Description: Boston mayoral debate from the 1975 campaign. 1975 mayoral campaign debate in WGBH studio, moderated by Pam Bullard, Ed Baumeister, and Gary Griffith, between Mayor Kevin White, Robert Gibbons, Senator Joseph Timilty, and Norman Oliver. Main topic is busing for school integration. Timilty believes that busing is a waste of resources; Gibbons believes that busing was forced by government and should be stopped. Discussion of budget: White is attacked for his handling of state funds. Timilty claims Boston is on verge of bankruptcy. White claims that he has tried to take politics out of City Hall. There is much bickering between Baumeister and Gibbons. Oliver says that Boston Police Department is not operating in the interest of the black community in the city. Timilty gives closing address, talks about type of city citizens want. Oliver closing address: vows to stand up against racism. Gibbons closing address: create neighborhoods for productive working class. White closing address: proud of his record in eight years as mayor. Talks about trying to balance the city fiscally. Ed Baumeister signs off.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/02/1975
Description: Day 3, year 2 of desegregation. Reporters on set give accounts of day's events in school system. Ed Baumeister opens with press conference in which Metropolitan Distric Commission Police (MDC) Superintendent Lawrence Carpenter and mayoral spokesperson Peter Meade comment on student safety and “minority white” school system. Clip of Robert Donahue of School Department on student suspensions. Reporter Pam Bullard presents statistical figures for racial makeup of schools. Clip of Cardinal Medeiros on white influx to parochial schools. WGBH reporters discuss political significance of majority African American schools. At police command center, officers monitor communications to spot trouble and coordinate efforts of State, MDC, and Boston police forces: George Landry of Boston Police Department comments on the professional rivalry between groups. Reporter Gary Griffith reports on South Boston residents who are less vocal in protest than in year 1. Stills of bandaged Michael Coakley, allegedly beaten by the Tactical Patrol Force (TPF). Claims against brutality of TPF. Reporter Paul deGive discusses Charlestown residents' resentment of media and threatened retaliation against media presence. Stills of peaceful Charlestown marchers filling street. Gloria Conway, editor of Charlestown Patriot comments on the peaceful demonstration. Pam Bullard reports on location about Joseph Lee elementary school in Dorchester (first busing site) exterior and open classrooms. Lee School Principal Frances Kelley talks about school's program. Children line up to board bus; wave goodbye from inside bus as it pulls away.
2:12:09: Ed Baumeister introduces the show. Opening credits. Baumeister gives summary of the day's events: no arrests related to the schools; an orderly demonstration in Charlestown. Visual: Footage of the day's press conference by city officials. Baumeister asks if there are plans to reduce police presence. Lawrence Carpenter (MDC Police Superintendent) replies that he does not know; Peter Meade (Mayor's Office) doubts that there will be a reduction. Baumeister notes the absence of top officials from daily press conference; that present attendance levels in Boston schools indicate that white students are in the minority. V: Footage of Robert Donahue (Boston School Department) reporting on discipline in the schools. Donahue gives information on new student registration for the following day. Baumeister reports that attendance was 52,109 (68,4%). 2:16:01: Pam Bullard reports on the percentages of white and minority children in Boston schools. Bullard reports that under the court-ordered desegregation plan, 60 of 162 Boston schools are projected to be predominantly African American; that 46 of 115 elementary schools are projected to be predominantly African American; that current attendance levels put 61 of 115 elementary schools predominantly African American. Bullard reports that school officials fear that white children will become a minority in Boston schools. V: Footage of Meade talking about desegregation leading to a white minority in other urban school systems. Meade says that one could project a non-white majority in the future based on elementary school enrollments; that racial imbalance in Boston schools is unfortunate. Bullard reports that elementary enrollment is down 18% from previous year; that 73 whites of 306 have attended the Lee School so far; that 85 of 145 whites have attended the Morris School so far; that 86 of 136 whites have attended the Ripley School so far; that 75 of 148 whites have attended the Kilmer School so far. Bullard reports that many white parents enrolled children in private schools to avoid eventual busing; that Catholic schools are serving as a haven for anti-busers despite a pledge to the contrary by Humberto Cardinal Medeiros (Archdiocese of Boston). V: Footage of Medeiros saying that he would examine enrollment numbers at Catholic schools before determining any punishment for those who enrolled to avoid busing. Bullard reports that school officials are uncertain if white students will return. 2:21:49: Baumeister asks Bullard about the significance of a majority non-white school system. Bullard replies that a majority non-white school system may not receive sufficient funds from a white city government; that the city risks losing its white population. Baumeister reports on a rivalry among state, MDC and Boston police forces during the 1974 school year. 2:22:33: Donovan Moore reports on coordination among state, MDC and Boston police forces. Moore reports that school desegregation requires 100 federal marshals, 250 MDC police officers, 350 state troopers and 1,000 Boston police officers. V: Footage of officers sitting in front of radios at communications center in Boston Police Headquarters. George Landry (Boston Police Department) explains how the communications center operates. Officers are shown looking at a map of the city and working the radios. Moore reports that the center can communicate instantly with officers on the streets. Moore lists the different police forces. V: Shots of an MDC officer on horseback; of state police in front of South Boston High School; of Boston police officers walking on the street. Footage of Landry admitting to a spirit of competiveness among the police forces. Landry denies any hostility. 2:25:49: Gary Griffith reports that South Boston remains a stronghold of the anti-busing movement; that South Boston has been relatively quiet since the opening of school three days ago. V: Shots of photographs of Nancy Yotts (South Boston Information Center); of students in front of a high school; of African American students boarding buses. Griffith reports that the SBIC has accused the police department's Tactical Patrol Force (TPF) of police brutality; that the SBIC has produced witnesses including Michael Coakley, who says he was beaten by police. Griffith reports that the SBIC has demanded the withdrawal of the TPF from South Boston; that Warren Zanaboni (South Boston Marshals) says he tries to get South Boston youth off the streets at night. V: Shots of photographs of an SBIC poster in a store window; of Michael Coakley, with bandaged head and arm in a sling. Shot of a photograph of Zanaboni. Griffith reports on small skirmishes between police and South Boston youth during the previous three nights; that the MDC police and the police in South Boston have a good working relationship with the South Boston Marshals; that the TPF does not have a good relationship with the marshals; that four arrests were made by the TPF the previous evening; that South Boston residents say the trouble would subside if the TPF withdrew. 2:28:55: Paul deGive reports that relations between between Charlestown residents, the police and the news media show slight improvement; that rumors circulated in the morning that residents would target the media; that the media tried not to antagonize the residents during the mother's march. V: Shots of photographs of mother's march in Charlestown; of prayer meeting at the St. Francis de Sales church; of camerapeople covering the march; of peaceful street scenes in Charlestown; of police patrolling streets. DeGive reports that the police did not crowd the marchers; that Superintendent Joseph Jordan (Boston Police Department) was calmly watching events develop; that police were quietly patrolling the streets. V: Footage of Gloria Conway (Editor, Charlestown Patriot) interviewed by deGive. Conway says that the police were wise to allow a peaceful demonstration because it allowed residents to vent their frustrations; that the police presence today seemed less aggressive and threatening; that many officers were covering their regular beats. DeGive reports that Conway, Dennis Kearney (State Representative) and community leaders requested that the TPF not be deployed in Charlestown. [ V: Shot of a photograph of Kearney in street. DeGive reports that Mon O'Shea (Associate Dean, Bunker Hill Community College) accused the TPF of creating a military-like atmosphere; that community leaders agree that some police presence is needed; that Kearney is seeking a way to keep Charlestown youth in check. 2:34:16: Baumeister adds that the atmosphere was calm and attendance was low at Charlestown High School. Bullard reports from the Joseph Lee School in Dorchester. Bullard notes that the Boston School Committee's decision to ignore the racial imbalance at the Lee School's opening provoked the lawsuit leading to court-ordered desegregation in Boston; that four years later, the Lee School is still racially imbalanced. V: Shots of photographs of the Lee School; of groups African American kids outside of Franklin Field Housing Project; of school classrooms. Bullard notes that the Lee School is located in an inner city neighborhood; that white students from West Roxbury were to be bused into the Lee School; that 73 whites out of 306 have attended the Lee School so far; that the school is an excellent but underutilized facility. V: Footage of Bullard interviewing Frances Kelley (Principal, Joseph Lee School). Kelley talks about enrichment programs at the Lee School. She says that the school opened with no problems; that white parents may be staying away due to safety concerns; that in the past, parents have been very satisfied with the Lee School. Footage of children exiting school and boarding buses. Bullard notes that children assigned to the Lee this year will stay for subsequent grades; that desegregation has failed so far at the Lee. V: Footage of African American children outside of Lee School; of white children leaving the school on a bus. 2:40:07: Baumeister talks about the evening's late newscast and closes show. Credits roll.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/10/1975
Description: Sound dropout in the beginning of the video. Boston City Council meeting on the Boston School budget. City Councilor reads communications from Mayor White to the City Council. Boston schools superintendent Marion Fahey testifies to City Council about school budget deficit. Accompanying Fahey are Paul Kennedy, Associate Superintendant in charge of personnel and John McGran, member of the superintendent's office on budgetary matters. Councilors Louise Day Hicks, Albert "Dapper" O'Neil, Larry DiCara are among those on the panel questioning Fahey. Mayor White and Superintendent Fahey both address the effect of Judge Arthur Garrity's 1975 court order on the Boston School Department budget. Video goes black in the middle for a few second, but audio continues.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 05/20/1976
Description: Dedication ceremony of John Hancock glass tower, in lobby. General James M. Gavin is introduced and addresses the audience. Gavin and other speakers talk about the history of the building project. Thomas O'Neill and Kevin White are also on stage. Unveiling of massive reproduction of Declaration of Independence on wall of lobby. English High School chorus sings patriotic songs. Hundreds of guests crowded in lobby.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/15/1976
Description: Kevin White gives press conference after mayoral reelection victory. He says the campaign was the toughest political battle of his life. He denies entertaining ambitions for national office. He also denies involvement in an accusation of one reporter being involved with organized crime.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 11/05/1975
Description: Press conference at City Hall. Boston Mayor Kevin White and Police Commissioner Robert DiGrazia read prepared statements about the following day's school opening in the third year of court-ordered busing. White expresses confidence in a peaceful opening of schools. DiGrazia says that police have been instructed to use minimum force, but to act decisively against any disruptions of public order. Both men hope that police can be removed from schools as soon as possible. White notes that the atmosphere seems calmer this year than during the previous two years. White says that he would like to remove police from the schools as soon as possible because their presence hinders the development of a healthy learning environment. Reporters question them on the school opening. Shots of Pam Bullard listening to the press conference.
2:09:33: Visual: Members of the press are assembled for a press conference at City Hall with Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston) and Robert DiGrazia (Police Commissioner, City of Boston). White begins reading a statement, then stops because there is a problem with sound. 2:11:53: V: White reads a prepared statement. He says that school opens tomorrow; that fewer students face assignments to new schools this year; that more students are attending the schools of their choice; that many schools are benefitting from programs linked with universities and businesses; that three new schools are opening; that he is confident that the school year will be productive. White says that the city is prepared to guarantee the safety of all schoolchildren; that he hopes to reduce the police presence at the schools this year; that police will restore order if disruptions occur. White urges citizens to share in the responsibility for a peaceful school opening; that the city will focus on improving schools this year. 2:14:32: V: DiGrazia reads a prepared statement. He expresses confidence in a peaceful school opening. He reports that police have received instructions to allow peaceful demonstrations, but to maintain public order; that police officers have been instructed to use minimum force and to treat those arrested with respect and courtesy. DiGrazia says that police will not tolerate any acts of violence or disruption; that these acts are often committed by only a few citizens. 2:15:56: V: White invites questions from the reporters. A reporter asks DiGrazia what kind of preparations have been made for additional police support. DiGrazia says that Massachusetts State Police will be assigned to South Boston; that MDC Police will be assigned to Charlestown; that US Marshals will be present for the opening of schools. DiGrazia says that the atmosphere on the streets seems calm; that a few citizens are engaging in disruptive behavior; that the atmosphere seems calmer than in the previous two years; that police presence will be less visible than last year; that additional police will stand by for support. DiGrazia says that the police have not received any indication that there will be outside agitators at the schools. DiGrazia says that he hopes there will be little overtime for police officers this year. DiGrazia says that uniformed State Police officers will be assigned to South Boston High School; that community service officers and juvenile officers will be assigned to monitor the other schools. 2:18:52: V: A reporter asks about cooperative efforts between the School Department, the city of Boston, and the Police Department. White says that the three entities have been working together on school desegregaton for three years; that differences about the school budget have not affected efforts to achieve a successful school opening. DiGrazia says that police will continue to enforce ordinances forbidding the assembly of more than three people along a bus route, or assemblies within 100 yards of schools. Shot of Pam Bullard. White says that he would like to remove police from schools as soon as possible; that police presence hinders a healthy learning atmospheres; that police can be removed if citizens refrain from disrupting the schools. A reporter asks DiGrazia to clarify the term "minimum force" in police conduct. DiGrazia says that he hopes police can dissuade citizens from engaging in disruptive behavior; that he would like to see the police removed from the schools as soon as possible. DiGrazia refuses to elaborate on minimum tolerance policy guidelines, but says that warnings will be given to disruptors before action is taken. DiGrazia says that the school department instituted the use of metal detectors at the schools; that they will be used again this year. DiGrazia refuses to give out information on the number of police officers assigned to the schools
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 09/07/1976
Description: Mayor Kevin White's message to citizens of Boston regarding the opening of school. He says that all residents share the responsibility for a safe opening of schools. He adds that no threat to school children or school buses will be tolerated, and that police, federal marshals, and the FBI will be on hand to enforce the court order. White reminds citizens that the education of schoolchildren must not be politicized. This tape has audible time code on track 2.
0:59:04: Visual: Chalk slate indicates production information: School Opening / Mayor White / 9 -3- 75 / Ferrante (producer) / DeBarger (director). 0:59:32: V: Kevin White reminds viewers that school starts on Monday; that the first week of school is a time of transition for teachers, students, and parents; that many are concerned about the safety of children in schools as well as safety on the streets; that many will have to adapt to the changes brought by new school assignments. White says that every citizen has a responsibility to make the school opening peaceful no matter how he or she feels about busing; that responsibility, judgement and restraint will be important. White says that every child has a right to attend school safely; that he will use every resource at his disposal to guarantee safe access to schools for all children. White says that a comprehensive safety plan has been developed to maintain peace on the streets and to avoid violence and disruption in schools. White pledges that he will not tolerate any breach of public safety; that unlawful activity posing a threat to schools, buses, or school children will be punished with the maximum sentence. 1:02:17: White says that many concerned citizens and parents have participated in the development of the public safety plan; that the plan for 1975 triples the efforts made in 1974; that 1,000 Boston police officers, 300 state troopers, 250 MDC police and 100 federal marshals will be on duty along bus routes and near schools; that 400 school crossing supervisors, 300 bus monitors and over 900 transitional aids will be employed by the city; that the FBI and special teams of prosecutors will be on hand to investigate unlawful activity. White says again that interference with school desegregation will not be tolerated; that violators of the court order risk arrest and prosecution under federal law; that the city is better prepared for the opening of school this year. White urges city residents to act with decency, compassion, and charity; to avoid violence; to set a good example for the city's children. White reminds viewers that children need to go to school; that schools need to be separate from politics and power struggles.
Collection: Evening Compass, The
Date Created: 09/03/1975
Description: Theodore Landsmark (attorney) speaks to the media at a press conference. His face is in bandages. Landsmark gives an account of the attack he sustained on City Hall Plaza, perpetrated by white teenagers attending an anti-busing rally. He commends the actions of Clarence Jones (Deputy Mayor, City of Boston), who came to his aid after the attack. Landsmark talks about the media's coverage of his attack. Landsmark says that he will seek full prosecution of his attackers, and adds that he will bring suit against members of the Boston School Committee and the Boston City Council. He condemns white city leaders who "incite and encourage" racist violence. Landsmark calls for an end to racism and race discrimination in the city. He accuses the white power structure of ignoring the problems of minority citizens.
1:00:04: Visual: A group of African American men greet each other at the entrance of the room where Theodore Landsmark (attorney) will hold a press conference. Landsmark enters the room. His nose and face are bandaged with white tape. An African American woman hands him a note as he enters. Landsmark sits down behind a table with microphones. An African American man sits beside him. A group of African American men and women, and a few white people, stand behind him as he speaks. Reporters sit at the other side of the table and stand around the room. The reporters take notes as Landsmark speaks. 1:02:00: V: Landsmark notes that there has been conflict among the media over coverage of the press conference; that he wants both union and non-union members of the media to cover the press conference; that the media needs to work out the union issues outside of the press conference. Landsmark greets the media and reads a statement. He says that the press conference will be brief because he needs to get some rest; that he lost a lot of blood in the attack. Landsmark says that he is concerned that the publicity generated by the attack may distort some of the crucial issues which need to be discussed. Landsmark runs through the sequence of events on the day of the attack. Landsmark says that he was on his way to an affirmative action committee meeting with the Boston Redevelopment Authority; that he was beaten and kicked by a crowd of young people coming from an anti-busing rally at City Hall. Landsmark refutes rumors that Clarence Jones (Deputy Mayor, City of Boston) had been with him and ran away from the scene. Landsmark says that he regrets the circulation of the false reports regarding Jones; that Jones was the only person who left City Hall to aid him after the attack. Landsmark says that he will seek full prosecution of the youth involved in the attack; that he will take action in civil and criminal court against members of the Boston City Council and the Boston School Committee; that he would like to see an end to the use of City Hall as "a sanctuary for racism and a resource center for those who would incite and encourage racist violence." Landsmark says that some city officials perpetuate discrimination against people of color in Boston on a daily basis. Landsmark expresses gratitude to members of the African American and white communities for the many acts of kindness and courage shown to him after the attack. Landsmark adds that meaningful gestures by the white community before the attack could have prevented the violence. Landsmark says that he is grateful for the support of the Black Caucus, the Board of Directors of the Contractors Association of Boston, and the Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association. Landsmark thanks the newspaper and TV cameramen for capturing the attack on film. He says that he wishes that somebody had come to his aid, but is grateful for the record of the attack provided by the journalists. Landsmark says that without the photos, the attack would have been recorded "as just another scuffle on the street." Landsmark says that racism is to blame for the attack; that racism in the city of Boston has been fueled by selfish politicians; that politicians continue to ignore the social and economic problems of the city. Landsmark says that he will work to solve these problems in the African American community; that solving these problems will benefit all citizens. Landsmark says that the attack lays bare the problems of the city; that the problems go beyond issues of safety in the street or busing. Landsmark notes that the attack has been called "an isolated incident" by J. Stanley Pottinger (Assistant US Attorney General). Landsmark says that he does not agree; that people of color must be allowed to participate on an equal basis in all areas and levels of business and city government. Landsmark says that the issue of racism must not be subordinated; that the white power structure is indifferent to people of color in the city; that businesses and government must work together to improve the economic situation of people of color in Boston. 1:15:29: V: Reporters ask Landsmark questions after his statement. A reporter asks him to specify city officials against whom he will bring suit. Landsmark says that he will not name the officials because he does not want to jeopardize any of the lawsuits. A reporter asks him if he will bring suit against Louise Day Hicks (Boston City Council). Landsmark says that he will not comment except that his attackers were violating truancy laws; that his attackers were marching on City Hall Plaza without a parade permit. Landsmark notes that Hicks invited the protestors into her office to escape from the cold; that police officers were on duty near City Hall Plaza, but did not arrive on the scene until after the attack. Landsmark says that he cannot comment on how the police department should have deployed its personnel to control the unlicensed protest on City Hall Plaza by the students. A reporter asks Landsmark if he agrees with the Black Caucus' decision to call for the resignation of Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston). Landsmark says that the Black Caucus is looking for better leadership from White on issues of affirmative action, busing, and unemployment. Landsmark says that he has received calls from around the country; that many are appalled by the incident on City Hall Plaza; that the city can take action to prevent more violent incidents.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/07/1976
Description: Judy Stoia interviews James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) about resistance to busing and his decision not to attend the Procession Against Violence. Kelly says that he has appealed to African American parents to put pressure on the NAACP to stop busing. Kelly says that many African American parents agree that "forced busing is the problem." Following interview is silent footage of helicopter and security detail among rooftops of City Hall Plaza. A WGBH camera crew overlooks City Hall Plaza and records the Procession Against Violence. Thomas O'Neill, Jr. (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Kitty Dukakis, Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Kathryn White, Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), Charles Barry (State Secretary of Public Safety), Dr. Charles Glenn (Massachusetts State Department of Education), Ann Landers (advice columnist), Joseph Kennedy, Edward Kennedy (US Senator), and Edward Brooke (US Senator) are among those at the front of the procession. Footage includes overhead shots of the crowd and audio of hecklers jeering at White and Kennedy. Reverend Robert Golledge and John Colburn address the crowd. Tape 1 of 3.
1:00:15: Visual: Judy Stoia sets up an interview with James Kelly (South Boston Information Center) near City Hall Plaza. Stoia asks Kelly about a message he delivered to African American parents. Kelly says that he urged African American parents to use their influence with the NAACP to stop forced busing; that both white and African Americans know that "forced busing is the problem"; that African American parents have encouraged the South Boston Information Center to continue the fight against busing. Kelly says that he made the plea to African American parents in order to help restore sanity to the city. Kelly says that he will not participate in today's Procession Against Violence because it will do nothing to remedy forced busing; that the mayor, state officials and "the liberals" need to take a stand against forced busing. Stoia probes Kelly's motives in boycotting the march. Kelly says that his statement to African American parents will be more effective than a march around the city by "the liberal establishment." Kelly says that white parents want a good education for their children in neighborhood schools; that the "liberal establishment" and the media need to realize that "good education for all kids" is more important than "quality integrated education." Kelly says that he hopes white parents and African American parents can work together to solve some of the problems in the city. Stoia thanks Kelly. The crew takes some cutaway shots of Stoia asking questions. 1:05:09: V: A small crowd begins to gather for the procession against violence at City Hall Plaza. A few people look down on the plaza from rooftops. Helicopters circle above City Hall Plaza. A crowd mills about on the plaza. A small crowd is gathered around some seating. A marching band plays. 1:07:44: V: Groups of people walk toward City Hall Plaza. Police officers are visible. One officer directs traffic. The music of a marching band is audible, then it stops. Marchers begin to fill the street, moving toward the plaza. Four men in uniform lead the march, carrying an American flag and a Massachusetts state flag. A crowd of people stream into the plaza. A woman yells, "Kevin, stop forced busing." A man yells, "Hey, you hypocrite." Thomas O'Neill (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Kitty Dukakis, Kathryn White, Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), Charles Barry (State Secretary of Public Safety), Dr. Charles Glenn (Massachusetts State Department of Education) and Ann Landers (advice columnist) are among those visible at the front of the marchers. Some of the crowd jeers. A man yells, "Kennedy, you faker." The officials at the front of the march greet Elma Lewis and others informally as they proceed to the front of the plaza. A woman yells, "Stop forced busing. A large crowd continues to stream into the plaza. Shots of the assembled crowd. The WGBH crew tries to locate and identify public figures. A helicopter circles overhead. 1:15:25: V: A marching band begins to play. The stream of marchers continues into the plaza. Shots of assembled crowd. A woman yells, "Stop forced busing. A voice is heard addressing the crowd, calling for "a peaceful community in Boston." Shot of the crowd. O'Neill, Joseph Kennedy, Edward Kennedy (US Senator) and Edward Brooke (US Senator) are visible. Audio is difficult to hear. Reverend Robert Golledge (Vicar, Old North Church) addresses the crowd from the podium. Golledge introduces the band from the St. William's School in Dorchester. Assembled in front of the podium, the band strikes up the national anthem. Shots of the media photographing the event; of the crowd filling the plaza; of officials at the front of the crowd. John Colburn (Episcopal Archdiocese) leads the crowd in prayer.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/23/1976
Description: Participants in the Procession Against Violence are assembled on City Hall Plaza. WGBH camera crew records the gathering from a rooftop above City Hall Plaza. Thomas O'Neill, Jr. (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Edward Kennedy (US Senator), Joseph Kennedy, Edward Brooke (US Senator) Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts), Kitty Dukakis, Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), Kathryn White and Ann Landers (advice columnist) are visible in the front of the crowd. Robert Golledge (Vicar, Old North Church) introduces the speakers. Humberto Cardinal Medeiros (Archdiocese of Boston) and Michael Haynes (Twelfth Street Baptist Church) lead the crowd in prayer. John Colburn (Episcopal Archdiocese), Roland Gittelsohn (Temple Israel), Michael Germinal Rivas (Chaplain, Boston University), and John Zanetos (Greek Orthodox Cathedral) are heard addressing the crowd. Paula Lyons (aide to Mayor Kevin White) leads the crowd in singing "God Bless America." Crowd breaks up and departs among marching band accompaniment. Tape 2 of 3
0:58:14: Visual: A crowd is assembled at City Hall Plaza for the Procession Against Violence. John Colburn (Episcopal Archdiocese) leads a prayer. Shot of the crowd. Thomas O'Neill (Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts), Edward Kennedy (US Senator), Edward Brooke (US Senator), Michael Dukakis (Governor of Massachusetts) and Kitty Dukakis are visible. Kevin White (Mayor, City of Boston), Kathryn White, and Ann Landers (advice columnist) are visible. Reverend Robert Golledge (Vicar, Old North Church) introduces Rabbi Roland Gittelsohn (Temple Israel). Gittelsohn addresses the crowd and condemns violence. Shots of crowds at City Hall Plaza. Marchers continue to stream into the plaza. 1:00:54: V: Michael Haynes (Twelfth Street Baptist Church) leads the crowd in prayer for peace. Overhead shot of massive crowd filling the plaza; of O'Neill, Joseph Kennedy, Edward Kennedy, Brooke, Michael Dukakis and Kitty Dukakis. 1:03:06: V: Golledge leads the crowd in the "Our Father." Shots of crowd; of Kennedy and Brooke. Golledge introduces Humberto Cardinal Medeiros (Archdiocese of Boston), who leads the crowd in prayer. The crowd applauds for Medeiros. Golledge introduces Reverend Michael Germinal Rivas (chaplain, Boston University). Rivas leads a prayer. Shots of the crowd. 1:06:32: V: Reverend John Zanetos (Greek Orthodox Cathedral) addresses the crowd. Shots of crowd; of Kevin White and Kathryn White. Golledge introduces Paula Lyons (aide to Mayor Kevin White). Lyons leads the crowd in singing"God Bless America". Shots of O'Neill, Joseph Kennedy, Edward Kennedy, and Brooke; of crowd in the plaza. Crowd slowly breaks up. Edward Kennedy and Joseph Kennedy make their way out with the crowd. Michael Dukakis and Edward Kennedy shake hands with White. Edward Brooke makes his way out of the plaza. The crowd breaks up and leaves the plaza. The marching band plays.
Collection: Ten O'Clock News
Date Created: 04/23/1976