the Boston School Committee; that the mayor needs to be aware of the situation in the schools. Flynn says that he is familiar with the city and school budgets. Flynn says that fiscal stability and predictable student placements are important for the schools. The audience applauds. 1:07:56: V: King thanks the audience and the CWEC. King says that the students in the school system must be served from birth to graduation; that early childhood education programs are important. King says that resources must be allocated to support Head Start programs and other early childhood education programs. King says that "child-centered" school system must guarantee education for all students; that the school system must believe that all children can be educated. King says that the mayor must work with the Boston School Committee; that the members of the School Committee will be newly elected; that the mayor and the Boston School Committee must determine the problems and the needs of the school system. King says that the newly elected School Committee must be unified in support of integrated schools. Jump cut in videotape. King says that he would provide leadership on the issue of education; that he would work to create a good climate and to end divisiveness on the issue of education. King says that the Boston Public School System must demonstrate its commitment to integrated education. The audience applauds. 1:14:52: V: An audience member asks if students should pass a standardized test in order to graduate from high school. King says that standards need to be established in the early grades as well as upon graduation. King says that the school administration must be held responsible for the education of the students; that diagnostic testing and evaluation is needed at every grade level, not just upon graduation.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 10/13/1983
Description: Interview with Boston coin dealer Ed Leventhal who says people are not flocking to buy the newly offered South African Krugerrand, one troy ounce of gold selling for about $163. B-roll of gold and coin dealer's stores. Several takes of reporter standup from the Boson coin district on Bromfield Street. Interview with Margaret Marshall who explains why investment in the Krugerrand supports discriminatory gold mining industry and therefore apartheid. Contemporary TV ads for Krugerrands, for editing into the news story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/28/1977
Description: Digital Corporation sponsors a demonstration of the evolution of voice technology at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. A moderator and a group of speakers answer questions from the audience about voice technology and computing technology. The speakers and audience discuss the importance of access to this technology by the blind and disabled. The moderator introduces musician Stevie Wonder. A short clip of Saturday Night Live is played, featuring Stevie Wonder as a news reporter. Wonder speaks to the audience about the opportunities provided to him through technology. He explains the transition from acoustic technology to a more visual technology in terms of music. Wonder discusses his experiences with technology and explains how he works with a Kurzweil reading machine, a DECtalk computer and a synthesizer to compose music. He explains how technology helps further opportunity. Wonder thanks the creators of this technology. Tape 1 of 2
0:59:59: Visual: A man stands at a podium, talking about the evolution of voice technology at a demonstration of the Kurzweil voice recognition machine at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. The man talks about the applications of voice technology in computer-assisted instruction. He talks about speech synthesis and speech recognition as two components of computer-assisted instruction devices. The man says that computer-assisted instruction devices can help young children learn. 1:01:36: V: The audience applauds. The moderator invites the audience to ask questions of the speakers. The speakers are gathered beside the podium, in front of a large banner for the Digital Corporation. The moderator talks about Digital's commitment to promoting and furthering technology in the interests of the company and the greater community. An audience member asks about the sales of the voice recognition machine. The moderator says that the product is successful; that sales figures are not the focus of this conference. 1:03:26: V: The man who spoke answers a question at the podium. The man talks about silicon technology. He says that the price of silicon chips will continue to decline. He says that his company has an active research and development team; that they are working hard to incorporate the latest technology into their products. The man predicts that the future will bring more powerful devices at lower costs; that companies in the field would like to provide computing devices which are affordable for individuals. Another man says that blind people can benefit from voice recognition machines which are available at their workplaces or through community organizations. He notes that blind people can access the machines in these ways, even if they cannot afford to buy one. The first man quotes a statistic indicating that two-thirds of all blind college students have access to a Kurzweil reading machine through their college campuses. The man notes that the Xerox Corporation donated reading machines to many college campuses. A third man approaches the podium. He says that many corporations are interested in donating machines to appropriate organizations; that corporations want to provide access to the machines. 1:05:33: V: The moderator tells the audience that there will be a question and answer period after the presentation of Stevie Wonder (pop singer). A fourth man talks about Wonder's Kurzweil music synthesizer. The man talks about Wonder's involvement with technology. The man talks about Wonder's accomplishments and his efforts to establish a holiday in honor of Martin Luther King (African American civil rights leader). The man talks about recent awards given to Wonder. 1:07:00: V: The audience applauds as Wonder enters the room. A man guides Wonder to the podium. Wonder introduces a video presentation, which begins to play. The video presentation shows Wonder doing a parody of a music critic on Saturday Night Live (late night TV show). 1:09:09: V: Wonder talks about the opportunities provided to him through technology. Wonder talks about the contributions made to the technology which allows him to communicate more fully. Wonder says that technology is his "little sister, big brother, mother and father. I get inspired by it." He talks about learning and developing along with technology. Wonder says that he was first introduced to technology through learning the Braille language; that the Braille language provided him with a fundamental understanding of technology; that he applies that lesson to the machines he encounters today. Wonder says that technology has become more visual; that blind people need to be able to read or hear visual displays on machines. Wonder thanks the technological community for allowing him to access to technology through voice recognition. Wonder says that he used a Teleprompter for the blind during his appearance on Saturday Night Live. Wonder talks about his portable Braille machine, which allows him to access information on a cassette tape. Wonder talks about the pleasure of reading a book through the Kurzweil reading machine. Wonder talks about the DECtalk machine. Wonder says that the DECtalk machine can read Braille input in English. Wonder talks about the usefulness of the DECtalk machine. Wonder says that he will show the audience how the DECtalk machine can read the visual output of a Kurzweil machine, which allows him to use synthesizers without relying on visuals. Wonder says that he is frustrated that these machines are not more accessible to the blind. Wonder says that this technology must be made available to the handicapped and non-handicapped alike; that demand for the product will lead to greater access. Wonder urges the technology community to apply its skill to create greater access for all people. Wonder thanks the creators of the technology and the audience. The audience applauds.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/29/1985
Description: Stevie Wonder demonstrates a Kurweil Reading Machine with text-to-speech capability, which enables blind people to read printed text. He uses the machine to help him read instructions for his synthesizer, so he can compose a song. He jokes around with the audience. He sings part of "I Just Called to Say I Love You." A Boston politician presents Wonder with a commemorative award of his visit to Boston. Wonder addresses the crowd and talks about how the Reading Machine is making a more "harmonious world." Several takes of reporter stand up. A man demonstrates a computer with a touchscreen and Deck Talk features.
1:00:00: Visual: An audience from the technology industry is gathered in the ballroom of the Boston Park Plaza Hotel. Stevie Wonder (pop singer) is at the front of the room, preparing to demonstrate the Kurzweil reading machine and DECtalk machine, which allow him to fully operate a synthesizer. Wonder stands before the keyboard. Wonder explains that the computer keyboard interfaces with the synthesizer; that he cannot operate the machine because he cannot see the controls. Wonder pushes a knob and a computerized voice says what the button does. Wonder begins to program the keyboard. Wonder program the keyboard to play like a piano. Wonder programs the synthesizer to lay down a drumbeat. Wonder stops the drumbeat. Wonder plays and records the tune to the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." The audience applauds when he finishes. 1:05:57: V: Wonder says that the synthesizer allows him to create the sound of a band. He jokes that he cannot afford a band of his own. Wonder programs the synthesizer to sound like drums. Wonder plays the drum track over the recorded tune to the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." Shots of the audience. The audience applauds when he finishes. Wonder programs the synthesizer to play bass and strings. Wonder has to try a few times before successfully programming the machine. Wonder adds a track with strings to the other tracks of the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." 1:13:48: V: The audience applauds. Wonder sings along to the recorded tracks of the song, "I Just Called To Say I Love You." He adds a line to the song, singing "What it is, is something true, that technology like this makes it possible for me to do." The audience sings and claps along with Wonder. Wonder sings a line, thanking DEC (Digital Equipment Corporation) and Raymond Kurzweiler (inventor of the reading machine). The audience gives Wonder a standing ovation. Wonder is guided to the podium. 1:17:16: V: Shots of the audience. A speaker presents Wonder with a silver Revere Bowl from Ray Flynn (Mayor of Boston) commemorating his visit to Boston. The audience applauds. 1:18:15: V: Shot of Wonder from the back of the room. Wonder stands at the podium. He talks about how technology makes communication easier. Shots of audience applauding. Meg Vaillancourt stands at the back of the room. Vaillancourt reports on Wonder's demonstration of new technology. 1:20:08: V: Shots of a computer on display at a vendor's table. Vaillancourt interviews the computer vendor. The computer vendor demonstrates the touch-sensitive screen on his computer. A computerized voice identifies which icon has been pushed. The computer vendor explains that the screen can show either text icons or picture icons. The computer vendor talks about the different voice options on the computer. The computer vendor programs the computer voices to repeat stock phrases for the camera.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/29/1985
Description: Some drop out at the beginning. Construction site of Lafayette Place. Cement truck. Workers in hard hats. Heavy equipment. Chain link fence surrounds site. Wide shot of excavated site. Volpe/Shuman campaign sign.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/10/1982
Description: John Lakian holds a press conference at the Parker House during his 1982 bid for governor of Massachusetts. Reporters gather and get handed press packets. Lakian and his wife enter room to applause. Lakian denies Boston Globe allegations about his background and considers suing them for libel. He takes questions from the press. Some questions concern his membership in the Republican Party. Lakian supporters call out throughout the conference.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/19/1982
Description: Second half of John Lakian press conference at the Parker House during his 1982 bid for governor for Massachusetts. He continues taking questions from the press and setting the record straight about the issues raised by the Globe article, which he claims in libelous.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 08/19/1982
Description: Theodore Landsmark (attorney) speaks to the media at a press conference. His face is in bandages. Landsmark gives an account of the attack he sustained on City Hall Plaza, perpetrated by white teenagers attending an anti-busing rally. He commends the actions of Clarence Jones (Deputy Mayor, City of Boston), who came to his aid after the attack. Landsmark talks about the media's coverage of his attack. Landsmark says that he will seek full prosecution of his attackers, and adds that he will bring suit against members of the Boston School Committee and the Boston City Council. He condemns white city leaders who "incite and encourage" racist violence. Landsmark calls for an end to racism and race discrimination in the city. He accuses the white power structure of ignoring the problems of minority citizens.
1:00:04: Visual: A group of African American men greet each other at the entrance of the room where Theodore Landsmark (attorney) will hold a press conference. Landsmark enters the room. His nose and face are bandaged with white tape. An African American woman hands him a note as he enters. Landsmark sits down behind a table with microphones. An African American man sits beside him. A group of African American men and women, and a few white people, stand behind him as he speaks. Reporters sit at the other side of the table and stand around the room. The reporters take notes as Landsmark speaks. 1:02:00: V: Landsmark notes that there has been conflict among the media over coverage of the press conference; that he wants both union and non-union members of the media to cover the press conference; that the media needs to work out the union issues outside of the press conference. Landsmark greets the media and reads a statement. He says that the press conference will be brief because he needs to get some rest; that he lost a lot of blood in the attack. Landsmark says that he is concerned that the publicity generated by the attack may distort some of the crucial issues which need to be discussed. Landsmark runs through the sequence of events on the day of the attack. Landsmark says that he was on his way to an affirmative action committee meeting with the Boston Redevelopment Authority; that he was beaten and kicked by a crowd of young people coming from an anti-busing rally at City Hall. Landsmark refutes rumors that Clarence Jones (Deputy Mayor, City of Boston) had been with him and ran away from the scene. Landsmark says that he regrets the circulation of the false reports regarding Jones; that Jones was the only person who left City Hall to aid him after the attack. Landsmark says that he will seek full prosecution of the youth involved in the attack; that he will take action in civil and criminal court against members of the Boston City Council and the Boston School Committee; that he would like to see an end to the use of City Hall as "a sanctuary for racism and a resource center for those who would incite and encourage racist violence." Landsmark says that some city officials perpetuate discrimination against people of color in Boston on a daily basis. Landsmark expresses gratitude to members of the African American and white communities for the many acts of kindness and courage shown to him after the attack. Landsmark adds that meaningful gestures by the white community before the attack could have prevented the violence. Landsmark says that he is grateful for the support of the Black Caucus, the Board of Directors of the Contractors Association of Boston, and the Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association. Landsmark thanks the newspaper and TV cameramen for capturing the attack on film. He says that he wishes that somebody had come to his aid, but is grateful for the record of the attack provided by the journalists. Landsmark says that without the photos, the attack would have been recorded "as just another scuffle on the street." Landsmark says that racism is to blame for the attack; that racism in the city of Boston has been fueled by selfish politicians; that politicians continue to ignore the social and economic problems of the city. Landsmark says that he will work to solve these problems in the African American community; that solving these problems will benefit all citizens. Landsmark says that the attack lays bare the problems of the city; that the problems go beyond issues of safety in the street or busing. Landsmark notes that the attack has been called "an isolated incident" by J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant US Attorney General). Landsmark says that he does not agree; that people of color must be allowed to participate on an equal basis in all areas and levels of business and city government. Landsmark says that the issue of racism must not be subordinated; that the white power structure is indifferent to people of color in the city; that businesses and government must work together to improve the economic situation of people of color in Boston. 1:15:29: V: Reporters ask Landsmark questions after his statement. A reporter asks him to specify city officials against whom he will bring suit. Landsmark says that he will not name the officials because he does not want to jeopardize any of the lawsuits. A reporter asks him if he will bring suit against Louise Day Hicks (Boston City Council). Landsmark says that he will not comment except that his attackers were violating truancy laws; that his attackers were marching on City Hall Plaza without a parade permit. Landsmark notes that Hicks invited the protestors into her office to escape from the cold; that police officers were on duty near City Hall Plaza, but did not arrive on the scene until after the attack. Landsmark says that he cannot comment on how the police department should have deployed its personnel to control the unlicensed protest on City Hall Plaza by the students. A reporter asks Landsmark if he agrees with the Black Caucus' decision to call for the resignation of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston). Landsmark says that the Black Caucus is looking for better leadership from White on issues of affirmative action, busing, and unemployment. Landsmark says that he has received calls from around the country; that many are appalled by the incident on City Hall Plaza; that the city can take action to prevent more violent incidents.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/07/1976
Description: Laval Wilson (candidate for Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) prepares for his interview with the Boston School Committee. He arranges several large posterboards around and in front of a table in the School Committee chambers. Eileen Jones interviews Wilson about his upcoming interview with the School Committee. Wilson says that he will try to show the School Committee that he is the best candidate for the job. He adds that posters and visual aids help him to communicate. Wilson says that he hopes to have the support of a broad spectrum of community groups and not just the African American community. Wilson declines to identify himself as "conservative." Wilson begins his interview with the School Committee. Wilson talks about his previous experience and his thorough understanding of school desegregation issues and school curricula. Wilson answers questions about remedial education. A member of the School Committee asks Wilson why two African American members of the School Committee do not support his candidacy. Wilson says that he is not familiar with the politics of individual committee members; he adds that he is an educator who happens to be black. Wilson says that he would like to be superintendent for all students and members of the community. Wilson notes that educational programs are more important than ethnicity. Jones reports on the interview and the School Committee's process in selecting a new superintendent.
1:00:00: Visual: Dr. Laval Wilson (candidate for Superintendent of Boston Public Schools) prepares for his interview with the Boston School Committee for the post of superintendent. He arranges several large posterboards around and in front of a table in the School Committee chambers. The boards display papers, advertisements and articles representing his achievements. Members of the press are gathered in front of the table. Several members of the press take photographs. Eileen Jones (WGBH reporter) comments that Wilson does not look nervous. Wilson says that he is a professional; that he has confidence in his abilities; that he hopes to convince the Boston School Committee to hire him. Crowd noise muffles the audio. Jones asks Wilson about his chances of being hired. Wilson says that he is one of three candidates; that he does not know how the School Committee will respond to his candidacy; that he plans to demonstrate his abilities and to answer the School Committee's questions. Wilson mentions that he will use visual aids in his presentation to the School Committee; that the visual aids document his career; that he plans to discuss ideas. Jones comments that the visual aids seem "showy." Wilson says that visual aids help him to learn and communicate better; that the visual aids document his abilities in several areas including planning, budget development, and partnerships. Jones asks how Wilson feels about African Americans in Boston coming out to support his candidacy. Wilson says that he does not know anything about it; that he is concentrating on his interview with the School Committee; that he hopes the entire community will support his candidacy. Wilson says that he is delighted to have support from the African American community; that he hopes to have support of the entire school system and a broad spectrum of community groups. Jones asks Wilson about his reputation as a tough administrator. Wilson says that descriptions are subjective; that he considers himself a "professional educator." Jones asks Wilson if he considers himself "conservative." Wilson says that he considers himself as a school superintendent, not as a liberal or a conservative. 1:06:10: V: Wilson sits down at the table, which faces the members of the Committee. John Nucci (President, Boston School Committee) warns the audience to be silent during the interview and presentation, so as not to distract Wilson. Nucci asks Wilson why he would like to be Superintendent of Boston Public Schools. Wilson arranges the microphones on the table. Wilson describes his previous experiences including his positions as a superintendent in Rochester NY, Berkeley CA, and on Long Island. Wilson says that he has a thorough understanding of school desegregation policies and school curricula. He describes his experiences in working with government agencies and lobbying for school funding. Wilson describes his planning abilities and his commitment to working with parent groups. Shot of the members of the school committee. Kevin McCluskey (Boston School Committee) asks Wilson a question about remedial education. Shot of Wilson. Wilson talks about his experience in and views on remedial education programs. Shots of African American audience members. Wilson talks about the possibility of extending the school day. Committee members ask Wilson questions about a specific remedial education program. Wilson talks about the need to close the gap between low-achievement scores and high-achievement scores. Shots of the audience; of individual audience members. 1:13:03: V: Wilson says that he is not the type of person to brag about his achievements; that he must highlight his achievements in order to be considered for this post; that he considers himself to be one of the most qualified superintendents in the nation. Wilson notes that he was selected as one of the top 100 executive educators in the nation; that he has a strong reputation across the nation. A member of the Committee asks Wilson why African American School Committee members John O'Bryant and Jean McGuire do not support his candidacy. The member says, "What do they know about you that we don't know about you?" Wilson says that he does not know why O'Bryant and McGuire do not support him; that a superintendent needs to make decisions for students of all races; that he is a school educator who happens to be black. Wilson says that he has not read the newspapers; that he is not familiar with the politics of individual Committee members. The same committee member asks Wilson what it means to be an educator "who also happens to be black." The committee member asks Wilson if he will deal with minority students who are not getting an education, or if he will "keep playing a game." Wilson says that the superintendent needs to implement the best educational programs for the school population. Wilson says that he would not like his statements as superintendent to be seen as "the black statement"; that he would not be the superintendent for any particular group; that he would be the superintendent for the whole community. Wilson says that the superintendent cannot afford to be associated with one particular ethnic group; that the superintendent has to work together with all staff, students, parents, and community groups. Wilson says that it is important to consider issues, not skin color. Wilson says that ethnicity can be an issue; that every ethnic group has its own specific concerns; that educational programs are more important than ethnicity. 1:18:55: V: Jones reports that the interviews with candidates are not the end of the selection process; that School Committee members will make site visits to the school districts of each candidate. Jones notes that the School Committee will elect a new superintendent on July 31. Jones does two takes of her closing to the news story.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 07/19/1985